Posts tagged with "LGBTQ community"

LGBTQ illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Miami Beach Pride Unveils Entertainment Line-Up

Miami Beach Pride is happy to announce its legendary pride celebration will return on September 10-19, 2021 with a hotly anticipated Festival and Parade happening on the weekend of the 18-19 boasting a star-studded roster of almost 100% LGBTQ talent. World-class entertainers such as Walk The Moon, Carson Kressley, Tracy Young, Alex Newell, Nitty Scott, and Ralphi Rosario are slated to headline the pop and latin stages this year as well as host other ticketed events during the week-long celebration. The Miami Beach Pride theme and matra is ONE LOVE, inspired by Bob Marley’s iconic song encouraging us to demonstrate love to ourselves and others, and is also the perfect tribute to the tropical surroundings that only Miami Beach can provide.

“We believe that love has the power to unify us. By reinforcing solidarity and acceptance within our community and with our allies, we can truly begin to create more inclusive spaces that are representative of our amazing LGBTQ community. ” said Rich Walczak, Executive Director, Miami Beach Pride. “The foundation on which this week is built is the concept of self-acceptance and authenticity and why we want everyone to feel like they belong at our celebration this year.”

Miami Beach Pride, working in tandem with local leaders, announced its new COVID-19 protocols and prevention measures (available online soon) for a safe and exciting festival. The organization has been examining the various factors that can lead to disease spread and seeking to mitigate with a host of safety protocols including a campaign encouraging attendees to Stop The Spread and Register For Pride. Updates to the flow of the festival will follow CDC guidelines to include: social distancing, sanitizer stations & distribution, frequent disinfection, increased VIP tent sizes and online registration. Free masks will also be available on-site.

Miami Beach Pride’s online registration portal is now available and ALL pride-goers are strongly encouraged to register. Registration enables the organization to more effectively communicate any changes in local, state and federal COVID19 safety guidelines and increases the accuracy of their contact tracing program. Please note: MBP Festival and Parade is FREE and open to the public.

To further support the health of the community, The Independent Medical Group will also be onsite to distribute thousands of COVID-19 vaccinations completely free of charge. Vaccination facilities will be clearly marked on the festival grounds and open to all attendees.

Weekend VIP packages and tickets to Sweet Spot feat. ULTRA NATE , SOAK Pool Party and Voguing Ball are now officially for sale on our website. For more information on events related to Pride as well as the latest programming, please visit miamibeachpride.com and follow us on Instagram @miamibeachpride.

image from Ernest Dukes for use by 360 Magazine

EBHONI — “ROTATION”

“Reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” — Pitchfork

Toronto R&B star Ebhoni returns today with an edgy, enthralling video for her dreamy single “Rotation.” The cut comes from her July project Good Dick & Weed, and finds Ebhoni over a woozy instrumental, singing an ode to taking control of your love life and keeping your options open. The video echoes that carefree spirit, featuring the artist riding a bike and flexing amidst a crowd of friends and dancers on a summer afternoon. Watch the video for “Rotation” HERE.

In the visual, Ebhoni flaunts a new look that showcases her badass side. With long, colorful nails and blown-out vintage film fuzz, Ebhoni looks like an icon from pop’s past transported to the modern day. Armed with a fun-loving crew, a few low-riding bicycles, a neon pink chore jacket and matching eyeshadow, Ebhoni radiates a cool that feels entirely her own.

The new video arrives amid a hot streak for the singer/songwriter. In May, Ebhoni released the unfiltered, melancholic “Rep It,” the single that kicked off the Good Dick & Weed era. That stunning drop wasn’t even her first of 2021, however. Good Dick & Weed followed February’s “X” EP, which garnered considerable critical acclaim. In addition to Pitchfork plugging the release, HotNewHipHop wrote, “Ebhoni has been one artist to keep an eye out for in the 6ix,” and The Root wrote that her music “makes you feel like you’ve been sipping on a fancy cocktail for the last few hours.” It’s no wonder FLAUNT crowned her “Our favorite new R&B artist.”

Over the last few years, Ebhoni’s string of animated R&B singles has won both commercial and critical success. In the middle of a productive 2019, Pitchfork wrote that she is “reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” Throughout her career, Ebhoni has made a point to partner with Black-owned businesses, support other women artists and workers, and to uplift the local LGBTQ+ community, which she’s done through efforts like hosting Pride Toronto. Visuals like “Rotation” only bolster the rep she’s built as one of R&B’s most magnetic young stars.

360 Magazine bottle illustrated by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Good Vibes

By: Emily Bunn × Vaughn Lowery × Gabe Majalca

360 Magazine has revealed a new, bedazzled brand bottle in collaboration with Integrity Bottles. Decorated with approximately 6,040 Swarovski crystal gems, this lavish flask radiates glamour and elegance. The shimmering container was created by artist Gabe Majalca of Good Vibe Gliders, who constructed the piece in over thirty hours of dedicated craftsmanship. Thousands of glimmering gems encase the container, creating a luxurious, polished and sophisticated look, as 360 Magazine represents. The bottle is to be debuted at the upcoming 360 Magazine Immersive Bodega Pop-Up.

Chrysolite, which is Greek for “gold stone,” sheaths the outside of the gleaming bottle in a rich yellow-green hue. For the “360” design on the side of the bottle, Chrysolite AB was utilized. Further, the cork is detailed with Electric White DeLite. The construction of the flagon took 30 hours in total. Overall, the process in creating this custom Swarovski-swathed bottle was time consuming, but the end result is an incredible feat of precision and dazzling artistry.

On 360 Magazine’s website, the popular Summer Sip List showcases some of the magazine’s favorite alcohol brands and drinks, all of which can be enjoyed in the new container. Cocktail recipes like Pinnacle Vodka’s Apricot Honeysuckle Spritz, Santo Spirit’s Hibiscus Smash, D’USSE’s champagne sparkler, and Cavit Wines’ Rosjito all invite readers to host a happy hour of their own. 360 Magazine is sure that the new pitcher will bring good times spent together enjoying fine sips and spirits. Now that the careful process of creating the bottle is over with, we will be sure to use this bottle in our everyday lives, whether we’re trying out new cocktail recipes, transporting drinks on-the-go, or simply displaying the container’s magnificent beauty.

This isn’t the first time 360 Magazine has worked with Integrity Bottles. In November of 2020, Integrity Bottles unveiled the 360 Magazine collection of glassware. The collection features seven products, including decanters, a refillable bottle, a stemless wine glass, a whiskey rocks glass, a 16 oz pint glass, and a Gibraltar beer mug. As with the previously released products, the new bedazzled carafe can hold your scotch, vodka, tequila, gin, rum, or any other desired sips. As the two brands look to their most recent collaboration to create the Swarovski-coated container, Integrity and 360 Magazine gleam with pride and assurance in the highest quality of production.

Integrity Bottles started as a small business between friends, but has blossomed into a thriving online store and studio based in San Diego. The company is run by military veterans and former law enforcement officers who always place integrity and honor at the forefront of their business practices. Having sold more than 3,200 bottles and earned 100% positive reviews on Amazon, Integrity Bottle products are sure to bring more merry making into your home. Integrity Bottles’ website can be accessed here, and customers can use the discount code “GIVEBACK” for 5% off their purchase.

Gabe Majalca, who constructed the 360 Magazine × Integrity Bottles’ bottle, spoke about the design process. His brand, Good Vibe Gliders, provides custom, crystal-encrusted creations to suit customer’s vibes.

What was your process of decorating this brilliant 360 Mag bottle?

First thing was choosing the right color. We wanted something that resembled sacred water or a magical lagoon. Chrysolite and Chrysolite AB Swarovski turned out to be the color most true to my vision. Next, was construction. It’s most important to keep your lines straight at the beginning, starting with the foundation. So, by the time your pattern reaches the top, your lines will still be straight!

How long did the process of decorating the bottle with Swarovski crystals take?

It was a tedious 30-hour [long] project. The thing is, you’re not just laying stones in a line–eventually you need to fill in the 360 Logo–and that right there was a massive challenge. It’s similar to a jigsaw puzzle. Putting the right stone in the right place is paramount to the letters looking clean [and] uniform. Lots of mental energy went into the letters. I’m very pleased with how it turned out.

What did you think when Vaughn first came to you with the idea?

Vaughn’s the homie and I knew he had worked with Integrity Bottles before. So, naturally, I was stoked to hear 360 Mag was getting themselves an iced-out bottle. I’ve always wanted to complete a Swarovski bottle–so the project made perfect sense to me and I jumped right on it. Anything for Vaughn.

How do you feel after seeing the original vision tangibly come to life?

It feels great! Looks like a magical lagoon! Something to keep in mind–it’s always a marathon when doing this artwork, so seeing something come together, completely finished–well, that makes me really happy inside. This was a challenging but very satisfying project, no doubt about that.

What was your first thought when you viewed the finished bottle product?

“I’m done! I’m finally done!” Haha No really though, I’m pretty sure that’s exactly what I said. This bottle was a deceiving hard project to complete – so many elements. Since this was my first try at a something like this, there were many twists and turns to the design that I simply did not foresee. In the end, it was like someone giving me an XL pizza and sa[ying], “you can’t get up until you finish it.” Not that it wouldn’t be totally delicious while I was eating it, but eventually you slow down at about half way through [when] you’re getting full and your stomach starts to hurt, but your tastebuds and your will power keep saying MORE! That’s what this project felt like… right up to the point when [I] took the last delicious bite. Worth it.

What do you think would be the best use of this bottle? Do you have a drink of choice you imagine drinking from it?

Easy, tell Vaughn to make me a Caramelized Citrus Smash! This refreshing summer cocktail is equal parts vodka and grilled citrus juice with sparkling water or lemon-lime soda. Vaughn will need some ruby-red grapefruits, lemons, limes, and navel oranges. Slice your citrus in half, brush the cut side with some honey, and dip the cut sides in sugar. Throw your fruit cut-side-down on the grill to caramelize the sugar. Once grilled, let it rest until cool. Lastly–the booze. Mix 1.5 ounces vodka, 1.5 ounces juice, and 1 ounce of water or sparkling water.

Hey V, I’m on my way!

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

Vaughn Lowery, President of 360 Magazine, spoke about the concept and creation the 360 × Integrity Bottles design:

How you originally come up with this idea of encrusting a bottle in Swarovski crystals?

Not too long ago, Victoria Secret had embellished some lingerie in diamonds for a runway show. Shortly after, Joe Boxer mocked the idea with boxer briefs for a stint during NYFW in Bryant Park. As the former spokesperson for this brand [Joe Boxer], I struggled in these uncomfortable underwear (the rhinestones literally dug deep into my skin causing several scratches on my thighs).

Over the years, Gabe has bejeweled scooters and e-bikes for Good Vibe Gliders. Once we saw that he’s ventured out into sneakers with various customizations, we knew that he had to lace one of our Integrity Bottles with Swarovski crystals, adding a touch a glam and panache. This meticulous process took more than 30 hours and was executed by a total of 4 craftsmen with close to 1000 dollars of materials (not to mention intensive work).

Did you come up with the Chrysolite colorway?

We wanted the bottle to embody a monochromatic color palette to reflect today’s modern and colorless society in celebration of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Why were these gems/colors specifically chosen?

We provided Gabe with a water theme and the end product represents clarity and purity, mimicking our eclectic mantra of transparency. After all, 360 readers are permanently celebrating their uniqueness along with this masterpiece.

Does the vessel actually cost $1,000,000?

No, not at all. But Swarovski crystals are the closest thing to a blood diamond without destroying the lives of people like in the Congo. They refract light as a prism, showcasing almost all the colors of the rainbow (thus paying tribute to the LGBTQ community).

Why did you choose to work with Integrity Bottles again? What is working with them like?

Integrity Bottles is a veteran-led business and provides opportunities for people who have proudly served our country. The[y] [are the] same people who return from a period of service to find themselves displaced in society, especially [from] the work force.

How do you envision using this bottle in your own life?

We will exhibit the container in our workspaces and activations though out the world where guests will be able to witness its unforgettable beauty.

Furthermore, several team members mentioned that we could auction the carafe in the hopes of helping to raise awareness and offer them some financial support for their efforts.

How do you view this product as representative of 360 Magazine?

Everything in this made-to-measure bottle embodies 360. Similar to life’s circle, we start our journey into this world as a fragile piece of glass. Over the years, we have evolved into something bigger and better than we were before.

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Gabe Maljalca for use by 360 Magazine

360 Magazine x Integrity Bottles bottle image by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

*This bottle is dedicated to our near and dear friend Chris March.

Armon Hayes image via Armon Hayes for use by 360 Magazine

Armon

Armon Hayes is an editor for 360 Magazine and the creative director for Ace of Haze Style of Ace (AOHSOA). Armon’s innovative eye for detail allows him to create long lasting partnerships with clientele as he helps them develop their personal brands. His design brand offers styling, design services, brand management, and lifestyle products. AOHSOA’s brand motto, “It’s not who you wear, how” encompasses the thoughtfulness with which Armon addresses each individual client to best emphasize their strengths and build their brands. This personalized approach to brand management and styling allows for AOHSOA to stand out in the field of design.

Armon describes his career aspirations regarding AOHSOA: “I’ve always dreamed of being an entrepreneur in the retail/fashion industry. In addition to feeding my own design sweet tooth, I enjoy developing design ideas and working with others to help them fulfill their own creative dreams. I have married these passions with the creation of Ace of Haze Style of Ace (AOHSOA) in 2017. My brand offers not only a street-luxe clothing line, but also styling and design services, home and children’s decor options, and brand management–all with the goal of motivating and empowering other creatives to look, feel, and produce their best. Our goal is to express creativity through fashion, art, and lifestyle, encompassing all creative endeavors. The focus at AOHSOA is elevating our lifestyle and transitioning our mindset. We live on the cutting-edge and believe that the key to brand success is being a part of–and influencers within–movements of change. Our motto is “It’s not who you wear, how.” This approach means that personal style should transcend past fashion trends to reflect your personality and your brand: you. Whether you’re getting back into the workforce or celebrating a milestone, when you look good, you feel good, and the world around you recognizes such. With this in mind, anyone and everyone can benefit from my brand. My clients include individuals, retail clothing brands, non-profit organizations, an independent recording artist, beauty brands and a pop culture and design magazine. Through our products, events and services, each client’s brand has been elevated. In turn, clients have been empowered to dream, create and develop their potential as they share their gifts with the world.”

Armon originally worked his way up in the retail industry, and now has created his own brand. He explains his journey to reaching his current achievements: “To me, success is measured as any opportunity from which I’ve had to learn and grow. In 2015/2016, before creating AOHSOA, I had the opportunity to participate in a spring product review when employed by True Religion as a store director. This experience sparked ideas in me for my future and gave me a raw understanding of the inner workings of a successful brand. My creativity and marketing sense was ignited in a way that I still look back on with gratitude. This experience led me to working as the assistant stylist for Toure Designs’ fashion show in 2018. At the fashion show, I had an idea that I felt would elevate a look just moments before the model was to walk the runway: having the model walk while shirtless. Fortunately, it was a very well received style suggestion. In that moment, I learned to trust my instincts, which has helped, and will continue to help, my endeavors with AOHSOA.

“More recently, I worked on several projects with independent recording artist, LaJune. As her personal stylist and creative director for three years, this is truly a passion project. During the pandemic, we collaborated on two live performances and two music videos. Additionally, we worked on an editorial shoot featuring Land Rover’s Defender to be featured in 360 Magazine. More recently, I hosted my second pop-up shop activation, The Bodega. The relaxed shopping event featured AOHSOA trunk options, and introduced a new assortment of blouses & dresses called “Onesie”. The one-size-fit-most offerings were a success, selling out of samples and having many orders placed. 2020 highlighted my need to develop a multifunctional living space, which has been an integral piece to my growth and development as a business owner. With the help of talented friends, family and supporters, we developed a space for myself and other creatives to come to develop their art and conduct business, with a twist. This living space has proved successful for both LaJune, AOHSOA, and my partners, as they may continue working, producing and creating safely during the uncertainty. The space, #360TRAP, has led to invaluable collaborations and partnerships.”

“While the pandemic has weighed heavy on small business owners, Armon found a way to take advantage of his downtime. He continues explaining how 2020 affected his career path and personal vision: “The pandemic has helped me realize the need for businesses and artists to pivot and evolve in order to overcome challenges. It became important to use the down time of lockdown wisely so that I wouldn’t lose the momentum I’ve generated, nor plateau creatively. I found myself unemployed and unable to operate AOHSOA in the traditional way. However, I felt even more committed to making AOHSOA successful and on the front lines of a movement of change. With the time the pandemic afforded me to commit myself to this passion full-time, I developed my administrative and brand management skill set in preparation for a resurgence. Additionally, the social justice movement gave people like myself an opportunity to reflect on the times and ways in which we can impact the world and its ecosystem. AOHSOA is committed to progress in diversity and inclusivity – it’s who we are. Expressing myself creatively supported me with a clearer perspective, and more importantly, an outlet for my process. I began sewing more, creating merchandise, and focusing on building my inventory and my social presence through blogging. I strategized around ensuring AOHSOA could survive and thrive in a pandemic, and set goals for the next six months. After creating a space, #360TRAP, in partnership with 360 Magazine, I developed concepts and ideas that mutually benefitted my business and my clients. I grew my client list and increased sales by $515 over this time last year. I honed in on social media engagement, adding a layer to my brand by sharing lifestyle aspects via my blog. On the blog, I discuss all things fashion, music and lifestyle, with elements of design. I am also working toward evolving this business into a bespoke brand with customized curations, as well as capsule fashion.

“As a precursor to World Blood Day and my birthday in June 2021, AOHSOA hosted a pop-up shop called the Bodega that featured several clients and sponsors. These collaborators included Respire by Design, The 6th Clothing Co., a local NYC tattoo artist,  Chinelos Tacos NYC food truck, CocoOil, and Zavor. The event was a direct response to realign and reconnect with my community post-isolation. I continued to develop concepts for LaJune, including a streetwear collection of merchandise for her third EP, Mind. The merchandise collection is titled #mindmerch, and has been made available to her fans and supporters of AOHSOA. Our partnership, live performances, and music videos led to a collaboration with Viacom and a video shot at Smash Studios. These challenging times have taught me to pivot (sometimes at a moment’s notice), adjust, and be consistent in executing my plans. Having a network of talented supporters and friends has allowed for delegation and shared responsibilities, and most importantly, resources. All of these efforts resulted in a 47% increase in site sessions over 2020, with 51% representing unique visitors retaining 38% of existing traffic. As we enter the fourth quarter of this year, at my digital shop we anticipate an increased in traffic shy of 26% of last year’s visitors. Despite the challenges of the pandemic, I committed myself to elevating my brand with proven success. I embrace future challenges with an open heart because I know they will only make me smarter and stronger.”

Armon continues to work to grow his innovative, fashionable design brand, Ace of Haze Style of Ace. Through conducting SWOT analyses and evaluating his business practices, Armon looks to the future with determination and his signature creative flair. He is committed to inclusivity and actively works to pay forward his successes. Armon looks to use the platform AOHSOA has granted him to continue to pursue his own dreams, and help others do the same. He looks to not only building his brand empire, but also giving back to his community through charitable endeavors and his design abilities. Through creating opportunities for and mentoring the next generation of future fashion entrepreneurs, Armon aims to aid other young creatives in finding their own personal brands.

In describing his brand’s business model, Armon remarks that ” I believe that newly formed corporations should add activations for their diverse team members to feel comfortable and accepted no matter their color, creed, belief, sexuality or religion, and I aim to have AOHSOA be a leader in this effort. I want to position my organization to reflect the “Ballroom” culture within the LGBTQ community, by fostering a movement in life & style and allowing creatives a safe space to hone their skills and talents while they build their network. I am also looking forward to becoming more active in charitable endeavors, specifically working with kids/teens to help them find their brand within.”

Follow AOHSOA on Instagram and check out their website.

Armon Hayes image via Armon Hayes for use by 360 Magazine

LGBT flag illustration by Symara Wilson for 360 Magazine

ABC Owned TV Stations Pride Content

ABC OWNED TELEVISION STATIONS FURTHER SOLIDIFY THEIR COMMITMENT TO SERVE THE LGBTQ+ COMMUNITY AND THEIR ALLIES WITH PREMIUM CONTENT AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES ACROSS ITS EIGHT STATIONS IN CELEBRATION OF PRIDE MONTH 2021

In a Range of Annual Pride Parade Coverage Across Linear—Including the Exclusive Streaming Special ‘Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be,’ Daily News Reporting, Educational Town Halls and Community Resources—Pride is on Display Across the Eight-Owned Stations’ Markets

ABC Owned Television Stations announce their content for Pride Month, with the addition of educational town halls and community resources for the LGBTQ+ community and viewers across their markets of New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston, San Francisco, Raleigh-Durham and Fresno.

Yesterday, ABC Owned Television Stations released the two-episode premiere of Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be, with full episodes of the series available for viewers beginning June 21 on the station group’s connected TV apps. The eight-episode short documentary series amplifies the voices of the transgender community across America through first-person narratives. OnJune 23, the “Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be”town hall will be available to stream across the station group’s connected TV apps. The post-documentary will discuss issues impacting the transgender community. The town hall will be co-hosted by transgender activist and award-winning writer Raquel Willis and KGO-TV reporter Reggie Aqui.

ABC7/KABC-TV Los Angeles, Southern California’s most-watched station, will exclusively air “Thrive with Pride Celebration,” SATURDAY, June 12, (9:00-10:00 p.m. PDT). The special is co-produced by ABC7 Los Angeles and Christopher West. Actress Raven-Symoné and ABC7 “Eyewitness News” anchors Ellen Leyva and Brandi Hitt host the one-hour special, with correspondents Karl Schmid and Eric Resendiz. Highlights from the special include how the LGBTQ+ community has evolved over the past five decades, where the community stands today in terms of equality, honors LGBTQ+ frontline heroes, and revisits the tragedy of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando on the fifth anniversary. The special also includes several pride performances from award-winning musicians such as the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles and the Backstreet Boys’ AJ McLean, performing his song “Love Song Love,” which celebrates the transgender community. Special appearances include “Grey’s Anatomy” star Jake Borelli, “Pose” stars Billy Porter and Mj Rodriguez, Freeform’s “Everything’s Gonna be Okay” star Adam Faison, and the cast of Hulu’s “Love, Victor.” Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

ABC7/WABC-TV, the most-watched station in the nation, is the broadcast partner for the “2021 NYC Pride March” for the fifth year in a row. Throughout the month, the No. 1 station will feature local LGBTQ+ leaders and provide resources and local news coverage celebrating Pride, leading up to a three-hour celebration of the “2021 NYC Pride March,” airing on SUNDAY, June 27 (12:00-3:00 p.m. EDT) and available on streaming platforms. Grand Marshals Wilson Cruz, Ceyenne Doroshow, Menaka Guruswamy and Arundhati Katju, Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, and Aaron Philip are heading this year’s celebration. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

An overview of Pride Month programming across linear and streaming includes the following:

ABC7/WLS-TV Chicago celebrates Pride month featuring extensive news coverage of LGBTQ+ issues, events and activities. ABC7 will air a half-hour special, “Our Chicago: Celebrating Pride” on SATURDAY, June 26 (6:30 p.m. CDT) with a rebroadcast on SUNDAY, June 27 (11:00 p.m. CDT).In addition, ABC7 Chicago hosts two streaming Our Chicago: Voices of the Community” town halls hosted by WLS’s “I-Team” consumer investigator Jason Knowles. The first town hall, “Issues Facing the LGBTQ+ Community,” airs on THURSDAY, JUNE 10 (2:00-3:00 p.m. CDT). The forum will share programs to address anti-gay hate, legislation impacting transgender people, and whether the lesbian community feels heard within the general LGBTQ+ discourse. Expert panelists will discuss “Northalsted” (the new name for the historically gay neighborhood known as “Boystown”) and the petition to change the name, and the controversy surrounding current FDA (Food and Drug Administration) restrictions on blood donations from gay men. The second town hall,“LGBTQ+ Youth Town Hall” is available on THURSDAY, June 24 (2:00-3:00 p.m. CDT) and focuses on LGBTQ+ youth issues – including homelessness, coming out, transgender youth and trans-youth sports.  Additional pride-focused content will air on ABC7’s “Windy City Live” which features weekly pride segments all month long. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

6abc/WPVI-Philadelphia’s “FYI Philly” Pride episode airs on SATURDAY, June 19 (7:00 p.m. EDT) with a rebroadcast the next day. The following week, WPVI’s long-running diversity-focused community affairs program, “Visions,” will spotlight events happening in the LGBTQ+ community. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC13/KTRK-TV Houston presents a streaming town hall “Protecting Our LGBTQ+ Youth” on TUESDAY, June 22 (7:00–8:00 p.m. CDT), followed by an ABC13 Localish: Houston Pride” half-hour Pride special on SATURDAY, June 26 (6:30 p.m. CDT). Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC7/KGO-TV San Francisco plans to air weekly content that includes discussions about the transgender community, proper terminology, and a community-led town hall focusing on issues that impact the LGBTQ+ community. There will be ongoing news coverage of local pride events—leading up to the “San Francisco Pride 2021” celebration taking place on SUNDAY, June 27. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC11/WTVD-TV Raleigh Durham will have ongoing news coverage of local pride events and initiatives throughout the month and will host a digital Pride town hall, “Why Terminology Matters,” on THURSDAY, June 24 (6:00 -7:00 p.m. EDT). Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

Each owned station will post resources on its websites that are relevant to the LGBTQ+ community and allies who would like to have more information or educate themselves. Additionally, all station websites have pride content that displays positive and uplifting stories about the LGBTQ+ community all year round.

Regardless of where viewers live, they can stream ABC Owned Television Stations pride content, including full episodes of “Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be” by downloading one of the following free news apps: ABC7/WABC-TV New YorkABC7/KABC-TV Los AngelesABC7/WLS-TV Chicago6ABC/WPVI-TV PhiladelphiaABC7/KGO-TV San Francisco, ABC13/KTRK-TV HoustonABC11/WTVD-TV Raleigh-Durham and ABC30/KFSN-TV Fresno on their mobile device or streaming platforms Fire TV, Android TV, Apple TV, and Roku

About ABC Owned Television Stations 

Disney Media Entertainment & Distribution’s eight owned ABC stations are multiplatform leaders in local news and information. Collectively No. 1 across all U.S. television, reaching 23% of households and more than 34 million Total Viewers and 62 million digital visitors a month, the eight stations are comprised of WABC-TV New York, KABC-TV Los Angeles, WLS-TV Chicago, WPVI-TV Philadelphia, KGO-TV San Francisco, KTRK-TV Houston, WTVD-TV Raleigh-Durham and KFSN-TV Fresno. The stations also deliver locally sourced storytelling to more than 17 million viewers across America through its multiplatform lifestyle network, Localish. In 2020, the stations received five Broadcast & Cable awards, including in the 2020 Best in Local TV Awards category as Station Group of the Year for its innovative and next-generation news reporting, and in the major market category for 2020: Best News Coverage, Best Digital Multiplatform or Website, Best Investigative Reporting Station Group and Best Public Affairs Programming, illustrating the group’s strength and ever-increasing growth and reach in the multiplatform space.

Illustration of a Booker by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Turf Shifts Modeling World

By Dana Feeney

The modeling industry has two very different faces. One side are supermodels, like Gigi and Bella Hadid, glamorously modeling, making millions of dollars, and traveling the world. The other are the unknown models working job to job, facing exploitation and manipulation by their agencies and clients, and trying to make their name in the industry. The mistreatment of models is as old as the industry itself. Skinny, cis, and white models experience this brutal reality. Working as a model is only worse for people of color [POC], LGBTQA+, and immigrants because of the lack of transparency or regulation and rampant misconduct.

New Players

The current push for diversity and inclusion has caused a much higher demand for POC, and LGBTQA+ models with different body types. In recent months, a few new players in the game are building their reputations on accountability and proper treatment of the models and creatives they represent. Three small agencies and one superpower are disrupting the model representation world: New Pandemics, Zandwagon, Community New York, and film and television power player Creative Artists Agency (CAA).
The way modeling deals traditionally work is that a model signs to an agency, such as Next Models, Ford Models, IMG Models, or Wilhelmina Models. The agency provides its models with certain services such as housing, transportation, portfolio shoots, and more. In most cases, anything an agency provides for a model they have to pay back to the agency, often at a high-interest rate. The interest rate means the longer they take to pay it back, the more they owe to the agency.

Although models sign contracts to agencies, they are not considered employees of those agencies and instead are independent contractors who the agency aids in booking jobs. The agencies do not keep models on their payroll. They do control the money that the models earn on a job and how their money models earn is distributed. Bad payment practices reach far beyond the agencies. The agencies are responsible for billing the client right after the model completes their job. Payment for jobs by agencies to their models is notoriously sketchy because clients are not required to pay upfront before shoots and can legally take up to 90 days to settle up. Most agencies take at least a 20% fee out of any money their models make and charge clients a “booking fee,” so for a $1000 job, they would charge $1200 but only pay the model $800. Worst of all, if a client does not pay the agency for work a model did, the agency does not owe the model the money they earned. The common practice in the industry is that the model only gets paid if the agency gets paid.

The film and television management world contrasts the modeling world in many ways. The modeling industry as a whole is riddled with misconduct, manipulation, and poor treatment of models by their agencies and brands. Many modeling agencies use contracts that include fees and costs they can pull out of the model paychecks and use debt, housing, and visas to keep their models dependent.

Agencies in other media such as film, only make money if their clients make money. In film, the percentage is around 10% because of unions. Although, none of these industries are flawless especially considering scandals in the film and tv world with predators like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer.
Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has a long history of representing talents across film, tv, music, and more. In August of 2020, CAA announced their partnership with KCD Worldwide, a fashion services agency, which signaled CAA’s entrance into fashion model management for the first time in the agency’s history. CAA has a strong legacy of representing high-profile individuals and building their careers. They have also stated that they only take a 10% fee out of their models’ earnings, half of the general standard of 20%. Despite their claims for better treatment of models, CAA is not blemish-free when it comes to allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct. Multiple former CAA agents have faced lawsuits.

Additionally, CAA has previously represented multiple people accused of misconduct, including Shia LaBeouf, Chris D’Elia, and Marilyn Mason; all of whom are no longer represented by CAA.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are the smaller boutique agencies mentioned earlier, New Pandemics, Zandwagon, and Community New York. New Pandemics is “a casting and management agency dedicated to increasing LBGTQ+ visibility.”

Zandwagon is “a talent management company that could guide everyday life individuals who are breaking beauty standards daily” according to their website. Community New York is run by Butterfly Cayley, Moe Lamstein, and Richie Keoall, three first-generation immigrants from Laos, and “is founded on inclusivity and progressive values by changing not only the style but the very structure of management.” Cayley, Lamstein, and Keoall have impressive experience at agencies including DNA and Elite Model Management. Community New York now represents stars such as Hunter Schafer, who is well known for her work on the hit HBO show “Euphoria” and is now a brand ambassador for Shiseido.

With small diversity forward agencies up and coming, the existing modeling industry is under attack from all sides. All three of these agencies emphasize how much they value representation and inclusivity in this industry that has avoided breaking societal beauty standards for so long. They also claim they will be different from other agencies and provide better treatment for their clients. These agencies are sending the message that you’re either with them or against them, and they’re willing to think outside of the box to get proper treatment and equity for models from all walks of life.

Same Old Problems

Many of the biggest fashion houses in the world are still reckoning with the #MeToo movement. The fashion industry is known as a highly predatory business. Many of even the largest names in modeling have had to survive people abusing their power on sets and behind the scenes to become who they are. Household names, such as Kate Upton, Coco Rocha, and Cameron Russel, have all spoken out about their experiences with the abuse they’ve experienced while working as models.

Kate Upton spoke out against Paul Marciano in 2018, which led to a total of $500,000 in settlement agreements involving five individuals. He has remained an active participant at GUESS as a board member and chief creative officer, despite resigning from his position as an executive. At the beginning of February, the news broke that Marciano is once again being sued over sexual assault allegations by a woman who has chosen to remain anonymous. The allegations against Marciano are not an isolated incident. Similarly, allegations were brought against Alexander Wang in December of 2020 but began as early as 2017, yet some still chose his side despite the overwhelming corroboration of multiple individuals. If the word of a woman as successful as Kate Upton is not enough to oust a predator from power, it’s unclear what realistically can protect vulnerable individuals with less acclaim from the same experiences or worse.

The silver lining of these allegations coming to light is the industry supporting the individuals coming forward more than ever before. In the past, many models lost their careers before they had even begun due to the actions of predators and the mechanisms powerful people use to silence their victims. Accounts such as @shitmodelmgmt and @dietprada have been using their online platforms to expose predators and condemn their actions openly across Instagram and Twitter. Additionally, the Model Alliance, an organization dedicated to giving models a voice in their work, has also spoken out against Wang on their Instagram saying, “We stand with David Casavant, Owen Mooney, Gia Garison, and all the accusers of @alexanderwangny in their pursuit towards justice.”

The upheaval that began in 2006 with survivor and activist Tarana Burke’s creation of the #MeToo movement has continued into 2021. Slowly but surely survivors are taking their power back and pushing to create real change in media industries that have exploited them for far too long.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

LGBTQ Illustration for 360 Magazine by Gabriella Archuleta

OUT CELEBRATES ANNUAL OUT100 ISSUE

Pride Media’s Out magazine is thrilled to release the 2020 Out100 presented by Lexus. The list remains the largest annual portfolio recognizing members of the LGBTQ+ for their ground-breaking, ripple-inducing, and culture-shifting impact nationwide. 

The coveted and anticipated Out100 issue features four covers including trailblazing actor Wilson Cruz, activist and BLM organizer Janaya Khan,  actor and director Joe Mantello, and artist and icon Janelle Monáe.

This year’s honorees make up one of the most diverse lists in Out magazine’s history, spanning several generations and a multitude of intersections. From 18-year-old rap sensation Kidd Kenn and 99-year old trans WWII U.S. Navy fighter pilot Robina Asti to MSNBC journalist Rachel Maddow, who in a year of political tension was a voice of reason for the LGBTQ+ community. 

From fashion legend André Leon Talley, headlining musician Lizzo, comedian Wanda Sykes, actors Jeremy Pope and Cheyenne Jackson to modeling industry heavyweight Ivan Bart, the creators of Queer Eye, and Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’s very queer team Jamal Brown, Reggie Greer, and Karine Jean-Pierre, inclusivity and progress are the driving force behind this year’s list. 

Each honoree represents not just the past but also the future. Leading into 2021, the LGBTQ+ community as a whole will undoubtedly reap the benefits of their accomplishments. This year might have brought an onslaught of challenges, but it also welcomed new opportunities to reflect on what matters to the LGBTQ+ community and what lies ahead in the fight for equality and justice.

Now more than ever, it’s vital to recognize the powerful voices leading the charge and sounding off the new vanguard of queer leaders. In a year of Pride celebrated at home instead of in the streets, community support from company partners like Lexus, Citi, Gilead, McDonald’s USA, Truly Hard Seltzer, and Stoli® Group USA, LLC has never been more important or helpful in amplifying these powerful Out100 voices moving the LGBTQ+ community forward. 

 “Community building has been the bedrock of the LGBTQ+ rights movement, and part of that is understanding the fact that we are not and have never been monolithic. All of us have a story and role to play in this fight. All of our experiences and lived realities are different, special, and integral in building a better world — together,” said Editor in Chief of Out, David Artavia.

“The Out100 list is a representation of this journey. For 26 years, it has stood the test of time and continues to empower the next generation of LGBTQ+ thought leaders, artists, and professionals to create a more inclusive future for all of us,” continued Artavia. 

This year, Out’s nationally recognized and respected Out100 issue extends beyond the brand’s print and online properties with two exciting virtual events. On Friday, November 20, the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Canada, Janaya Khan, will moderate a dynamic “How Do We Come Back From This?” symposium on what moving out of the last four years looks like for culture, politics, the movement, and ourselves, including Emmy-winning creator of Transparent Joey Soloway, trans activist Ashlee Marie Preston, and PR strategist Kelly Bush Novak.

On Saturday, November 21, the Out100 culminates in the first-ever 2020 Out100 Virtual Honoree Induction Ceremony, live at 5 p.m. Pacific (8 p.m. Eastern) at Out.com/Out100Live, and available on all Revry live channels and on-demand at 6 p.m. Pacific (9 p.m. Eastern) at watch.revry.tv.

Ashlee Keating, 360 MAGAZINE

Ashlee Keating’s “YASSS”

If quarantine has you feeling down, popstar Ashlee Keating’s new single is here to get you dancing and make you say “YASSS.”

The Billboard chart sensation, dancer, songwriter, and actress’s newest song, “YASSS,” racked up nearly 150K streams on Spotify, and now the anxiously awaited music video is out.

“YASSS,” which is a single from her upcoming EP (set to drop this summer), is a fun pop/dance track that emphasizes the importance of self-confidence. With its upbeat sound and catchy lyrics, “YASSS” is the perfect quarantine dance party track.

Ashlee is highly regarded in the LGBTQ+ industry as a supporter and activist, and she wrote this song with her LGBTQ+ friends in mind – she wants to give them the confidence through her music that they give her when she performs.

“We’ve gone through some tough times during the last few months, and I wanted to do my part to try and bring hope and happiness through my art. The world needed a pick-me-up, and I wanted “YASSS” to be that. I hope that the lyrics encourage empowerment and confidence, and the uptempo beat will help people forget about their worries for a minute. Creatively, I wanted the video to be colorful, poppy, and most importantly, fun! I wanted people to hear it and feel inspired to get up and do that in-home work out, have that dance party in the mirror with themselves or their quarantine buddy, or just feel the positive vibes for a few minutes, to help make it through another day at home,” said Ashlee.

Preceding “YASSS” is Ashlee’s single “Hurt Me So Good,” which skyrocketed up the Billboard Dance charts to #8 within days and has more than 1 million streams on Spotify. Following “Hurt Me So Good,” Ashlee’s “Bad Mistake” was released as her #1 breakout song and held its own on the Billboard Dance charts for weeks.

Watch the “YASSS” music video here.

ABOUT ASHLEE KEATING

Born in Southern New Jersey, Ashlee is truly an Italian, “Jersey Girl” at heart. She moved to Los Angeles in her early teens to pursue her career. The songstress got her debut at just six years old, landing the lead role of “Gretl” in The Sound of Music on Broadway, where she starred alongside Richard Chambarlain in the National Tour. Shortly after, she played the leading role of Annie at the famous Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia, PA – to which she was no stranger to – she had previously played the role of Molly in the same play at just four! Ashlee would go on to be selected as a contestant to be on CBS Star Search – which then lead to her selection for a spot as Radio Disney’s “up and coming artist” on their Incubator Program. Ashlee has opened up for artists like Demi Lovato, Keke Palmer, and Raven Symone.

With all this under her belt already, Ashlee is set to become a household name within the next few years. Not just as a popstar, but as a brand, entrepreneur, actress, and philanthropist. When Ashlee isn’t busy traveling to world, attending fashion week, writing chart-topping songs, or participating in gay rights productions, she enjoys working out and makes sure to meditate daily to keep her sanity.

FOLLOW ASHLEE: Instagram | TwitterSpotify

Kim Petras, Malibu, Press Here Productions, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Kim Petras – “Malibu”

KIM PETRAS Joined by Demi Lovato, Paris Hilton, Jonathan Van Ness, Charli XCX, Madelaine Petsch, Jessie J, and many more for “Malibu” (At Home Edition) Fan Video

PRESS HERE to Watch

Kim Petras has released the star-studded, “At Home Edition” fan video for her brand new single “Malibu.” PRESS HERE to watch the video, which features Kim’s most spirited fans alongside some special celebrity friends including Demi Lovato, Paris Hilton, Jonathan VanNess, Charli XCX, Loren Gray, Madelaine Petsch, Jessie J, Pablo Vittar, Aquaria, Todrick Hall, NikitaDragun, Aly & AJ, Dorian Electra, Slayyyter, Brittany Broski, Teddy Quinlivan, Bowen Yang, and many more.

Following break-up banger “Reminds Me“, “Malibu”  is a glittering, sun-kissed bop with instrumental elements and raw vocals, inspired by the silver screen, Baywatch fantasy of Malibu. The track is the next in Kim’s string of undeniable singles which have racked up more than 320 million global streams, including “Icy“, “Heart to Break“, “Sweet Spot“, “Close Your Eyes“, “Broken“, “Hillside Boys” and “I Don’t Want It At All” and follows her critically-acclaimed, 12-track project Clarity  which dominated Spotify’s “New Music Friday” and Apple Music’s “Best of The Week” for ten consecutive weeks.

Kim recently performed as part of The Stonewall Inn Gives Back – A Livestream Fundraising Concert for the LGBTQ+ Nightlife Industry alongside Cyndi Lauper, Kristin Chenoweth, Troye Sivan, Rufus Wainwright, Betty Who, Allie X, Alan Cumming, and more. Kim performed a cover of Paris Hilton’s single “Stars Are Blind” Kim also recently received a GLAADOutstanding Music Artist award nomination for Clarity after being nominated last year for Turn Off The Light, Vol. 1.

MORE ON KIM PETRAS:

Fast-rising international pop sensation Kim Petras has become one of music’s most buzzed-about artists. She has racked up more than 320 million global streams, and her  critically acclaimed debut full-length project Clarity dominated Spotify’s “New Music Friday” and Apple Music’s “Best of The Week” playlists for 10 consecutive weeks with its acclaimed singles, including glacial hit “Icy” which landed her on Good Morning America for her national TV debut.

Selling her first ticket in 2019, Kim sold out her first-ever headline tour last summer in minutes during presale, and her international The Clarity Tour sold out The Shrine in LA and two back to back nights at Avant Gardner in NYC. Kim’s undeniable voice and imaginative artistry have skyrocketed her to international recognition and earned her major mainstream media acclaim from the likes of NY Times, NPR, Vanity Fair, People, Rolling Stone, MTV, Glamour, Elle, Variety, Harper’s Bazaar, Allure, Billboard, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, Paper, V Magazine, Noisey, OUT, Pitchfork, i-D, Refinery29, and more.

First breaking out with her #1 Spotify Global Viral 50 bop “I Don’t Want It At All“, Kim launched into Top 40 radio with her pop hit “Heart to Break” opened for Troye Sivan’s nationwide Bloom Tour last year, revived and redefined Halloween music with her spooky project TURN OFF THE LIGHT, collaborated with Charli XCX, Cheat Codes, MAX, SOPHIE, Lil Aaron, and more, appeared on “How It’s Done” from the Ariana-Grande-produced Charlie’s Angels soundtrack, and has been featured on multiple billboards in New York, London, and Los Angeles as a Spotify RISE artist.

PRAISE FOR KIM PETRAS

“‘Outstanding… Clarity is full of songs that are stitched so tightly and varnished so brightly that they… transcend into something utterly new.” – New York Times

“One of pop music’s brightest talents.” – Pitchfork

“‘Clarity’ might be the best-constructed collection of R&B-inflected pop music by a female European singer.” -Variety

“Petras has slowly built a committed cult following thanks to pure pop bops like  “I Don’t Want It At All” and “Heart To Break.” – Cosmopolitan

“Petras demonstrates a robust knowledge of several decades of pop music” – Vice

“…the sparkling songcraft and knockout performances across Clarity prove her inherent talent.” – Billboard

“Kim Petras is making her pop dreams come true – on her own terms.” – People

“America’s Sweethearts shift old paradigms and inspire millions to work towards becoming them. Petras is on that track already…Clarity proves just how powerful and versatile Petras can be…” – Paper

“The next savior of pure unadulterated pop may be upon us…” – V Magazine

“It’s clear that Kim Petras is on the fast-track to stardom” – L’Officiel

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