Posts tagged with "time management"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, smile, dentistry

Top 10 college mistakes to avoid

Though the first year of college does not require you to take complex subjects and write a dissertation, you may find it surprisingly difficult as compared to your last high school year. In most colleges, the freshmen curriculum has plenty of subjects, and teachers’ expectations seem to exceed students’ abilities. However, your academic performance can be better than you think. To realize how much you can achieve as a freshman, try to avoid these common mistakes most people make when entering college or university. 

Skipping classes repeatedly

This is a major temptation for all students living on campus. When there is no one out there to control you, it is easy to skip all morning classes and attend just the ones you like. At first, some teachers may seem quite tolerant of student absences. However, you may regret skipping classes when it comes to tests or exams. Of course, it may be wise to skip a class occasionally after having a big party or spending a long night studying. Just make sure it does not happen often. 

Ignoring time management

When there are many things to do, you need to utilize at least some time-management techniques. Even though the first year is merely an introduction to college life, the pressure in academic subjects is crushing. Now, you have to decide what tasks are a top priority and how much time you can devote to each of them. 

Avoiding communication with teachers

All the teachers at college are new to a freshmen. Most of them devote some time to students who are willing to ask questions. Sometimes, it is the only way to make teacher’s instructions clear. So, take an opportunity to communicate with your teacher. It may help you write better papers and escape conflicts in your college life. 

Wasting money

If this is the first time you have lived on your own, you may go off budget. Now you have to pay for housing, cover your educational needs, and still have money for eating nutritiously. So, you need to make your monthly budget and decide how much you can spend on what. Keep your expenses under control, and you will save more time and energy for what is most important to you. 

Living off campus

There is nothing wrong with living at your parents’ place if your college is situated in your hometown. However, if you need to take a long daily commute, it would be better to move to campus. This way you will save precious time for studying, fun activities, and essential rest. Wasting a few hours on commute every day can kill your ambitious plans and deprive you of energy. 

Oversharing student life on social media

Many freshmen find their new experiences exciting. Still, be careful about what you put on social media. Always think about how your teachers or your future employers would react to your Facebook or Instagram profile. Despite privacy policies, what’s posted on the web can become more public than you may want. 

Depriving yourself of sleep

It happens to all students and everyone else. Nevertheless, studying all night long can kill your performance in a long-term prospect. Do not forget to take care of your health. Try to get as much sleep as you need. Remember that your daily productivity as well as your ability to enjoy life depends on how well-rested you are.

Not asking for help

No doubt, a freshman’s life is more difficult than people expect. Still, many students decide to cope with all their assignments alone. While it is good to be ambitious, it would be even better to learn to delegate your tasks. Ask RapidEssay to complete English 101 essays for you. Decide with your roommates who does what in the dorm. Asking for help is an essential skill that will help you immensely to get through your adult life.

Taking on too much

Besides home assignments and daily chores, your college life is full of fun activities. In participating too much, you can easily exhaust yourself and overlook some important tasks. At first, you can find yourself capable of doing many of the things that you like, but over time, you will see that you are ignoring your less than favorite, but still very important, tasks on a daily basis. 

Staying secluded more than necessary 

Clearly, not all people enjoy new challenges, social events, and stepping out of their comfort zone. If you are one of them, you may find yourself constantly hiding at home, doing the bare minimum of tasks you are expected to complete. In such a case, you are probably missing useful opportunities and potentially interesting activities. Try to take part in some campus events every now and then. As you stop fearing over-exhaustion, you will see many things that may interest you around school. Try one or two of them as they can be an enriching experience.

These are 10 common mistakes that either diminish our productivity or add more trouble to our lives as freshmen. By refraining from these compulsions, you may find it easier to perform well and actually enjoy your college life. 

Lacking Self-Discipline?

5 Ways To Develop It And Reach Your Goals

Americans are known to overeat, abuse credit cards, marinate for hours in social media, and break New Year’s resolutions before the end of January. Self-discipline doesn’t seem to be a national strength.

And achieving self-discipline – and the success that can come with it – may never have been harder than it is in this instant-gratification age, says Dr. Rob Carter III.

“Self-discipline is an undervalued trait in a modern society that wants everything now,” says Carter, co-author with his wife, Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter, of The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life (www.themorningmind.com). “Self-discipline is the ability to motivate and coordinate our efforts to improve our quality of life, but unfortunately most people are not taught it.

“It is, however, a skill that everyone can learn. Self-discipline is the skill that will allow you to reach any goal you set.”

Carter offers five ways to develop self-discipline:

Be aware of your resistance. Resistance, Carter says, is the biggest obstacle to developing self-discipline, and it often comes in the form of discouraging internal self-talk such as, “I can’t do it” or “Why should I have to change?” “The next time you embark on a new project that causes resistance,” Carter says, “fight it by asserting or writing down your intended goal and the benefits it will bring.”

Plan for every outcome. Plans go awry when people let excuses get in the way. “An example is having a goal of running in the morning for 30 minutes, but you have bailouts such as it’s raining, cold, or you don’t feel like it,” Carter says. “Developing self-discipline is recognizing and planning for these self-created obstacles and actively choosing to work through them. So when you set a goal to achieve, have chart in place listing “Even ifs.” List the potential obstacles to achieving your goal and counter each one with a promise to yourself that you’ll achieve your goal even if these challenges arise.”

Prepare to give something up in order to gain. Carter suggests compiling a list of the pros and cons of sacrificing for a certain goal. “To reach your goal, Carter says, “you will more than likely have to impose certain limitations on yourself in order to gain something. These limitations could be less free time, socializing, money or television. The upside is that seeing the rewards of the sacrifice on the pros list will keep you motivated and disciplined.”

Reward yourself with self-compensation. “Rewards are an incredibly powerful tool for motivating yourself to reach your goals,” Carter says. “Consider them the carrot on the stick. Have a reward in place for when you achieve a goal or part of a goal, and make sure it’s appropriate.”

Break your goal down into manageable steps. “If you break your goal down into bite-sized steps,” Carter says, “you’re much more likely to stay disciplined enough to complete every sub-goal. Each step accomplished gives you an encouraging boost. Consider using SMART goals — specific, measurable, attractive, realistic, timed. This makes the goal more definitive and puts the steps in tangible action.”

“Self-discipline includes structured planning, organization, delayed gratification, and the willingness to step outside your comfort zone,” Carter says. “These things can appear scary, but don’t worry, you’re not alone. And once you take the first step, you have ventured onto a beautiful path that offers many rewards.”

About Dr. Rob Carter III and Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter

Dr. Rob Carter III and Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter are co-authors of The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life(www.themorningmind.com). Rob Carter is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army, an expert in human performance and physiology, and has academic appointments in emergency medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, in public health and health sciences at Los Angeles Pacific University, and in nutrition at the University of Maryland, University College. He holds a PhD in biomedical sciences and medical physiology and an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology.

Kirti Carter was born in Pune, India, and received her medical education in India, where she practiced as an intensive-care physician before moving to Texas to complete postgraduate training in public health. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Stress (FAIS), has more than 18 years of experience in meditation and breathing techniques, and has been facilitating wellness seminars for the past decade.