Posts tagged with "ally"

Car Cat is an NFT from 360 MAGAZINE’S OPENSEA collection

NFT | LA Roundup

At the crux of the crypto community are gatherings. During a four-day inaugural conference from March 28-31, the brilliant minds behind the Edge of NFT podcast–Joshua Kriger, Jeff Kelley, Eathan Janney and Zack Sekar brought the LA blockchain clique together.

L.A. LIVE, the entertainment complex perfectly set in DTLA and adjacent to the Arts District is where tons off-site events were held. Since parking is difficult to navigate, public transit is one’s ideal option. In fact, some arrived via e-bikes with helmet in tow.

Attendance included financial experts alongside web developers, to those eager to learn about digital market spaces, DeFi, Web 3 and minting NFTs. Thanks to the growing tech within the City of Angels, largely in part to lower startup costs in comparison to Silicon Valley, the event drew an international crowd. 

Notable speakers ranged from billionaire Mark Cuban, NBA legend and founder of Black Santa Baron Davis, famed DJ Steve Aoki and world-renowned CEOs Robby Yung and David Wachsman. Other highlights which grabbed our attention were the art installations, innovative activations and musical performances.

The venue’s outdoor courtyard provided us with a much needed recess in between talks. In fact, we caught performances by rappers Nelly and Rich the Kid, played Trivia at the Freckle and snacked on lite bites from a plethora of parked food trucks. 

Wednesday night included an exclusive party held by Magic Eden, the leading NFT market place on Solana. The beginning of the night included a panel discussion from the Magic Eden team members Jack Tanlu, Zhuoxun Yin, Sidney Zhang and Zhuojie Zhou. After the discourse, the night was led by sets from Flosstradamus, Waka Flocka Flame and Migos‘ very own Quavo.

However, like many industries in America, the tech arena is white male-dominated, threatening new generational wealth of both women and minorities. 

That said, there were few discussions which concentrated on marginalized people within the realm, including the web3 panel which featured Dapper Labs, Stephanie Smellie, Ridhima Khan, Jayne Peressini, Nicole Rochette with moderator Ros Gold-Onwude

Perhaps next season, the organizers will consider grants for POC, LGBTQ and artists alike, encouraging inclusivity.

In celebration of this metaverse, 360 MAGAZINE, a brand which was established within this emerging smart city, launched its NFT capsule.

Recap of NFT.NYC

360 MAGAZINE NFT ANIMAL SERIES ON OPENSEA

Article: Bee Davies, Yash Thadani, Vaughn Lowery

image from Ernest Dukes for use by 360 Magazine

EBHONI — “ROTATION”

“Reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” — Pitchfork

Toronto R&B star Ebhoni returns today with an edgy, enthralling video for her dreamy single “Rotation.” The cut comes from her July project Good Dick & Weed, and finds Ebhoni over a woozy instrumental, singing an ode to taking control of your love life and keeping your options open. The video echoes that carefree spirit, featuring the artist riding a bike and flexing amidst a crowd of friends and dancers on a summer afternoon. Watch the video for “Rotation” HERE.

In the visual, Ebhoni flaunts a new look that showcases her badass side. With long, colorful nails and blown-out vintage film fuzz, Ebhoni looks like an icon from pop’s past transported to the modern day. Armed with a fun-loving crew, a few low-riding bicycles, a neon pink chore jacket and matching eyeshadow, Ebhoni radiates a cool that feels entirely her own.

The new video arrives amid a hot streak for the singer/songwriter. In May, Ebhoni released the unfiltered, melancholic “Rep It,” the single that kicked off the Good Dick & Weed era. That stunning drop wasn’t even her first of 2021, however. Good Dick & Weed followed February’s “X” EP, which garnered considerable critical acclaim. In addition to Pitchfork plugging the release, HotNewHipHop wrote, “Ebhoni has been one artist to keep an eye out for in the 6ix,” and The Root wrote that her music “makes you feel like you’ve been sipping on a fancy cocktail for the last few hours.” It’s no wonder FLAUNT crowned her “Our favorite new R&B artist.”

Over the last few years, Ebhoni’s string of animated R&B singles has won both commercial and critical success. In the middle of a productive 2019, Pitchfork wrote that she is “reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” Throughout her career, Ebhoni has made a point to partner with Black-owned businesses, support other women artists and workers, and to uplift the local LGBTQ+ community, which she’s done through efforts like hosting Pride Toronto. Visuals like “Rotation” only bolster the rep she’s built as one of R&B’s most magnetic young stars.

LFREAQ x Lissyelle single artwork by Anna Azarov from Leigh Greaney, Big Hassle Media for use by 360 Magazine

L’FREAQ shreds her puppet strings – Gimmick

“Fans of FKA Twigs and Banks would be remiss not to check out synth-pop enchantress L’Freaq” -Billboard

L’FREAQ’s blend of gothic sensibilities and sultry soulfulness manages to continually hit the marks of bona de pop bangers.” -Nylon

L’FREAQ has a sexy, neo-goth, synth pop sound.” -Bust

“world-building music… colossal” -Refinery29

Today, LA-based dark-synth pop artist, L’FREAQ, shares a music video for her latest single “Gimmick,” the debut single from the forthcoming release and sophomore EP, Showgirl, due out on August 27, 2021 via Position Music. The first visual from the upcoming release is absolutely stacked with metaphor, all-star fashion, witchy vibes and an important message about the role media plays with children – especially young women. From puppet to powerhouse, L’FREAQ breaks free of the monotony and shreds through the brainwashed stereotypes, as she literally shreds on a guitar.

Describing the video, L’FREAQ says, “While the song is about my experience on a singing show and the judge who made me doubt myself, I wanted the video to have a bit of a darker message. My director and I, Shepherd Flashman Lowrey, came up with the idea to have a little girl watching me on a growing TV screen, a symbol for how the media consumes and controls us. I came up with the puppet master idea to go along with it, showing that what we see on our screens is not always what is happening in reality.”

The new track embodies the theme of resiliency in a time of self-doubt. “Gimmick” combines heart-pounding beats with passionate lyrics about believing in the power that everyone inherently owns and nobody else can take away, while and emphasizing L’FREAQ’s expansive “robust range” (Refinery29).

Describing the song L’FREAQ says, “After a grueling audition for a singing show in late 2019, I felt incredibly disempowered. One of the judges called me “gimmicky” and I felt as if my career had ended. What I didn’t realize was that this one person, one show, and one opportunity just wasn’t the right fit for me. After months struggling with mental health, I wrote this song as a way for me to empower myself and others, and a tongue in cheek diss to the judge that made me doubt my power.”

Having recently performed for Backline’s “Set Break” live stream alongside Alanis Morissette, Tom Morello, Ben Folds, Sara Bareilles and more to raise funds and awareness for mental health services to be distributed to music industry for free, L’FREAQ has been a champion for her community. This song is another chapter of that consistent commitment to rise up and bring people with her.

L’FREAQ, continues to remain an open book of emotions for fans as she lays out her own experience with rejection and struggles with mental health. L’FREAQ belts, “Got the courage to be vulnerable, got the guts to wear the crown, cause I dare to bare it all, I refuse to water down,” as a testament of truthfulness and self-confidence even when it’s hard. Intimacy on this level allows L’FREAQ to push the storyline forward when it comes to believing in dreams as a reality, especially in the face of adversity. NYLON says, “Look at L’FREAQ, draped in jewels and Cleopatra-esque eye makeup; then look a little harder. Behind the artifice, integrity abounds.”

L’FREAQ is all about being inclusive, and she is outspoken when it comes to defending the underdog. As an ally of everyone on the spectrum of gender and sexuality, bullies, racists and sexists are not allowed in L’FREAQ’s kingdom. She also shows her love for those closest to her, by highlighting their work: namely her fashion photographer mom, Kelly Cappelli (as seen in Vogue), who does all the photography and artwork for L’FREAQ.

The new release follows L’FREAQ’s debut EP, Weird Awakenings, which played with themes of self-discovery, as well as her 2021 single “Make Me Move.” Armed with a full book of poetry, L’FREAQ took pieces of her work and composed songs with Mike Irish, who also produced and mixed the EP at Shifted Recording Studios. The EP was mastered by Stuart Hawkes at Metropolis London Music. They took their time in discovering a sound that felt genuine, one that explored all the raw places she had been longing to find. Together, they created a modern amalgamation of L’FREAQ’s dark, thoughtful poetry and her raw musical instincts, which inevitably alchemized into songs that are all at once aggressive, sensual and moving.

Having shared a stage with ABBA, India.Arie and Jakob Dylan, it’s important to note her live performance prowess, even without tour dates on the books (speaking of longing). L’FREAQ played a packed NYC performance debut at SoHo House, and channeled Britney Spears (especially during her ferocious “Toxic” cover”), Nick Cave and Beats Antique vibes. The Deli Magazine later dubbed her “NYC’s Favorite Emerging Artist.”

With over 500k streams, 240K plays on YouTube, and songs featured in “Riverdale,” Playboy, Netflix’s “Dating Around, “Good Trouble,” “FBI,” “The Voice,” “City on a Hill” and more – all born from her 5-song debut EP, it’s safe to say this follow-up EP is highly anticipated. Stay tuned for more visual components to follow, along with brand new singles. Showgirl is on the way.

Track listing: SHOWGIRL EP

  1. Gimmick
  2. Showgirl
  3. Take You Down
  4. LOUD
  5. Nothing on Me

Previous Releases By L’FREAQ:

Listen To “Make Me Move”: Here

Watch “New Skin”: Here

Listen To Weird Awakenings Ep: Here

Watch “Weird Awakenings” Video: Here

Watch “Moonlight” Video: Here

About L’FREAQ:

L’FREAQ is the alias of Brooklyn and LA-based singer/songwriter Lea Cappelli, who crafts songs inspired by pop and R&B but with a biting edge. Some highlights of her career include performing privately for Muhammad Ali, sharing the stage with Jakob Dylan, and performing with Grammy-winning artist India.Arie.

L’FREAQ released her EP, Weird Awakenings, to critical acclaim in October 2018 and was voted one of NYLON’s 20 Best Releases. The EP has also garnered radio play and enthusiastic reviews in the US, UK, Europe, and Australia. Her second music video was premiered by Billboard while her most recent music video, “New Skin,” was released exclusively through NYLON which noted “integrity abounds” throughout.

Playboy recently used the title track “Weird Awakenings” in its groundbreaking video of actor Ezra Miller, while another song from the EP, “I’ve Become a Thief” has been featured in the trailer for the CW’s hit show “Riverdale.” L’FREAQ was recently voted “NYC’s Favorite Emerging Artist” in an open poll sponsored by The Deli Magazine, and can be seen this fall on her upcoming west coast tour in support of the Weird Awakenings EP.

Stay Connected with L’FREAQ:

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | SoundCloud | Spotify

PrideHouseLA Image via Jessica Katz and Melanie Du Pont at Katz Public Relations for use by 360 Magazine

PrideHouseLA Q×A

PrideHouseLA has created major buzz this June during pride month. The accepting, rainbow-emblazoned content house supports the LGBTQIA+ community and is a judgement free zone for all. The content house’s members consist of Mollee Gray, Jeka Jane, Kent Boyd, and Garrett Clayton. Together, the Pride House collective looks to spread tolerance and supports everyone being the most authentic version of themselves. We spoke with the members of the house about their coming out stories, advice for those who may be afraid to come out, and how PrideHouse fosters queer expression.

What was the original concept for PrideHouseLA?

PrideHouseLA was always intended to be an inclusive platform for people in the LGBTQ+ community and our allies! We wanted to create a positive space that radiates acceptance and love, regardless of your sexual orientation or gender identity!

If you’re comfortable saying so, how does everyone in the house identify and what are their pronouns?

Of course!

Mollee Gray: I’m queer and my pronouns are She/Her.

Jeka Jane: I’m straight and my pronouns are He/Him.

Kent Boyd: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Garrett Clayton: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Besides PrideHouseLA members being part of the LGBT community, in what ways does the PrideHouse foster and feature queer expression?

We truly feel that queer expression is what makes us PrideHouseLA! Whether it be “gender bending” how we identify, or simply just being, we represent our community in all facets! The community is really big on self-expression. Through the arts, makeup and creative collaborations, PrideHouseLA is extremely vibrant and loud with how we choose to showcase our life!

What are the biggest ways in which PrideHouseLA is contributing to the LGBT community?

PrideHouseLA is very involved with GLAAD and is openly supporting The Trevor Project as our charity on social media. Apart from being an advocate for big organizations, we personally take the time to respond to our DM’s, support small LGBTQ+ businesses, and always make sure to be extremely active in elections to make sure our community is being fought for and to demand that our rights be as important as others!

If they’re comfortable answering, what were all of your coming out experiences like?

Mollee: I grew up Mormon in Utah, so I was extremely nervous to come out. I do believe it was a shock to some people and others responded with, “I’ve been waiting for you to tell me.” I had to be okay with it being a process for everyone and not just myself. I didn’t come out until I was about 20, so I know it was a change for others! I gave people who needed time, time and they were able to witness my relationships and see that love is love! They realized that who I love is just as valid as who they love.

Garrett: When I came out to my mom, I accidentally dramatized it by saying I had something really important to tell her…she got nervous and thought I was doing drugs! I immediately told her no, and that I just needed her to know I was gay. Right away, she said she knew and that she loved me so much. The response was the same with my step dad! The relationship with my brother is very different. Ever since I came out, our relationship has been estranged. He does not believe I should have the right to get married, which is obviously very hurtful and unacceptable, so we have not spoken in years.

Jeka: My coming out story is pretty crazy, and I feel like a lot of trans people can relate. In elementary school I had my first realization that I wasn’t a girl, but back then transgender wasn’t a big topic so my feelings just fell away. I always knew I was attracted to girls and the only label, and I use that lightly, that made sense was lesbian. Something about that didn’t sit right. My mom was very accepting but some other family member weren’t so inviting. They told me it was a phase. I didn’t let that affect me! I lived with this mask on for years. Then, one of my really good friends came out as transgender a few years back and my gut just sank. I remember the feeling of being weirdly jealous. Not in a bad way, but in a way that he was living his truth and I was stuck wearing this mask. First came top surgery, which was a slow filter into what I was really feeling without actually realizing it. After some time with this internal battle I told my wife “I am transgender.” Oh the weight that I felt lift off my shoulders. Since then, I’ve been educating myself on trans issues and really connecting with my community. I want people to know that there’s no timeline for coming out. So do it at your own pace and safely.

Kent: I actually was very lucky, being from Ohio. I came out to each of my family members, and gratefully enough, they were all so supportive. My sister was the first one I told, and she was so sweet and accepting. She later wrote me a letter explaining that she was just sad that I hadn’t let her in sooner, but she was so happy I finally did.

What advice would you have for fans of PrideHouseLA who are afraid to come out?

Coming out is YOUR process and YOU deserve the right to handle it how you want. Please know that you always have a safe space with PrideHouseLA, and we will love you unconditionally!

 PrideHouseLA has already collaborated with internet personalities such as Todrick, Jojo Siwa, and Ruba. Can fans expect any other internet collaborations to come?

Yes! We have some really fun ones coming up, so follow us on TikTok and Instagram to stay up to date!

 Does PrideHouseLA have any exciting, upcoming plans for Pride Month?

Most definitely! We will be hosting our own event as well as teaming up with our community to bring you all the joy and excitement this month!

City of Seattle Diversity Trainings

By Eamonn Burke

The City of Seattle recently held a training about “Interrupting Internalized Racial Superiority” for their white employees. Traits of internalized racism, according to the diversity trainers that led the session, include individualism, objectivity, and intellectualization.

The training included an extensive list of offenses that white people can commit against their co-workers, as well as a guideline for being allies to minorities. The also city encourages self affirmation in one’s contribution to the persistence of racism, with a goal of “undoing whiteness”. A visual aid of the racist “cycle” was included in the training. Another handout read: “racism is not our fault but we are responsible.”

A major focus of the training was that white people had to “give up” certain privileged liberties to truly purge themselves of internalized racism. These include comfort as well as social status and control. Lastly, they gave examples of achieving the status of a “white ally” to describe the goal of the training.

The goal, as described by the city in an email, is for “city employees who identify as white to join this training to learn, reflect, challenge ourselves, and build skills and relationships that help us show up more fully as allies and accomplices for racial justice.”