Posts tagged with "climate"

image by Sara Davidson for use by 360 Magazine

Can’t Wait Live: A Concert For Jobs, Climate and Care

On Friday, August 13, 2021 DaBaby, Saweetie and Wyclef Jean will perform at Can’t Wait Live: A Concert for Jobs, Climate and Care with additional performances by Mavis Staples, Snow Tha Product and Beach Bunny in Philadelphia at the Mann.

 

The artists and organizers of the conference will call on Congress to pass a legislative package that makes meaningful investments in jobs, climate, care, housing, and immigration, and demand members of Congress stay in session until the package is passed.

 

Throughout the concert, artists, activists and other speakers will uplift a core message: Americans can’t wait for our communities to have a rightful path to recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Coming off a year of historic suffering, speakers will highlight the urgency of the intersecting crises Americans face, including climate disasters and unemployment, and remind Democrats in Congress that voters expect them to deliver on their commitments to bold, popular policies that will tackle decades of disinvestment and improve the post-pandemic lives of working people.

 

The concert will be livestreamed on via the Working Families YouTube and Facebook pages. DJ sets by Philly legend DJ Jazzy Jeff and Philly star DJ Diamond Kuts and appearances by political figures and activists.

 

The concert is organized and sponsored by the Working Families Party, MoveOn, National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Green New Deal Network, Patriotic Millionaires and more. The coalition includes local Philadelphia organizations such as PA Working Families Party, 215 People’s Alliance, Unite Here Local 274, Abolitionist Law Center & Straight Ahead, Union of Musicians and Allied Workers – Philadelphia Chapter.

Get tickets here:  VIA EVENTBRITE HERE

Johnny Yukon Flight Plan album cover via Sarah Goldstein for use by 360 Magazine

Johnny Yukon – Mystery

Johnny Yukon returns to the scene with a new single, Mystery.

Singer, songwriter, and producer Johnny Yukon has returned with new track Mystery, the first single off his Elektra Records debut project, Flight Plan 001. In anticipation of the project, Yukon also shared an official trailer, previewing new music as the artist explores a Yukon-branded futuristic airport. Flight Plan 001 arrives August 20th and Mystery is available now on all streaming platforms.

Doubling as an offshoot of his Installation concept, Flight Plan 001 speaks both to Yukon’s lifelong fascination with aviation and opens a different channel for his endless creativity. Following fan demand for proper release, Flight Plan 001 integrates previously released Soundcloud favoritesGrow, 81 Nights, Climate, Yes, and Night Like Thisinto the tracklisting alongside seven new tracks.

Johnny adds, “This project is like my airport. Last year, I went through a lot of relationship issues. Sitting in one place isn’t ever good for me mentally or creatively. I need to escape. So, I’m escaping isolation with these tunes. Every song is like a plane, and there’s a flight for everyone.”

TRACKLIST

  1. FP001
  2. Night Like This
  3. Mystery
  4. Uptown
  5. Soon
  6. Can’t Stop
  7. Alibi
  8. Yes
  9. Climate
  10. Nights
  11. Don’t Blame Me
  12. Grow

ABOUT JOHNNY YUKON

Much like the recordings of an airplane’s black box, the music of Johnny Yukon chronicles a cloud-scraping personal journey. Spun through a jet stream of lo-fi beatcraft, vintage world-building, hip-hop malleability, and alternative pop eloquence, the Pennsylvania-born and Los Angeles-based singer, songwriter, and producer navigates through raw emotions with acute storytelling, head-nodding rhymes, and fits of cathartic falsetto. Even though the ideas often gestate from an intimate personal studio, he projects his vision on the big screen with ambitious scope. After making waves from behind the scenes with songwriting placements for Young Thug, Ty Dolla $ign, Camila Cabello, and Leon Bridges, he made his formal artist debut with Installation I in 2018. Johnny’s influence only amplified throughout the global pandemic, co-writing Internet Money’s multi-platinum mega-smash Lemonade [feat. Gunna, Don Toliver, & NAV], Skepta & Pop Smoke’s F9 soundtrack standout Lane Switcha [feat. A$AP Rocky, Juicy J, & Project Pat], and co-producing Trauma from PARTYNEXTDOOR’s Partymobile, which bowed in the Top 10 of the Billboard Top 200. Signing to Elektra in early 2021, Johnny continued to write and record at a prolific pace, distilling post-breakup feelings, isolation, and hope into the sonic architecture. Constructing a hub where his emotions and songs may launch from, Johnny Yukon charts a new course forward on his 2021 project, Flight Plan 001.

Hurricane symbol illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Are Hurricanes Getting Worse?

Are Hurricanes Really Getting Worse?

Author and climate scientist Bill Pekny says while recent severe storms may lead us to believe the answer is yes, the data doesn’t back this up. He explains why the way we track and measure hurricanes is so misleading.

As we approach the start of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season (June 1–November 30), there is a lot of fear that these types of storms are getting more frequent and more severe. Many folks believe that warming oceans will mean more energy for these storms to absorb, which will translate to stronger and more destructive hurricanes when they make landfall.  

While this might make sense in theory, climate science is much more complicated in practice. Bill Pekny, author of A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary (Two Climates LLC, 2020, ISBN: 978-1-73493-960-6, $34.59) says that the relationship between storms and temperature is not that simple. Plus, he says, other things have changed that create the impression that hurricanes have gotten worse.

“One of the biggest changes is the level of property damage caused by hurricanes,” notes Pekny. “But that’s because development has dramatically increased in tropical areas. When you measure the severity of hurricanes in financial terms, and you’re building more and more expensive structures, it makes sense that property damage dollars will go up.”

Pekny has studied hurricanes for a long time.

 “My interest in severe storms began as a kid, continued as a graduate student in Meteorology at the Florida State University, and then flourished as a radar meteorologist in my first job with the U.S. Navy Weather Research Facility, during the 1969 hurricane season,” says Pekny. 

What’s changed in 75 years? Not the storms, but the monitoring technology.

Tropical cyclones go by different names in different parts of the world. In the North Atlantic, Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and Eastern Pacific they are called hurricanes. In the Western Pacific region, they are typhoons, and in the Indian Ocean region, they are simply cyclones.

After watching and tracking these types of storms in various roles for more than 50 years, Pekny says that they haven’t changed much.

“With respect to the storms themselves, nothing has changed,” he says. “What has changed, however, is our satellite and radar technology, and consequently our ability to track and measure these storms globally.”

Prior to 1945, visual observation of tropical cyclones was spotty at best. Ships at sea and observers on land were the only ways to track tropical cyclones. And the handful of ships at sea provided the only way to be warned before these big storms made landfall. 

Since then, airborne observation by Navy, Air Force and NOAA Hurricane Hunters have dramatically improved position tracking and warning of these storms and hinted at their severity.

What we’ve learned by watching storms for almost 50 years.

The most significant improvement in tracking and warning arose from the deployment of geo-stationary weather satellites during the 1970s and 1980s. In parallel, the development and deployment of long-range and pulsed Doppler RADAR instrumentation enabled the measurement of tropical cyclone severity as well as further enhanced tracking capabilities. 

“Even though there are ups and downs from time to time and region to region, when you add up all of the trends, the net change in global tropical cyclone frequency from 1970 to 2020 is zero,” says Pekny.

Improved global scale monitoring and data collection over the last half century shows that the climatic trend in tropical cyclone frequency is flat. And, the severity of these giant storms has not increased either. In fact, the severity, or amount of energy the storm carries, has been trending downward since reliable data became available. 

So why does it seem like storms are causing more damage?

While Pekny says these storms are not getting worse, as mentioned earlier he recognizes that they have gotten more expensive. This is not a result of more powerful storms, however, but because we continue to build more and more high-dollar homes, hotels, and resorts in high-risk coastal areas. When hurricanes do make landfall, they naturally create more property damage with higher price tags.

“In other words, the real culprit is more development, not more hurricanes,” Pekny states. “People just conflate these two issues.”

“Where and how we build is the ‘human’ factor that determines the cost to life and property,” he adds. “We can’t control the storms, but what we can do is have productive conversations about how to prepare for them.” 

About the Author:

Bill Pekny is the author of A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary. He holds physics M.S. and B.S. degrees from Georgia Tech and DePaul University, plus graduate study in physical meteorology and numerical analysis at Florida State University and the University of Utah, and a visiting scholar appointment at the Ginzton Laboratory of Applied Physics at Stanford University.

Bill’s career in science spans over 50 years in the U.S. Armed Forces and the aerospace industry.

His career highlights include: Project Stormfury with the U.S. Navy Hurricane Hunters; applied atmospheric physics and meteorology research; LASER RADAR development; new product testing in various atmospheric environments; aviation optics and electronics; global climate research; and more.

For more information, please visit this website.

About the Book:

A Tale of Two Climates: One Real, One Imaginary (Two Climates LLC, 2020, ISBN: 978-1-73493-960-6, $34.59) is available from major online booksellers.

Agriculture illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

USDA Announces Investment

USDA Announces $218 Million Investment in Land and Water Conservation

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the USDA Forest Service will invest more than $218 million to fund Great American Outdoors Act projects to conserve critical forest and wetland habitat, support rural economic recovery, and increase public access to national forests and grasslands.

Leveraging the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) provided by Congress, this investment will improve public access by funding strategic land acquisitions. Funds will also support work with state agencies to encourage private forest landowners to protect their land through conservation easements or land purchases.

“These investments reflect President Biden’s commitment to supporting locally-led conservation efforts from coast to coast and to honoring and building on the proud private land stewardship traditions of farmers, ranchers, and forest owners,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “The investments will not only protect our natural heritage, but they will also create jobs, expand access to the outdoors, and help tackle climate change.”

The Forest Service administers two LWCF programs: The Forest Legacy Program and the Land Acquisition program. Together, these programs conserve critical and strategic lands across the nation’s forests on both private and public lands. The Forest Service will invest more than $94 million to fund 28 projects under the Forest Legacy Program and $123 million to fund Land Acquisition Program projects, including projects for recreation access and other needs.

Land Acquisition Program highlights include:

  • $6.4 million in FY 2021 to acquire 8,590 acres for the Lolo Trails Project in Montana. This project aims to mitigate the effects of climate change by providing the cold water that federally listed bull trout and other species need to sustain healthy populations in a warming climate.
  • $3.7 million to acquire 1,550 acres in the Yakima River Basin for the Washington Cascades Project. Supported by a wide coalition of public, private and non-profit partners, this project seeks to ensure a long-term water supply in the face of climate change.

Forest Legacy Program highlights include:

  • Protecting 12,500 acres of habitat, water and timber on the Ceylon Forest in Georgia. 2.5 million people depend on the Ceylon for drinking water that flows from and through the forest. As a working forest, the Ceylon supports a local wood-based economy that includes 121 mills, with a $1.69 million payroll impact. Once completed, the area will also become part of a much larger Wildlife Management Area and serve as an ideal hunting and fishing destination for sportsmen across the Southeast.
  • The East Grand-Weston in Maine builds on a century-old tradition of sustainable forestry and expands recreation opportunities over more than 4,300 acres. The property supports a thriving local recreation industry by protecting lands, waters and trails while also providing sustainable wood products to up to 15 mills. The property will remain in private hands while continuing to be managed for public benefits.
  • The second phase of the Kootenai Forestlands Conservation Project will permanently protect nearly 28,000 acres of land in northwest Montana. The project area belongs to the Stimson Lumber Company and contributes to the local economy while allowing free public access as a recreation destination for hunting, fishing, skiing, hiking, snowmobiling and more. The project will also protect the area from further residential development, reducing future firefighting costs by more than half.

Background

The Forest Service has been administering LWCF projects since 1964 along with the Department of the Interior. The fund supports Forest Service-led conservation projects including acquisition of critical non-federal lands within the boundaries of national forests and grasslands. Now, with full and permanent funding through the Dingell Act and the Great American Outdoors Act, the Forest Service is poised to strengthen its conservation program and provide greater recreation access to national forests and grasslands.

The agency worked with partners, considered multiple criteria and used established competitive processes to select projects for fiscal year 2021. During the review, the agency evaluated the environmental, social, and economic benefits of proposed projects and whether they contributed to other conservation initiatives. The Forest Service also considered local recreation access needs, the level of local support for strategic land acquisitions and how likely it would be for project areas to be converted to non-forest uses.

For more information on the Great American Outdoors Act and related projects, visit the website.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration under Secretary Vilsack, USDA is committed to transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate-smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit USDA.

Mosquito illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mosquito Season

How to Prepare for Mosquito Season

Mosquito season is right around the corner. If you happen to live in warmer regions of the country, you might already be seeing some mosquito activity around your home. Even if it will be a couple of months until the warm weather reaches your part of the country, it is very important to prepare for mosquito season early.

Here is why you should begin to prepare for mosquito season early and some ways to do that:

Why should I prepare for mosquito season early?

  • Mosquitoes may already be in your yard: While they seem to disappear in the colder months of the year, some mosquitoes can in fact survive the winter. How? Through a process called overwintering. Overwintering is when female mosquitoes lay their eggs before winter, and the eggs survive and eventually hatch when temperatures rise again.
  • Being prepared means avoiding unnecessary hassle: Why wait until your yard is filled with mosquitoes to do something about them? By preparing early, you can lessen the stress of mosquito season and focus on enjoying your outdoor space.

How should I prepare for mosquito season?

There are a number of ways you can get ready for the beginning of mosquito season and help prevent bites around your home. Below are a few:

  • Hire your local mosquito control company: The best way to beat mosquitoes is to enlist the help of a professional. Our specialists at Mosquito Authority are committed to doing everything possible to ensure your home and yard are mosquito-free zones. Our treatments are even designed to break up the 21-day lifecycle of mosquitoes, which means you won’t be bothered in between treatments.
  • Be aware of the best mosquito repellents and how to use them: Although your home will be mosquito-free after your Mosquito Authority treatments, other outdoor areas might not be. If you are planning on hiking, going to the park, or participating in any other outdoor activities in the spring and summer, make sure to apply insect repellent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend using products that contain DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or other EPA-registered products.
  • Make sure your yard isn’t a breeding ground for mosquitoes: Mosquitoes need water to lay eggs, which is why any areas of standing water make for popular mosquito breeding grounds. As the snow begins to melt (or you start to experience more rainfall), standing water will start building up around your yard. A big part of DIY mosquito control is getting rid of standing water near your home; this includes tipping over items like trash can lids, tire swings, and children’s toys to empty the water out.

Joe Malinowski is the director of pest management for Mosquito Authority and Pest Authority. He has worked on the operational and corporate side of top companies in the pest control industry. Malinowski served as vice president of technical services at Orkin and vice president of sales for B&G Equipment Company. He also helped launch new and innovative products in the industry for ForeFront Product Design and SenesTech. Operational roles at the branch, regional, and divisional levels have given him an understanding of profit and loss, customer and employee retention, correct product and equipment selection, and precise training to ensure exceptional service.

How Conspiracists Dominate YouTube Climate Content

The geoengineering of consent: how conspiracists dominate YouTube climate content

Most YouTube videos relating to climate change prevention oppose scientific consensus and hijack technical terms to appear credible, says study using YouTube to learn about climate science will expose you to video content that mostly opposes worldwide scientific consensus.

That’s the finding of a new study published in Frontiers in Communication, which also reveals that some scientific terms, such as geoengineering, have been ‘hijacked’ by conspiracy theorists so that searches provide entirely non-scientific video content. Scientists could counteract this by forming alliances with influential YouTubers, politicians and those in popular culture, to ensure scientifically accurate video content reaches the widest-possible audience.

“Searching YouTube for climate-science and climate-engineering-related terms finds fewer than half of the videos represent mainstream scientific views,” says study author Dr. Joachim Allgaier, Senior Researcher at the RWTH Aachen University. “It’s alarming to find that the majority of videos propagate conspiracy theories about climate science and technology.”

Nearly 2 billion logged-in users – half the world online – visit YouTube every month, and research has shown that users see it as a platform for learning about science, health and technology.

Climate conspiracists

Allgaier wanted to know if the information YouTube users found, when searching for scientific information on climate change and climate modification, represented scientifically accurate views.

“So far, research has focused on the most-watched videos, checking their scientific accuracy, but this doesn’t tell us what an average internet user will find, as the results are influenced by previous search and watch histories,” reports Allgaier. “To combat this, I used the anonymization tool TOR to avoid personalization of the results.”

Employing ten climate change-related search terms, Allgaier analyzed 200 videos about climate change and climate modification topics. He found that the majority of these videos opposed the worldwide scientific consensus, as detailed by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Most videos propagated the so-called “chemtrails” conspiracy theory, which is a belief that the condensation trails of airplanes are purposefully enriched with harmful substances to modify the weather, control human populations, or for biological or chemical warfare. Scientists have clearly shown there is no evidence for such a large-scale secret atmospheric spraying program.

Geoengineering has been hijacked

Alarmingly, Allgaier found that the conspiracy theorists have ‘hijacked’ some relatively recent scientific terms by using them to describe their worldview of a global conspiracy. In fact, ‘chemtrailers’, as they are known, explicitly advise their followers to use scientific terms in their content, so that they are not immediately identified as conspiracy theorists.

“Within the scientific community, ‘geoengineering’ describes technology with the potential to deal with the serious consequences of climate change, if we don’t manage to reduce greenhouse gases successfully. For example, greenhouse gas removal, solar radiation management or massive forestation to absorb carbon dioxide,” explains Allgaier. “However, people searching for ‘geoengineering’ or ‘climate modification’ on YouTube won’t find any information on these topics in the way they are discussed by scientists and engineers. Instead, searching for these terms results in videos that leave users exposed to entirely non-scientific video content.”

Allgaier also questions YouTube search algorithms – does its business model direct traffic towards videos of dubious scientific content? He found some of the conspiracy videos being monetized by the users via adverts or the sale of merchandise with conspiracy-theory motives.

“The way YouTube search algorithms work is not very transparent. We should be aware this powerful artificial intelligence is already making decisions for us, for example, if you choose to use ‘auto-play’. I think YouTube should take responsibility to ensure its users will find high-quality information if they search for scientific and biomedical terms, instead of being exposed to doubtful conspiracy videos,” argues Allgaier.

Scientists and YouTubers unite!

To counter the non-scientific content on YouTube, Allgaier, who recently spoke at the World Conference of Science Journalists about his work, suggests scientists and science communicators should take YouTube seriously as a platform for sharing scientific information.

“YouTube has an enormous reach as an information channel, and some of the popular science YouTubers are doing an excellent job at communicating complex subjects and reaching new audiences. Scientists could form alliances with science-communicators, politicians and those in popular culture in order to reach out to the widest-possible audience. They should speak out publicly about their research and be transparent in order to keep established trustful relationships with citizens and society.”

Abu Dhabi x World Ocean Summit 2019

Government of Abu Dhabi Announced as Host of World Ocean Summit 2019.

This year’s World Ocean Summit, held in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, has brought together over 500 leaders from the private sector, civil society and government to explore the development of a sustainable ocean economy through innovative financing and technologies as well as bold new efforts to implement the world’s sustainability commitments. It is the largest World Ocean Summit yet, and underscores The Economist Group’s doubling down on this topic, in no small part through announcing the launch of the World Ocean Initiative, an effort that will translate the momentum and focus of the World Ocean Summit into a year-round programme on the ocean that leverages the full capabilities of The Economist Group.

Carrying this momentum forward, The Economist Group is pleased to announce the Government of Abu Dhabi as the host of World Ocean Summit 2019. Abu Dhabi has a close relationship with the ocean, through its history as a centre for pearl diving, its resilient coral reefs and its mangroves sea grass meadows that provide valuable services in the face of climate change.

Bringing the World Ocean Summit to Abu Dhabi presents a unique opportunity to amplify the conversations on the sustainable development of the ocean in the Middle East and the wider region, and equally provides a platform for Abu Dhabi to share its innovative approaches to conservation, and developing a vibrant and sustainable ocean economy, with the rest of the world.

The challenges facing the ocean are global, and the World Ocean Summit 2019, which will be held March 5th-7th, will bring the bold discussions and diverse audiences that characterise the World Ocean Summit into a new part of the world, and host stimulating conversations on the topics of ocean financing, governance and innovation. A key priority for World Ocean Summit 2019 will be to foster greater cooperation and collaboration between different groups, and to serve as a bridge between the development of economic policies and protecting the marine environment. It intends to build a truly global community for the creation of a sustainable ocean economy. Through the World Ocean Initiative, The Economist Group will build a programme of work across these topics and themes throughout 2018 to ensure that we continue to play a role in fostering progress against the global community’s commitments on the ocean.

 

To know more about World Ocean Summit 2019 in Abu Dhabi, watch video here.