Posts tagged with "writing"

image by Sara Davidson for use by 360 Magazine

Joy Crookes × New York Times

Joy Crookes — who is already garnering Amy Winehouse and Lauryn Hill comparisons from her own songs—began her musical journey years before her magpie-like introduction to brass. The daughter of a Bengali mother and an Irish father, she grew up listening to an eclectic mix of genres. Every week, while driving her to Irish dancing lessons, they would listen to a different album. Kendrick Lamar’s ‘To Pimp a Butterfly’ one week ‘Soon Forward’ by Gregory Isaac the next. As a curious, passionate, and music-obsessed 12-year-old, Joy decided to start writing her own song and honing her modern soul sound. Her first song “Seaside” was penned after falling head over heels for a boy by the beach. Seven years later, her songs might have grown more sophisticated, but the approach remains the same: whether she’s dealing with heartbreak or trying to come to terms with the latest Trump headline, Joy is committed to translating her most honest and vulnerable feelings to music. While her candid song-writing and fearless attitude have won her dedicated grassroots following, it was a baby-faced Joy singing a cover of Hit the Road Jack, which caught the attention of 600,000 viewers, and her first management company. Now she has a feature in the New York Times.

READ FEATURE HERE

UPCOMING ALBUM SKIN, OUT OCTOBER 15 |PRE-ORDER SKIN HERE

WATCH JOY DISCUSS HER “FIRSTS” FOR BRITISH VOGUE
DURING LONDON FASHION WEEK HERE

“Listening to Crookes’s soulful, intimate music can feel like intruding on a private conversation or cracking open a diary” – The New York Times”

“In her music, Crookes offers listeners a nuanced and candid exploration of her multiracial identity. At a time when many conversations about race in the arts and calls for change have only recently begun, Crookes’s commitment to vulnerability in her storytelling has helped her connect with a growing — and loyal — fan base.” – The New York Times

2021 UK IN-STORE PERFORMANCES

10/16 – Resident – Brighton

10/17 – Banquet – Kingston

10/8 – Rough Trade East – London

10/20 – HMV Manchester

10/21 – HMV Westfield White City

10/23 – Rough Trade – Bristol

10/24 – Rough Trade –Nottingham

2021 UK TOUR DATES

10/24 – Dublin

10/26 – Glasgow

10/28 – Sheffield

10/29 – Leeds

10/31 – Newcastle

11/2 – Manchester

11/3 – Birmingham

11/4 – Norwich

11/6 – Southampton

11/7 – Bristol

11/8 – London (Kentish Town Forum)

11/9 – London (Kentish Town Forum)

Image via Booksavvy Public Relations for 360 Magazine

Karen Gershowitz – Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust

Yes, You CAN Fit Travel into a Busy Career. It Just Takes Planning.

By Karen Gershowitz

I know what you’re thinking: Travel is opening back up and I’m itching to go. But when I’m drowning in deadlines and work and want to spend time with family and friends, how can travel possibly fit in? The answer is, with planning.

My career as a marketing researcher and strategist is intense. Yet in 5 decades, I’ve managed to travel to 90 different countries. Travel is my passion. Reducing or giving it up, even for work, is out of the question. These competing priorities have taught me to plan ahead and be creative.  I talk about some of the many ways I’ve done this in my memoir Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust.

At the beginning of my career, two weeks of vacation was the maximum allowed. I planned those weeks around long weekends to get the most out of them. Four vacation days became nine-day trips.

Another possibility I discovered is to rollover vacation time, allowing for a longer trip.  You might take one week the first year, then plan for a three-week trip the next. That strategy allowed me to go to Tanzania for a photo safari and then climb Mt. Kilimanjaro.

If you can afford it, consider unpaid leave. I did that for a trip to Australia that took me across the globe when after the flight and recovering from jetlag, two weeks would have been whittled down to just over a week of satisfying travel. That extra vacation time is unlikely to change your career trajectory and will leave you with memories for a lifetime. Negotiating extra travel time when taking a new job is a great tactic, and in this post- COVID world where labor supply is short, now might be the perfect time. Two weeks is far too short to satisfy a travel itch. In negotiating for extra vacation time when changing jobs—four weeks in total—I only brought it up after we had settled on pay. The deal with my boss was that the month had to be split into three periods scattered across the year. That worked for the company; my absence didn’t stop any projects from proceeding. It also satisfied my desire for travel. 

You might also consider taking an extended break prior to starting with a new employer. time off between jobs. It’s a magical time with no stresses about what you’ve left behind. When I negotiated for four weeks of vacation time, I also negotiated my start date. I gave myself a full month, which allowed me to take three separate trips–Hawaii, Spain and Puerto Rico. I began my new position fully rested, with a clear head and excitement about the work. 

If you do find yourself with a quiet stretch take advantage of it. Rather than fretting about not having work or creating make work, scour the internet for last minute deals. Traveling to a lesser known place may lead to fabulous, unexpected finds. Years ago, I went to Venezuela at the last moment and discovered nearly empty pristine beaches and an Italian village in the Andes.

Here are some tips for making whatever time you have enjoyable, worry-free and non-jeopardizing to your career.

  • Give everyone lots of advance notice if you will be gone for more than a few days.  No one likes surprises, least of all clients and colleagues. This gives them time to discuss what should happen while you are away.
  • Try to anticipate any issues, problems, or questions and make sure you’ve dealt with them before you leave. 
  • Update your boss and co-workers on any current projects in detail and in writing so they have a reference document if they need information. 
  • Make it clear that you will be unreachable during your away time (you don’t want to be brought back to “reality” while traveling).  If necessary, tell them wi-fi is likely to be unreliable where you will be staying.

For much of my career I have also traveled for business, both domestically and internationally. This allowed me to see the world while my clients paid for my flights and other expenses. If you are also lucky enough to travel for business, here are some ideas for how to experience the location beyond meeting rooms. 

  • Try to plan the trip near a weekend, then stay a couple of extra days. Or even plan your whole vacation in some desirable destination. I traveled for two weeks in Asia, following a meeting in Singapore.
  • Once virtual conferences become an option instead of a necessity, if you attend them and can choose, find ones that meet your needs and are in a destination you’d like to see. 
  • Ask local business associates what to see and do. Because they live there, they may have some great tips for restaurants and sites off the usual tourist routes.
  • Before going, look for events taking place while you’re there—concerts, ball games, walking tours, cooking classes, art or antique shows. 

I hate clichés, but where there’s a will, there’s a way really applies to fitting travel into a career. If you want it enough, plan ahead, don’t keep it a secret and enjoy every moment.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Karen Gershowitz, author of Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust, has been traveling since age 17 when she boarded a plane to Europe and stayed there for three years. She has since traveled to more than 90 countries, experiencing countless bold, once-in-a-lifetime adventures: climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, trekking atop an elephant in Thailand, hiking in the blistering heat of the Moroccan desert—and much more. While studying ceramics as an undergraduate at the Kansas City Art Studio, Karen proposed and received a grant to photograph ceramics studios, potters and their work throughout Japan. She later built a career as a marketing strategist and researcher with companies who sent her around the globe to conduct focus groups, interviews and meetings. She lives in New York City, but is a citizen of the world.

Stephen Gilles image via Daphne Diluce at Roar Creative Media for use by 360 Magazine

Stephen Gillen Q×A

By: Emily Bunn

Stephen Gillen is an bestselling author and established entrepreneur who has gained success with his biopic “The Monkey Puzzle Tree,” alongside various business, media, and film projects. Looking towards the future, Gillen is soon to release his highly-anticipated book, “In Justice, Love, & Honour.” He also recently signed a worldwide TV deal with Film Volt, in which his The Stephen Gillen Crime Files channel will be broadcast on all major platforms. 360 Magazine sat down with the author to discuss the creation of his latest text and other upcoming projects.

What has working with someone so closely related to in the historic incident, namely Joseph Loney?

It was great working with Joseph to get a real human feel behind this story of what the real-life fallout and struggles translated to for everyone involved. It can be the small or big things, it’s all relevant in such a massive, emotional, historic and trauma-driven story. I want to know, feel and understand what it was really like, and to pinpoint the details and exclusive parts of the story not known or perhaps published. That [way] I can not [only] do justice to everyone involved and the victims, but [also] translate it authentically and with the right information and emotion for my readers. For me, having a real expert experience of what it is to live lives like this and what these characters would have been feeling, was a fascinating expose of everything that went on. I understood the ‘humanness, challenges and fears’ of the people behind this unbelievable story. It was always a great privilege and each had an amazing story in their own right.

Did you always have an interest in history, or did something about the incident concerning Fredrick Sewell and his band of robbers particularly pique your interest in the subject?

The story actually came to me through Joseph Loney, who contacted me because of his great love of the story I wrote about my life, “The Monkey Puzzle Tree.” We started talking over time and the more I understood about his journey and his father’s journey linked with Fredrick Sewell and the history surrounding it, I began to see what a massive narrative it was. Not just because of the historic angle and what actually happened, but [also] how the journeys of the main characters were incredibly linked in paradoxical and emotional ways. There were unbelievable links in this story – like Fredrick Sewell, Joseph Loney Senior, and Gerald Richardson (the policeman killed) were all the same age, but [each] ended up in a way you would never imagine. Fact really is stranger than fiction, and as I crafted this story, I cared very much about [what] all the characters went through and how they all ended up. This is one of the many elements that makes it an un-put-down-able read, which at the moment is being highly desired by the world’s top publishers.

What has it been like signing with Global Aggregate Film Volt for your channel?

It was a great moment. We have always worked so hard, and I have such wonderful people around me, like Daphne, my partner, and the rest of the team. It was good to then be invited in to do the awesome work … together at Film Volt. Mark is a cool guy, well respected, and very influential in the industry. He has a very strong and talented work ethic. We’re very similar in ways, so for all of us involved in the partnership with such a connected and influential worldwide distributor, it offers us great opportunities for the future to do the fantastic work we are all focused on together.

I have a very unique history, skill set and experience/profile, so [I] am [an] individual in this space and for what we are shaping on the Crime Channel. My crime channel, called ‘The Stephen Gillen Crime Files,’ is now in the process of being on all major TV platforms around the world. We aim to consistently deliver raw, highly produced and coveted content that will really add value and make the difference to audiences and people’s lives around the world. We have a world class team behind us now to make that happen and [are] committed to really raising the bar in content creation. With such a massive reach to such vast audiences, the future is very exciting.

What do you plan to discuss on your worldwide crime channel? Are there any specific cases you want to shed more light on?

We have many great and riveting formats under development, [that are] really out of this world and well-formatted. I’ll be continuing interviewing my YouTube model ‘The Big Shift,’ which interviews big name global crimes [and] many high-ranking organized crime figures and mobsters. But, we have other out of the box enthralling shows [too]. They are being released very soon so can’t say too much. But what I can say is [that] they are very professional throughout and crafted to entertain a wide scope of audiences in the genre, [the show is] very gripping and appealing to all. Most are really emotionally charged, which will really pull in, shock, and excite audiences. Other are focused on redemption and atonement, real hard-hitting, true stories that are amazing. [These stories] aim to be targeted, [and] to bring light, learning, closure and information to people so [that] these awful events may not happen again and there is improvement [for the] next generations. Other formats will be cliff hangers and work with viewers ‘outside the box,’ in the way this genre usually works. We want to thrill, shock, inform, improve and entertain as much as possible, focusing on the unbelievable stories that people really want to watch and hear about. It’s going to be content not to miss, I promise you.

How long did the process of researching for “In Justice, Love & Honour” take?

Research for ‘In Justice, Love & Honour’ took around six months to research, but possibly longer as even when I was writing, there was other important bits of information I needed. It was a real emotional journey… My family tell[s] me [that] when I’m writing not only do they not see me, but [also they] can’t talk to me I’m just so immersed in the characters, story arcs, plots and narrative. It’s how I write and why the writing is always so powerful, it’s a[n] emotion process that is finely woven and really burned, translated and detailed in a masterful and human way on the page. I also feel a lot of responsibility, and really work tirelessly for it to be as cleverly-crafted as possible for my audience and readers.

What do you anticipate reader’s reaction to “In Justice, Love & Honour” will be like?

I know they’ll be blown away by the detail of the characters, the emotion, the masterful weaving and moving plots, the descriptive and well written writing structures and the burning humaneness carv[ing] right through it. It is not just a massively historic, true story, but an amazing and riveting character study as you are emotionally gripped by these unbelievable characters that jump from the page. Part of the allure and uniqueness of this book is, of course, I live deep in this world and [have] travelled through most of the things these characters did from a very deep angle. So, I have great value as experience [in] the internal things going on as a person goes through these unbelievably crazy and breathtaking events. It certainly is a path less trodden and my main goal was to go to the heart of it in a way no other author could as we can only go as deep as we have been before. This certainly adds a massive uniqueness to everything in this unbelievable story. The world’s top publishers seem to think so too, as they are excited and pushing hard for the chance to be the one to publish and bring it to mass audiences. It is a great privilege to do it and I’m sure it will be a roller-coaster ride for all.

Find out more about Stephen’s story and the opportunity to get a signed copy of his book HERE.

*Photos and book cover design: Daphne Diluce

Interview with Dean Karnazes

Dean Carnazes is a marathon runner known for serious feats of endurance. He recently wrote a book, Runner’s High: A Life in Motion, about running and his experience as a marathon runner. I got the chance to speak with Dean about his marathon career and Runner’s High.

What was your favorite experience while running?

While I was running across the country—from LA to NYC—I got a call from the White House saying that Michelle Obama wanted me to stop in to say hi. Prank call was my first reaction. But it was real. I’ll never forget running down the hallway of the White House and out to the South Lawn to meet with the first lady. She welcomed me with a hug and said, “It’s such an honor to meet you.” I’m not making this up. 

What is your favorite part of the marathon experience?

The pain and the struggle. You remember the joyful moments, but the tough moments leave a more indelible imprint. 

Do you have a marathon that you particularly liked?

How long is the interview? (laughter) I’ve run hundreds of marathons and each is memorable in it’s own way. I once ran 50 marathons, in all 50 states, in 50 consecutive days. That experience in its totality was quite extraordinary.

Do you have a favorite place to run?

Greece. I’m 100% Greek and Greece is the birthplace of the marathon. It doesn’t get more real than that.

What athletes do you particularly admire?

The back of the packers struggling to reach the finish line before the cutoff. Sure, I admire the elite, but watching the last place finisher is more inspiring. 

I’ve been in a 2-week quarantine in a hotel in Sydney in preparation for this crazy 1,000-mile run across Australia, so I’ve been watching a lot of the Tokyo Olympics. In fact, I’ve probably watched more television in the past two weeks than I’ve watched in the past two years! 

Are there any Olympic athletes, in the most recent Tokyo Olympics, that you were particularly impressed by?

So many of the athletes impress me. But I think what impressed me the most this Olympics’ was Simone Biles withdrawal because of mental health concerns. She is such a dominant force but she became very human in showing her vulnerability.

How do you feel about energy drinks and other products that may change/enhance athletes’ performance?

Athletes will always seek anything that can provide an edge. So long as it is not a banned substance, I’m okay with it.

What, in your opinion, is your biggest accomplishment as a runner?

The fact that I am still just as passionate about running as I was when I first started. The stoke is still there after all these years.  

What was it like to write a book about something you’re so passionate about like running?

To capture my authentic running voice, I do a lot of writing while I run (by dictating into my phone). People say I truthfully capture the essence of running in my writing, and that’s because at a time when I’m experiencing the thoughts, feelings and emotions of a runner I’m taking note. To put that passion into words makes compelling reading. 

Are you happy with the way people have spoken about your book thus far?

I got an email from a gentleman this morning who said he had intended to read a couple chapters of my book last night before going to bed. Five hours later he finished the book, he told me. Then, he said, he got up. He just had to go on a run.

Yes, I’m happy with the way people have spoken about my book. That message says it all.

Photo via Lucas Jones of Polity Press for use by 360 Magazine

Q&A WITH AUTHOR DAVID THEO GOLDBERG

A pervasive sense has taken hold that any and all of us are under suspicion and surveillance, walking on a tightrope, a step away from erasure of rights or security. Nothing new for many long-targeted populations, it is now surfacing as a broad social sensibility, ramped up by environmental crisis and pandemic wreckage. We have come to live in proliferating dread, even of dread itself.

In this brilliant analysis of the nature, origins, and implications of this gnawing feeling, author David Theo Goldberg exposes tracking capitalism as the operating system at the root of dread. In contrast to surveillance, which requires labor-intensive analysis of people’s actions and communications, tracking strips back to the fundamental mapping of our movements, networks, and all traces of our digitally mediated lives. A simultaneous tearing of the social fabric – festering culture wars, the erosion of truth, even “civil war” itself – frays the seams of the sociality and solidarity needed to counter this transformation of people into harvestable, expendable data.

This searing commentary offers a critical apparatus for interrogating the politics of our time, arguing that we need not just a politics of refusal and resistance, but a creative politics to counter the social life of dread.

David Theo Goldberg is Director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Interview by: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

To begin, when did you realize that you first wanted to be a writer?

Quite young. I liked to write as a teenager, fifteen or sixteen, won a prize at high school for English writing. Looking back, I was not nearly as compelling as I fantasized. In training to be an academic I started attending closely to my technical writing. While at graduate school in New York I was involved in making independent films and music videos. I co-wrote the outline and voice-over text for an experimental film on apartheid South Africa which I also co-directed. The film won some international film festival awards. My early published academic writing was dense. I worked hard at getting myself to be clearer, cleaner, more concise. Like all art, writing requires endless attention to its detail, rhythm, flow.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I have a couple. I lap swim quite seriously early every morning. When I am struggling with an idea, or even to articulate a sentence, the quiet solitude of pulling through water on one’s own unbothered by anything around often leads one, or even a whole sentence or two. The challenge, of course, is to recall accurately   enough what I thought so great to be able to write it down at swim’s end. Until injuries caught up with me a few years ago I surfed extensively, and for many decades. I would travel to some surf spots further afield as much to be able, between surfs, to write uninterrupted by day-work at home as to enjoy the great surf and culture at hand.

When I have things pouring out of me and I am writing fast I tend to plug into fast jazz. The likes of the great Cuban jazz pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba or Japanese pianist Hiromi. Or the big band Snarky Puppy, with Hammond organist Cory Henry, who are fun. Writing has rhythms and I hope some of the music has rubbed off in my writing. There are times, nevertheless, when I like to write in silence, completely alone with my own thoughts.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

It depends on the book: I usually read extensively regarding the subject matter until I feel saturated and an argument thread for the book is mostly in place. Jacques Derrida, the great French philosopher, was once asked by the documentary filmmaker, Amy Ziering, if he had read all the books in his enormous personal library. “I have read only four,” Derrida responded. He then added, the crease of a smile at the corners of his mouth, “But I have read them very well.” The challenge is to read whatever one is engaging to find insights and ideas with which one can think.

I also find it thought-provoking to observe cultural, technological, political and economic trends and changes at work around us. My writing itself is as much an unfolding of the argument line, often enough surprising me in the writing, through where the writing takes me.

Edward Said, the great intellectual of the late twentieth century, wrote a book, Beginnings, which is about how challenging it can be to open a book, to write the first sentences. But also how to end, to bring it to a close in ways that will linger with the reader. Whether creative or analytic writing, not that it is always easy to distinguish the two. Said’s book has stuck with me through much of my writing career.

How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

Ten sole or co-authored monographs; another ten edited or co-edited books. Naming a favorite, especially publicly, is like saying who among your children are your best ones. Tough to do. There are two books that stick out because they have both expressed key developments in my thinking and have been impactful in scholarly debates around these questions.

The first is The Racial State (2002), about how the modern state since the 17th century was founded on racial structures, structuring into its very formation the elevation of Europeans/those of European descent at the expense of all others. Obviously these structures transformed over time, and from one place to another,  but the driving principle has largely remained in place. The key argument is that modern states become modern by taking on the technologies of race as structuring mechanisms.

The second is The Threat of Race: Reflections on Racial Neoliberalism (2009). This book traces the ways the neoliberalizing of polities globally—the financialization of everything; the divorcing of contemporary social, economic, and political conditions from the historical forces that produced them; the complete personalizing of responsibility for one’s standing and experience in society, no matter the social structures and challenges one has faced–has sought to empty the concept of racism and its affiliated racial conceptions of any critical charge or meaning.  The conservative attacks we are currently witnessing on critical race theory have their foundations in this neoliberalizing turn starting in the 1980s. Conservatives of this stripe find discussions, analysis, and engagement of racial issues threatening precisely because they challenge their view of the world.

What inspired you to write Dread: Facing Futureless Futures?

In 2016 family, friends, and colleagues were waking up each day with a sense of anxiety, some calling it a sense of doom. The rise in authoritarianism here in the U.S. but also across a widening range of societies was in part fueling this sense. I was feeling it too. I started by trying to put my finger on what this feeling was, what it amounted to, to name it. “Dread” was the concept I came up with to best express this sense. When I mentioned it aloud, others would exclaim, “That’s it!” What followed was the urge to write a book exploring the underlying conditions prompting this generalized sense, and the implications.

What is the significance of the title?

Dread is a socially produced pervasive anxiety the basic cause(s) of which it is difficult fully to identify. Like Kierkegaard in the 19th century, I contrast dread with fear. Fear is a feeling the object of which one can usually identify, name concretely. The object of dread is a feeling of anxiety and unsettlement the sources of which I cannot concretely or precisely articulate.

“Facing Futureless Futures,” the subtitle, speaks to the ways in which we have created or collectively allowed to be created social conditions that threaten our very wellbeing, if not existence. That some are talking about “the sixth extinction” exactly expresses this heightening anxiety about the survival not just of lifestyle but of life, of the world that supports life itself.

Can you tell us about the book?

I wanted to account for the conditions prompting this pervasive sense of dread, of uncontainable anxiety. The authoritarianisms that seemed to be taking hold, the unhinged statements and expressions struck me as symptomatic of something deeper, structurally more pervasive and difficult to address. So I was concerned to string together an analysis of those conditions, to offer a language of analysis for what is happening to us, what we are doing to ourselves and over which we think we have little if any control.

These include the pervasive emergence of algorithmic culture, the ways algorithms are structured increasingly into and order our everyday activities, the overwhelmingly instrumentalist mode of thinking it insists upon, often in increasingly intrusive ways (the “internet of everything”). This pervades not just how we order consumer goods, how we invest, how we learn at school and college but how we run our homes and businesses, increasingly how cars drive, how and with whom we interact, how we relate to each other, indeed, the quickening pace of worker and work function replacement by robots. Everything we do when electronically connected is now being tracked—where we go, who we interact with, what we consume, how we vote, our medical conditions, our work habits, everything! And that in turn becomes the basis for shaping and reshaping our desires but also the (narrowing of) possibilities presented to each of us.

Increasingly, chips are being inserted into human beings, for a variety of purposes, from medical reasons to consumption accessibility (we are in the early process of being turned into walking credit cards), to tracking productivity, and government control. The digital is transforming the very nature of the human into the techno-human.

The anxiety all this is producing, consciously or not, includes the sense of lost privacy and transparency, depersonalized desire, and undermined self-control. This is readily exacerbated by events and even structures over which we take ourselves to have little or any control, like the pandemic and the impacts of climate change, the conditions for the production of both of which have been dramatically over-politicized. And all of this has laced through it structurally produced differentiations of class, race, and gender, further intensifying the concerns. The outcome of all of this, I suggest, is the ramping up of “civil war,” less conventionally understood than as more or less violent contestations over how we should all be living in the world.

Did you learn anything while writing the book?

One cannot address a dominant set of social concerns without first understanding it. The given is not indelibly cemented into place. What looks like natural conditions is often, at the very least, socially arranged. That means what we have made with debilitating effect we can unmake.

Above all, this invites a relational mode of analysis. It involves seeing—in the sense of looking at the world—in its deeply relational constitution. What we do in one place both affects and is affected by what others are doing elsewhere. Like the weather, environmental impacts and pandemics know no national boundaries or borders. Tracking is at once individually isolating and, less visibly, deeply relational. Racial ideas circulate globally, even if taken up and expressed differently in one place from another, just as racisms in one place are shored up and sustained by racisms elsewhere. For example, critical race theory was originally formulated and fashioned in American law schools but both its application and of late its facile condemnation have been taken up as far afield as Britain, France, and Australia.

And second, I found myself reaching a more hopeful conclusion, if not ending. I suggest that those societies that have taken seriously infrastructures of care for members of the society at large are far better able to address collective challenges such as pandemics and the impacts of climate change, or indeed racisms, at least in principle. Societies that fared better in quickly addressing the pandemic and saving their populations from rampant infection and death have been those that have invested more readily and enduringly in social infrastructures of care.

What is the purpose of the book?

To elaborate an analysis and vocabulary for understanding the debilitating social and ecological conditions we have created and face, and how we might address the challenges in creatively relational ways.

What are you wanting your readers to take away from the material?

Three insights: that we have created a world that in all it gives us is undermining the very conditions of possibility for sustaining those affordances; that the technological apparatuses so completely transforming our worlds and who we are in them,    especially tracking technologies, enable possibilities not previously available. But at the very same time they have proved debilitating, socially, ecologically, and increasingly politically; that a completely self-regarding disposition to the world, individually and nationally, is in stark contrast with one that recognizes our deeply relational condition socio-ecologically; the deeply relational ways in which socio-ecological worlds are constituted become key to addressing the challenges we are facing interactively.

What were the key challenges you faced when writing this book?

The conditions unfolding across the world were transforming remarkably quickly. The pandemic took hold in the middle of writing the book, shutting down much of what we had taken for granted. It revealed deep socio-economic  disparities, racially indexed, exacerbating the impacts.  These were further ramified by the George Floyd murder, among others, and the protests that followed. While I was already lacing racial analysis into the analytic contours of the book, the series of police killings and protests as well as the attacks on Asians, especially women, needed to be referenced. Nor could one write a book about dread without addressing the pandemic. So I added a chapter devoted to Covid and its social impacts and implications pretty much in situ.

What was the highlight of writing this book?

Being in sustained conversation with close intellectual friends and colleagues about the range of conditions I address in the book. This was especially productive and meaningful given our extended collective remoteness as a pandemic consequence. But also, because I was thinking and writing in the midst of an unfolding of the very conditions which I was addressing.

Is there anything that you would like to add for the readers?

The world we have inherited and from which we make ourselves today has furnished us with extraordinary possibility. But in being less mindful of the cumulative impacts of the many generations of this making we have just begun to understand that our world also is in advanced process of radically undermining the conditions making its enduring sustainability possible. The book is about our present circumstances with a view to understanding some of what it will take to have futures to which to look forward. I very much hope it is read in this spirit.

Emily Bunn image via emilyxbunn on Instagram for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily

Emily Bunn is a writer and photographer, who has been published by the likes of 360 Magazine, County Lines Magazine, Cambridge Editors, Society19, Milkcrate, WhatsPop and Gauge Magazine, among others. Specializing in lifestyle writing and entertainment journalism, Emily is constantly on the pulse of pop culture.

A bonafide media mogul, Emily currently works at 360 Magazine. While Emily produces stories in a variety of topics, she concentrates on the topics of fashion and beauty, music and entertainment, current affairs coverage, and auto industry writing. The impressive roster of clientele she’s produced writing for via 360 Magazine includes celebrities such as Beyoncé, Markice Moore, and John Oates, and high-end brands like Rolls-Royce, Lamborghini, and TAG Heuer. While Emily began as a digital media intern with 360, she has been able to cement herself as a valuable asset to the magazine as the Executive Assistant.

Emily is arriving on the scene of the publishing industry with spunk and diligence. She recently graduated magna cum laude in May of 2021 from Emerson College. During her time at Emerson, Emily majored in Writing, Literature and Publishing, with a minor in Photography. She was involved with various on-campus publications, including writing for the music blog, Milkcrate, and providing photography for the design-oriented literary magazine, Gauge.

Emily’s photographic responsibilities progressed throughout her collegiate career, due to success in documentary, darkroom, and digital photography courses. Emily’s deep passion for image-making blossomed as she worked as a film and photo tech at Emerson College’s darkroom and photo lab. Able to produce images both through both analog and digital mediums, Emily enjoys documenting street photography and live music events. Her debut photography exhibition, “People Watching” was showcased at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts in November of 2020.

A live music enthusiast, Emily has always been very involved in her local music scene. In Boston, she worked on the Live Events team at Emerson College’s radio station, WECB.fm. Representing the underground sound of Emerson, Emily worked with the team to produce open mic nights, campus events, and sold out concerts. Eventually, Emily’s participation with WECB.fm landed her the position of Live Events Manager. She produced large scale concerts for a variety of notable musicians, including Alex G, Japanese Breakfast, and Diet Cig. Emily also worked to highlight emerging, local artists in her community by photographing album covers and organizing band photoshoots.

Emily’s involvement with the radio station didn’t stop there, as she was also a live broadcast DJ personality on WECB.fm. Throughout her entire collegiate career, Emily performed as the personality for several radio shows, including “The Cry Guys” and “Suppy?” As a DJ, Emily worked to curate weekly radio show playlists and grow her listenership. Both of her shows highlighted recently released alternative music. A weekly album review accompanied each episode, in which Emily researched and reported on musicians and offered her opinion on stand-out album tracks. Both “Suppy?” and “The Cry Guys” premiered weekly on Sunday mornings, and Emily was sure to wake up, electrify, and excite listeners with her punk music curation.

Looking towards the future, Emily is working to continue expanding her music coverage repertoire, honing in her interviewing abilities, and creating engaging, politically conscious, intelligent digital content. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Instagram.

"People Watching" photography exhibit by Emily Bunn, photographed by Emily Bunn, for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily Bunn at her “People Watching” photography exhibit at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, MA.

AMERCHAVEZUSA from Anthony Blackwood from Marvel Entertainment for use by 360 Magazine

AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #4!

Fans are getting to know America Chavez like never before in her latest series, AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA! Written by Kalinda Vazquez (Once Upon a Time, Marvel’s Runaways) with art by Carlos Gómez (Amazing Mary Jane), each issue of the limited series has been packed with exciting revelations about the breakout hero’s fascinating origins and promising future. Not only has she encountered Catalina, a mysterious woman claiming to be America’s sister, but she’s learned that her home dimension, the Utopian Parallel, may not even exist! These shocking moments combined with an intimate new look at her Washington Heights upbringing have made this explosive story a critically acclaimed hit but the greatest reveals are still to come.

“Working on this America Chavez mini-series has truly been a dream come true, not only because I love the character, but because of my incredible collaborators on this book,” Vazquez said. “Editor Annalise Bissa, artist Carlos Gómez, colorist Jesus Aburtov and letterer Travis Lanham all make this book what it is; they took my scripts and ran with them, bringing them to the next level. I can’t wait for readers to see how this arc will wrap up, and I’m so excited to see what comes next for America.”

Check out never-before-seen artwork from AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #4 plus two all-new variant covers by Marvel’s Stormbreaker Natacha Bustos and lifestyle illustrator Marc Aspinall in his Marvel Comics debut. And don’t miss the next pivotal chapter in the saga of America Chavez when AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #4 hits stands on July 7th! For more information, visit Marvel.

Retailers, don’t forget to order your copies of AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #4 by Monday, June 14th!

AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #4 (OF 5)

Written by Kalinda Vazquez

Art by Carlos Gómez

Colors by Jesus Aburtov

Cover by Sara Pichelli (May210650)

Variant Cover by Marc Aspinall (May210651)

On Sale 7/7!

AMERICA CHAVEZ: MADE IN THE USA #5 (OF 5)

Written by Kalinda Vazquez

Art by Carlos Gómez

Cover by Sara Pichelli (Jun210699)

Variant Cover by Natacha Bustos (Jun210700)

On Sale 8/11!

To find a comic shop near you, visit here.

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of more than 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media for over eighty years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing, publishing, games, and digital media.

For more information visit Marvel.

© 2021 MARVEL

Fran Lebowitz via Emporium Presents for use by 360 Magazine

An Evening with Fran Lebowitz

In a cultural landscape filled with endless pundits and talking heads, Fran Lebowitz stands out as one of our most insightful social commentators. She will be at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre, for “An Evening with Fran Lebowitz,” on April 15, 2022. Tickets go on sale Friday, May 28th and are available HERE.  

Lebowitz’s essays and interviews offer her acerbic views on current events and the media – as well as pet peeves about tourists, baggage-claim areas, after-shave lotion, adults who roller skate, children who speak French, or anyone who is unduly tan. The New York Times Book Review calls Lebowitz an “important humorist in the classic tradition.” Purveyor of urban cool, Lebowitz is a cultural satirist whom many call the heir to Dorothy Parker.

Her writing — pointed, taut and economical — is forthright, irascible, and unapologetically opinionated.

Lebowitz worked odd jobs, such as taxi driving, belt peddling, and apartment cleaning (“with a small specialty in Venetian blinds”), before being hired by Andy Warhol as a columnist for Interview. That was followed by a stint at Mademoiselle. Her first book, a collection of essays titled Metropolitan Life, was a bestseller, as was a second collection, Social Studies. By turns ironic, facetious, deadpan, sarcastic, wry, wisecracking, and waggish, Lebowitz’s prose is wickedly entertaining. Her two books are collected in the Fran Lebowitz Reader, with a new preface by the author. Lebowitz is also the author of the children’s book, Mr. Chas and Lisa Sue Meet the Pandas.

Between 2001 to 2007, Lebowitz had a recurring role as Judge Janice Goldberg on the television drama Law & Order. She also had a part in the Martin Scorsese-directed film, The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). In an interview with the Paris Review, Lebowitz said “I’m not a nervous person. I’m not afraid to be on TV. I’m only afraid when I write. When I’m at my desk I feel like most people would feel if they went on TV.”

She can also be seen in various documentary films including the American Experience on New York City, as well as Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures (2016), Regarding Susan Sontag (2014), and Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol (1990), among others. In 2010 Martin Scorsese directed a documentary about Lebowitz for HBO titled Public Speaking. A new limited documentary series, Pretend It’s a City, also directed by Martin Scorsese, premieres on Netflix January 8, 2021.

Lebowitz was once named one of the year’s most stylish women by Vanity Fair. She remains a style icon. Lebowitz lives in New York City, as she does not believe that she would be allowed to live anywhere else.

Outsider Project illustration by Heather Skovlund (original artwork: Henry Darger)for 360 Magazine

Outsider Project × Henry Darger

OUTSIDER PROJECT CELEBRATES WORLD-RENOWNED CHICAGO ARTIST HENRY DARGER’S BIRTHDAY

French musician Philippe Cohen Solal found material ripe for musical expression in Chicago-born author and artist Henry Darger’s drawings, paintings, writings, life story and lyrics. The award-winning Cohen Solal drew from Darger’s oeuvre to compose OUTSIDER, an album and transmedia project honoring the renowned outsider artist. In celebration of Darger’s birthday on Monday, April 12, Intuit partners with Cohen Solal and Musee Art Moderne de Paris (MAM) on the launch of OUTSIDER, in which Cohen Solal will present an excerpt from the project live from MAM on the website at noon central time.

In the baroque pop album OUTSIDER, musicians Philippe Cohen Solal, Mike Lindsay, Adam Glover and Hannah Peel turn Darger’s paintings and writings into melodies. The album is available now on streaming platforms and the website an immersive bilingual website featuring music videos and a short film. Releasing in English on Wednesday, April 14, the accompanying bilingual podcast retraces Darger’s story through the testimonies of the people who knew him and studied and exhibited his work. Hear stories from the artist’s former landlord, Kiyoko Lerner, and learn more about the Henry Darger Room Collection, which Cohen Solal used as inspiration, from Intuit President and CEO Debra Kerr.

“It’s exciting to see Darger’s influence in new mediums. Philippe has long been inspired by both seeing the artworks in person and his visit to the Henry Darger Room at Intuit. As Darger is Intuit’s most closely associated artist and many people’s entry to the genre of outsider art, I’m always interested to see new creativity catalyzed by his story and body of work,” says Kerr. “In this case, Philippe and his colleagues have treated Henry’s legacy with the utmost respect, honor and care. Darger’s story is shrouded in mystery, and I am happy when new interpretations stay true to what we know and can uncover with rigorous scholarship. I send my warm congratulations.”

Although Darger and his mysterious artwork have been of interest to the art world for several decades now, the outsider artist lived life in obscurity as a hospital janitor. Lerner’s husband, Nathan, discovered Darger’s work shortly before the artist’s death in 1972, and the couple shared it with outsider art enthusiasts and scholars who became fascinated by him over time.

As the pandemic keeps people removed from one another, an exploration of the notably isolated Darger is especially relevant. Cohen Solal’s interest in and repurposing of Darger’s work into new artforms speak to the universality and timeless emotional rawness of the late creator’s life and work. Celebrate Darger’s legacy at this commemorative program that is sure to delight and inspire fans around the world.

For more news from Intuit, visit our press room.

ABOUT INTUIT

Founded in 1991, Intuit is a premier museum of outsider and self-taught art, defined as work created by artists who faced marginalization, overcame personal odds to make their artwork, and who did not, or sometimes could not, follow a traditional path of art making, often using materials at hand to realize their artistic vision. By presenting a diversity of artistic voices, Intuit builds a bridge from art to audiences. The museum’s mission to celebrate the power of outsider artis grounded in the ethos that powerful art can be found in unexpected places and made by unexpected creators.

Intuit is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and reserves admission by appointment for guests who are in an increased risk group. More information on the website.

Intuit is generously supported by the following organizations: Alphawood Foundation Chicago; anonymous foundations; Art Dealers Association of America Foundation; Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events; Crown Family Philanthropies; Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation; Field Foundation; Illinois Arts Council Agency; Illinois Humanities; MacArthur Fund for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at Prince; National Endowment for the Arts; Polk Bros Foundation; Prince Charitable Trust; and Terra Foundation for American Art.

Album cover with original artwork: Henry Darger, Spangled Blengins. Edible. Boy King Islands. One is a young Tuskerhorian the other a human headed Dortherean
Album cover with original artwork: Henry Darger, Spangled Blengins. Edible. Boy King Islands. One is a young Tuskerhorian the other a human headed Dortherean
Gigi Vega illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rising Star Gigi Vega

360 Magazine had the opportunity to ask rising star, Gigi Vega, questions that her fans would want to know. Gigi Vega debuted her hit song “Mistletoe Kiss” taking the holiday music charts by storm. She went viral on TikTok with 10 million views and 15k videos. In addition to writing and producing, GiGi is a dancer and choreographer. Read on to learn more about Gigi!

GIGI VEGA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 

1. How has your family inspired you and your music?

GV: I would always do little shows and auditions. My father is a jazz musician. He would play the piano, so I was always surrounded by music, and theater as well. 

2. What or who inspired your song “Watchu Tryna Do?”

GV: It just happened. Actually, had it for a while, but was finally able to come back to it. Originally, the lyrics were supposed to be “in the club”, instead of “in the crib”. But I had to make adjustments due to COVID 19

3. Talk about your producer on this song? 

GV: Jack London. He has worked with the Chainsmokers.

4. Where do you get your ideas for songwriting? 

GV: Melodies just come to me. Melodies come first for me. Lyrics come from everyday life experiences. I’ve always been into dancing and singing. It’s something that just clicked for me, but I got more into it once I started composing my own songs.

5. What charities are you aligned with and why? 

GV: Anti-bullying programs.

6. What acting projects will you be involved with in the future?

GV: I will be in The Drone That Saved Christmas. Production begins in March. After that, I hope the COVID situation improves, so I can be touring.

7. Who are your biggest influences?

GV: Janet Jackson. Definitely into anyone who is super full out, and she is one of them.

8. What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

GV: Don’t let anyone steer you in the direction of what they want you to be – it is not worth it, ever.

9. Talk about your training as a triple threat, what do you do to stay on top? 

GV: Just take a look at my Music video, it is all there. Acting, dancing, singing. I have trained in all three disciplines since I was very young. My dance training was focused on modern dance, but I am schooled in all disciplines. I have always been on stage or behind the camera, so it is second nature.

10. How do you take care of your voice? 

GV: Regular training, like an athlete. Lots of lemon and pineapple juice, as well.

11. If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

GV: Chris Brown or Jason Derulo. Dancer/singer like I am. Janet – anyone who is full out, as mentioned before.

12. What is on your playlist right now?

GV: Omarion, Michael Jackson, Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, Pop Smoke, Jason Derulo.

13. Who are you currently watching on TikTok?

GV: Everything that comes across my feed.:)

14. When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer? 

GV: Never thought about anything else. I was on stage from an early age. I made the move from stage to commercial work in my teens. Once I learned how to write solid music, I knew I wanted to record music. It was a process. I spent hundreds of hours in the studio as a kid.

15. What artist did you admire as a child?

 GV: I loved watching Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson is my absolute favorite.

16. Do you play any instruments? 

GV: I pluck out notes on the piano and guitar to help my melodies. Had many lessons and music theory, but I won’t be accompanying myself just yet.

17. What’s your fashion style?

GV: I like more tropical vibes, or casual, put-together vibes, but I always like to switch it up. I can be glam or a Tomboy. Get a girl who can do both.

18. What do you do to relax?

GV: I love fashion, always putting fashion pieces together. I learned to sew as a child, went to classes and camps for years. I was one of those kids who got a new shirt, and then I would go to my room and change the shape and design. I love listening to music and writing. Honestly, writing is my happy space.

19. What other businesses do you plan on starting to promote your brand?

GV: I am very into sneakers and shoes. I have so many different designs in my head that need to come out.

20. What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

GV: Less judgment of others, especially strangers.

Image courtesy of Jodi Jackson