Posts tagged with "press"

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

New Act May Worsen Staffing Crisis

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and long term care facilities across the country that provide care to approximately five million people each year, said that two provisions in the Build Back Better Act (H.R. 5376) will have a devastating impact on nursing homes and could force thousands more facilities to further limit admissions or possibly close their doors.

The provisions, one that would require nursing homes to have a registered nurse (RN) on-staff 24 hours a day and another that would require the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct a study on minimum staffing ratios and implement the regulations within one year, are unfunded mandates that conservatively, would cost the nursing homes industry billions of dollars a year and require hiring more than 150,000 new caregivers. 

“We strongly support having a RN on staff in nursing homes 24 hours a day, as we originally proposed in our reform agenda earlier this year. However, current data shows that the nursing homes are facing the worst job loss among all health care providers. We’ve lost 221,000 jobs since the beginning of the pandemic, and recovery is a long way away. Nursing home providers are doing all they can to attract and retain new workers, but the applicants simply aren’t there. The provisions in this bill do nothing to help us strengthen our workforce and will only force thousands of nursing homes to further limit the number of residents they can serve,” said AHCA/NCAL President and CEO Mark Parkinson. 

AHCA/NCAL estimates that if the HHS study found that nursing homes need to increase clinical and direct care staff by 25 percent, it would require hiring more than 150,000 RNs, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and certified nursing assistants (CNAs), costing $10.7 billion per year. 

Current requirements mandate that nursing homes have a RN on staff eight hours a day. Under the proposed mandate in the legislation, AHCA/NCAL estimates it would require hiring 21,000 more nurses, costing $2.5 billion a year.

Phil Fogg, President and CEO of Marquis Companies, who operates more than 20 long term care facilities in California, Nevada and Oregon, said if Congress enacts these provisions without the necessary resources and recruitment programs, it could have a devastating impact on nursing homes and the residents they serve across the country.

“The workforce and economic crisis long term care providers are already experiencing is unprecedented. Lack of qualified workers is forcing providers to limit their admissions and, in some cases, close their doors permanently. Providers simply cannot attract more caregivers to our profession and meet the requirements of these mandates without financial support from Congress,” said Fogg, who is also the chair of the AHCA Board of Governors.

“We all share a common goal and that is to strengthen our workforce and provide the best possible care for our residents. But these unfunded mandates could further exacerbate the challenges we face and ultimately limit access to care for millions. We are eager to work hand-in-hand with lawmakers to find meaningful solutions that will ensure seniors continue to receive the highest quality care and caregivers have access to good-paying, rewarding jobs,” said Len Russ, operator and administrator of Bayberry Care Center in New Rochelle, NY.

Art by Mina Tocalini of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Fabtech Conference 2021

By: Skyler Johnson

Coronavirus affected every single aspect of society, including factory labor. The Fabtech 2021 conference showcased the top metal forming brands in Taiwan, discussing the unique ways they were able to adapt to Covid-19. 

Mechalogix was the first company that spoke. They designed a system designed to lower labor costs through computers that actually monitor the performance of the machines and send back statistics to the operator, allowing the user to gain statistics from the strength of a saw blade to overall performance. If something needs to be replaced, the user will know, and a mechanic can be sent to the machine. But, no one needs to be watching the machines, which allows for a decrease in labor costs.

SEYI has developed a computer program that allows for users to interface with a lot of different aspects of the press, figuring out the analysis of the machine, including operation analysis and downtime analysis. Like with Mechalogix, the technology is able to send messages immediately to maintenance personnel.

Tailift has implemented a system to help in decreasing the time between taking orders and delivering products by using different web services that cut out the middleman between taking orders and delivering products, and have secured high speed internet and a strong firewall to do so. The company has also invested in technology including utilizing robot arms which help to increase efficiency and decrease maintenance costs

Da Jie is utilizing automated technology in order to avoid human cluster as a result of the pandemic, thus leading to more efficiency in production and 50% of the material being saved. SImilar to Tailift, the company uses robotic arms and other devices in order to save on cost. 

Ultimately, metal forming companies have implemented a lot of changes in order to deal with the pandemic, making their systems smarter and more efficient in the process. The pandemic has hurt everyone, but these factories were able to adapt.

Illustration By Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

MILLS RELEASES NEW SONG × VIDEO – THE STORE

Mills, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and troubadour, releases his new song and video “The Store.” Check it out here. Alongside this, Mills also releases his cover of John Mayer’s “Waiting On The World To Change” which can be found here.

“The Store” is the first new music from Mills since the release of his EP “Train of Thoughts” via Keep Cool/RCA Records earlier this year. Listen here.

Born and raised in Bowling Green, KY, and having spent time in both Nashville and Los Angeles, Mills’ southern influences have been brightened by the Los Angeles sun, resulting in buoyant melodies tinged with nostalgia. With his poetic storytelling and distinctive harmonies that evoke the 1970s era of Laurel Canyon, 21-year-old Mills emerges as a troubadour for the modern age, vividly spinning tales of young love, happiness and heartbreak.

Check out what the press says about Mills:

““Hollow” is sun-kissed singer-songwriter music, with a beautifully loping hook that gains texture as the harmonies fully arrive.” – Billboard

“His songs are personable, relatable, and carry captivating melodies that get stuck in your head even after the first listen.” – Earmilk

“Mills simplifies even the most complex emotions into a coherent stream of consciousness.” – Ones To Watch

“”Hollow” is an exciting glimpse into the music Mills has ready to release.” – Ones To Watch

“…straight-up, no fuss tunes that instantly stick.” – The Interns

“Hollow finds a sweet spot between John Mayer and Harry Style.” – The Interns

To Buy/Stream/Watch “The Store” and “Waiting On The World To Change”:

Multi

Official Video

Follow Mills:

Twitter | Instagram

glass of wine via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Borgo Santo Pietro Wine Harvest Weekend

Claus and Jeanette, co-founders of Borgo Santo Pietro, will personally host you in Tuscany to join them in the epicurean experience of the wine harvest.  Much more than a mere agricultural event, it is a celebration of the soul of the community and the land.

The harvest includes picking grapes alongside the workers before enjoying a well-earned Tuscan feast which will be produced by Borgo’s Michelin-starred chefs at trestle tables set up under a large oak tree surrounded by the estate’s wine fields and heralded by the notes of local musicians.

As a part of this “la dolce vita” Borgo Santo Pietro lifestyle, guests are invited to explore the estate, to see the animals at the local farm, and even to take a class from Mama Olga at the cooking school.

The experience includes:

Day One

  • Gourmet breakfast;
  • Estate tour of the farm and the Borgo animals;
  • Collection of still warm, fresh eggs from the hen houses;
  • Lunch (where will this be?);
  • Discovering the skill of milking the sheep.

Day Two

  • Gourmet breakfast;
  • Tour of the dairy to learn how to make cheese from ravagiolo, Primo Sale, Robiola, Pecorino, and Ricotta cheese;
  • The wine harvest with grape picking and the countryside picnic feast;
  • Tour of the herb fields which includes collecting herbs for the local production of essential oils.

About Borgo Santo Pietro

Born in 2001 from the desire to create a community and share a tangible sense of home, where nature and luxury flow seamlessly together to build a more sustainable way of living, Borgo Santo Pietro, a luxury five-star boutique hotel and part of Leading Hotels of the World, features 22 rooms and 4 private pool suites decorated with traditional craftsmanship and vintage furnishings, 1 Michelin star restaurant Meo Modo, La Trattoria sull’Albero, a holistic Seed to Skin spa and an estate of over 300 acres with 300 sheep, 20 pigs, 15 alpacas, 175 chickens, 70 rabbits, 11 acres of herbs garden, 2 acres of vegetable gardens, 1 Herb House, 1 Fermentation Laboratory, 1 Borgo Cooking School, 1 Seed to Skin Science Laboratory and hands-on experiences to nurture the body, mind and soul on another level.

Scorpion AS Plus 3 courtesy of Pirelli Tires LLC for use by 360 Magazine

Pirelli Announces New Tire Launch

PIRELLI RUN FLAT: 20 YEARS OF CONTINUOUS INNOVATION TECHNOLOGY BORN OUT OF RALLYING: NOW APPLIED TO COMFORT, SUSTAINABILITY AND NEW ELECTRIC MOBILITY

MORE THAN 1000 DIFFERENT TYPES OF RUN FLAT TIRES DEVELOPED, MORE THAN 70 MILLION TIRES PRODUCED AND OVER 50 CAR MODELS ON THE ROAD WITH THIS TECHNOLOGY

The principal benefit of Pirelli’s run flat technology – introduced to select Pirelli road tires in 2001 using the lessons learned from rallying – is to allow drivers to continue driving for a while after most punctures, rather than being stranded by the side of the road. Rallying is where this technology was tried and tested for the first time, with tires featuring a reinforced structure designed to allow driving after a puncture, which would otherwise cost several minutes in the heat of intense competition on a wide variety of roads.

NEW MATERIALS AND PROCESSES TO INCREASE COMFORT AND SUSTAINABILITY

Non-stop research and development into new materials and processes has helped Pirelli to improve driving comfort in recent years for cars equipped with Run Flat tires. Thanks to new technology in the tire’s structure, as well as advances in the materials used, increased comfort for drivers and better rolling resistance, with reduced fuel consumption and fewer emissions, are possible. These tires are built to absorb bumps in the road, and they offer similar levels of comfort as standard tires, but with the key advantage of being designed to allow continued driving up to 50 miles at 50 miles per hour (mph) to seek assistance after most puncture events – even with reduced air pressure. The particular suspension characteristics of vehicles equipped with Run Flat tires as original equipment should encourage the driver to always use tires with this technology, including as replacement tires when needed, to maximize the performance of the car.

USEFUL TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES, WITH AN EYE TOWARDS THE FUTURE

Spare tires are not usually available in electric cars, in order to free up more space for batteries. That’s why several vehicle manufacturers choose extended mobility solutions such as Run Flat or Seal Inside to minimize inconvenience and allow the driver to get to a shop in the event of most punctures. Run Flat tires are designed to allow motorists, including those with electric vehicles, to continue driving up to 50 miles at up to 50 mph without loss of air pressure, even after most punctures. Run Flat technology is also expected to play an important role in future autonomous driving systems, by helping the vehicle remain operative in most road hazard events.

OVER 1,000 DIFFERENT VERSIONS DEVELOPED AND MORE THAN 70 MILLION RUN FLAT TIRES PRODUCED

Over the last 20 years, Pirelli’s engineers have developed more than 1,000 different types of tires featuring run flat technology, which are built to allow drivers to keep driving for up to 50 miles at a maximum speed of up to 50mph. It’s a solution that has been adopted by many different manufacturers, who have requested run flat tires as original equipment on their new vehicles – such as Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Alfa Romeo. Throughout these two decades, Pirelli has produced more than 70 million run flat tires, including summer, winter and all-season tires – some of which have been fitted to the most powerful and prestigious cars of recent times, including the entire BMW and Mini range, a substantial part of the Mercedes range, the Alfa Romeo Giulia, Audi Q5 and Q7.

A WIDE RANGE AVAILABLE

There are more than a dozen premium and prestige vehicle car manufacturers that use Pirelli tires with run flat technology today, including Audi, Alfa Romeo, BMW, Jeep, Mercedes-Benz and Rolls-Royce. This technology is available on more than 50 models of Pirelli tires homologated as original equipment for use by car vehicle manufacturers. All these tires carry ‘run flat’ markings on the sidewalls, together with markings denoting the individual vehicle manufacturer they are intended for. On some tires, this technology is combined with Pirelli Elect and PNCS noise-cancelling technology. The former is dedicated to electric vehicles and is focused on low rolling resistance, reduced tire noise, grip, and a structure designed to support the weight of a battery-powered vehicle. PNCS is instead focused on reduction of perceived tire noise inside the cabin, thanks to the use of special sound-absorbing sponge on the inside of the tire. Pirelli Seal Inside is yet another technology made available by Pirelli. In the event of a puncture in most portions of the tire, a sealing substance inside the tire forms a seal around the foreign object as soon as it penetrates the tire, preventing air from escaping and the tire from losing pressure. When the foreign object is extracted, the same material seals up the edges of the resulting hole, until the tire can be repaired, so drivers can carry on driving in control and comfort.

Pirelli’s high-end Run Flat tires are the result of Pirelli’s innovative MIRS production process, which is entirely controlled by computer with ‘raw’ tires made using robots offering a final result with high standards of quality and reliability. Pirelli’s self-supporting run flat system uses special reinforcements inserted into the internal sidewalls, which are designed to sustain the lateral and transversal loads on the car even in the absence of tire pressure.

By: Matthew Anthenelli

Today, Pirelli is proud and excited to announce the introduction of the newest model to their Scorpion AS Plus line, the Scorpion AS Plus 3. The quiet, sporty tire was designed using cutting-edge 3D technology to ensure the most durable, gripping tire possible for all North American crossovers, SUVs, and pickup trucks. 

Pirelli is an internationally known brand that is signified by its outstanding quality tires that increase the performance of virtually any kind of car. Their tires are specifically designed to provide the maximum amount of comfortability, quietness, grip, and durability for cars ranging from electric vehicles and hybrids to Formula 1 race cars. 

The Scorpion line of tires from Pirelli is designed specifically for North American consumers and was started in 2013. This means that all the tires were manufactured not only to custom fit many popular American car models and brands, but also in order to be able to perform in the conditions of all four seasons and a wide variety of terrain. Another main goal of the Scorpion line is an increased mileage guarantee, with the new Scorpion AS Plus 3 boasting a seventy thousand mile warranty. 

The AS Plus line of Pirelli tires have been specifically designed and manufactured to meet the requirements of larger vehicles like crossovers, SUVs, and pickup trucks. Pirelli has always maintained its reputation of providing high quality products that are geared towards performance and innovation, while still being able to be used for both sports and lifestyle purposes. 

As a result of the pandemic, CEO Pietro Berardi explained that Pirelli has put more investment into researching their customer base and design innovations than ever before in the past year. The head of Pirelli’s North American Marketing team added that in their research for the Scorpion AS Plus 3, designers were able to use 3D modelling and simulation in order to create the most optimal tread design for the best handling and grip on both tight turns and high speeds. The 3D models are a huge innovation in the design and manufacturing of tires, as designers were able to see in real time the differences in type of treads in different environments as well as comparing how they’d each hold up over time. 

Using 3D technology, Pirelli was able to design the Scorpion AS Plus 3 to optimize quietness and comfortability, road-hugging grip, and all-season performance that motorheads and thrill-seekers will depend on. The tires are designed for all North American crossovers, SUVs, and pickup trucks and come in a wide variety of thirty seven different sizes. They even have custom-fit tires for popular vehicles like the Jeep Grand Cherokee and F-150 for customer’s ease and convenience. 

The Pirelli Scorpion AS Plus 3 is a highly technologically advanced tire that is a must for anyone driving a crossover, SUV, or pickup truck and looking for a high performing tire to go with it. Featuring tread designed with innovative 3D models and a seventy thousand mile treadwear warranty, the Scorpion AS Plus 3 is without a doubt the most futuristic and cutting-edge tire available today. 

Check out Pirelli’s new video featuring Danica Patrick, which highlights the performance capabilities of the new Scorpion AS Plus 3 here! You can also find out more by checking out Pirelli’s Instagram and website.

Laura Basset is the co-founder of the Save Journalism Project

Laura Bassett QxA

Laura Bassett is co-founder of the Save Journalism Project. She was formerly a senior culture and politics reporter at HuffPost before being laid off in 2019. She currently writes for GQ Magazine, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Marie Claire, the Daily Beast, and other publications. Along with John Stanton, she began the Save Journalism project after losing her job, when she became interested in why so many great news publishers were beginning to go under and having to lay off staff.

  1. How did you first get interested in journalism and politics and have these always been passions of yours?

I’ve always had a passion for writing, but wasn’t sure what direction it would take. I was in a graduate program for English Literature in 2008, thinking I wanted to go on and do a Ph.D. when Obama first ran for president. I became kind of obsessed with the election and started blogging on the side, and then I realized I enjoyed doing my politics blog a lot more than I enjoyed sitting in a library writing research papers that only one or two people would read. So I applied for a reporting internship at HuffPost, and the rest is history!

  1. Which are some of the biggest issues with modern journalism and how have they coincided with your career so far?

I think there are three big ones: Lack of diversity in newsrooms, the question of what objectivity in political journalism means in the age of Trump, and the financial/existential crisis facing the industry as a result of the digital age and big tech’s monopoly on ad revenue. The last one affected me the most directly, as I was laid off in 2019 after ten years at HuffPost. The site just wasn’t generating enough profits, having to compete with tech giants like Google and Facebook for ad money, and I lost my job along with scores of other journalists. I never expected to be freelancing for the first time, involuntarily, in the middle of my career, but it has proven to be a great exercise for my writing.

  1. What have been the most valuable skills/pieces of knowledge that you have learned from working at HuffPost?

I never went to journalism school, so most of what I know about reporting I learned at HuffPost. I learned how to write a compelling lede and nut graf, how to draw interesting things out people in interviews, how to show both sides of an issue without necessarily drawing a moral equivalence between them. I learned how to build source relationships and hustle for scoops. And I developed a deeper knowledge of politics and my particular beat, which for a long time was women’s rights issues. I learned how to own up to mistakes immediately and correct them in a transparent way, how to accept constructive criticism, and how to tune out the internet trolls and harassment. All the basics!

  1. What motivated you to co-found the Save Journalism Project and what made it special as an initial idea?

John Stanton, formerly of BuzzFeed, and I were laid off the same week in January of 2019. It was very unexpected for both of us: He was the Washington Bureau chief at the time, and I was a senior politics reporter. There seemed to be very little rhyme or reason to who was laid off that year; news outlets were forced to cut hundreds of staffers and had to make some really tough decisions. At the same time, local newspapers like the New Orleans Times-Picayune were going under entirely. We could see that our whole industry was facing a potentially fatal financial crisis, and we felt like if we didn’t fight for it ourselves, we didn’t know who would. So this project was born.

  1. How can you and your teamwork with or against big tech companies to improve the integrity of news?

Big tech companies are the financial competitors to news publishers, and it isn’t a fair fight right now. They gobble up about two-thirds of the digital ad market, leaving very little money for the actual content creators and publishers from which they also profit. Right now, we are looking to Congress and federal and state antitrust regulators to conduct antitrust investigations into the big four– Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon–and hoping that when they see the devastating impact those companies are having on newspapers, they will break them up and/or regulate them and create a more even playing field.

  1. In the era of fake news and heavy media bias, how can technology be used for the greater good in terms of addressing populations?

“Fake news” is a term the president has thrown at real news outlets because he doesn’t like their coverage of him. By and large, the news stories he calls “fake” are true and factual. But the internet does have an actual fake news problem, which is the disinformation that fringe activists and bad actors spread online, particularly on Facebook and Twitter. I think social media platforms have a massive responsibility to closely monitor and regulate the false propaganda raging through their sites, especially close to election time.

  1. In your opinion, how do you see the future of journalism and how can the Save Journalism Project be a part of this future?

I don’t know what I see for the future of journalism because, especially since COVID, we are on an extremely troubling trajectory. What I hope to see in the future of journalism is a sustainable business model– one in which people are happy to pay for news, and one in which news publishers and magazines don’t have to compete with Google in a David and Goliath-type situation for ad money to survive. And ideally, newsrooms can stop firing and start re-hiring again, because so much talent has been lost in the past few years.

  1. Why is it so important that our country defends the freedom of the press and how can this freedom lead to a more functional democracy?

We’re at the nexus of several historic national crises at the moment, including a deadly pandemic, so journalism–especially local journalism–has never been more important to get life-saving information across to the people and to hold powerful people and institutions to account. At the same time, we have a president attacking the press and encouraging violence against us, along with these devastating financial issues. Without a robust and thriving free press, no one is there to uncover corruption and expose the lies of politicians and inform the electorate and just, basically, keep people aware of what’s happening in their communities and the world at large. That in itself is a massive threat to democracy.

  1. What kinds of opportunities do you have for people who may want to get more involved with the Save Journalism Project?

Please contact us! We’re looking for help raising money, we’re funding freelance stories on local news deserts, and we can always use the voices of other journalists who would like to fight with us to save this industry.

  1. Do you have any clear goals or visions for expanding this Project’s influence, and if so, what are they?

Our primary focus and objective are on policymakers. We aim to get U.S. lawmakers and regulators to address the exploitation of the online marketplace by Google and Facebook which gives them an unfair advantage in the competition for digital advertising revenue. Antitrust regulators in Australia and the U.K. have begun to take these kinds of steps that are necessary and we are encouraged that their American counterparts appear to be on the verge of similar actions.

It is only after the distortions of the marketplace have been addressed that we can rebuild a sustainable business model for journalism in the digital age, particularly local news. Given our focus on policymakers, we are more supporters rather than drivers of changes in the industry. We do not favor any specific model for what kind of journalism industry emerges from these multiple ongoing crises, only that we believe it must include a viable method for news outlets to monetize their content through advertising.

360 Magazine, Muller

Mae Muller – Video

MAE MULLER RELEASES “I DON’T WANT YOUR MONEY” (ACOUSTIC) AND ACCOMPANYING VIDEO TODAY WATCH/LISTEN HERE COMBINED GLOBAL STREAMS OF MULLER’S SONGS SURPASS 67 MILLION 

“Unapologetic, self-assured and fiercely independent, Mae Muller is the next big British sensation.” – PAPER

Today Mae Muller shares ‘I Don’t Want Your Money (Acoustic)’ and its accompanying video. Self-shot in isolation, the dreamlike visual plays out the lyrics to the track displayed as Mae’s thoughts, while Jimmy Napes accompanies her on the guitar. Watch the video, which premiered today on YouTube, HERE. The original single, co-written by Muller and produced by Jimmy Napes, (Sam Smith, Khalid, Alicia Keys) showcases Muller’s stripped back vocals, sharply juxtaposed with her fierce lyrics- a distinct reminder of her status as an independent young woman.

Speaking about the inspiration behind the track she explains, “I wrote ‘I Don’t Want Your Money’ just under 2 years ago now, and I’m so happy it’s finally out! I just wanted to show that there are other ways to be treated, rather than just materialistically, especially if you make your own money! I’m financially independent so you have to find other ways to impress me, I don’t need anything else apart from love and affection. Treat me with respect and we’re GOOD.” Hailed as “a clear pop sensation in the making” by Wonderland and the “new queen” by NYLON, Muller’s music pairs self-assured lyrics with strong narratives and entwined soulful pop melodies – a style that is quickly cementing the young London-based artist as a spokeswoman of her generation.

“I know what I want to say, and I know what the message is that I want to get across,” says Muller. “I want women and young girls going through hard shit to put on my songs and feel better. We’re going through this together.” Released last month, the official “I Don’t Want Your Money” video was self-shot by Muller on her iPhone at home and directed remotely by Sophie Muller (No Doubt, Selena Gomez, Rihanna, Beyoncé). Watch it HERE. Combined global streams of Muller’s song are approaching 70 million.

“I Don’t Want Your Money” comes on the heels of her early 2020 single, “Therapist,” which landed on over 45 Spotify playlists as well as Apple Music’s A-List Pop, In My Room, Future Hits and more.

WHAT THE PRESS HAS TO SAY ABOUT MAE MULLER… 

“London singer Mae Muller rules.” – The FADER

“Mae Muller’s witty and brutally honest lyrics set her apart from her peers…” – GQ   

“Sound the horns because a new queen is here.” – NYLON

“A clear pop sensation in the making…” – Wonderland

“Expect an abundance of attitude…” – TheGuardian

Photo Credit: Rosaline Shahnavaz 

Download hi-res photo HERE 

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter 

coffee, mug, plate, cocoa, green, white, brown, 360 Magazine, illustration

Tech x Press Freedom

Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

The Reporters Committee urged a federal court on Friday to deny the Trump administration’s request for an emergency order that would block the publication and distribution of a highly anticipated memoir written by former National Security Adviser John Bolton. In a friend-of-the-court brief filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the Reporters Committee argued that the requested injunction amounts to an unconstitutional prior restraint. “Such an extraordinarily broad injunction would be a clear prior restraint that violates long-settled constitutional law,” said Bruce Brown, executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. “The court must reject this effort to censor the free flow of information to the public about government activities.”

In addition to Trump’s response to Bolton’s published memoir, several journalists were targeted in a large-scale hacking operation. After a journalist contacted The Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto in 2017 about a suspicious phishing attempt, researchers recently uncovered a huge hack-for-hire operation, dubbed “Dark Basin,” that targeted thousands of people in journalism, business, banking, law, and especially the nonprofit sector.

Researchers linked Dark Basin to BellTroX InfoTech Services, an Indian tech firm owned by Sumit Gupta. Gupta, who in 2015 was indicted on federal hacking charges in California, denied the allegations in an interview with Reuters.

Dark Basin targeted a range of organizations and, in several cases, the journalists connected to them. For example, hackers attempted to infiltrate American environmental advocacy groups, including the Rockefeller Family Fund, Greenpeace, and 350.org, as well as “multiple major US media outlets” who covered the groups’ work on the #ExxonKnew climate change campaign. The hackers also targeted Free Press and Fight for the Future, organizations that advocate for open internet policies.

Despite the danger, a recent report by the Tow Center for Digital Journalism found that many journalists are not particularly careful with their digital security. In newsrooms short on time and money, digital security may seem like an unnecessary burden, and some journalists believe as long as they are not covering “sensitive” topics they will not be targeted. Often newsrooms that adopt security protocols do so informally, with some journalists becoming trainers for others.

Week in Tech + Press Freedom

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and 115 media and press freedom organizations sent a letter last week to officials in Minnesota, demanding that law enforcement officers immediately stop attacks against credentialed, clearly identifiable journalists covering nationwide protests in response to a white Minneapolis police officer killing George Floyd, a Black man, on May 25. The Reporters Committee also sent a letter to officials in New York, and will be contacting officials in other states in the coming days.

The Reporters Committee is also tracking curfew orders imposed by cities, counties and states in response to the protests — and whether they include exemptions for members of the news media.

Here’s what the staff of the Technology and Press Freedom Project at the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press is tracking this week.

Two developments this week point to the potential use of technology to automate how government documents are processed internally and in response to public records requests. As access to government records are a mainstay of a journalist’s toolbox, how these advances play out will be critical to the profession.

At the federal level, the Public Interest Declassification Board issued recommendations largely focused around transitioning the classification system from the “analog age” to digital. The report was decidedly pro-transparency; it opens by acknowledging the “bipartisan recognition that the Government classifies too much information for too long.” Specific goals include implementing “Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Cloud storage and retrieval” to automate classification and declassification decisions and potentially streamlining the classification categories by adopting a two-tiered system.

A California Supreme Court judge, Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, commented on similar technological improvements in the context of public records requests. The case, National Lawyers Guild v. City of Hayward, involved a public records request that included police body camera footage with audio and visual material exempt from disclosure.

The court ruled that the requesters would not have to pay a fee for redactions from electronic records under the California public records law. (The Reporters Committee filed a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the NLG, which had submitted the public records request.) Cuéllar wrote separately from the majority, noting that implementation of artificial intelligence or other advanced software to collect and redact records en masse will “merit nuanced application of statutory provisions.” He suggested that because a better, more efficient records system might be more expensive, it would at times be “prudent” to interpret the law such that certain requests will fall under the fee-bearing provisions.

Enhanced technology in records systems has the potential to unlock far more records, permitting journalists, in particular, to obtain and disseminate that information to the public. And as technological advances are applied to the management of government records, courts and legislators should be wary of undermining government transparency by overburdening the individuals and organizations — particularly in media — who function as critical watchdogs.

The Center for Democracy and Technology on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against President Trump in his official capacity, arguing that the recently signed “Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship” violates the First Amendment. The organization notes that the order is “plainly retaliatory” against Twitter, and that it “seeks to curtail and chill the constitutionally protected speech of all online platforms and individuals — by demonstrating the willingness to use government authority to retaliate against those who criticize the government.” On May 28, the Reporters Committee issued a statement raising constitutional concerns about the executive order.

On Tuesday, the Reporters Committee joined a friend-of-the-court brief, drafted by the Harvard Cyberlaw Clinic, in Everytown for Gun Safety v. ATF. The Second Circuit case arose out of a Freedom of Information Act request Everytown made for records from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives regarding firearms recovered from the scenes of suicides. ATF denied the request, claiming that retrieval of aggregate data from a database requires the creation of a new record. The amicus brief argues that there is no legal distinction between searching data in a database and retrieving aggregate data. Privacy and civil liberties advocates are raising concerns about government efforts to conduct surveillance on protesters using facial recognition software, license plate readers, body cameras, drones, and other tools. Additionally, BuzzFeed News reported on Tuesday that the Justice Department signed off on new authority for the Drug Enforcement Administration to “conduct covert surveillance” and collect intelligence on protesters, which some note could require the use of “stingray” devices that simulate cell sites.

On Monday, the FBI announced on Twitter that it is soliciting information, photos, and videos that show violent encounters during demonstrations. In a press release, the FBI stated that it was collecting this information as part of what it dubbed a commitment “to apprehending and charging violent instigators who are exploiting legitimate, peaceful protests.”

newspaper via 360 Magazine

Tech’s Impact on Journalism

In the epicenter of big tech, Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) joined Audrey Cooper, the Executive Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group Neil Chase, and Save Journalism Project co-founders Laura Bassett, a laid-off HuffPost reporter, and John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed, to shine a light on the plight of local news and a key culprit: big tech.   

n the first quarter of 2019, the media has shed more than 2,400 jobs – including East Bay Express staffers – and, over the past 10 years, newsrooms have declined in size by 45%. The plight of the journalism industry has generated bipartisan congressional action, a rather unique occurrence in this polarized political climate. And while the journalism industry faces many challenges, the focus of Congress’ current action is to halt big tech’s negative impact on the economic sustainability of the free press. Wednesday’s speakers will address this unusual bipartisan action and the widespread consequences of the loss of local news.

According to Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), “Not that long ago, the Bay Area was home to over 1,500 journalists, but now there are less than 300 serving roughly 7 million people. This problem is not unique to our community—it is happening in every corner of the country, and we need to act. During a time when fact and accountability are under constant attack, today’s conversation about ways to preserve and protect local news and high-quality journalism is critical to the health of our democracy.”

According to Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group, “I’m glad we had such a deep, meaningful conversation about the challenges facing journalism today, right here in downtown San Francisco. If we can’t solve it here, we can’t hope to help the places across America that don’t have the technology and financial resources that are available in a place like this.”

According to Laura Bassett, laid-off HuffPost senior politics reporter and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “As our country grapples with natural disasters, political turmoil, violence, and everyday life, Americans rely on journalists and the news industry to explain and break through the chaos. But, for that process to survive, we need well-staffed newsrooms and a blossoming industry. Instead, big tech is decimating journalism. Facebook, Google, and big tech have consumed the digital landscape and continue to threaten local and national journalism. We need our elected officials to weigh in, to reign in big tech, and to save the journalism industry, before this goes any further.”

And, according to John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “The irony of all ironies, we live streamed today’s event on Facebook to ensure it reached the largest audience. The mere fact that we had to rely on the conglomerate proves our point: Facebook and Google have too much power. Together, they control the landscape, the audience, and the content. I saw this first hand at BuzzFeed, when Facebook, without notice, changed its algorithm, resulting in huge viewership and financial losses for the company. As more and more local and national news outlets feel the death grip of big tech, we need Congress to step in and save journalism.”

 

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.