Posts tagged with "harvest"

Pumpkin Patch Illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Fall Fun In Tennessee

As the leaves begin to change and the air grows brisk, that can only mean one thing; fall is upon us in Tennessee. So carve out a good time and add these joyous farms, festivals, events, and pumpkin-spiced treats to check off your Fall bucket list.

1. Pick the Perfect Pumpkin of the Patch

The River Maze – Ocoee

Located on the banks of the Ocoee River, The River Maze is celebrating its 20th year of Spookley the Square Pumpkin with a wide array of fall-tastic activities, including corn and soybean mazes, bonfires, hayrides, farm animals, pumpkin basketball, and ziplines.

Falcon Ridge Farms – Bolivar

Falcon Ridge Farms is an expansive family farm in West Tennessee where visitors can take a shot at a corn cannon and visit its pumpkin patch. This fall destination includes a corn maze, tractor-drawn wagon rides, pony rides, food at the market, tire swings, giant slides, tether pole, cornhole, and bounce houses.

Lucky Ladd Farms – Eagleville

A petting farm, pony rides, and more than 70 activities and educational adventures are the norm on the 60-acre Lucky Ladd Farms in Eagleville. Farm-themed playgrounds, mega slides, wagon rides, tire climbs, games, and tractor trains entertain for hours. Visitors can choose from more than ten varieties of picked pumpkins or visit the patch to handpick their own. The farm’s corn maze is named “Tennessee’s #1 Corn Maze” four years in a row.

2. Take a Fall Weekend Getaway

Embark into the woods to find some of the coziest fall getaways in Tennessee to lay your head. Spend the weekend surrounded by fall foliage, breathing in fresh air, and being steps away from some of the state’s best hiking trails. Whether at Pickwick Landing State Park or Chickasaw State Park in West Tennessee, Montgomery Bell State Park in Middle or Norris Dam CCC State Park in East Tennessee, these lodging options are perfect for a fall break or weekend escape. 

3. Get Lost in a Corn Maze

Sunset Valley Farms – Huron

Celebrate Tennessee’s 225th anniversary and Henderson Country’s 200th anniversary with Sunset Valley Farm’s a-MAZE-ing corn maze at its 2021 Fall Festival. Capture Instagram-worthy photos in the farm’s large sunflower fields, munch on freshly made apple cider donuts and pulled pork, take a ride on the grain train, climb abroad a tractor, and pick the perfect pumpkin. Stay until sundown to experience the stunning Tennessee sunset against the ample woods of the west. 

Myers Pumpkin Patch and Farm – Greeneville

Deemed East Tennessee’s largest corn maze, Myers Pumpkin Patch and Farm delivers 500-acres of fun for the whole family with tractor rides, s’more stations around fire pits, and its epic Fall Farm Market. At the market, guests can handpick the farm’s freshly grown fruits, vegetables and homemade baked goods, including pumpkins, squash, corn, pumpkin pie, and fudge.

Honeysuckle Hill Farm – Springfield

Venture out to Springfield for a fall-filled day at Honeysuckle Hill Farm’s fall festival, where its guests can get lost in this year’s Loretta Lynn-themed country music corn maze, take a hayride to the pumpkin patch, hear chickens sing, and watch pig races. Snack on the scrumptious food they have on-site, including caramel apples, kettle corn, and chili cheese nachos.

4. Get the In-Cider Information on Tennessee’s Hottest Apple Orchards

Wooden’s Apple House – Pikeville

Wooden’s Apple House offers over 100 acres to pick a wide selection of apples for the perfect day spent in the orchard. Grab a few bottles of apple cider to take home and stop by the pie shop that has delicious apple dumplings and meat-and-three restaurant. Take it easy and chill among the rolling hills and enjoy the nature at their vineyard.

Morning Glory Orchard – Nolensville

Located right outside of Nashville, Morning Glory Orchard offers everything from apples, peaches, and honey, to vegetables, cider, and fresh baked goods. Make a day out of your visit and enjoy a picnic in the orchard while snacking on a charcuterie box and sampling their fresh produce.

Buffalo Trail Orchard – Greeneville

Since 1890, the Buffalo Trail Orchard has been providing crisp fruits and vegetables to those in East Tennessee. During the fall month, guests enjoy the orchard’s pumpkin patch and take hayrides while spending the day with friends and family picking apples.

Jones Orchard – Millington

Here at Jones Orchard you can not only go apple picking, but the family can also enjoy everything from a 10-acre corn maze, hayrides, and pumpkin patch, to a farm scene investigation, monster mysteries, and other haunted attractions at their Festival of Fear.

5. Get Spooked at these Historically Haunted Tennessee Destinations

Unique spooks are what makes your travel to Tennessee exhilarating and the scary tours are full of excitement. Immerse yourself in the sights and thrills of haunted hotels, theaters, and homes where wicked stories and chilling surprises are tied to the stories of the past. 

6. Taste the Flavors of Autumn

The Apple Barn Cider Mill – Sevierville

Guests can pick apples in the orchards, then peruse the delicious homemade items in the general store.

Carver’s Orchard and Applehouse Restaurant – Cosby

While in Cosby, stop by Carver’s Orchard and Applehouse restaurant, where you can load up on freshly picked apples, fried pies, homemade candies, and apple butter.

Fairlane Hotel’s Falling for Fairlane – Nashville

Head to downtown Nashville and ascend to the top of the Fairlane Hotel for their latest fall-inspired pop-up bar, Falling for Fairlane. Get in the spirit with their delicious infused cocktails, such as The Drunken Pumpkin, Not Your Mother’s Mulled Wine, Maple Old Fashioned, and feast on their shared plates like the goat cheese and savory pear tart, apple pie, and pumpkin spiced donut holes.

Old Millington Vineyard – Millington

Only 14 miles outside of Memphis, the Old Millington Vineyard captures the flavors of autumn in their seasonal plum wine. Cap off Sunday afternoon by having a picnic and enjoying the sights and original wines.

7. Explore Outdoors and Experience Tennessee’s Fall Colors

Kick up the fallen leaves and cruise along the state’s scenic byways to catch a glimpse of the colorful ridges, charming destinations, and outdoor treasures. Add these relaxing hikes, scenic drives, and leaf-peeping places to your fall bucket list.

8. Attend a Fall-tastic Event

“Once Upon a Pumpkin” – Discovery Park of America in Union City

Get lost in the stories of fairy tales at Discovery Park of America’s Pumpkin Village with this year’s “Once Upon a Pumpkin.” Climb through 40,000 pounds of pumpkins constructed along with hay bales and flowers to create displays that showcase childhood tales such as “The Three Little Pigs” and “Goldilocks and the Three Bears.”

Goblins and Giggles – Gaylord Opryland Resort in Nashville

Fall at the Gaylord Opryland Resort makes for the perfect child-friendly getaway with their highly anticipated Goblins and Giggles. From Sept. 10 until Oct. 31, visitors to the resort see Spooktacular décor, play hide and seek scavengers hunts with Spookley the Square Pumpkin, go on the trick or treat expedition trail or Jack-o’-Lantern Walk, and win the haunted Hidden Treasure Escape Room. Other enticing events include Ghouls Night Out Riverboat Ride, Wicker Brews Spookeasy, the Monster Mash Bash, Frightfully Fun Zone, Bedtime Stories with Morgana, Spooky Animal Encounters, and the Fall Fountain Show.

Autumn at Anakeesta – Gatlinburg

Escape into wonderland this season with Autumn at Anakeesta from Sept. 24 – Oct. 31. Breathe in the Great Smoky Mountains while enjoying the live music, food, drinks and decorations. Go leaf peeping in the sightseeing Chondola, zipline through breathtaking fall greenery, and engage in the delightful beauty of East Tennessee.

Harvest Festival – Pigeon Forge

Dollywood goes all out to celebrate this time of year with its annual Harvest Festival. Running from Sept. 24 until Oct. 31, travelers cherish the lovely decorations, feast on seasonal treats, and listen to first-class entertainment. Stay until the sun goes down to see Dollywood’s ornaments come glowing to life at the LumiNights.

Cheer on Your Favorite Tennessee Football Team

Football is a big deal in the South. With the onset of changing leaves and the flavors of pumpkin spice on store shelves, that means that football fans everywhere are rejoicing and cheering on their favorite teams. While visiting Tennessee during the fall, schedule sometime to watch what football season is all about. Whether it’s the University of Tennessee Volunteers or the Tennessee Titans or the University of Memphis, there’s many teams to entertain all autumn long.

glass of wine via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Borgo Santo Pietro Wine Harvest Weekend

Claus and Jeanette, co-founders of Borgo Santo Pietro, will personally host you in Tuscany to join them in the epicurean experience of the wine harvest.  Much more than a mere agricultural event, it is a celebration of the soul of the community and the land.

The harvest includes picking grapes alongside the workers before enjoying a well-earned Tuscan feast which will be produced by Borgo’s Michelin-starred chefs at trestle tables set up under a large oak tree surrounded by the estate’s wine fields and heralded by the notes of local musicians.

As a part of this “la dolce vita” Borgo Santo Pietro lifestyle, guests are invited to explore the estate, to see the animals at the local farm, and even to take a class from Mama Olga at the cooking school.

The experience includes:

Day One

  • Gourmet breakfast;
  • Estate tour of the farm and the Borgo animals;
  • Collection of still warm, fresh eggs from the hen houses;
  • Lunch (where will this be?);
  • Discovering the skill of milking the sheep.

Day Two

  • Gourmet breakfast;
  • Tour of the dairy to learn how to make cheese from ravagiolo, Primo Sale, Robiola, Pecorino, and Ricotta cheese;
  • The wine harvest with grape picking and the countryside picnic feast;
  • Tour of the herb fields which includes collecting herbs for the local production of essential oils.

About Borgo Santo Pietro

Born in 2001 from the desire to create a community and share a tangible sense of home, where nature and luxury flow seamlessly together to build a more sustainable way of living, Borgo Santo Pietro, a luxury five-star boutique hotel and part of Leading Hotels of the World, features 22 rooms and 4 private pool suites decorated with traditional craftsmanship and vintage furnishings, 1 Michelin star restaurant Meo Modo, La Trattoria sull’Albero, a holistic Seed to Skin spa and an estate of over 300 acres with 300 sheep, 20 pigs, 15 alpacas, 175 chickens, 70 rabbits, 11 acres of herbs garden, 2 acres of vegetable gardens, 1 Herb House, 1 Fermentation Laboratory, 1 Borgo Cooking School, 1 Seed to Skin Science Laboratory and hands-on experiences to nurture the body, mind and soul on another level.

Marijuana illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Honest Marijuana Company

In the old days of illegal weed, the price you paid for your weekend toke depended mostly on who was selling it to you. These were behind-the-scenes transactions, with no recourse for a deal gone bad and no way to price compare with a competitor. You paid the price asked or you went without.

Now, as state legalization grows and the chatter about federal legalization becomes less talk and more reality, the game has changed forever for the buyer. So, it’s a good time to be clear on what you’re paying for before you go to your local cannabis boutique, or even the corner store, if you should be so lucky to have marijuana available for sale there!

First off, price comparing starts with quantity

If you want to look at what your weed is going to cost you, and even compare different strains, it’s best to pick a quantity. From state to state, the price of quantity X will vary, based on factors we’ll discuss later, but for now, it’s important to understand what quantities you can order in. 

The most common quantities you can buy cannabis in are a gram, eighth of an ounce, quarter of an ounce, half an ounce, and a full ounce. Notice how the common quantities mix metric and Imperial measuring units? A gram is 1/1000th of a kilogram and an ounce is 1/16th of a pound. Typically, you’ll find that dispensaries will use ounces for larger quantities, and grams for a smaller purchase.

What does a gram look like? It’s about the size of a bottle cap, which gives you a visual point of reference to figure out what you’re getting for what price. The average joint is about 0.7 grams of weed so a gram will give you about 1.5 joints. Here are the other measurements, to give you a rough idea of what you’re getting:

  • An eighth of an ounce (which is roughly 3.5 grams) will give you just about 5 joints.
  • A quarter of an ounce (7 grams) will net about 10 joints.
  • A half an ounce (14 grams) will give you about 20 joints.
  • A full ounce (28 grams) is just about equal to 40 joints.

From Alaska to West Virginia, that price per ounce of medium quality weed can run anywhere from $6 to $12.

Quality is the next factor

If you look at average prices of weed across the country, they’re pretty stable and typically refer to medium quality cannabis. When you want to compare a gram of cannabis from one shop to another, a major increase in price could be because of the quality of the product. 

For example, an organic and locally indoor grown variety might be more expensive than a mass produced, imported one. You really do have to compare apples to apples, if you want to be sure you’re getting the right picture.

Other factors that will influence the price of weed

Your state’s legal stance toward cannabis

If you live in a state where cannabis isn’t legal in any form, obviously you’re still operating in the old ways of quiet deals made with people who don’t really care to negotiate the prices they feel like charging. After all, they risk going to jail for providing you with your ‘chill’ so there’s a premium attached to that.

In the states that have legalized recreational marijuana (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), you’ll find competition higher and prices that reflect that.

The remaining twenty-one states that have legalized medical marijuana require a doctor’s note to obtain it, which isn’t a particularly challenging hurdle in most places, so this doesn’t affect the prices too significantly.

One place where cannabis is particularly expensive? Washington D.C. Despite legalization of medical and recreational use, they didn’t legalize the purchase of cannabis. That little detail is reflected in prices that are almost twice the national average for legalized / decriminalized states!

The physical geography of where you live

Cannabis isn’t an overly fussy plant to cultivate but it does prefer warm, stable temperatures, averaging in the daytime around 80 degrees. Places that have daytime temperatures that run hotter than 88 degrees or colder than 60 degrees have a harder time growing—it’s a slower process—and can end up with plants that have lower THC content and therefore lower overall quality.

So, if you live in Alaska or New Hampshire, for example, your weed has most likely been brought in from elsewhere, which means added costs in transportation and labor, to package and ship.

How your weed is grown

How your preferred brand is grown makes a difference on quality. 

  • Are they grown outdoors where light, water, soil, and ambient daytime temperatures are all free for the asking and therefore don’t add to the cost of production? 
  • Are they grown indoors, where special electrical lighting, watering and feed systems, and climate control are all required and add to the cost of production? 

Outdoor grown weed can be lower quality in that there aren’t many ways to control Mother Nature. Being able to control elements through technology can yield a higher quality product. From pest and humidity control to very specific watering schedules, as well as the use of light waves to maximize growth and intensity, indoor growers have the keys to control quality in ways that outdoor growers really cannot.

Factor in also whether the grower is using organic production methods, as this will definitely yield a higher quality product. No toxins from pesticides means a cleaner experience for you.

Where you buy your marijuana

Are you buying from a boutique dispensary or a corner store? Are you buying from a chain of cannabis stores or from a one-man dealer? Which way you go will affect the price you pay.

Dispensaries have overhead and staff to pay, which adds to the cost. However, they also have guidelines to follow in terms of packaging and labeling, as well as a vested interest in pleasing their customer, so they’re a good bet. You will know exactly what you’re getting, including the sourcing, THC content, whether it’s organic or not and so on. If you buy from a dealer, who is claiming to sell high quality products, you have no guarantees whatsoever that they are telling the truth.

Competitors drive the price down

Supply and demand is an easy equation. If there are several dispensaries with similar offerings in your area, the price per gram will be lower than in an area with no competition for your one dispensary. There is less supply for potentially similar demand, which can easily affect the price. The key as a consumer is to know your average pricing so you can tell whether or not you are getting a good deal.

Taxation and legalization go hand in hand

The states that have legalized marijuana have also clued in that it is an important revenue source. Sales tax, if the state has one, is applied to cannabis too. The rate can be higher for weed than for other products, as it is in Colorado. They have a state sales tax rate of 2.9% but the rate for weed? 10%.

In addition to sales tax, legal sellers are faced with taxes in production, purchasing, packing and transportation, costs that are typically downloaded to the end consumer.

The timing of your purchases

Time of year can impact the price of weed. Like most cultivated crops, the largest amounts are harvested in and around the month of September. Result? The supply is up, and prices should go down a little. 

As legalization continues to expand, state to state and even federally, the pricing will become more standard and easier to predict. At that point, the quality of the weed will be the big differentiator and as the end consumer, that’s not a small factor to consider. Buy with care and enjoy yourself!

Bio:

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all-natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

Consumer Physics, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery, Corn

Consumer Physics Corn Analysis

Consumer Physics’ pocket-size solution enables farmers, agronomists and seed producers to test larger areas, project the optimal harvest time, save lab and dry-down costs, and increase yield potential

Ag-tech startup Consumer Physics is unveiling the world’s first corn moisture analysis solution that provides results in seconds, in the field, directly on the cob, without shelling. The solution is based on SCiO – Consumer Physics’ micro-NIR flagship platform, which is also the world’s first pocket-sized connected micro-spectrometer.

The solution includes a pocket-sized analyzer based on NIR (Near Infra-Red) Spectroscopy as well as a mobile app that sends data to the cloud, where Consumer Physics’ algorithms analyze the data and send back the results in seconds. This solution is tailored for corn farmers, corn seed producers and agronomists.

Corn plays a critical role in American and global agriculture and is widely implemented by various industries, from the food industry to a wide range of industrial applications. The National Corn Growers Association in the U.S. estimates that the value of corn grown in the U.S. alone amounted to $53 billion in 2019, planted on 90 million acres.

Analyzing moisture with SCiO is simple and non-destructive, and best of all, it is carried out in the field. The operation is as easy as scanning five different cobs, tapping the mobile app, and getting the moisture level reading within seconds. The solution’s accuracy and precision are on par with labs, and moisture levels range from 8% to 80%. The higher range is particularly relevant for seed producers to monitor the growing process and collect data to support the development of future products.

Consumer Physics’ user-friendly solution replaces lengthy, expensive, and complicated processes that currently require the collection of several corn cobs from the field, which are sent back to the plants or labs. In the labs, kernels must then be shelled and ground, with results taking up to several hours. With SCiO, users can conduct many measurements, daily, from numerous locations in the field, to ascertain the precise moisture level in each plot and determine the optimal harvest time. Users can also track and monitor the data collected in the cloud across time to produce long-range insights into crop efficiency and areas where they should make improvements.

Consumer Physics opened new Sales offices in Minnesota and started piloting the solution in 2019. Within a short period of time, SCiO was rolled out successfully by the leading corn growers and seed producers in the U.S., including Corteva Agriscience, Syngenta, Cargill, Beck’s, and Precision Planting.

Terry Allen, Consumer Physics’ North America Head of Business Development, said, “We successfully transferred NIR technology from the lab into the field, allowing growers and operators to get more data and take better decisions.”

According to Allen, “precise moisture measurement in real time has a direct impact on the corn business’ bottom line. SCiO was seen to improve forecasting by about 2-3%, which is likely to save tens of thousands of dollars on an average 1000-acre field.”

Consumer Physics works with Corteva to be on the forefront of technology and maximize seed quality and overall effectiveness in key crops such as corn. Consumer Physics’ unique solution for in-field moisture analysis enables farmers, agronomists and seed producers to test larger areas, project the optimal harvest time, save costs and ultimately ensure great quality seed for the customer.

For more information about the study, click here.

About Consumer Physics

Consumer Physics is the company that developed SCiO, the world’s first pocket-sized connected micro-spectrometer. Our mission is to empower the Agriculture and Food industries around the world with material analysis capabilities that provide real time data to support decisions that impact the way these industries grow crops and harvest them, handle quality control, monitor trends and performance, and more, through a powerful connected ecosystem. We believe that the days when only labs or skilled professionals used spectrometers are behind us.

Watch a corn kernel moisture analysis video here and a video about how to analyze corn moisture here.