Posts tagged with "maine"

Pumpkin illustration by Nicole Salazar at 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Maine’s Harvest on the Harbor Returns

Harvest on the Harbor returns November 4-6, 2021 with multi-day food, drink, and Maine-maker events. This year’s main events will take place at O’Maine Studios on Danforth Street with fringe events at select Portland-area locations. A plan for virtual festival components is in the works and details will be announced later this month. 

In light of the ongoing pandemic, this year’s celebration of Maine’s farmers, fishermen, distillers, and food community will require proof of vaccination or negative COVID tests at the events. The Meet Your Maker and OysterFest at O’Maine studios will take advantage of the venue’s large garage bays and courtyard space, allowing for plenty of airflow and movement. All events are designed to keep the health and safety of everyone in mind.

Tickets are on sale now at harvestontheharbor.com

Meet Your Maker – Friday, November 5 at 5:30 pm

A collaboration with the Maine Distillers Guild; a community of Maine distillers will gather under one roof for the ultimate tasting event.  The event will feature Maine-made gins, vodkas, bourbons, rums, and more, accompanied by food pairings from Pemberton’s Gourmet Foods to complement the selection of spirits. 21+  Ticket price $60

Maine OysterFest – Saturday, November 6, two sessions, 12:30pm & 4pm

In partnership with Maine Oyster Company, this event features the choicest oysters from up and down the coast of Maine. Tickets include oysters and beer from Allagash Brewing Co. and Austin Street Brewery, and Los Dos Cava Spanish sparkling wine. While slurping and sipping, guests will have the chance to learn about this burgeoning Maine industry and meet the farmers. 21+  Ticket price $80

Cocktail classes

Three of Strong Spirits – Wednesday, Nov. 3 @ 4 pm 

While many people only think of rum as a cheap mixer for a glass of Coke or as an overly sweet, frozen drink, rum is a complex spirit with a great cocktail range. The knowledgeable team at Three of Strong will guide attendees through a tasting and demonstration of two cocktails. 

Maine Craft Distilling – Thursday, Nov. 4 @ 3 pm and 5 pm

This hands-on educational class offers the two basics of cocktail making – one shaken and one stirred. Attendees will use Maine Craft Distilling’s tools and ingredients to make two different cocktails. Enjoy the cocktails with bites sent out from the kitchen and a tour of the distillery. 

In-person events require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test for all staff, partners, and ticket holders. Full details are online at harvestontheharbor.com 

Planned virtual events include the OysterFest, with options for overnight shipping or pick-up of special oyster kits, a Zoom author talk with the people behind the Maine Bicentennial Community Cookbook on November 4, and more. 360 Magazine is interested to see how this event is coming back this year.

2021 HOTH sponsors include Bangor Savings Bank, Norway Savings Bank, Diageo, The Maine Oyster Company, Allagash Brewing Co., Austin Street Brewery, Winebow, Los Dos Cava, Pemberton’s Gourmet Foods, O’Maine Studios and Eat Drink Lucky.

Kaelen Felix illustration for 360 MAGAZINE pizza article

Maine Lobster Week

Maine Lobster Week, the State’s First Weeklong Celebration of Lobster, Invites Diners to Indulge in Maine Lobster Three Course Menus, Lobster Rolls, Lobster Pizza and much more!

Maine’s first week dedicated to all things lobster, Maine Lobster Week (MLW), will be held September 19-25, 2021. Lobster shacks, diners, food trucks and restaurants across the state will prepare Maine lobster in dishes from classic lobster rolls to fine dining multi-course meals. The lobster-licious event is sponsored by the Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative (MLMC) to celebrate Maine’s most popular seafood. Maine Lobster Week concludes on September 25, National Lobster Day.

Marianne LaCroix, Executive Director of the Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative, said, “Maine Lobster Week will give residents and visitors alike a chance to enjoy classic Maine lobster dishes and discover innovative new options while supporting hard-working fishermen and beloved restaurants. The MLMC is thrilled to support the first MLW.”

Lobster dining destinations signed up so far include destinations from Kennebunkport to Bar Harbor with plenty of stops in between:

  • 95 Ocean at The Nonantum Resort, Kennebunkport
  • Bar Harbor Lobster Co., Bar Harbor
  • The Boathouse Waterfront Restaurant, Kennebunkport
  • Boone’s Fish House & Oyster Room, Portland
  • Corner Room Italian Kitchen and Bar, Portland
  • David’s, Portland
  • DiMillo’s On the Water, Portland
  • Eventide Oyster Co., Portland
  • Evo Kitchen + Bar, Portland
  • Fish Bones Grill, Lewiston
  • Front Room Restaurant and Bar, Portland
  • Grill Room and Bar, Portland
  • Hartstone Inn, Camden
  • Higgins Beach Market, Scarborough
  • Highroller Lobster Co., Portland
  • The Honey Paw, Portland
  • Island Lobster Company, Peaks Island Portland
  • Little Giant, Portland
  • Monte’s Fine Foods, Portland
  • Nonesuch River Brewing, Scarborough
  • Nubb’s Lobster Shack, Cape Neddick
  • Old Port Sea Grill and raw bar, Portland
  • Petite Jacqueline, Portland
  • Pine Point Grill, Scarborough
  • Sea Glass Restaurant, Cape Elizabeth
  • Sebago Brewing Company – multiple locations
  • The Tiller, Cape Neddick
  • Union River Lobster Pot, Ellsworth

Details about the participating venues are on the official website. The three-course prix fixe meals range from $45 to $65 per person; other lobster dishes are priced a la carte.

About Maine Lobster Week
Maine Lobster Week is a statewide celebration of Maine lobster, held September 19-25. Participating locations will serve dishes ranging from the classic Maine lobster roll to fine dining multi-course meals. The event is sponsored by the Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative. Maine Lobster Week is additionally supported by the Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram and Eat Drink Lucky.

Music Notes by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Role Model Releases New Single and Video – forever&more

Role Model (a.k.a. Tucker Pillsbury) is back with a brand-new single entitled “forever&more” along with the music video. The track is a mid-summer bop that glides along on a sun-soaked guitar loop and glitchy beat as he details the bliss of new love. With its nostalgic hook and vivid lyrics, “forever&more” marks a new chapter for Tucker as he enters the next phase of his music career. Role Model’s “forever&more” is available now at all digital retail providers via Interscope Records.

Click here to listen.

Role Model says about the track, “It’s obviously a love song. I really wanted to set up scenes of how my relationship started and the little moments that got us to where we are. This is the first time I’m letting people into the relationship and giving them visuals of those early stages and how I see it going in my head forever and more.”

The music video for “forever&more” was directed by Dylan Knight and finds Tucker happy and in love. The camera pans between shots of Role Model amongst his friends and alone time with his love interest while he chronicles the indescribable, euphoric feeling of being in love, and knowing it’s going to last forever. While the song and video parallel his real-life experience, it’s clear that this relationship has made Tucker the best version of himself.

Click here to watch the music video.

About Role Model

Tucker Pillsbury assembles, disassembles, and reassembles different vibes, sounds, and emotions into Role Model. One moment, he’s crooning about his crush’s earrings over crunchy chords. The next, he’s spitting bars about staying home. Either way, the intimacy of his songwriting beckons connection. You’ll experience doubt, anxiety, infatuation, and even love right next to him. His story kicked into high gear back in 2017. Following the Soundcloud success of “Cocaine Babe” and “Girl In New York,” he earned the respect of late idol Mac Miller and Benny Blanco. Trading Maine for California, he made waves with the oh, how perfect EP in 2019, generating tens of millions of streams on “hello,” “notice me” [feat. BENEE], and “that’s just how it goes.” A year later, his momentum only increased with the follow-up our little angel EP. The single “blind” eclipsed 40 million Spotify streams, while coup de main hailed it as “must-listen.” The Line of Best Fit praised his “songs with tenderness and Gen Z apathy.” After gathering nearly 200 million streams and receiving acclaim from HYPEBEAST, DIY, Earmilk, and many more, he illuminates every side of himself on newest single “forever&more” with more music to come.

To Buy or Stream “forever&more”:

Retail

Amazon

Apple Music

Deezer

iTunes

Pandora

Soundcloud

Spotify

Tidal

YouTube Music

Follow Role Model:

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RV camper illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 MAGAZINE

2021 Is The Summer of Road Trips

Make this the Summer of the road trip! What to see and where to stay.

This summer is all about making up for the lost vacations from the last year, and what better way to see it all (and make up for lost time) than a road trip to our country’s beautiful state and national parks! Pack up the car or, better yet, try out the popular RV lifestyle by renting an RV from peer-to-peer rental platform Outdoorsy.

As always, pinpointing where to go can be the hardest part but we’re here to help. We’re sharing some of the most scenic views across the country and where to stay when taking in all this beautiful country has to offer.

Arizona: Red Rock State Park

If you’re visiting the Sedona area, Red Rock State Park provides some of the most breathtaking scenery you may ever see. Simply strolling through this rugged valley with its startling sandstone formations is a sight for the eyes, but if you choose to visit the Chapel of the Holy Cross, you’ll add to the magnificent spectacle. Built into the buttes of the Red Rocks, the Chapel of the Holy Cross is considered an architectural wonder. Spend the night at the Verde Valley RV Campground in Cottonwood just a 30-minute drive from Red Rock State Park. Bring your RV or stay in one of their adorable tiny houses or cabin rentals.

California: Yosemite National Park

Any way you slice it, Yosemite National Park is one of the most scenic spots on Earth. To get a spectacular view of the Park’s highlights, including Half Dome and Yosemite Falls, take in the scenery from Glacier Point. With a commanding elevation of 7,214 feet, this popular overlook is a great way to see all the beauty of the Yosemite Valley. You can set up your home base at Yosemite Lakes RV Campground only five miles from the west entrance of the national park. Park your RV in a full hookup site or stay in one of their cozy riverside yurts.

Maine: Acadia National Park

Thunder Hole in Acadia National Park is named due to the thundering sound that occurs when the waves of the Atlantic roll into the cavern on this inlet at Acadia. The water can splash as high as 40 feet! Thunder Hole also offers fabulous views of Otter Cliff and the Great Head from the safety of an observation deck. A seaside RV site or a colorful cottage at Narrows Too RV Campground in Trenton is the perfect place to stay for a visit to Acadia and offers amazing views of the Mt. Desert Narrows Island.

New Hampshire: Odiorne State Park

Pick your favorite vista when you visit Odiorne State Park, in Rye. There are beautiful views of the woodlands, the rocky coastline and the Atlantic Ocean. On a clear day you can see the Isles of Shoals, a small group of six islands located about six miles off the coast. In addition to the views, there is also the Seacoast Science Center and the remains of Fort Dearborn, established during World War II to help protect the Portsmouth Harbor. Tuxbury RV Campground is a little over 30 minutes from Rye and is the perfect hideaway. Enjoy the beautiful swimming pool, kayak on the pond and then retreat to your RV or one of their cozy tiny house vacation rentals.

Pennsylvania: Tucquan Glen Nature Preserve

One of the most scenic spots in Lancaster County is Tucquan Glen Nature Preserve. Lake and river views, as well as streams, creeks, and waterfalls are just a few of the scenic details here.  The rugged terrain of the woodlands provides possible glimpses of the preserve’s wildlife inhabitants, including coyotes, fox, and deer. Several well-marked trails lead the way as you explore the amazing scenery. A little over 20 minutes from the Preserve, visit Circle M RV Campground which offers both RV sites and yurt rentals, the perfect way to enhance this once in a lifetime vacation.

Washington: Kerry Park

Kerry Park, in Seattle, is the perfect spot to grab a panoramic view of the Emerald City. If you’ve seen such a shot in a magazine or movie, it was most likely taken from Kerry Park. There are so many pluses to visiting this location. Not only is the view of the city skyline spectacular, two bonus views include Mt. Rainier and Elliot Bay. Also, the charming neighborhood of Queen Anne provides views of 19th century homes in Upper Queen Anne, and another one of Seattle’s best locations for amazing views, the Space Needle, in Lower Queen Anne. Seattle is a perfect day trip when you stay at the Leavenworth RV Campground. Park your RV, pitch a tent or rent a cabin or cottage.

Transgender Sports illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam facilitators publish open letter condemning anti-transgender legislation

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam, a group of NCAA- trained facilitators at colleges across the country published an open letter condemning the actions taken by 28 states across the country to introduce, pass, and sign anti-transgender legislation. 2021 has been a record year for anti-transgender legislation, with 93 anti-transgender bills introduced across the country, the vast majority of which attempt to ban transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports or ban transgender youth from accessing medically necessary, gender-affirming health care.

Laws have been signed banning transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas, with Executive Orders being signed to the same effect in South Dakota.  Legislators across the country have failed to provide examples of issues in their states to attempt to justify these attacks, laying bare the reality that these are attacks on transgender youth that are fueled by discrimination and not supported by fact.  Collegiate and professional sports organizations have had trans-inclusive policies for years without incident, and there is no reason any state would need a ban on transgender participation in sports.

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam open letter reads as follows:

An Open Letter in Support of Transgender Student-Athletes

We, the undersigned, are facilitators of the National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (NCAA)Division III LGBTQ OneTeam Program, which is a national training program that fosters LGBTQ+ inclusion in NCAA Division III athletics, and members of the NCAA’s Division III LGBTQ Working Group. Given the recent rise in legislation that is focused on excluding transgender people from athletics across the country, we have decided to use our collective voice to condemn such actions. We call on elected officials across the country to immediately halt legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport.

In our role with the NCAA’s LGBTQ OneTeam Program, we train coaches, athletics administrators, and student-athletes across the whole of Division III athletics. This program is aimed at helping to understand the importance of LGBTQ inclusion in college athletics, while also identifying strategies and best practices for institutions and conferences to better ensure that all student-athletes–regardless of their sexuality, gender identity, and/or gender expression–can participate in an inclusive and safe athletic climate. We cannot, in good conscience, fail to speak out at this critical moment.

In the past several weeks, actions–which are aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport–have been taken by elected officials inseveral states, including Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia. At the time of this writing, the Governors ofArkansas,Idaho,Mississippi, andTennessee have already signed such dangerous legislation into law. 

Legislation aimed at categorically banning transgender people–and particularly transgender girls and women–from sport is inherently discriminatory. Such legislation is often “informed” by hate and misinformation rather than science, and it is most certainly “informed” byfear instead of fact. Conversely, trans-inclusive policies, such as those established by theNCAA and theInternational Olympic Committee (IOC), are better informed by the current scientific evidence, and this evidence shows that transgender women do not have an inherent competitive advantage over cisgender women.

Furthermore, discriminatory legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender people from sport has a number ofserious consequences for transgender students. Such legislation dehumanizes transgender students, refuses them the opportunity to participate equally and equitably in athletics, undermines their support in educational settings, damages their mental health, and ultimately harms these students, while also contributing to an exclusionary athletic environment and a more hostile school climate for all students.

We immediately call for 1) an end to such legislation in all states and 2) a repeal of such laws in Arkansas, Idaho, Mississippi, and Tennessee. And finally, we also encourage our legislators to better consider theNCAA best practices and importance of an inclusive athletic environment for all student-athletes.

Sincerely,

The Undersigned

Timothy R. Bussey, Ph.D.

Pronouns: they/them

Associate Director, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion | Kenyon College

Kayla Hayes, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Denison University

Kyrstin Krist, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Professor of Kinesiology and Faculty Athletic Representative | Methodist University

Melynda Link, M.B.A.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletic Facilities & Game Day Operations, Dept. of Athletics | Haverford College

Kathleen M. Murray

Pronouns: she/her

President, Office of the President | Whitman College

Jess Duff

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director for Student Athlete Services & Internal Operations Dept. of Athletics | Bates College

Jessica Weiss

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Randolph-Macon College

Jennifer Dubow

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)

Maura Johnston

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Fairleigh Dickinson University

Scott McGuiness

Pronouns: no pronouns

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | Washington & Jefferson College

Danielle Lynch, M.S.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Track and Field/Cross Country Coach Athletic Department | Penn State University – Harrisburg

Melissa Walton

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Associate Athletic Director Athletic Department | Albion College

Amy Reed

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Rochester Institute of Technology

Donna M. Ledwin

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC)

Donnesha Blake, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Diversity and Inclusion Dept. of Student Affairs | Alma College

Tim Wilson

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Track and Field Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Stevens Institute of Technology

Anne Kietzman

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Washington College

Ashley Crossway, D.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education Dept. of Kinesiology | SUNY Cortland

Melissa Brooks

Pronouns: she/her

Head Women’s Basketball Coach Athletic Department | Fairleigh Dickinson University – Florham 

Tiffany Thompson

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Gender and Sexuality Initiatives, Intercultural Center | Swarthmore College

Kirsten Clark

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Director, Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | Clark University

Kate Levin

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Sports Information Director Dept. of Athletics | Ramapo College

Cori Collinsworth

Pronouns: she/her

Head Softball Coach, Athletic Department | Hanover College

Bethany Dannelly

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Athletics, Dept. of Physical Education and Athletics | Washington and Lee University

Jennifer Childress-White, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and University Title IX Coordinator Dept. of Athletics | Pacific Lutheran University

Elise Fitzsimmons, M.S., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Trainer, Dept. of Athletics| SUNY Oswego 

Amanda Walker

Pronouns: she/her

Athletic Program Coordinator Athletics Department | Lake Forest College

Danielle O’Leary

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach Athletics Department | Mount Aloysius College

Crystal Lanning

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Neil Virtue

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Director of Athletics and Head Swimming Coach | Dept. of Athletics, P.E., and Recreation Mills College

Jose’ Rodriguez, M.Ed.

Pronouns: he/him

Chief Diversity Officer, Office of University Diversity Initiatives | Cabrini University

Karen Moberg, M.Ed., L.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Trainer, Athletic Department | Macalester College

Yishka Chin

Pronouns: she/her

Coordinator for Tutoring Services and Trailblazer Program Director, Dept. of Student Success | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Renee Bostic

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics & Wellness Dept. of Athletics & Wellness | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Megan Cullinane

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | University of Massachusetts – Boston

Maureen Harty

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW)

Stephanie Dutton

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC)

Sharia Marcus-Carter

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Director of Compliance, Athletics Department | Brooklyn College

4 Seasons illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Spring In The Town & Country

SPRING IN THE TOWN & COUNTRY AT FOUR SEASONS HOTEL

Spring heralds the start of a new season dedicated to rebirth and new beginnings. In celebration of the Spring Equinox, Four Seasons Hotel One Dalton Street, Boston, debuts the latest experiential seasonal program for guests – Seasons in the Town and Country. This latest offering highlights the very best scenic destinations in Boston and New England through seasonal Insiders’ Guides, curated by the One Dalton Hotel team.

As the first of three seasonal offerings throughout the year, Spring in the Town and Country includes a seasonal welcome amenity on arrival; a personalized picnic for two including a bottle of wine; complimentary overnight valet parking and a curated Spring Insiders’ Guide designed to maximize the fun and enjoyment of exploring some unknown locations in the city and surrounding countryside.

Renowned for being one of the most scenic destinations within the country, New England boasts a stunning Atlantic coastline, rugged mountain ranges, spectacular spring blooms and quaint seaside towns. The city of Boston sits at the heart of New England and acts as the cultural hub within the region. Boston is a charming and extremely walkable city and offers a fascinating window into the nation’s history, making it an ideal base for exploration.

The team at Four Seasons Hotel One Dalton Street, Boston has thoughtfully curated a selection of their favorite destinations in the city of Boston and the surrounding New England area in the Spring Insiders’ Guide. Local natural attractions in Boston, ideal for a picnic, include the variety of parks that constitute the Emerald Necklace and the stunning cherry blossoms in Back Bay. The arrival of the cherry blossoms signals that the long winter is over, and spring has arrived. Most prominent in Back Bay and along the Charles River Esplanade and throughout the Public Garden and Boston Common, the Hotel team recommends a stroll or a bike ride to take in the gorgeous blooms across the city. Specifically, start a self-guided walking tour along Newbury Street or Commonwealth Avenue and head towards the Boston Public Garden for prime bloom-spotting.

Two other city suggestions include landmark locations such as the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the North End. Completed in late 1901 and dedicated to its namesake, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is one of the most wonderfully unique museums in Boston. As a passionate and devoted art connoisseur, Isabella Stewart Gardner personally collected and arranged the works of art in the historic galleries on three floors. Alternatively, if guests are looking for a great locale for history and dining, the Hotel team suggests guests take some time to wander the streets of little Italy in the North End of Boston, home to some of the best Italian restaurants, markets, and pastry shops in the country. For history buffs, guests should not miss The Paul Revere House (circa 1680) and the Old North Church, dating back to 1723.

A little further afield but within an hour’s drive from the Hotel, the Spring Insiders’ Guide features two wonderful destinations in Massachusetts – Hingham, and Essex. World’s End is a 251-acre (100 hectares) park and conservation area located on a peninsula in Hingham that is bordered by the Weir River to the north and east and Hingham Harbor to the west. Alternatively, Essex is a quaint coastal town that once centered on the ship-building industry but is now known as the antique capital and famously claims to have the highest density of antique shops in the United States. Seafood and clams are a particular specialty here and a serving of fried clams for lunch or dinner should not be overlooked.

For guests wanting to escape the city for the ultimate day-trip, the team has suggested Perkins Cove in southern Maine and MASS MoCA in North Adams. Originally a small fishing community and artists’ colony, Perkins Cove is a charming area that consists of local independent shops, restaurants, and scenic outlooks. Hugged by the Atlantic Ocean on one side and a small harbor on the other side, guests can picnic on the rocks while enjoying the crashing surf. If culture is on the agenda, then a visit to MASS MoCA will not disappoint. As one of the world’s liveliest centers for making and enjoying today’s most evocative art, the center features vast galleries and a stunning collection of indoor and outdoor performing arts venues.

Designed by the culinary team at One Dalton and perfectly packaged to enjoy while exploring by bike or foot in the city or by car for those longer distances, the Spring Picnic Menu includes a delicious seasonal selection of salads and sandwiches or wraps, accompanied by a variety of sides. Salad options include farfalle pasta salad, burrata salad, arugula salad and a spring green salad. Sandwich options include a Maine lobster cobb wrap, turkey and Vermont cheddar on a brioche bun, local Massachusetts meats muffuletta, grilled organic chicken breast and crumbled feta with zucchini, red pepper flakes, cucumber and mint on local ciabatta. Every Spring Picnic hamper includes Natalie’s handcrafted lemonade, house-made spiced potato chips and One Dalton’s own pistachio-cherry-chocolate cookies.

Spring in the Town and Country is available for stays through June 20, 2021 with rates starting at just USD 745 per night.

Following Spring in the Town and Country, additional packages will be seasonably available during the summer and fall months to celebrate the Summer Solstice and the Fall Equinox. Both packages will include a dedicated seasonal Insiders’ Guide and Picnic Menu showcasing seasonal ingredients.

College Campus Overnight Experience

Researching and discovering a future university or college is an exciting time for any parent or student. Four Seasons Hotel One Dalton Street, Boston has thoughtfully curated a dedicated College Campus overnight experience, which ensures that the prospective student or alumni and their families are set up for success and well prepared for the days ahead.

Guests who book this overnight experience will receive a college-themed amenity specific to their college of choice, a branded Four Seasons backpack filled with bottled water and snacks for the day, notebook and pen ready for taking notes in an instant, a college-themed postcard with an insider tip by alumni specific to the college of choice, and an overnight stay at the Hotel. As many of the One Dalton team have personally attended local Boston colleges, the Hotel team is also able to offer suggestions and recommendations and give prospective students the inside scoop on college life at any of these prestigious schools.

Reservations for the College Campus Experience can be made online.

Marijuana illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Honest Marijuana Company

In the old days of illegal weed, the price you paid for your weekend toke depended mostly on who was selling it to you. These were behind-the-scenes transactions, with no recourse for a deal gone bad and no way to price compare with a competitor. You paid the price asked or you went without.

Now, as state legalization grows and the chatter about federal legalization becomes less talk and more reality, the game has changed forever for the buyer. So, it’s a good time to be clear on what you’re paying for before you go to your local cannabis boutique, or even the corner store, if you should be so lucky to have marijuana available for sale there!

First off, price comparing starts with quantity

If you want to look at what your weed is going to cost you, and even compare different strains, it’s best to pick a quantity. From state to state, the price of quantity X will vary, based on factors we’ll discuss later, but for now, it’s important to understand what quantities you can order in. 

The most common quantities you can buy cannabis in are a gram, eighth of an ounce, quarter of an ounce, half an ounce, and a full ounce. Notice how the common quantities mix metric and Imperial measuring units? A gram is 1/1000th of a kilogram and an ounce is 1/16th of a pound. Typically, you’ll find that dispensaries will use ounces for larger quantities, and grams for a smaller purchase.

What does a gram look like? It’s about the size of a bottle cap, which gives you a visual point of reference to figure out what you’re getting for what price. The average joint is about 0.7 grams of weed so a gram will give you about 1.5 joints. Here are the other measurements, to give you a rough idea of what you’re getting:

  • An eighth of an ounce (which is roughly 3.5 grams) will give you just about 5 joints.
  • A quarter of an ounce (7 grams) will net about 10 joints.
  • A half an ounce (14 grams) will give you about 20 joints.
  • A full ounce (28 grams) is just about equal to 40 joints.

From Alaska to West Virginia, that price per ounce of medium quality weed can run anywhere from $6 to $12.

Quality is the next factor

If you look at average prices of weed across the country, they’re pretty stable and typically refer to medium quality cannabis. When you want to compare a gram of cannabis from one shop to another, a major increase in price could be because of the quality of the product. 

For example, an organic and locally indoor grown variety might be more expensive than a mass produced, imported one. You really do have to compare apples to apples, if you want to be sure you’re getting the right picture.

Other factors that will influence the price of weed

Your state’s legal stance toward cannabis

If you live in a state where cannabis isn’t legal in any form, obviously you’re still operating in the old ways of quiet deals made with people who don’t really care to negotiate the prices they feel like charging. After all, they risk going to jail for providing you with your ‘chill’ so there’s a premium attached to that.

In the states that have legalized recreational marijuana (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), you’ll find competition higher and prices that reflect that.

The remaining twenty-one states that have legalized medical marijuana require a doctor’s note to obtain it, which isn’t a particularly challenging hurdle in most places, so this doesn’t affect the prices too significantly.

One place where cannabis is particularly expensive? Washington D.C. Despite legalization of medical and recreational use, they didn’t legalize the purchase of cannabis. That little detail is reflected in prices that are almost twice the national average for legalized / decriminalized states!

The physical geography of where you live

Cannabis isn’t an overly fussy plant to cultivate but it does prefer warm, stable temperatures, averaging in the daytime around 80 degrees. Places that have daytime temperatures that run hotter than 88 degrees or colder than 60 degrees have a harder time growing—it’s a slower process—and can end up with plants that have lower THC content and therefore lower overall quality.

So, if you live in Alaska or New Hampshire, for example, your weed has most likely been brought in from elsewhere, which means added costs in transportation and labor, to package and ship.

How your weed is grown

How your preferred brand is grown makes a difference on quality. 

  • Are they grown outdoors where light, water, soil, and ambient daytime temperatures are all free for the asking and therefore don’t add to the cost of production? 
  • Are they grown indoors, where special electrical lighting, watering and feed systems, and climate control are all required and add to the cost of production? 

Outdoor grown weed can be lower quality in that there aren’t many ways to control Mother Nature. Being able to control elements through technology can yield a higher quality product. From pest and humidity control to very specific watering schedules, as well as the use of light waves to maximize growth and intensity, indoor growers have the keys to control quality in ways that outdoor growers really cannot.

Factor in also whether the grower is using organic production methods, as this will definitely yield a higher quality product. No toxins from pesticides means a cleaner experience for you.

Where you buy your marijuana

Are you buying from a boutique dispensary or a corner store? Are you buying from a chain of cannabis stores or from a one-man dealer? Which way you go will affect the price you pay.

Dispensaries have overhead and staff to pay, which adds to the cost. However, they also have guidelines to follow in terms of packaging and labeling, as well as a vested interest in pleasing their customer, so they’re a good bet. You will know exactly what you’re getting, including the sourcing, THC content, whether it’s organic or not and so on. If you buy from a dealer, who is claiming to sell high quality products, you have no guarantees whatsoever that they are telling the truth.

Competitors drive the price down

Supply and demand is an easy equation. If there are several dispensaries with similar offerings in your area, the price per gram will be lower than in an area with no competition for your one dispensary. There is less supply for potentially similar demand, which can easily affect the price. The key as a consumer is to know your average pricing so you can tell whether or not you are getting a good deal.

Taxation and legalization go hand in hand

The states that have legalized marijuana have also clued in that it is an important revenue source. Sales tax, if the state has one, is applied to cannabis too. The rate can be higher for weed than for other products, as it is in Colorado. They have a state sales tax rate of 2.9% but the rate for weed? 10%.

In addition to sales tax, legal sellers are faced with taxes in production, purchasing, packing and transportation, costs that are typically downloaded to the end consumer.

The timing of your purchases

Time of year can impact the price of weed. Like most cultivated crops, the largest amounts are harvested in and around the month of September. Result? The supply is up, and prices should go down a little. 

As legalization continues to expand, state to state and even federally, the pricing will become more standard and easier to predict. At that point, the quality of the weed will be the big differentiator and as the end consumer, that’s not a small factor to consider. Buy with care and enjoy yourself!

Bio:

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all-natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

Agriculture illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

USDA Announces Investment

USDA Announces $218 Million Investment in Land and Water Conservation

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the USDA Forest Service will invest more than $218 million to fund Great American Outdoors Act projects to conserve critical forest and wetland habitat, support rural economic recovery, and increase public access to national forests and grasslands.

Leveraging the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) provided by Congress, this investment will improve public access by funding strategic land acquisitions. Funds will also support work with state agencies to encourage private forest landowners to protect their land through conservation easements or land purchases.

“These investments reflect President Biden’s commitment to supporting locally-led conservation efforts from coast to coast and to honoring and building on the proud private land stewardship traditions of farmers, ranchers, and forest owners,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “The investments will not only protect our natural heritage, but they will also create jobs, expand access to the outdoors, and help tackle climate change.”

The Forest Service administers two LWCF programs: The Forest Legacy Program and the Land Acquisition program. Together, these programs conserve critical and strategic lands across the nation’s forests on both private and public lands. The Forest Service will invest more than $94 million to fund 28 projects under the Forest Legacy Program and $123 million to fund Land Acquisition Program projects, including projects for recreation access and other needs.

Land Acquisition Program highlights include:

  • $6.4 million in FY 2021 to acquire 8,590 acres for the Lolo Trails Project in Montana. This project aims to mitigate the effects of climate change by providing the cold water that federally listed bull trout and other species need to sustain healthy populations in a warming climate.
  • $3.7 million to acquire 1,550 acres in the Yakima River Basin for the Washington Cascades Project. Supported by a wide coalition of public, private and non-profit partners, this project seeks to ensure a long-term water supply in the face of climate change.

Forest Legacy Program highlights include:

  • Protecting 12,500 acres of habitat, water and timber on the Ceylon Forest in Georgia. 2.5 million people depend on the Ceylon for drinking water that flows from and through the forest. As a working forest, the Ceylon supports a local wood-based economy that includes 121 mills, with a $1.69 million payroll impact. Once completed, the area will also become part of a much larger Wildlife Management Area and serve as an ideal hunting and fishing destination for sportsmen across the Southeast.
  • The East Grand-Weston in Maine builds on a century-old tradition of sustainable forestry and expands recreation opportunities over more than 4,300 acres. The property supports a thriving local recreation industry by protecting lands, waters and trails while also providing sustainable wood products to up to 15 mills. The property will remain in private hands while continuing to be managed for public benefits.
  • The second phase of the Kootenai Forestlands Conservation Project will permanently protect nearly 28,000 acres of land in northwest Montana. The project area belongs to the Stimson Lumber Company and contributes to the local economy while allowing free public access as a recreation destination for hunting, fishing, skiing, hiking, snowmobiling and more. The project will also protect the area from further residential development, reducing future firefighting costs by more than half.

Background

The Forest Service has been administering LWCF projects since 1964 along with the Department of the Interior. The fund supports Forest Service-led conservation projects including acquisition of critical non-federal lands within the boundaries of national forests and grasslands. Now, with full and permanent funding through the Dingell Act and the Great American Outdoors Act, the Forest Service is poised to strengthen its conservation program and provide greater recreation access to national forests and grasslands.

The agency worked with partners, considered multiple criteria and used established competitive processes to select projects for fiscal year 2021. During the review, the agency evaluated the environmental, social, and economic benefits of proposed projects and whether they contributed to other conservation initiatives. The Forest Service also considered local recreation access needs, the level of local support for strategic land acquisitions and how likely it would be for project areas to be converted to non-forest uses.

For more information on the Great American Outdoors Act and related projects, visit the website.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration under Secretary Vilsack, USDA is committed to transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate-smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit USDA.

The Greeting Committee

“This band needs to be on your radar.” – Idolator

The Greeting Committee share a new song, “You’ve Got Me”

LISTEN HERE.

This is the newest teaser from the critically acclaimed Kansas City quartet’s upcoming debut album. They recently shared their single “17”.

Idolator wrote, “The Greeting Committee exudes youthful abandon on [their] shimmery new single.”

Stay tuned for more details soon.

Kicking off September 6 in Indianapolis, the band will join Jukebox The Ghost for upcoming North American tour dates. Amidst that run, they will also perform at WEQX PearlPalooza in Albany, NY on 9/15 alongside White Reaper, Superorganism, and KITTEN.

Full routing can be found below.

With their recent U.S. run, their energetic live show captured the attention of audiences across the country. After their Pittsburgh set, AXS wrote that The Greeting Committee “quickly won over the crowd with their energy and catchy songs.” Twin Cities Media praised, “If every band had the amount of energy that Addie had last night I would never have a complaint about a live show there’s no denying the power behind The Greeting Committee’s live shows”, while Music In Minnesota agreed, “The Greeting Committee put on one of the best performances from an opening act Iߣve ever seen in my life.”

Between high school classes in their native Kansas City, The Greeting Committee quietly stirred up a following with their 2015 debut EP It’s Not All That Bad, which caught the attention of Lazlo Geiger, a radio personality from 96.5 The Buzz. The lead single “Hands Down” impressively generated 10 million-plus streams as the band went on touring with the likes of MisterWives, Tennis, The Mowgli’s, Saint Motel, and Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, as well as making a splash at Lollapalooza and SXSW. “17” is their first new release since their 2017 sophomore EP Meeting People Is Easy.

Photo credit: EILZABETH MIRANDA

The Greeting Committee are: Addie Sartino (vocals), Brandon Yangmi (guitar), Pierce Turcotte (bass), and Austin Fraser (drums).

THE GREETING COMMITTEE TOUR DATES WITH JUKEBOX THE GHOST:

9/6 • Indianapolis, IN @ HiFi

9/7 • Cincinnati, OH @ Taft Theatre

9/10 • Nashville, TN @ The Basement East

9/11 • Charlotte, NC @ Neighborhood Theatre

9/13 • Richmond, VA @ The Broadberry

9/14 • Baltimore, MD @ Rama Head Live

9/15 • Albany, NY @ WEQX PearlPalooza*

9/17 • Toronto, ON @ Horseshow Tavern

9/19 • Syracuse, NY @ The Lost Horizon

9/20 • Pawtucket, RI @ The Met

9/21 • Holyoke, MA @ Gateway Arts

9/22 • Portland, ME @ Port City Music Hall

* not a Jukebox The Ghost date with White Reaper, Superorganism and KITTEN

New Medicare Cards

Next week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will be automatically mailing new Medicare cards to more than 3.5 million people with Medicare in New York State.

People with Medicare in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Vermont will also be receiving their new card. People with Medicare in these states and New York, should receive their new card by the end of August and can begin using it right away.

Key features of the new card and rollout process:

  • Social Security Numbers have been replaced with new unique identifying numbers.
  • Social Security numbers are no longer on the new Medicare, helping protect people with Medicare from identity theft and CMS fight fraud.
  • The new Medicare card is free. Avoid scammers by knowing that CMS will not call people with Medicare asking for any personal information, your Social Security Number, bank information, or to pay for the new Medicare card.
  • People with Medicare can sign up for email notifications on when the new cards will be mailed to their area by going towww.medicare.gov/newcard.
  • There are no changes to Medicare benefits. Once you receive your New Medicare card, you should destroy your old Medicare card by shredding or cutting it up with scissors.

You can also access new Medicare card fact sheets, graphics, b-roll, images and other resources here.