Posts tagged with "Ernest Dukes"

Ebhoni via Capitol Records for use by 360 Magazine

Ebhoni – Rep It

Unfiltered and unapologetic, Toronto’s “bad gyal” Ebhoni shares her latest visual for “Rep It.”. Directed by Jake & Oliver Productions, “Rep It” showcases the 21-year-old in her truest and most authentic form as she commands the screen with her confident “bad bitch” demeanor on full display. Ebhoni channels 90’s R&B nostalgia giving viewers an inside look on Toronto fashion, glam and culture. Watch HERE.

Framing the dissolution of a relationship that never was, her honest lyrics are a candid complement to the track that generates an emotional resonance beyond it’s barely two-minute run time. A product of both faded nighttime and the melancholic reflection of the morning after, Ebhoni’s matter-of-fact verses remain in the same harshly ephemeral gleam that highlights her own personal heartbreak into an evocative anecdote that feels both universally relatable and unexpectedly transcendent.

About Ebhoni

Ebhoni is a Canadian musician and model. Originally from Toronto and moving to Oshawa after her parents’ divorce, she was a Youtuber, doing covers of Beyonce and Keyshia Cole songs before releasing her debut EP, Mood Rings at seventeen in 2017 and her next EP X earlier this year. She has also modeled for Savage X Fenty and Adidas.

Ebhoni via Alex Hodor-Lee for Capitol Records foruse by 360 Magazine

Artwork courtesy of Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

Fire in Little Africa – Elevator

FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA ALBUM OUT NOW + POWERFUL VISUAL FOR ELEVATOR VIA MOTOWN RECORDS/BLACK FORUM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BOB DYLAN CENTER AND WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER, Album Brings Fresh And Important Perspective To The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre And Celebrates The City’s Vibrant Hip Hop Scene, LISTEN & STREAM FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA HERE, WATCH ELEVATOR VISUAL HERE

Fire in Little Africa, a groundbreaking album of original material, written and recorded by a collective of Oklahoma hip hop artists to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, will be released on May 28 by Motown Records/Black Forum in partnership with Tulsa’s Bob Dylan Center and Woody Guthrie Center.

The 21-track collection gets to the truth of what happened on May 31 and June 1, 1921 when a white mob descended on the streets of Greenwood, then a prosperous Tulsa neighborhood known as Black Wall Street, and burned down the business district, destroying roughly 1,500 homes, killing hundreds and leaving thousands of Black Tulsans homeless. For years, this historic, albeit dire, chapter was left out of classrooms and textbooks as the city attempted to erase this part of its past. The artists heard on Fire in Little Africa get to the truth through urgent songs, recalling stories told and stories lived in hope to usher in a new era for Tulsa as they help the community process this generational trauma through music.

‘Fire in Little Africa’ is a powerful and timely project that provides a platform and outlet for the incredibly talented and thriving music community of Tulsa, Oklahoma, said Motown Records Chairman & CEO, Ethiopia Habtemariam. Carrying the legacy of the Black Wall Street community, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ is a body of work filled with purpose and prolific storytelling. I am honored and feel privileged to have Motown Records/Black Forum partner with Dr. View, the Bob Dylan Center and Guthrie Center to release this impactful hip-hop album.

Track List

  1. Elevator
  2. City of Dreams
  3. Shining
  4. Descendants
  5. Regardless
  6. Party Plane (feat. Charlie Wilson)
  7. Been Through It All
  8. Drowning
  9. Our World
  10. Top Down
  11. Creme of the Crop
  12. 918 Thug Town Skit
  13. Watchu On
  14. P.O.D.
  15. Reparations
  16. P.O.D. Pt. II
  17. Raw Cocaine
  18. The Rain
  19. North Tulsa Got Something to Say
  20. Brunch at the Brady
  21. Young & Free

I am honored to be a part of the ‘Fire In Little Africa’ album featuring the musical contributions of young talented local artists from my hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This tragedy has been suppressed for generations. Charlie Wilson continues, Growing up in Tulsa we named our band, The GAP Band, after Greenwood, Archer and Pine Streets, the wealthiest and most successful African American community in the United States in the early 20th century. I am proud to see a new generation of talented Tulsans continue to tell the story of our ancestors. They are opening the door for many generations to come by shedding light not only on the race massacre but the excellence of the Black Wall Street and Greenwood community.

Stevie Dr. View Johnson, PhD, Manager, Education & Diversity Outreach at the Woody Guthrie Center|Bob Dylan Center and the album’s executive producer added, Fire in Little Africa has evolved into a communal hip hop movement and we’re excited that we get to share the flavor, history and legacy of Black Wall Street with the world, in collaboration with the amazing leadership of the Motown/Black Forum family. We’re grateful for Ethiopia’s foresight in providing us an opportunity to share our important stories with the world. There are Black Wall Streets across the diaspora and we unequivocally know that ‘Fire in Little Africa’ will inspire many people. In the words of Steph Simon, ‘everything is us.’ 

In this feature Rolling Stone noted, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ is poised to teach the world about that long-suppressed history, from locals who grew up in a community that still lives with the aftermath of the massacre. Just as important, the artists involved in the project also hope it serves as a launching-pad moment for Tulsa’s hip-hop scene, which has long flown under the national radar.

The album was recorded in Greenwood over a five-day period in March 2020. Studios were set up at the Greenwood Cultural Center and other locations, including the former home of 1921 massacre mastermind/KKK leader Tate Brady. The house is now owned by former NFL first-round draft pick and Tulsa native Felix Jones. The Tulsa World was on hand to speak with the artists involved in the historic sessions. Read the article HERE and check out the accompanying video HERE.

‘Fireside with Dr. View’ is a weekly podcast featuring Dr. View in conversation with thought leaders in activism, academia and culture, centered on the movement behind the Fire in Little Africa music. Listen to Fireside with Dr. View HERE. Hosts Ali Shaw and Doc Free sit down with Fire in Little Africa artists, Tulsa community leaders and national voices for conversations on music and culture in the Fire in Little Africa podcast, which can be found HERE.

Located in the Tulsa Arts District, the Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013. The Bob Dylan Center is expected to open on the same block within the next year. Both are projects of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the primary funder for Fire in Little Africa. The album is chronicled in a documentary film, which will be released later this year.

Fire in Little Africa marks the first new material released by Black Forum since the label’s relaunch earlier this year. Black Forum originally debuted in 1970 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Why I Oppose The War In Vietnam, which won a GRAMMY Award for Best Spoken Word Album. The label reissued Dr. King’s influential speech earlier this year.

Visit the official Fire in Little Africa website, YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. Follow the Black Forum on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.

Fire in Little Africa artwork courtesy of Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

Fire in Little Africa Announces Tracklist

FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA ALBUM ART & TRACK LIST REVEALED + CHARLIE WILSON ANNOUNCED AS GUEST FEATURE, SET FOR MAY 28 RELEASE VIA MOTOWN RECORDS/BLACK FORUM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BOB DYLAN CENTER AND WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER, Album Brings Fresh And Important Perspective To The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre And Celebrates The City’s Vibrant Hip Hop Scene

Visit the official Fire in Little Africa website here!

Fire in Little Africa, a groundbreaking album of original material, written and recorded by a collective of Oklahoma hip hop artists to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, will be released on May 28 by Motown Records/Black Forum in partnership with Tulsa’s Bob Dylan Center and Woody Guthrie Center.

The 21-track collection gets to the truth of what happened on May 31 and June 1, 1921 when a white mob descended on the streets of Greenwood, then a prosperous Tulsa neighborhood known as Black Wall Street, and burned down the business district, destroying roughly 1,500 homes, killing hundreds and leaving thousands of Black Tulsans homeless. For years, this historic, albeit dire, chapter was left out of classrooms and textbooks as the city attempted to erase this part of its past. The artists heard on Fire in Little Africa get to the truth through urgent songs, recalling stories told and stories lived in hope to usher in a new era for Tulsa as they help the community process this generational trauma through music.

‘Fire in Little Africa’ is a powerful and timely project that provides a platform and outlet for the incredibly talented and thriving music community of Tulsa, Oklahoma, said Motown Records Chairman & CEO Ethiopia Habtemariam. Carrying the legacy of the Black Wall Street community, Fire in Little Africa is a body of work filled with purpose and prolific storytelling. I am honored and feel privileged to have Motown Records/Black Forum partner with Dr. View, the Bob Dylan Center and Guthrie Center to release this impactful hip-hop album.

Track List:

  1. Elevator
  2. City of Dreams
  3. Shining
  4. Descendants
  5. Regardless
  6. Party Plane (feat. Charlie Wilson)
  7. Been Through It All
  8. Drowning
  9. Our World
  10. Top Down
  11. Creme of the Crop
  12. Thug Town Skit
  13. Watchu On
  14. P.O.D.
  15. Reparations
  16. P.O.D. Pt. II
  17. Raw Cocaine
  18. The Rain
  19. North Tulsa Got Something to Say
  20. Brunch at the Brady
  21. Young & Free

I am honored to be a part of the ‘Fire In Little Africa’ album featuring the musical contributions of young talented local artists from my hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This tragedy has been suppressed for generations. Charlie Wilson continues, Growing up in Tulsa we named our band, The GAP Band, after Greenwood, Archer and Pine Streets, the wealthiest and most successful African American community in the United States in the early 20th century. I am proud to see a new generation of talented Tulsans continue to tell the story of our ancestors. They are opening the door for many generations to come by shedding light not only on the race massacre but the excellence of the Black Wall Street and Greenwood community.

Stevie Dr. View Johnson, PhD, Manager, Education & Diversity Outreach at the Woody Guthrie Center | Bob Dylan Center and the album’s executive producer added, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ has evolved into a communal hip hop movement and we’re excited that we get to share the flavor, history and legacy of Black Wall Street with the world, in collaboration with the amazing leadership of the Motown/Black Forum family. We’re grateful for Ethiopia’s foresight in providing us an opportunity to share our important stories with the world. There are Black Wall Streets across the diaspora and we unequivocally know that Fire in Little Africa will inspire many people. In the words of Steph Simon, ‘everything is us.’

In this feature, Rolling Stone noted, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ is poised to teach the world about that long-suppressed history, from locals who grew up in a community that still lives with the aftermath of the massacre. Just as important, the artists involved in the project also hope it serves as a launching-pad moment for Tulsa’s hip-hop scene, which has long flown under the national radar.

The album was recorded in Greenwood over a five-day period in March 2020. Studios were set up at the Greenwood Cultural Center and other locations, including the former home of 1921 massacre mastermind/KKK leader Tate Brady. The house is now owned by former NFL first-round draft pick and Tulsa native Felix Jones. The Tulsa World was on hand to speak with the artists involved in the historic sessions. Read the article here and check out the accompanying video here.

Fireside with Dr. View is a weekly podcast featuring Dr. View in conversation with thought leaders in activism, academia and culture, centered on the movement behind the Fire in Little Africa music. Listen to Fireside with Dr. View here. Hosts Ali Shaw and Doc Free sit down with Fire in Little Africa artists, Tulsa community leaders and national voices for conversations on music and culture in the Fire in Little Africa podcast, which can be found here.

Located in the Tulsa Arts District, the Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013. The Bob Dylan Center is expected to open on the same block within the next year. Both are projects of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the primary funder for Fire in Little Africa. The album is chronicled in a documentary film, which will be released later this year.

Fire in Little Africa marks the first new material released by Black Forum since the label’s relaunch earlier this year. Black Forum originally debuted in 1970 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Why I Oppose The War In Vietnam, which won a GRAMMY Award for Best Spoken Word Album. The label reissued Dr. King’s influential speech earlier this year.

Make sure to follow Fire in Little Africa via their YouTube, Instagram and Facebook

Joseph Black artwork courtesy of Capitol Music group for use by 360 Magazine

Joseph Black – Mad At Me

JOSEPH BLACK DELIVERS RAW EMOTION ON NEW SINGLE MAD AT ME, WATCH THE VISUAL FOR MAD AT ME HERE, LISTEN TO MAD AT ME HERE

The rising Duluth, Minnesota, singer, rapper, and producer Joseph Black releases mad at me, the latest single from his forthcoming mixtape. Listen here. Known for his introspective breakthrough single (i hope you) miss me, Joseph showcases his signature pop-rap sound as he effortlessly delivers raw emotion and vulnerability.

The new track builds on Black’s ability to translate his personal pain into revelations anyone can relate to, which is quickly becoming one of the young star’s standout attributes. For those worried that a song as brilliant as (i hope you) miss me would be hard to follow, Joseph Black’s mad at me proves that the 21-year-old star is here to stay.

About Joseph Black

Combining a singular voice with a DIY mentality, Joseph Black is a self-made rapper, singer, and producer on a mission to make it. Supported by rich harmonies and piercing hooks, his sharp lyrics stay raw and don’t shy from emotion as the man vividly chronicles his dramas, heartbreaks, and triumphs. It’s a blend that’s already resonating with millions worldwide. For Black, who grew up on welfare and surrounded by drugs in Duluth, Minnesota, a chaotic upbringing and the struggle to persevere provide the fuel for his music. As for the kindling, an eclectic soundtrack informed his youth, a mixture of Eminem, Lil Wayne, and country that pointed him toward the twin powers of storytelling and melody. By 15, he was recording his own music, releasing one-offs and mixtapes even while getting picked on for being small. At 18, he was done fighting his way through school. Black dropped out and turned to the streets, where his new routine, an untenable juxtaposition of music daydreams and nocturnal mischief, would soon give shape to his art: soul filtered through the grit of urban life.

Shining artwork courtesy of Capitol Music Group and Motown Records for use by 360 Magazine

Fire in Little Africa

“SHINING” THE FIRST SINGLE AND VIDEO FROM FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA IS OUT TODAY VIA MOTOWN RECORDS/BLACK FORUM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BOB DYLAN CENTER AND WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

“Shining” is a celebratory song and video conveying the peak of black excellence that defined the Greenwood District 100 Years Ago. Watch the “Shining” music video here and listen to it here

Fire in Little Africa, a groundbreaking album of original material, written and recorded by a collective of Oklahoma hip hop artists to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre releases “Shining” today along with a striking visual. It is the first single from the album that will be released on May 28 by Motown Records/Black Forum in partnership with Tulsa’s Bob Dylan Center and Woody Guthrie Center. Watch, post and share the music video here.

“Shining” was produced by Executive Producer Dr. View and features Tulsa area artists Steph Simon, Dialtone, Ayilla and Jerica Wortham. The video was produced and directed by Boomintree Films with Assistant Director avitiuh.

Giving context to the video, Dr. View shares,”’Shining’ is a trip back in time to Tulsa in 1920, just before Black Wall Street was attacked, bombed and burned to the ground in the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The video conveys the peak of Black Excellence that defined the Greenwood district 100 years ago and ties it to the Fire in Little Africa movement that is showing the world how Tulsa still shines today.” He continues, “We know that the story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre is one filled with pain, darkness and trauma for Black people, but the story of Tulsa in 2021 is about the greatness that rose from the ashes. “Shining” humanizes the victims of the Tulsa Race Massacre, taking them out of the history books and showing them on a night on the town living life joyfully. That is what Greenwood was, is, and will always be about.”

ABOUT FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA

The 21-track collection gets to the truth of what happened on May 31 and June 1, 1921 when a white mob descended on the streets of Greenwood, then a prosperous Tulsa neighborhood known as Black Wall Street, and burned down the business district, destroying roughly 1,500 homes, killing hundreds, and leaving thousands of Black Tulsans homeless. For years, this historic, albeit dire, chapter was left out of classrooms and textbooks as the city attempted to erase this part of its past. The artists heard on Fire in Little Africa get to the truth through urgent songs, recalling stories told and stories lived in hope to usher in a new era for Tulsa as they help the community process this generational trauma through music.

Motown Records Chairman & CEO Ethiopia Habtemariam said, “Fire in Little Africa is a powerful and timely project that will reward listeners with a sense of discovery. Not only does it examine a largely overlooked chapter in our history, the album also pulls the curtain back on the vibrant hip hop scene that has been Oklahoma’s best-kept secret. Like the citizens who created Black Wall Street, the artists of Fire in Little Africa are driven by creativity, love, and an uplifting, ego-free sense of community. The project aligns perfectly with Black Forum’s commitment to introducing the next generation of game changers.”

Stevie “Dr. View” Johnson, PhD, Manager, Education & Diversity Outreach at the Woody Guthrie Center | Bob Dylan Center and the album’s executive producer added, “Fire in Little Africa has evolved into a communal hip hop movement and we’re excited that we get to share the flavor, history and legacy of Black Wall Street with the world, in collaboration with the amazing leadership of the Motown/Black Forum family. We’re grateful for Ethiopia’s foresight in providing us an opportunity to share our important stories with the world. There are Black Wall Streets across the diaspora and we unequivocally know that Fire in Little Africa will inspire many people. In the words of Steph Simon, everything is us.”  

In this feature, Rolling Stones noted, Fire in Little Africa is poised to teach the world about that long-suppressed history, from locals who grew up in a community that still lives with the aftermath of the massacre. Just as important, the artists involved in the project also hope it serves as a launching-pad moment for Tulsa’s hip-hop scene, which has long flown under the national radar

The album was recorded in Greenwood over a five-day period in March 2020. Studios were set up at the Greenwood Cultural Center and other locations, including the former home of 1921 massacre mastermind/KKK leader Tate Brady. The house is now owned by former NFL first-round draft pick and Tulsa native Felix Jones. The Tulsa World was on hand to speak with the artists involved in the historic sessions. Read the article here and check out the accompanying video here

“Fireside with Dr. View” is a weekly podcast featuring “Dr. View” in conversation with thought leaders in activism, academia and culture, centered on the movement behind the Fire in Little Africa music. Listen to “Fireside with Dr. View” here. Hosts Ali Shaw and Doc Free sit down with Fire in Little Africa artists, Tulsa community leaders and national voices for conversations on music and culture in the “Fire in Little Africa” podcast, which can be found here

Located in the Tulsa Arts District, the Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013. The Bob Dylan Center is expected to open on the same block within the next year. Both are projects of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the primary funder for Fire in Little Africa. The album is chronicled in a documentary film, which will be released later this year.

Fire in Little Africa marks the first new material released by Black Forum since the label’s relaunch earlier this year. Black Forum originally debuted in 1970 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Why I Oppose The War In Vietnam, which won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album. The label reissued Dr. King’s influential speech earlier this year.

ELHAE illustration by Siwoo Lee and Motown Records for 360 Magazine

ELHAE – SEPARATED

WATCH THE VISUAL FOR “SEPARATED” HERE

STREAM “SEPARATED” HERE

Emerging as a melodic force of nature, rare groove enthusiast, singer and lyricist, Elhae releases his music video for “Separated“ out now. A follow up to his infectious “Fun Fact“ single featuring Rick Ross, “Separated” showcases a more complex side of Elhae that his fans have yet to experience. The beautifully shot visual, directed by Loris Russier, captures the emotional dynamic between two lovers who are desperately trying to hold on to their union, but ultimately realize that they’re better off apart. The visual portrays raw imagery with emotional highs and lows as Elhae painfully sings of heartbreak and love lost. Watch it HERE.

Praised by XXL as being “the next R&B sensation that’s about to make a huge wave in the industry,” the visual encompasses all the elements of a classic period piece tied into a modern-day love story, proving that Elhae’s creativity and talent are both layered and timeless. “Choosing “Separated” as a single was a no-brainer for me. I just think it’s such a relatable song in the sense that everyone’s been there before, in that heartbroken space, that disappointed space.” Elhae continues, “It’s not an easy topic for most, but on the other side of it usually comes growth and wisdom.”

“I was really stoked to have Loris Russier direct the video. My creative director Siwoo Lee really put me on to his work and I just loved the colors he was using, the shots and angles he used to convey emotion.” Elhae continues “I knew he’d be the right guy for the job. Although it’s impossible to show a whole relationship in 3 minutes, the goal was to try to show how good things can be and then instantly not be with someone you love. The song is really emotional, and I just wanted to pair that with something just as emotional visually. I love how everything came out and excited to work on more projects with Loris in the future.”

Known for his creativity and incredible attention to detail, Elhae’s vision for the single’s cover art was inspired by the parable of Samson & Delilah, a story of man who lost his strength due to putting his trust into the wrong woman. Produced by P2J (Beyonce’s Brown Skin Girl) and co-written by Ari PenSmith (Doja Cat, Snoh Aalegra) “Separated” showcases Elhae in rare form as he boldly sings “I’m man enough to take the blame for my mistakes, it’s unfortunate you wanna try again, I can’t relate.”

In addition to XXL, Elhae has garnered glowing praise from The FaderBillboardVibeThe Source, and more. His 2016 album All Have Fallen produced hits like “Doesn’t Matter” (feat. Kehlani) and “Needs,” which has over 19M Spotify streams. 2017’s Aura II EP boasted the Ty Dolla $ign-assisted “Bang Your Line,” which adds to its 24M Spotify streams every day. Outside his solo work, Elhae has collaborated with stars like Lecrae and Eric Bellinger. Following his 2018 Coachella performance, he released his conceptual album Trouble in Paradise (2019).

About Elhae:

North Dakota-born and Georgia-raised singer, artist, and visionary ELHAE approaches R&B like a film director would, choosing every element carefully, ensuring an intricate level of cohesion, and building his own world. Since catching fire in 2015 on the independent Aura EP, he worked towards eventually architecting such a world. The follow-up All Have Fallen yielded fan favorites such as “Doesn’t Matter” [feat Kehlani] and “Needs,” which clocked 19 million-plus Spotify streams. In between, he garnered glowing praise from the likes of The FaderBillboardVibeThe Source, and more as Sprite named him among its P.O.U.R. (Purveyors of Urban Reality) program. The 2017 sequel to Aura, the Aura II EP, boasted “Drama,” “Something,” and the popular “Bang Your Line” [feat. Ty Dolla $ign]. The latter ignited 24 million Spotify streams and counting. Meanwhile, he lent his voice to high-profile collaborations with Lecrae, Eric Bellinger, and many others in addition to supporting blackbear on tour.

2018 saw him grace the stage of Coachella for the first time in front of 40,000 fans as he diligently worked on new tunes in Los Angeles, Miami, and Atlanta. Inspired by childhood favorite albums such as Kid Cudi’s Man on the Moon: The End of Day, Childish Gambino’s Because the Internet, and Kendrick Lamar’s Good Kid, M.A.A.D. City, he developed an airtight vision with a detailed plotline for his next release. In 2019, the vision unfolds over the course of his twelve-track conceptual project, Trouble In Paradise [Atlantic Records], introduced by the intoxicating first single “Hennessy.” His sound is about to blow up on the biggest canvas possible now.

ELHAE image Siwoo Lee by Motown Records for 360 Magazine

ELHAE still image by Loris Russier and by Motown Records for 360 Magazine

Bankroll Freddie by DJ BRUCE BRUCE for 360 Magazine, by Quality Control/Motown Records and Ernest Dukes

BANKROLL FREDDIE x “ADD IT UP”

Rising Arkansas rapper Bankroll Freddie stays true to his name, counting up the stacks on his new hustler’s anthem “Add It Up, out today via Quality Control/Motown Records. Freddie’s first release since signing with Motown is a celebration of his success; he takes the occasion to flex the price of his new cars, neck-breaking jewelry, and designer clothes. The single arrives alongside a cinematic video that finds the rapper running countless cash through a money machine and speeding through his hometown of Helena, Arkansas.

Backed by haunting keys and thundering drums, Freddie catalogs every comma on this ominous trap banger. He raps with unshakeable confidence, his Southern drawl enhancing the nonchalance he shows in spending his pocket change. While Freddie celebrates leaving the streets for the industry, he delivers a flex in nearly every line: “40 on my AP / Wait until I cop the Lamb, gone make these niggas hate me.” Keenly aware of the envy he’ll inspire, Freddie asserts his place in the rap game with a confidence as impressive as his stacks of cash.

Add It Up” comes on the heels of Freddie’s 2020 debut album, From Trap to Rap, which boasted features from Lil BabyYoung DolphLil YachtyMoneybagg YoTay KeithRenni Rucci, and more. In May 2020, he released “Quarantine Flow”, a rapid-fire track that showed off his dextrous lyrical gifts. “Add It Up” is just the first of many 2021 tracks from one of Quality Control and Motown’s most promising talents.

Listen to “Add it Up” HERE or Watch HERE

Asiahn releases new single with video - Get Away

Asiahn releases new single – Get Away

Jersey-born, Carolina-raised, R&B singer/songwriter Asiahn returns today with her new single “Get Away,” and a video to accompany it. Fluttering harps and serpentine bass-lines set the tone for the song’s welcome escapism, as she dreams of better days in the arms of a lover. Listen HERE. The peaceful video places Asiahn in a dreamy desert, living out that message. Watch HERE.

“Get Away” offers simple pleasures in both Asiahn’s beckoning lyrics and the meditative production. 

“The Inspiration for the song came from the frustration with what’s going on in the world today and wanting to get away to just exist. In my mind I wanted to create a song that felt like the experience of being free.” Asiahn states. When speaking on conceptualizing the visual, Asiahn continues “We’re over sexualized, overused, and most of the time unrealistic in what we look like. I wanted to show a goddess-like depiction of two females in love. Not overly sexual, but sensual, powerful & feminine. The concept circles around the belief that beautiful things can grow in the most unexpected places.”

This new track follows Asiahn’s self-assured single “Gucci Frames” and her 2019 project Love Train 2, the latest installment in a series that once led Okayplayer to call her “a rare jewel in an industry full of fool’s gold.” “Get Away” is the fruit of a new phase for Asiahn that’s seen her focusing on her growth as a person and an artist. If this single is any indication, you’ll want to stop whatever you’re doing when her forthcoming EP arrives.