Posts tagged with "health news"

Alex Bogdan for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Tips to Maintain a Healthy Back

With the COVID-19 pandemic reaching another surge this holiday season, its more important than ever to stay safe, protected and healthy. With the pandemic continuing throughout the winter season, it’s easy to forget that the chilling winter weather can result in the muscles and ligaments of our bodies to contract and tighten significantly more. The muscles and ligaments that strengthen the back and spine, as well as the shoulders and knees, are considerably impacted by these seasonal changes.

From the Pinkston News Service comes a series of tips from Dr. Rita Roy, Chief Executive Officer of the National Spine Health Foundation, on how to protect and keep your back healthy during these frostier months.

Stretch regularly

Implementing a consistent stretching routine can lower your risk of injury, and can even elevate the healing process of a previous injury. Engaging in basic back stretches such as the child’s pose or cat-cow and enhance strength and flexibility to your spine.

Wear proper footwear

Dr. Rita Roy encourages everyone to be mindful of the shoes that you plan to wear depending on the weather you may be dealing with. Make sure that your footwear is a fitting size, by trying them on in-store first, if you can. Ensure that your shoes have proper lining to keep you warm during the chilling temperatures. Making note to purchase a set of footwear that has non-stick rubber soles and treads on the bottom of the shoe for an extra level of safety from slipping. Remember to also take those shoes off when you head indoors, replacing them with socks or slippers, so you don’t run the risk of slipping inside as well.

Be aware of your surroundings

If you know that you may be heading outside, make sure to pay attention to what surfaces you step foot on. To get ahead of the game, keep up on the weather conditions heading your way. If you live in an area with a lot of icy roads and sidewalks, make sure to take your time, walk slowly and steer clear of carrying large items along your path. Make sure to look around you and use the objects that are not moving to your advantage; hold onto a handrail or tree to give yourself some extra balance. Keep your eyes peeled and watch around you to avoid unwarranted hazards.

Stay active

While winter follows the holiday season, this may warrant a lot of eating, sitting around and mood shifts. Seasonal depression is ever apparent through this time of year, so it’s extremely crucial to get your body moving to aid the dreariness that comes with winter. Moving around in between meals through exercising can help you in more ways than you may know.

Don’t overextend yourself

While it is crucial that you keep exercising, be sure to not overreach these efforts. The end of the holiday season raises a whole new set of physical activities, such as, hanging Christmas lights and shoveling snow. These unique tasks pose risks to the body because these are not activities that are regularly carried out year-round. Shoveling snow can cause intense stress to your back. It is vital that you use proper techniques and equipment when carrying out these tasks. Give yourself well-needed breaks and time to rest while participating in these endeavors.

Always wear a seatbelt

This may seem like a misplaced tip among the rest, but nonetheless this one is exceptionally valuable. Studies have found that a large amount of weather-related auto accidents happen throughout the winter, and around 76,000 people become hurt in accidents that result on snowy or slushy roads. Back pain can result from a mere low-speed fender-bender since the body was not anticipating the impact. So, keeping your seatbelt on can limit these sudden movements.

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

New Latinx Community Studies

 Leading Latino digital media company mitú, in partnership with premier multicultural marketing and communications agency The MRKT, released the first of a series of studies titled The mitú InTell Series. The studies aim to gain and socialize insights on the current state of the U.S. Hispanic community while digging deeper into their motivations and behaviors behind topics ranging from health and wellness to finance, sports, food, commerce, and travel.

“As a digital media brand that has stood for Latinx representation for 10 years, mitú has conversations with millions of Latinos daily. This interaction and our editorial process allows us to gather signals and real-world concerns from our audience to develop insights not only on what our community is thinking, but also why, and to do so while the topics are still actionable and timely,” said President of mitú, Stephen Brooks. “Ultimately we feel a responsibility to not only share these insights, but to give a voice to our audience.”

Both mitú and The MRKT are inherently able to provide insights into the state of the U.S. Hispanic population both from a macro, public perspective and at an interpersonal scale, allowing them to uncover nuances and evaluate the community from a unique point of view not seen before. 

“As a leading multicultural marketing and communications agency, our team lives and breathes the experiences that permeate the cultural zeitgeist within our community, making the issues that affect the U.S. Hispanic community incredibly evident to us. It is with that real-world and professional experience that we help create these studies which we hope enable other entities and organizations to identify the most current needs of the U.S. Latino population and bring us closer to a future where our community is fully seen and heard.” said President of The MRKT, Marcos Barron.

This first online quantitative study – conducted by a third party, HyperFocus ROI, with a sample size of 1,000 U.S. Hispanics–consisted of evaluating participants for their various attitudes, perceptions and behaviors across a number of demographic segments relative to the broader topic of health & wellness. Four key areas under this topic–medical, mental health, fitness, and nutrition–were evaluated across key audience segments broken out by age, income, gender, and country of origin.

While specific insights relative to each of these four areas were uncovered across the various audience segments, mental health emerged as the most common denominator, garnering the highest overall importance ratings when compared with the other three subcategories, with 65% of all respondents rating mental health as very important. Notably, mental health has declined across all segments of the U.S. Latino population vs. two years ago.

 Additional key findings include:

  • U.S. born Latinos are reporting health issues that affect multiple generations at nearly twice the rate as non U.S. born Latinos.
  • 37% of the Latinos surveyed report that the #1 reason they don’t have a primary care physician is their financial situation, with non U.S. born Latinos expressing this as a barrier with even more frequency at a rate of 46%. 
  • Latinos in the lowest income bracket (earning under $49K) are rating all of the health subcategories (medical, mental health, fitness, nutrition) as being somewhat/not at all important to them. However, there are some key barriers and reasons that surfaced on why they may not be placing importance on their health when compared to the other groups.
  • Out of the four subcategories, Latinos aren’t placing as much importance on fitness even though their reported habits are demonstrating that they are exercising at higher rates when compared to two years ago, with 45% stating that they are exercising more often.

For more key insights and to read the full study, click HERE

About mitú

Mitú is the leading digital media company representing the Latino point of view among consumers 18-44. Through our multiple touch points in video, editorial, social media and commerce, we connect brands, content buyers, and creators to the massive community of Latino consumers in America. Our audience is the 200%, 100% American and 100% Latino, who inspire us to create authentic, culturally relevant stories. We reach a massive, cross-cultural audience across a variety of social and O&O platforms. Mitú is a GoDigital Media Group company headquartered in Los Angeles, CA with operations in New York, Miami, Chicago, Mexico, Colombia, Belarus, Sri Lanka and South Korea. 

About The MRKT

The MRKT is the full-service multicultural marketing and communications division of Terry Hines & Associates (THA), a leading entertainment-marketing firm for over 40 years. The MRKT offers a comprehensive approach to creating narratives and experiences that connect clients to diverse, multicultural demographics via culture and lifestyle, over stereotypes and assumptions. The MRKT specializes in reaching Latinx, African American, and AAPI consumers and executes campaigns with both a national and local footprint, all infused with cultural resonance, across several disciplines including: PR, social media, influencer marketing, experiential, grassroots, and creative (print, digital, AV) on behalf of some of the largest entertainment and consumer brands in the world.

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New Act May Worsen Staffing Crisis

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and long term care facilities across the country that provide care to approximately five million people each year, said that two provisions in the Build Back Better Act (H.R. 5376) will have a devastating impact on nursing homes and could force thousands more facilities to further limit admissions or possibly close their doors.

The provisions, one that would require nursing homes to have a registered nurse (RN) on-staff 24 hours a day and another that would require the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct a study on minimum staffing ratios and implement the regulations within one year, are unfunded mandates that conservatively, would cost the nursing homes industry billions of dollars a year and require hiring more than 150,000 new caregivers. 

“We strongly support having a RN on staff in nursing homes 24 hours a day, as we originally proposed in our reform agenda earlier this year. However, current data shows that the nursing homes are facing the worst job loss among all health care providers. We’ve lost 221,000 jobs since the beginning of the pandemic, and recovery is a long way away. Nursing home providers are doing all they can to attract and retain new workers, but the applicants simply aren’t there. The provisions in this bill do nothing to help us strengthen our workforce and will only force thousands of nursing homes to further limit the number of residents they can serve,” said AHCA/NCAL President and CEO Mark Parkinson. 

AHCA/NCAL estimates that if the HHS study found that nursing homes need to increase clinical and direct care staff by 25 percent, it would require hiring more than 150,000 RNs, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and certified nursing assistants (CNAs), costing $10.7 billion per year. 

Current requirements mandate that nursing homes have a RN on staff eight hours a day. Under the proposed mandate in the legislation, AHCA/NCAL estimates it would require hiring 21,000 more nurses, costing $2.5 billion a year.

Phil Fogg, President and CEO of Marquis Companies, who operates more than 20 long term care facilities in California, Nevada and Oregon, said if Congress enacts these provisions without the necessary resources and recruitment programs, it could have a devastating impact on nursing homes and the residents they serve across the country.

“The workforce and economic crisis long term care providers are already experiencing is unprecedented. Lack of qualified workers is forcing providers to limit their admissions and, in some cases, close their doors permanently. Providers simply cannot attract more caregivers to our profession and meet the requirements of these mandates without financial support from Congress,” said Fogg, who is also the chair of the AHCA Board of Governors.

“We all share a common goal and that is to strengthen our workforce and provide the best possible care for our residents. But these unfunded mandates could further exacerbate the challenges we face and ultimately limit access to care for millions. We are eager to work hand-in-hand with lawmakers to find meaningful solutions that will ensure seniors continue to receive the highest quality care and caregivers have access to good-paying, rewarding jobs,” said Len Russ, operator and administrator of Bayberry Care Center in New Rochelle, NY.

Doctor illustration

Dr. Jerome Adams × Purdue

Dr. Jerome Adams, former Indiana state health commissioner and the 20th U.S. surgeon general, will join Purdue University on Friday (Oct. 1) as a Presidential Fellow and the university’s first executive director of health equity initiatives, professor of practice in the departments of Pharmacy Practice and Public Health and a faculty member of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering at Purdue.

The appointment was announced Thursday (Sept. 30) by Purdue President Mitch Daniels.

“Dr. Adams represents the highest level of excellence through decades of caring for patients and service to the nation in public health,” Daniels said. “He has consistently demonstrated commitment for health equity prior to, during and subsequent to his time as surgeon general. We are thrilled to have him provide leadership at Purdue and represent Purdue globally in this important strategic area.”

Eric Barker, dean of the Purdue College of Pharmacy, and Marion Underwood, dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences, said Adams’ leadership will bolster Purdue’s efforts to be a leader in public health and health equity as he works alongside colleagues across multiple colleges and units at Purdue, around the state of Indiana and beyond to elevate the awareness and impact of Purdue’s science-based public health programs, research and engagement.

“We know there are many societal determinants of health that transcend a person’s biology,” Underwood said. “Our efforts both in terms of urban and rural health can address many of these factors. Culture, family backgrounds, socio-economic status, and education all influence health and wellness. The College of Health and Human Sciences is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities. We are eager to work alongside Dr. Adams to expand HHS research and outreach in the areas of public health, HHS Extension and beyond.”

Barker added, “Through the extensive learning, research and engagement missions of our College of Pharmacy and, broadly, across the Purdue system and our extensive networks, we have a chance to really study these issues and continue our vital work on initiatives that will improve the health of populations of our state and our nation.”

Pavlos Vlachos, director of the Regenstrief Center, said he expects Adams to be a catalyst to translate Purdue’s research to the health care systems and communities and to ultimately and positively impact population health.

“Often, some of the best health care technologies, scientific contributions or interventions fail to impact society because they are disconnected from the exact needs of the communities and what is needed for their successful implementation,” Vlachos said.  “Jerome’s long experience and deep understanding of the complex U.S. health care landscape and the current population health challenges will help us best navigate these challenges, and position Purdue as a national and global health care innovation leader.”

Adams, who comes to Purdue after having served as the 20th U.S. surgeon general from September 2017 through January 2021, said he intends to help amplify the efforts of the Purdue Extension program to promote health equity through Indiana and particularly in rural communities, as well as work specifically with the business community to make the case for health equity as workforce and economic issues.

“Purdue is a storied institution that has the legacy, the talent and thanks to President Daniels, the commitment to being a national leader in the promotion of health equity,” Adams said. “Never before in American history has the need been greater or the community been more desirous of such an effort. I’m excited to combine my experiences in public health and public policy with the resources and opportunities afforded by Purdue to help coordinate, amplify and innovate in the health equity space.”

Before his service to the nation, Adams served as Indiana state health commissioner from 2014 through 2017. In that role he oversaw the state’s response to Ebola and Zika, as well as an unprecedented HIV outbreak in southern Indiana and a lead contamination crisis in northern Indiana. Dr. Adams also has served as an associate professor of anesthesia at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where he still sees patients and helps train residents and medical students.

Adams received his Master of Public Health with a focus on chronic disease prevention from the University of California, Berkeley, and his medical doctorate from Indiana University School of Medicine. His postgraduate internship was at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Indianapolis and he completed his anesthesiology residency at the Indiana University Department of Anesthesia in 2006.

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Rice Team Creates New Treatment for Diabetes

Rice University bioengineers are using 3D printing and smart biomaterials to create an insulin-producing implant for Type 1 diabetics.

 

The three-year project is a partnership between the laboratories of Omid Veiseh and Jordan Miller that’s supported by a grant from JDRF, the leading global funder of diabetes research. Veiseh and Miller will use insulin-producing beta cells made from human stem cells to create an implant that senses and regulates blood glucose levels by responding with the correct amount of insulin at a given time.

Veiseh, an assistant professor of bioengineering, has spent more than a decade developing biomaterials that protect implanted cell therapies from the immune system. Miller, an associate professor of bioengineering, has spent more than 15 years researching techniques to 3D print tissues with vasculature, or networks of blood vessels.

“If we really want to recapitulate what the pancreas normally does, we need vasculature,” Veiseh said. “And that’s the purpose of this grant with JDRF. The pancreas naturally has all these blood vessels, and cells are organized in particular ways in the pancreas. Jordan and I want to print in the same orientation that exists in nature.”

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. About 1.6 million Americans live with Type 1 diabetes, and more than 100 cases are diagnosed each day. Type 1 diabetes can be managed with insulin injections. But balancing insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities is difficult. Studies estimate that fewer than one-third of Type 1 diabetics in the U.S. consistently achieve target blood glucose levels.

Veiseh and Miller’s goal is to show their implants can properly regulate blood glucose levels of diabetic mice for at least six months. To do that, they’ll need to give their engineered beta cells the ability to respond to rapid changes in blood sugar levels.

“We must get implanted cells in close proximity to the bloodstream so beta cells can sense and respond quickly to changes in blood glucose,” Miller said. “We’re using a combination of pre-vascularization through advanced 3D bioprinting and host-mediated vascular remodeling to give each implant several shots at host integration.” 

The insulin-producing cells will be protected with a hydrogel formulation developed by Veiseh, who is also a Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas Scholar. The hydrogel material, which has proven effective for encapsulating cell treatments in bead-sized spheres, has pores small enough to keep the cells inside from being attacked by the immune system but large enough to allow passage of nutrients and life-giving insulin.

“Blood vessels can go inside of them,” Veiseh said of the hydrogel compartments. “At the same time, we have our coating, our small molecules that prevent the body from rejecting the gel. So it should harmonize really well with the body.”

If the implant is too slow to respond to high or low blood sugar levels, the delay can produce a roller coaster-like effect, where insulin levels repeatedly rise and fall to dangerous levels.

“Addressing that delay is a huge problem in this field,” Veiseh said. “When you give the mouse, and ultimately a human, a glucose challenge that mimics eating a meal, how long does it take that information to reach our cells, and how quickly does the insulin come out?”

By incorporating blood vessels in their implant, he and Miller hope to allow their beta-cell tissues to behave in a way that more closely mimics the natural behavior of the pancreas.

Chrons via Rice University News for use by 360 Magazine

New Bacteria to Help Detect Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

In an important step toward the clinical application of synthetic biology, Rice University researchers have engineered a bacterium with the necessary capabilities for diagnosing inflammatory bowel diseases.

The engineered strain of the gut bacteria E. coli senses pH and glows when it encounters acidosis, an acidic condition that often occurs during flare ups of inflammatory bowel diseases like colitis, ileitis and Crohn’s disease.

Researchers at the University of Colorado (CU) School of Medicine used the Rice-created organism in a mouse model of Crohn’s disease to show acidosis activates a signature set of genes. The corresponding genetic signature in humans has previously been observed during active inflammation in Crohn’s disease patients. The results are available online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Study co-author Jeffrey Tabor, an associate professor of bioengineering in Rice’s Brown School of Engineering, whose lab engineered the pH-sensing bacterium, said it could be reprogrammed to make colors that show up in the toilet instead of the fluorescent tags used in the CU School of Medicine experiments.

“We think it could be added to food and programmed to turn toilet water blue to warn patients when a flare up is just beginning,” said Tabor.

Bacteria have evolved countless specific and sensitive genetic circuits to sense their surroundings. Tabor and colleagues developed a biohacking toolkit that allows them to mix and match the inputs and outputs of these bacterial sensors. The pH-sensing circuit was discovered by Rice Ph.D. student Kathryn Brink in a 2019 demonstration of the plug-and-play toolkit.

PNAS study co-authors Sean Colgan, the director of the CU School of Medicine’s Mucosal Inflammation Program, and Ian Cartwright, a postdoctoral fellow in Colgan’s lab, read about the pH sensor and contacted Tabor to see if it could be adapted for use in a mouse model of Crohn’s disease.

“It turns out that measuring pH within the intestine through noninvasive ways is quite difficult,” said Colgan, the Levine-Kern Professor of Medicine and Immunology in the CU School of Medicine.

So Brink spent a few weeks splicing the necessary sensor circuits into an organism and sent it to Colgan’s lab.  

“Normally, the pH in your intestines is around seven, which is neutral, but you get a lot of inflammation in Crohn’s disease, and pH goes to something like three, which is very acidic,” Tabor said.

Colgan and colleagues have studied the genes that are turned on and off under such conditions and “needed a tool to measure pH in the intestine to show that the things they were observing in in vitro experiments were also really happening in a live animal,” Tabor said.

“Colonizing this bacterial strain was the perfect biological tool to monitor acidosis during active inflammation,” Colgan said. “Correlating intestinal gene expression with the bacterial pH sensing bacteria proved to be a useful and valuable set of biomarkers for active inflammation in the intestine.” 

Tabor said he believes the pH-sensing bacterium could potentially be advanced for human clinical trials in several years. 

Tabor’s work was supported by the Welch Foundation and the National Science Foundation.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Veterans Day for 360 Magazine

“Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” By Eric Power

Veterans face incredible challenges after leaving the military. From coping with mental health issues like depression and PTSD to finding employment, re-establishing relationships, and more – readjusting to civilian life is not easy. After putting their lives on the line in service of our country, veterans deserve more support than what they are getting.

The pandemic has only made this issue worse over the last year with the surge of loneliness, unemployment, and an increase in mental health cases among all Americans. A survey done by the Wounded Warriors Project found that more than half of veterans said their mental health had worsened during the pandemic.

Fortunately, a new book from recent military veteran, Eric Power can help. “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is a powerful story of self-discovery that shares the keys to overcoming some of life’s greatest challenges and the wisdom and insights in this book are more timely and relevant than ever before.

“This pandemic has set a shocking and much greater feat for veterans (and all Americans for that matter) to rise above thier mental health challenges. Yet, I am very optimistic about the future and hope to provide support, advice, and my personal experience to help save someone’s life…” said Power, whose mission is to provide a valuable resource and life-changing advice to veterans, their families, and all struggling Americans.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Blurring the lines between fiction and nonfiction, “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is a powerful story that shines light on the unique challenges veterans face after leaving the military. As an active combat veteran, Eric Power knows the sacrifices and struggles of civilian veterans. As a mentor and a self-development student, he also knows the keys to overcoming some of the greatest challenges in business and in life.

Power shares his success principles as he takes you through the challenges of David Little, a veteran facing personal and career challenges. Follow along as David meets his mentor, Ralph Power, who helps him discover his self-worth and shows him how to build life-changing relationships.

The statistics on veteran mental health are horrific. According to a 2020 report, roughly 17 veterans die by suicide each day in the US. This means meaning more veterans die by suicide every two days than were killed in action last year! This staggering statistic is why “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” rings true to 24 million veterans around the world who have some type of personal struggle after returning home. As the Coronavirus surges forward, we have seen an increase in mental health conditions among all Americans. The wisdom and insights in this book are more timely and relevant than ever before.

Of course, this personal development is a must-read for military veterans, but it also appeals to non-veterans because it offers timeless and universal business and success principles applicable to all people. This book is a valuable resource for military families or anyone with loved ones in the service. It offers a glimpse into the reality of the veteran experience and readers can learn more about what their loved one is going through and how they can help.

Whether you are a veteran or not, “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is an unforgettable story about life, relationships, and the power we all have to create a lasting imprint on the people we meet and know.

The book was released December 28th, 2020 by Waterside productions and starts at $16.95 for the paperback edition. “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is available for purchase on Amazon HERE. 

ABOUT ERIC POWER:

Eric Louis Power is an author, speaker, entrepreneur, and social activist dedicated to helping military veterans and their families achieve a better quality of life. Power served honorably in the US Navy reaching the rank of Petty Officer First Class and serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Southern Watch. Power has a total of seven deployments, with 3.5 years in Active Combat zones. He is the founder of For Veterans By Veterans, a nonprofit that provides assistance to homeless vets, and he is the founder and CEO of Veterans Disability Help, LLC, a firm that manages VA disability claims and helps disabled veterans get the benefits they deserve. Since 2012, Power has been responsible for redirecting over 2.1 Million dollars a month recurring from the VA, back to the veterans in regard to their VA disability claims.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT https://veterandisabilityhelp.com

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oral Hygiene × SARS-CoV-2

The British Dental Journal recently found that poor oral hygiene may be linked to more severe cases of COVID-19 because of the harmful bacteria found in mouths that have not been properly taken care of.

While the mouth has always been known as a gateway to the rest of the body, giving it the ability to cause problems in other areas, it is now found that poor oral hygiene can cause respiratory infections, making COVID-19 stronger.

The good news is that the best defense, in this scenario, is to follow good oral practices, like flossing, brushing and using mouthwash.

COVID-19 continues to be deadly, but there does appear to be some sort of link in more than half of fatal cases.

According to the British Dental Journal, “More than 80% of COVID-19 patients in ICUs exhibited an exceptionally high bacterial load, with more than 50% of deaths exhibiting bacterial superinfections.”

Even though COVID-19 is transferred virally, complications like pneumonia and acute respiratory distress might be caused by bacterial superinfection, which begins in the mouth.

The study says, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection.”

Again, hygiene can be maintained by brushing, flossing and using mouthwash, but oral-care probiotics can also offer protection.

Oral-care probiotics are a specialized type of probiotic formulated to repopulate the oral cavity bacteria, which battles harmful bacteria that could lead to cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Dr. Eric Goulder, founder of the Heart and Stroke Prevention Center of Central Ohio, said he thinks heart health is also determined by oral health. His team uses ProBiora, which supports health in teeth and gums.

“We think everyone should be extra careful during the pandemic, and oral-care probiotics are a great way to help keep the oral cavity in balance 24-7,” Dr. Goulder said.

To see the study, you can click right here.

Donovan Mitchell, BODYARMOR x adidas

Donovan Mitchell is fresh off a five-year, $195 million extension with the Utah Jazz, and now he’s dropping some fresh, new kicks.

The star guard teamed up with BODYARMOR for a collaboration with adidas to create a limited edition version of his D.O.N. Issue #2 sneaker called the adidas D.O.N. Issue #2 x BODYARMOR.

The shoe features a brand new colorway inspired by Mitchell’s favorite BODYARMOR flavor, Tropical Punch.

D.O.N., which stands for “Determination Over Negativity,” is representative of Mitchell’s mindset both on and off the court.

The new shoe features the BOUNCE midsole, which enhances comfort and stability. It is also a higher heel counter, which provides even more containment and support. A webbed lacing system and the soft, breathable mesh upper provide even more lateral support.

The D.O.N. Issue #2 x BODYARMOR will not be available for purchase. Rather, it is available to fans and consumers nationwide through giveaways on BODYARMOR social platforms beginning Tuesday.

There will be just 100 pairs, so those who can get their hands on the shoes will be the envy of sneaker collectors everywhere.

Mitchell was first announced a partner and investor with BODYARMOR Sports Drink in Jan. 2018. He was another premier name added to a list of athlete partners that includes James Harden, Trae Young, Megan Rapinoe, Skylar Diggins-Smith, Kemba Walker, Dustin Johnson, Naomi Osaka, Mike Trout and more.

Mitchell took the league by storm in the 2017-2018 season. He was drafted by the Denver Nuggets with the 13th overall pick in the 2017 draft and was traded to the Utah Jazz the same night.

He won the 2018 Slam Dunk Contest and was named an All-Star during the 2019-2020 season. Through the first three seasons of his career, he is averaging 22.7 points per game, 4.1 rebounds per game and 4 assists per game.

BODYARMOR is now the No. 2 sports drink sold nationwide.

For more information about BODYARMOR, you can click right here. You can also follow them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

You can also follow Donovan Mitchell on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

New Purdue Pharmacy Programs

Purdue pharmacy programs take innovative approach to saving lives

Programs designed to provide much-needed health care services to rural families in Kenya are leading to a new generation of medical professionals and innovators – who are helping save the lives of those facing financial and mobility constraints.

Purdue University’s College of Pharmacymhas a strong presence in Kenya, with multiple programs supporting the health care needs of families. Purdue is one of a handful of schools involved in the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) program, which promotes and fosters a comprehensive approach to address the multifaceted needs of the western Kenyan population AMPATH serves.

This program has helped to permanently change the trajectory of the millions of citizens it serves. One such example is Benson Kiragu, who was one of the first Kenyans the AMPATH program reached. Benson’s experience with AMPATH serves as a microcosm of the impact AMPATH and consortium partners like Purdue can have in unlocking the potential of vulnerable populations.

When Kiragu first met AMPATH staff, he was one of many street youth with an extensive list of health issues that impeded his desire to break the poverty cycle. He suffered from eye conditions, which could have easily led to permanent blindness, and life-threatening asthma that has nearly taken his life on several occasions.

However, through the support of a team of faculty from Purdue and Indiana University, Kiragu has been able emerge from his humble beginnings to become the leader of several initiatives that now prevent other Kenyans from being trapped in the same poverty cycle he once found himself in.

Now, Kiragu is leading programs focused on providing education to street kids and treating cardiovascular and other diseases in the clinic and in homes.

“I know from my own experiences that working together as teams has helped to dramatically improve health care in Kenya,” Kiragu said. “Western Kenya now has some of the best access to health care in sub-Saharan Africa and this infrastructure is being used to help people of all ages and incomes.”

Through Kiragu’s training as a pharmacist, he has been able to become a part of the transformation in the roles that pharmacists play in Kenya through the support of the Purdue’s College of Pharmacy, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, and Moi University School of Medicine.

“Pharmacists are now seen as experts in providing health care support to patients,” Kiragu said. “We know how certain medications will likely impact patients and which ones are the most likely to improve their lives with minimal side effects.”

Kiragu said he was inspired by the work of Julie Everett, an associate professor of pharmacy practice from Purdue who was based full time in Kenya. Everett had suffered an unexpected health emergency and passed away in 2006 but was able to inspire individuals like Kiragu to follow in her footsteps and address the needs of the Kenyan population.

“Kiragu was determined to become a pharmacist and carry on the great work Julie had started with the people of Kenya,” said Sonak Pastakia, who was hired in 2007 to lead Purdue’s presence in Kenya. “I continue to be thankful that programs like AMPATH and people like Julie have been able to inspire vulnerable youth like Benson to become the change agents the country needs to prevent additional generations of Kenyans from succumbing to treatable illnesses or being trapped in the poverty cycle.

“It is because of AMPATH’s years of collaborative efforts that I have the good fortune of working alongside people like Benson who have a deep firsthand knowledge of the challenges Kenyans face and then work tirelessly to overcome them.”

Pastakia and his team in Kenya have worked with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization to patent some of their technologies and approaches. They are looking for additional partners as they work to take their proven approaches and expertise to other parts of the world. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park and Purdue Technology Centers. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.