Posts tagged with "book"

Paul Gallico via Yousef Karsh for use by 360 Magazine

Paul Gallico Exhibit

Chiswick Auctions is thrilled to offer the library and private estate of one of the greatest storytellers and writers of the 20th century, Paul Gallico (1897-1976). The celebrated American-born novelist, screenwriter and journalist is renowned for the writing of a number of significant works, including his most well-known book, The Snow Goose, a short novel that achieved much acclaim and was later made into a film and broadcast on BBC TV.

The film was created from a screenplay by Gallico and featured Jenny Agutter and Richard Harris. It was so popular that it won a Golden Globe for ‘Best Movie Made for TV’ and was nominated for both a BAFTA and an Emmy, with Agutter winning ‘Outstanding Supporting Actress’. It didn’t end there, as in 1976, Spike Milligan narrated an edited version, with music by Ed Welch, issued on RCA records in 1990 (a copy of which is offered in the sale amongst a collection of First Editions of Gallico’s work Lot 96 Estimate for group lot £200-£300).

Another of his most popular works, The Poseidon Adventure, which was written in 1969, led to a hugely successful film adaptation in 1972 and a TV remake in 2005 and a further adaptation in 2006. Works relating to The Poseidon Adventure are offered in the sale, such as a set of Uncorrected Proof Copies by Gallico (Lot 113 Estimate £250-£350) and a collection of 32 volumes used by Paul Gallico in researching his novels The Poseidon Adventure and Beyond the Poseidon Adventure on topics such as knots, shipping law, diving, sea planes and cooking on ships, occasionally featuring the author’s annotations and labels (Lot 114 Estimate £80-£120). A First Edition of The Poseidon Adventure is included in a collection of Gallico’s First editions (Lot 96 estimate £200-£300) and a collection of original promotional material from 20th Century Fox, for the film of the same name, that was based on Gallico’s book (Lot 115 Estimate £150-£200). The latest film adaptation of one of his books is already being hotly anticipated and will be released this year, based on his book Mrs. ‘Arris Goes to New York (two copies of which are offered in the sale as part of group lots 95 and 96).

Among some hugely exciting pieces in his collection is a fascinating range of Gallico’s own work, as well as personal notes, press cuttings, personal artifacts including his trusty typewriters, his leather Abercrombie & Fitch flying jacket from his time as a war correspondent, a range of his highly popular books and insightful notes that offer us a glimpse into the man behind his writings, as well as some rare First Editions by significant writers and great friends of his. While the sale is primarily an auction of Books and Works on Paper, furniture, original art and posters will also feature. The sale is titled Books & Works on Paper including Contents from the Estate of Paul Gallico and will take place at Chiswick Auctions on Thursday, 27th January 2022.

About Paul Gallico

Paul Gallico (1897-1976) was one of the great storytellers and writers of the 20th century. Journalist, novelist, screenwriter, he was born in New York and died in Monaco, but spent much of his life living in Saltram in Devon, England. Gallico is known for writing a number of major books and films of the mid-20th century and is still highly prized.

STRANGE ACADEMY series art and cover by HUMBERTO RAMOS for use by 360 MAGAZINE

STRANGE ACADEMY FINALE ARRIVES THIS APRIL

Marvel Comics introduced STRANGE ACADEMY to fans in 2020, which is a mystical series produced by writer Skottie Young and artist Humberto Ramos. The series follows some of Marvel’s strongest sorcerers as they attend Doctor Strange’s school for the mystic arts. At the school, Marvel characters are introduced and taught the skills necessary to work with magic. Throughout 18 eccentric issues, Marvel fans have been introduced to new stars such as Emily Bright, Doyle Dormammu and Zoe Laveau, seeing the true prospective of magic in the future of the Marvel Universe. The phenomenon ends its first chapter in April’s STRANGE ACADEMY #18, but there’s a surplus of STRANGE ACADEMY still to come.

Writer of STRANGE ACADEMY Skottie Young spoke on the series, stating, “This book is so close to my heart. We created so many brand new characters and brought each one to life in such a unique way. Working alongside my brother Humberto over these last 18 issues has been such a special thing to me. I’m just glad we have more Strange Academy stories to tell and can’t wait to get them in your hands!”

Senior Editor of the series, Nick Lowe, also had words on the series. He said, “Platitudes get thrown around a lot in these pages, but if you’ve been reading STRANGE ACADEMY, you know we don’t mess around. So listen up, seriously, you do not want to miss this issue that is going to destroy you emotionally and destroy the school beyond recognition.”

The out-of-this-universe finale of STRANGE ACADEMY comes out on April 27. Get ready for the second semester of STRANGE ACADEMY that begins this summer. For more information, visit Marvel.com.

Japanese Breakfast Jubilee album art via Peter Ash Lee for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Japanese Breakfast

Tuesday, January 18, indie pop act Japanese Breakfast performed “Slide Tackle,” a track from their GRAMMY-nominated album, Jubilee, on The Late Show with James Corden. Michelle Zauner, applauded founder, did a ‘Bar Chat interview where she talked about these recent nominations and more. Watch Japanese Breakfast’s performance on The Late Show with James Corden HERE.

Jubilee released last June as one of the years leading, critically acclaimed albums. The album stole spots on Best Of lists for 2021 from Rolling Stone, People Magazine, Pitchfork, Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, NPR, Wall Street Journal, The Ringer, SPIN, Esquire, Vulture, The AV Club, Paste, Cosmopolitan, UPROXX, Consequence of Sound, Slant and Hypebeast. The album gained so much attention that it was even voted the #1 album of the year on NPR’s Listener’s Poll and #1 on UPROXX’s Critics Poll.

If that wasn’t enough success for one year, Zauner, too, published her New York Times Best Seller, Crying in H Mart, which is now being reworked for MGM’s Orion Pictures. The book is a moving memoir that captures Zauner’s experiences growing up Korean American, the struggles she went through with the death of her mother and how she navigated discovering her own identity.

About Michelle Zauner

The Korean American musician and author Michelle Zauner is renowned for her sonic demeanor. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Zauner grew up in Eugene, Oregon for most of her adolescence. Zauner took to music instantly, beginning to learn to play the piano at 5, later moving to the guitar at age 15. Her mother’s passing in 2014 lead to her starting Japanese Breakfast. She tells Teen Vogue, “I moved back to Oregon to care for her, and I kind of put the band on indefinite hiatus. Unfortunately, she passed away, and while I was in Oregon, helping take care of the house and being a support system for my dad, the only way that I could have something for myself was if I made my own record. So I kind of carved out some time to do that.” Japanese Breakfast’s debut came in 2016 with the hit album Psychopomp. Through the album, Zauner revealed the intense period that followed her mother’s death. Zauner’s unique perspective amongst mainstream pop music sets her apart from other artists, and she’s one you’ll want to take a listen to.

Paint Splash via Mina Tocallini for use by 360 Magazine

ELLE Canada Releasing Holiday Issue

KO Média is excited to unveil the Holiday issue of ELLE Canada featuring Diane Kruger. The German-born actor talks about learning choreographed fight scenes for the new action-packed spy thriller The 355, how her life has changed since having a daughter (spoiler: it involves more time at playgrounds and less time sporting cool Chanel boots), and working on a child-friendly set with other mothers. “I’ve never done a movie like this in my career,” she admits. “I usually make films with a lot of men and very few female leads, so this was really refreshing.” Kruger also discusses changes in the film industry now that women have greater creative control, and the fulfilment that comes from playing more nuanced characters. “At this point in my life, I’m interested in roles that show women in their complexity, in their fullness.” 

Female creatives abound in this edition. Singer-actor Josie Ho explains why Hong Kong’s male-dominated film industry prompted her to launch her own production company. Actor Aubrey Plaza talks about connecting with young readers in her new children’s book, a dark and twisty Christmas tale. Montreal-born artist Chloe Wise, a lover of food and hyperrealism, reflects on how her work has evolved over the last five years. Kaia Gerber—model, actor and daughter to Cindy Crawford—opens up about the importance of self-care and listening to your body.

With the holiday season upon us, our team has assembled a local gift guide complete with clothes, accessories, beauty products and home-decor pieces from an all-Canadian lineup of brands. We also ask beauty experts to share their insider tips, tricks and must-have items for a polished look at your upcoming IRL soirees. Plus, some limited edition holiday beauty products, Dior’s elegant new makeup line, and must-have hair treatments for winter.

For those swept up in post-pandemic wanderlust, take a trip to Newfoundland’s Fogo Island Inn, a magical retreat imbued with the remote community’s rich history and way of life. And Susan Sarandon weighs in as the global brand ambassador for Fairmont Hotels & Resorts. If you’d rather take it easy over the holidays, check out our roundup of the top TV shows of 2021 that you might have missed.

In fashion, this issue takes readers from the ski resort to the catwalk with the latest in alpine chic; explores how Canadian lingerie brand Fleur du Mal pairs whimsy with sexy; and dives into the backstory of the wildly successful Boyy accessories brand. We also get a glimpse of a retrospective exhibition at Montreal’s McCord Museum that delves into the androgynous, avant-garde style pioneered by Parachute.

There’s something for everyone in this edition, from our conversation with Jean-Marc Gallot, CEO of the iconic champagne house Veuve Clicquot, to a wide-ranging discussion with Canadian tennis pro Bianca Andreescu about Cadillac’s first all-electric vehicle, making eco-friendly choices and taking care of her physical and mental health.

The Holiday issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ on November 16, 2021.

Art by Heather Skovlund of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Nikki Sixx – The First 21

Mötley Crüe and Sixx:A.M. founder Nikki Sixx is now a four-time New York Times best-selling author with his new book, THE FIRST 21: How I Became Nikki Sixx entering the coveted list at #8 on the Hardcover chart and #11 on the Combined Print And Ebook List. THE FIRST 21 joins Nikki Sixx’s other three bestsellers, The Heroin Diaries, This Is Gonna Hurt, and the Mötley Crüe biography, The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band. In addition, THE FIRST 21 also quickly rose to Amazon’s bestsellers list since its release on October 19, occupying the top spot on Amazon’s rock music books chart and in the Top 40 overall biographies and memoirs chart. THE FIRST 21 is also #22 on the USA Today’s best-selling books top 150 list, as well as #9 on Canada’s The Globe and Mail bestsellers list, evident of the book’s global appeal.

“I am such a fan of books and storytelling,” said Nikki Sixx. “The whole process is extremely creative from the beginning to the end, which allowed me to open up candidly in the memoir about addiction, sobriety and reflect about the formative years of my life, while unpacking the complicated childhood that had some twists and turns along the way. I am really happy THE FIRST 21 connected with people in such a deep way.”

THE FIRST 21: How I Became Nikki Sixx is available at book sellers everywhere including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, INDIEBOUND, BOOKSHOP, HUDSON BOOKSELLERS, Powell’s, Target, and Walmart, among others. Fans can also listen to the latest release of his band Sixx:A.M, SIXX:A.M. HITS via Better Noise Music. The album serves as a companion piece to the book. The album debuted at #2 on the iTunes Metal in the US (#2 Rock), UK, Canada and Australia, as well as top 10 in numerous other countries. For more information, please visit: www.hachettebooks.com, or www.TheFirst21Book.com for the book and www.betternoise.com for the album.

About THE FIRST 21: How I Became Nikki Sixx:

Rock-and-roll icon and three-time bestselling author Nikki Sixx tells his origin story: how Frank Feranna became Nikki Sixx, chronicling his fascinating journey from irrepressible Idaho farm boy to the man who formed the revolutionary rock group Mötley Crüe.

Nikki Sixx is one of the most respected, recognizable, and entrepreneurial icons in the music industry. As the founder of Mötley Crüe, who is now in his twenty-first year of sobriety, Sixx is incredibly passionate about his craft and wonderfully open about his life in rock and roll, and as a person of the world. Born Franklin Carlton Feranna on December 11, 1958, young Frankie was abandoned by his father and partly raised by his mother, a woman who was ahead of her time but deeply troubled. Frankie ended up living with his grandparents, bouncing from farm to farm and state to state. He was an all-American kid—hunting, fishing, chasing girls, and playing football—but underneath it all, there was a burning desire for more, and that more was music. He eventually took a Greyhound bound for Hollywood.

In Los Angeles, Frank lived with his aunt and his uncle—the president of Capitol Records—for a short time. But there was no easy path to the top. He was soon on his own. There were dead-end jobs: dipping circuit boards, clerking at liquor and record stores, selling used light bulbs, and hustling to survive. But at night, Frank honed his craft, joining Sister, a band formed by fellow hard-rock veteran Blackie Lawless, and formed a group of his own: London, the precursor of Mötley Crüe. Turning down an offer to join Randy Rhoads’s band, Frank changed his name to Nikki London, Nikki Nine, and, finally, Nikki Sixx. Like Huck Finn with a stolen guitar, he had a vision: a group that combined punk, glam, and hard rock into the biggest, most theatrical, and irresistible package the world had ever seen. With hard work, passion, and some luck, the vision manifested in reality—and this is a profound true story of finding identity, of how Frank Feranna became Nikki Sixx. It’s also a road map to the ways you can overcome anything, and achieve all your goals, if only you put your mind to it.

Mike Mattison via Kailey Wolcott for use by 360 Magazine

POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry

While accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016, Bob Dylan quoted The Odyssey: “Sing in me, muse, and through me tell the story.” In their new book, POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry (University Press of Mississippi, November 9, 2021), renowned musician Mike Mattison and literary historian and beloved Catholic University professor Ernest Suarez offer an enlightening look at the artform that artists like Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Gil Scott-Heron, Lucinda Williams and others used to tell their stories. Mattison and Suarez lay out the contours of what they see as a unique literary genre they dub ‘poetic song verse.’ This form was inspired by blues music and poetry, nurtured in the beat coffee houses of the 50’s and 60’s, and fully bloomed as it cross-pollinated with rock and roll. It goes far beyond the borders of popular entertainment, using voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production to highlight evocative lyrics that resemble poetry. 

Synthesizing a wide range of writing and thinking, as well as their own experiences, (Mattison is a vocalist and songwriter for the Grammy-Award-winning Tedeschi Trucks Band; he wrote hits like “Midnight in Harlem,” “Bound for Glory”), the authors train a powerful lens on some of the most well-known songs of the 20th and 21st centuries. By demonstrating how the blues and poetry came together to birth a whole new genre of artistic expression, they shift the thinking on how we categorize lyrics—as literature, as music, or as a combined, innovative, new art form.

Q&A W/ Mike Mattison × Ernest Suarez 

What is poetic song verse, and how has studying and writing about it changed your appreciation of the artists who practice it?

We use the term “poetic” to describe lyrics that have literary intent and that consciously strive for aesthetic impact: linguistically rich compositions that operate on many levels simultaneously, incorporating image, metaphor, narrative, and play in ways that often deliberately correlate to broader cultural conversations. We’re talking about lyrics that seek to transcend the grasp-and-release mechanism of pure entertainment, lyrics that prick our curiosity and invite repeated visits and renewed scrutiny. Poetic song verse isn’t poetry set to music, like the Beats’ poetry with jazz accompaniment, but it sometimes takes a hybrid form in recordings like Gil Scott-Heron’s or Leonard Cohen’s. The distinction we draw rests on the symbiotic relationship that most often occurs when potent lyrics and sonics are developed together. By “sonics” we mean every aural dimension of song, including voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production. In poetic song verse, sonics combine with verbal techniques often associated with poetry—imagery, line breaks, wordplay, point of view, character, story, tone, and other qualities—to create a semantically and emotionally textured dynamic.

The book argues that artists like Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and Jimi Hendrix were transformative in the development of poetic song verse, but there were allusions and poetic phrasing in lyrics long before them. What did they do that wasn’t being done previously?

Songs from many periods and in different styles contain compelling verse, but in the late fifties and the sixties blues-based popular music and the new American poetry—especially the work of the Beats—came into close contact, resulting in a concentration of songwriters who transformed songwriting from entertainment to art-that-entertains. 

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues and contemporary poetry.  Both forms emphasize the sound of the human voice.  Poetry’s turn toward more accessible language and the blues’ origins in the sound of the human voice helped rock absorb poetic language and techniques, and provided a catalyst for Dylan and others to change rock into a more lyrically and sonically sophisticated art form. Think about it this way: If you were a reasonably intellectual young musician who had been turned on to the blues, traditional metrical verse, or high modernist poetry such as T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, this might provide an idea of how to use allusions in a song, or provide strategies for intermingling certain types of imagery (as in some of Dylan’s, Van Morrison’s, and Joni Mitchell’s verse). But the language in most traditional and modern poetry tends to be very different from the type of language that characterizes blues-based popular music. However, when that same blues-enthralled young musician heard Howlin’ Wolf or Willie Dixon and read and heard Beat and other contemporary poets, he or she was exposed to rich, sophisticated language based on rhythms of speech (i.e., material that could serve as a powerful source for lyrics). With different twists and turns this essentially was the case for Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jim Morrison, and many others.  By examining the confluence of blues and poetry in various artists’ work, and by considering the creative practices of various seminal artists and the cultural conditions and landscapes in which they worked, we identify a relatively specific subgenre of song that’s also a form of literature.

What role did the coffee houses of the 50’s play in creating this genre? What does instrumentation add to the artform?

In the late fifties and the sixties Beat coffee houses, bookstores, and nightclubs sprang up across the United States and spread to Western Europe. Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Van Morrison, Jim Morrison, Joni Mitchell, David Crosby, Neil Young, Stephen Stills, and others embraced the blues and Beat coffeehouse culture, where they encountered contemporary poetry, rural blues, and folk music.  After putting rock ’n’ roll of their youth aside for a handful of years, many sixties songwriters returned to the rebellious rhythms of fifties rock ’n’ roll and wedded it with verse inspired by contemporary poetry. In the mid-sixties Dylan’s rock ’n’ roll–Beat poet persona strengthened his already active sense of the possibilities between poetry and music and led to Bringing It All Back Home (1965), Highway 61 Revisited (1965), and Blonde on Blonde (1966), albums that ignited an explosion of poetic song verse. Instead of portraying themselves as the descendants of Woody Guthrie, Bukka White, and Pete Seeger, artists returned to the theatrics of Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Jerry Lee Lewis but retained the cerebral, self-consciously artistic emphasis that characterized songs and poetry in Beat coffeehouses. This combination released Dylan and others from songwriting conventions that ranged from the length of individual songs to how albums were conceptualized, recorded, and produced. In essence, the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, the Doors, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, the Kinks, and others followed Dylan’s lead and expanded fifties rock ’n’ rollers’ sounds and emphasis on performance, assuming often extravagant yet artistically resonant personae that resulted in songs and albums replete with ambitious wordplay and sonic arrangements.

Is poetic song verse a uniquely American invention? How did America’s history of slavery, Jim Crow, war, and sexism affect its creation?

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues—a quintessential American art form—and various types of contemporary poetry that developed in the United States.  That said, artists around the world quickly started to write songs in this mode, largely due to blues artists’ popularity in England and other countries, and to Dylan’s influence on the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and others.

The history of slavery had a profound influence on the blues, which grew out of nineteenth-century spirituals and work songs, much like those styles grew out of various African musical traditions.  Nineteenth century work songs and blues songs written during the era of Jim Crow often contained “coded” lyrics that indirectly commented on topics that would have raised the ire of their oppressors.  This practice melded with techniques employed by contemporary poets in the work of songwriters from Dylan to Joni Mitchell to Marvin Gaye to Bruce Springsteen to Grandmaster Flash to Lucinda Williams.

The War in Vietnam also had a strong influence on many songwriters.  They often combined surrealistic imagery that they encountered in contemporary poetry with imagery from various African and Western metaphysical traditions.  This combination led to songs like the Stones’s “Gimme Shelter.”

What artists do you see as the contemporary and future upholders of this new tradition? 

Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, Kendrick Lamar, Norah Jones, Dave Grohl, Fiona Apple, Lorde, Aimee Mann, Fantastic Negrito, Josh Ritter, Lyle Lovett, Luther Dickinson, Jason Isbell.

b. intro via Chris Parsons for use by 360 Magazine

A Little Spark

By: Merilee Kern

Whether gifting for the holidays, a birthday, Valentine’s Day or “just because,” children’s literature is a timeless gift that can impact the recipient, families and society at-large in meaningful ways. This truth is exemplified with “A Little Spark ” children’s book authored by Chris Parsons—a truly unique title that was recently awarded the prestigious Mom’s Choice Award Gold Medal for best in family-friendly media. Fittingly so, as this distinctive  interactive, read-along chapter book is centered around the noble theme of finding, and doing, good in the world. 

A Little Spark is redefining children’s literature by driving its overarching message home by combining a compelling narrative and cast of identifiable characters with full color  illustrations; a custom-scored musical soundtrack of original songs like this accessible through QR Codes while reading the book; an audiobook featuring delightful performances; fun on-and-offline activities; and invaluable life lessons that are highlighted throughout each chapter. It’s a heartening activity to enjoy with young children, grandchildren and students.

To complement the beautifully illustrated 160-page chapter book, Parsons collaborated with renowned music producer Bruce Faulconer  to develop the full album with an original soundtrack and accompanying audiobook. “Lyrics range from playful to heartwarming and, in one instance, even a bit ominous,” noted Faulconer. “The music keeps the reader poised and, at times, thrillingly on the edge of their seat. We worked with an amazing group of performers and have created something truly special that’s resonating with kids and adults, alike.”

Enhancing the read-along story and the various audio components, A Little Spark also comes complete with a free companion online Resource Library available at BeThatSpark.com, which boasts over 50 book-related family activities like coloring pages, character puppets, word searches, mazes, dance videos, character drawing video tutorials and more. A “Parent’s Guide” is also available to help plan and optimize the overall experience.

“Parents, grandparents, caregivers and educators are indelibly seeking great content to engage with kids, and A Little Spark is written with purpose and intention toward that end,” said Parsons. “The storyline, and the various lessons embedded throughout, underscore that even the smallest creature can make the biggest difference. This takeaway message is especially important for young, impressionable children to hear because they so badly want to be seen and heard…in today’s culture more than ever.”

“Children’s literature is a powerful force that can shape and nurture the minds of kids,” continued Parsons. “In the case of A Little Spark, the combination of a great story, captivating illustrations and rich characters—in combination with mood-inducing music—can truly engage young minds in an impactful and immediate way. It’s one that not only entertains and inspires young audiences, but also helps them develop critical thinking skills and encourages a sense of adventure and the confidence to take that first step.”

As per the Mom’s Choice Award, “A Little Spark is an innovative, inspiring, and entertaining tale about unlikely comrades who join forces on a quest to defeat a threatening enemy. A little Spark reminds us that, to awaken our passion and spirit, we all need something in life to make the world be a warmer place, and to always look for ways to ‘Be That Spark.’”

Working in partnership with a teacher advisory group, the “Be That Spark” elementary education pilot program launched this October in multiple first grade classrooms. This one-of-a-kind scholastic program combines the book, music and all of the related material into a formal academic lesson plan designed to provide a fun, inspiring experience for educators and their students. The Be That Spark program includes a focus on helping students develop positive character traits based on the characters and lessons from the book. It aligns with U.S. standards by creating meaningful and challenging lessons for students intended to increase their reading, listening and comprehension skills.

“Our panel of judges really felt this book merited a place on our list of the best in family-friendly media products that parents and educators can feel confident in using,” said Dawn Matheson, CEO, Mom’s Choice Awards. Other accolades include A Little Spark earning its place as an Amazon new release best-seller in a number of categories, including #1 in Children’s Music Books.

Pandemic Mental Health with Dr. Friedberg

On Saturday, September 25, Dr. Ahron Friedberg, distinguished Manhattan and Sag Harbor psychiatrist and resident, held a reading and discussion of his book, Through a Screen Darkly: Psychoanalytic Reflections During the Pandemic, in the home of renowned fellow psychiatrist and Hamptons resident, Dr. Mirjana Blokar. Attendees and discussion participants included prestigious neuroscientist, Dr. Heather Berlin, among numerous Mount Sinai colleagues and friends.

Dr. Friedberg explains, “The book shows that, of necessity, people can learn to adapt, even in the most difficult circumstances. Even though we can only see “darkly” we can call on resources we do have, in addition to those we can acquire to retain our sense of dignity and purpose. Through a Screen Darkly is a time capsule of how we struggled – and are continuing to navigate – a disease we do not fully understand.”

The book addresses the pandemic in phases, including I) Pandemic, II) Venturing Out, III) The New Normal, and IV) Life Simplified. The essays provide perspective on several subjects relating to mental health, including parenting, elder care, work life (losing jobs, finding jobs, choosing new work, commuting), loneliness, children, and dating. Through a Screen Darkly offers practical examples of how patients coped with these conditions and (in many cases) found the resilience to get past them.

“The ultimate goal is to bolster your resilience,” states Dr. Friedberg. “In my experience counseling patients through the pandemic, I found that they had greater capacity for resilience than they realized. Deploying this resilience was their pathway to successfully managing their mental health.”

In addition to Through a Screen Darkly, Dr. Friedberg has also written Flashing Seven: Seven Essential Skills for Living and Leading, co-authored with Dr. Jack Hischowitz, Clinical Professor at Mount Sinai, Between Us, A Father and Son Speak, co-authored with his father, Dr. Eugene Friedberg, and Psychotherapy and Personal Change; Two Minds in a Mirror, also written with Dr. Sandra Sherman.
Through a Screen Darkly is available for purchase at amazon.com.

About Dr. Ahron Friedberg
Dr. Ahron Friedberg, M.D. is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He is a practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in Manhattan. At Mount Sinai, Dr. Friedberg served as Co-Chair of the Psychiatry Advisory Board and has helped develop and lead several academic and teaching initiatives including their Innovations in Psychiatry Symposium. Dr. Friedberg also directs the ‘Symposium’, a national meeting held annually at Mount Sinai. He has participated in clinical research as part of the Department’s Mood

and Anxiety Program, which focuses on translational neuroscience and understanding resilience.
Dr. Friedberg has served twice as national President of the American Society of Psychoanalytic Physicians. He was named first Executive Editor of International Psychoanalysis.net, a highly regarded online psychoanalytic resource. In addition, he is an Acquisitions Editor of International Psychoanalytic Books, Book Editor of Psychodynamic Psychiatry, Editor of the American Academy of Psychodynamic Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis Academy Forum, elected chair of the International Council of Editors, Psychanalytic Journals, as well as a regular contributor to Psychology Today.

His research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including The Psychoanalytic Review, The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Neuro-psychoanalysis, and Psychodynamic Psychiatry. Dr. Friedberg’s writing focuses on the treatment of anxiety and trauma, clinical technique, and the concepts of resilience, consciousness, and desire in psychoanalysis. He has received awards for excellence in writing, in addition to originality and scholarship.

Headphones illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Dr. Kraus

By: Skyler Johnson

Learning how to play an instrument can help with the development of the human brain, according to scientist, inventor and Northwestern University professor Dr. Nina Kraus. She outlines this research in her new book, Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful World. I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Kraus about the book and her findings. 

  1. Can you go over, briefly, what your newest book covers?

My book is a retrospective of what my lifetime researching sound and the brain has taught me. It covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the brain of a musician, to the link between sound and reading, to the perils of noise, to the wonder that is birdsong, to the aging brain. And much more.

  1. How did you get into that sort of research?

As a child, I was fortunate, from a sound perspective, in two ways. First, I was exposed to music at a young age. My mother was a pianist and my favorite place to play was under her piano, listening to her beautiful music. Second, I grew up in a household where more than one language was spoken, regularly traveling between the US and Italy, learning to navigate two different linguistic worlds. These early experiences with music and language left a deep imprint. They stuck with me as I made my way through college, looking for a way I could channel my interest in sound into a career. After a few starts, I got hooked up with a lab studying how sound acquired relevance in the brain. In other words, how the brain itself is changed by sounds it hears! And the rest is history.

  1. How often should people be playing music? 

The benefits of playing music are many, and certainly the more you play the more it enriches your sound mind. However, my research has told me you do not have to be a professional to tune your brain. I would say you need to play (practice) regularly, though. At least a few times a week.

  1. What types of instruments should people be playing to gain the effects? 

As far as I can tell, based on my research and others’, it does not matter. Any instrument, including voice, is a boon to your brain.

  1. When did you first start playing an instrument yourself?

Age 5. Piano. I also play some guitar and drums.

  1. Did your personal experience with playing music influence your desire to start your research?

In a way, I think it did. I did not start my career studying music. That line of work got rolling some 15 years ago. At that time, my research was examining the role of sound processing on literacy in school-age children. That got me connected with teachers and other educators and I was starting to hear the same thing over and over: “The kids that do best in school tend to be the ones who play an instrument.” And that just seemed right to me on a scientific-gut level. I can feel, on a personal level, that my music playing has been good for my brain. Soon, I made some contacts with educators who ran music programs and wanted to know whether and how playing music affected the brains of their young musicians. And, so this whole new rewarding line of research was born. Who knows? If I wasn’t a musician myself, my research would have taken some other course.

Tracy Sugarman’s Works Offered at Auction

“AND ALL THAT JAZZ”! WORKS BY TRACY SUGARMAN – ARTIST TO THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, TO BE OFFERED AT AUCTION

September 2021. Artworks by the American illustrator, Tracy Sugarman (1921-2013), who documented some of the most momentous events in American history, such as Mississippi’s Freedom Summer of 1964 (a milestone in the civil rights movement in America) and images of World War II, will be offered in Dreweatts Modern and Contemporary Art sale on October 12, 2021.

As well as encapsulating historical moments in a unique way, Sugarman illustrated hundreds of books and record covers in a career spanning 50 years. The group of works coming up for auction spotlights Sugarman’s work for the music industry. Between 1954 and 1959 he produced more than a hundred album covers for the record labels Grand Award and Waldorf Music Hall Records. These were later reissued on CDS.

His illustrations were published in hundreds of magazines and books, as well being shown as on TV (PBS, ABC TV, NBC TV, and CBS TV). He was in high demand as a multi-talented artist, scriptwriter, producer, and author and won numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Art Directors Club in Washington, D.C. He was also a civil rights activist, something he also captured in his artworks.

While carrying out his commissions for the music industry he was given complete artistic freedom to create the works as he wished. Commenting he said: “I had been able to explore every medium from scratch-board to oils, from pastels to watercolors and seen them reproduced. I had captured Mahalia Jackson singing gospel and Knuckles O’Toole playing ragtime piano.” A work in 2007 marked the beginning of a lifelong love affair with jazz and the works in this sale show how he creatively captures the spirit and energy of Jazz.

In the Studio (lot 301) in its bright red hues, communicates the passion and vibrancy of Jazz and music in general. Dark lines contrast the colour, creating the shapes of the figures, resulting in a simple, but powerful piece. It carries an estimate of £400-£600. Portrait of a Trumpet Player (lot 299) by Tracy Sugarman captures a trumpet player in full flow. Created in wax crayon, the raw image brings the paper to life. It is estimated to fetch £400-£600. The Thinker (Lot 300) in wax crayon and watercolor shows the creative process and thinking behind the creation of music. In rough strokes Sugarman conveys all of this in a minimal way, creating the impact by its very simplicity.  The work is estimated to fetch £400-£600.

More works by Sugarman can be seen in the online catalogue, follow the link here