Posts tagged with "LGBT community"

FENDI Caffe Miami via Gnazzo Group for use by 360 Magazine

Fendi Caffe and Aventura Pop-Up

FENDI announces the return from March 17 through May 1, 2022, of the iconic FENDI CAFFE at OTL Restaurant in the heart of Miami’s vibrant Design District, located across from the FENDI Boutique, following the great success of the FF Vertigo-inspired iteration in Summer 2021.      

In a celebration of the spring season, the new creative concept for the FENDI CAFFE draws creative cues from the FENDI Women’s Spring/Summer 2022 Collection, and its inspiration from the figurative drawings of visionary fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez. In collaboration with The Estate and Archive of Antonio Lopez and Juan Eugene Ramos, the artist’s work has been freshly revived for the FENDI Women’s Spring/Summer 2022 Collection, bringing a modern perspective on disco-age glamour, and a spotlight on the diverse and powerful femininity that underscores the FENDI name.

With a bold sunset graphic in hues of red, orange, and yellow, the FENDI CAFFE takes over the outdoor corridors of the restaurant and FENDI Boutique. The concept comes to life with illustrations of ‘Lopez Girls’–focusing on Lopez’s innovative vision on femininity, diversity, inclusivity, and unconventional beauty–emblazoned across the outside of the space.

Upon entering, guests will immediately discover the space transformed into a world of FENDI and Antonio Lopez.  The space will be adorned with rainbow graphics and the sketches of ‘Lopez Girls’ come to life in 3D billboard sculptures. The FENDI CAFFE tables embrace the 70’s aesthetic, with the colorful sunset graphics topping each surface. The theme is continued throughout with custom FENDI table settings and takeaway elements, as well as decorative details for the menu’s food and beverage. The hand-sketched version of the FENDI logo inspired by Lopez’s original work for the brand appears throughout elements of the café.

The FENDI CAFFE menu includes a fusion of local and Italian favorite breakfast and lunch items, as well as beverages including a signature FF logo cappuccino served in porcelain cups decorated with FENDI’s signature Pequin striped motif.  An evening Aperitivo menu will also be offered. Sweet and savory bites will include special FF logo toast and paninis, as well as a variety of pastries and baked goods in special FENDI packaging.

Fendi Aventura Pop-up

FENDI also announced the opening from March 18 through April 20, 2022, of an exclusive pop-up in the Aventura Mall, just outside Miami, to celebrate its Women’s Spring/Summer 2022 Collection.  

For the FENDI Women’s Spring/Summer 2022 Collection Artistic Director of Couture and Womenswear Kim Jones revived Lopez’s work, bringing a modern perspective on disco-age glamor, and a spotlight on the diverse and powerful femininity that underscores the FENDI name.

The dedicated 576 square foot FENDI space draws from the vibrant inspiration of the collection, with Antonio Lopez’s graphics emblazoned across the exterior of the metal structure. The pop-up conceptualizes vintage billboard displays, with ‘Lopez Girls’ showcased in 3D across the structure. Neutral tones pulled from the art works create a clean palette, juxtaposed against the splashes of colorful red, oranges, and yellow hues of the collection. An all-pink fitting room for clients is also included inside the new space. The standalone pop-up store presents the FENDI Women’s Spring/Summer 2022 collection across categories, including the introduction of Ready-to-Wear to the market. A selection of the signature accessories, from the First bag and shoes to the iconic Peekaboo and Baguette bags are displayed on shelves and counters throughout the space. Through powerful mixes of colors, layers, materials, and workmanships, icon accessories are transformed into graphic artworks featuring ‘Lopez Girls’, becoming the best expression of luxury and a desirable series of collector’s items.

Rainbow Washing + Slacktivism During Pride Month for use by 360 Magazine

NGLCC TAPS POP CULTURE PUBLICATION

‘The NGLCC has long been a global network for the LGBT business community, creating opportunities for hard-to-hear voices. While 360 MAGAZINE, an award-winning international publication, has created a refuge for youth stories and under-represented artists to celebrate their uniqueness while promoting their efforts. It was therefore inevitable that the two entities would join forces to foster a just ecosystem.‘ – Vaughn Lowery – a newly inducted nglccNY member as well as 360’s President and founder.

360 received their accreditation from the NGLCC on February 3, hereby declaring 360 as an NGLCC accredited business and an official LGBT business, guaranteeing diversity and inclusion within the organization. This commission affirms the continued commitment of the magazine to serve the LGBT community through all efforts.

A certified LGBT business organization, in accordance with NGLCC directives, is any company that meets the preceding criteria:

• Business is at least 51% owned, operated, managed and controlled by a LGBT person or persons who are US citizens or lawful permanent residents 

• Work independently from any non-LGBT business corporation

• Headquarters based in the US and are a legal entity in the US

The NGLCC operates as a key advocate for the LGBT community in all business endeavors. The organization aims to grow available opportunities for LGBT persons in corporate settings and conditions. Co-founders Justin Nelson and Chance Mitchell began NGLCC in 2002 after they failed to see equal opportunities for those who identify as lesbian, gay, bi, trans, etc. They both observed that although the members of this community contribute a massive $1.7 trillion to the economy through being business owners, employers and taxpayers, these contributions had been historically overlooked. 

Co-founder and President Justin Nelson stated, “Back in 2002 we realized that too few government leaders and corporate executives had considered the economic equality of LGBT people or the impact economics could have on the future of the equality movement. So with a few forward-thinking corporate partners and a small network of LGBT business owners willing to tell their story, NGLCC was born.

Co-founder and CEO Chance Mitchell, too, sounds in on the beginnings of the organization, stating, “Word began to spread about NGLCC very quickly, thanks to outlets like the Washington Blade and Out magazine recognizing the previously underreported strength and promise of the LGBT business community. That proved what we, and our NGLCC corporate partners, always believed: economic and social visibility go hand-in-hand as we march toward equality and opportunity for all.

Both Nelson and Mitchell saw that LGBT people were an integral piece of American business, and they built NGLCC to strengthen the community to its fullest potential. 

NGLCC works to grow their list of Certified LGBTBE businesses to develop more employment possibilities for all LGBT people. Apart of their mission involves partnership with other companies that support the strengthening of the LGBT business community.  Some of their top founding corporate partners include Wells Fargo, American Airlines, Travelport and Intel.

NGLCC certificate via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 MAGAZINE
NGLCC certification letter via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 MAGAZINE
NGLCC Certification
LGBT flag illustration by Symara Wilson for 360 Magazine

Netflix’s Pray Away Reveals Horrors of Conversion Therapy

By: Skyler Johnson

Edited By: Andrew Shibuya

Conversion therapy, or the pseudoscientific practice of changing someone’s sexual orientation, has been considered and practiced for over a century now. Dubious to many of its’ creators’ contemporaries, conversion therapy’s capacity for change has long been contested and considered futile. The practice itself is scientifically baseless and detrimental, and what is essentially man’s foolish and ineffectual attempt to change human nature. In recent Netflix documentary Pray Away, the effects and harms of this “therapy” are explored and uncovered throughout investigation of its century-long practice.

Pray Away follows ex-leaders and survivors of the “pray the gay away” movement, focusing on Exodus International, a conversion therapy organization that only ended eight years ago in 2013. The film follows several people as they detail their horrific experiences and the consequences of their both voluntary and involuntary participation in the practice.

Conversion therapy was publicly started in the 1890s, when Albert von Schrenck-Notzing stated in a conference that he was able to turn a gay man straight through hypnosis. Decades later, Eugen Steinach would later transplant the testicles of a straight man onto a gay man to “cure” homosexuality. Lobotomies, chemical castration, and aversion therapies became popular as “therapeutic” techniques. This lasted throughout the earlier half of the 20th century into the 1960s and 1970s, during the rise of the LGBT Rights Movement, when psychiatrists began to shy away from the practice. In 1973 the APA removed homosexuality from the DSM. Unfortunately, conversion therapy did not stop but was instead utilized by faith-based groups, including Exodus International.    

Talk therapy now makes up the bulk of all current conversion therapy procedures. While this may seem a lot less intimidating, the effects of this talk therapy can be powerful, especially when utilized by the wrong people. The film exposed how many ex-gay leaders weren’t licensed professionals, and how, if they believed someone were gay, it was because they had a poor relationship with their parents. And if not, they must have been sexually abused even if they were unable to recall any abuse. To a lot of young people, this thought process made sense, as many were too young to truly understand its flaws.

The film also displayed how the people involved in this movement were dishonest about the “progress” they were making. They included the story of John Paulk, once claiming to have become a straight man through the therapy. John later admits that the entire time he was consumed with gay thoughts and was mendacious about his reformation.

The documentary exhibited that there are a lot of people that still hold their beliefs. Organizations still exist that enforce conversion therapy. It’s not a thing of the past. This was highlighted by the film’s portrayal of the leader of the Freedom March, Jeffrey McCall, an ex-transgender woman living as a man with the belief that being trans is a sin. The organization’s Facebook page now has 10,000 followers and is still growing.

While the film primarily covers people that were able to escape the movement and live better lives, there remains great struggle that many people experience. The film’s director, Kristine Stolakis, decided to make Pray Away when her uncle, who had gone through conversion therapy, committed suicide. Julie Rodgers talked about self-harm, which is something that’s incredibly common, most notably in people who have undergone conversion therapy. Participants have been 8.4x more likely to commit suicide and 5.9x more likely to undergo severe depression. It’s also been connected deeply to an overall sense of hopelessness and an increase in self-hatred.

Conversion therapy is a practice that causes pain for the many people that were subjected to it. But the film did also evince that there is, at least somewhat, a way out. Many of the film’s subjects were able to enter into healthy homosexual relationships. On the film’s website, they list a variety of resources for those anguished by conversion therapy. These can be found HERE.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Q×A

Reese Sherman is a talented photographer who creates stunning portraiture. The photographer has been featured by the likes of Town & Country, Essence, Ambassador Digital Magazine, W Magazine, Muze, and more. The vibrant portfolio of Sherman’s evocative, striking, beautiful photographs can be viewed on their website or Instagram. Sherman looks to empower viewers with their photography and highlight gender-neutral inclusivity and LGBT+ acceptance. During this pride month, we sat down with the artist to discuss their latest photography project, which involves self-exploration, unity, and love.

Could you tell us about your photographic approach to this project?

This all came about during the BLM and Trans Lives Matter movement, where I was noticing so many people were standing up and showing up as themselves. Such an array of different people showed off their style and spoke loud and proud about who they are. [It] really inspired me to pick up my camera and shoot my husband wearing masculine clothes mixed with feminine jewelry against bright, bold and colorful backdrops. [These photos] showcase[ed] him being 100% comfortable within the style of art and fashion. I wanted to explore incorporating feminine elements within a masculine framework in a way that transcends sexuality. This is all about style and freedom and identity that goes beyond any pre-conceived category.

“This is all about style, freedom, and identity…” Was your model, Jamarr, a part of the creative process as well? 

Jamarr is a creative individual… I love to collaborate with him and have him give his input into projects, especially this one, where we both styled the wardrobe and jewelry. Also having my husband a part of this, I wanted the story to stay true to his own authentic style, since his normal everyday accessory wear isn’t geared towards feminine pieces. But, styling him with a pink beaded necklace, yellow roses and eyeliner really took him out of his norm—but he was confident in wearing it all.

Did photographing your partner make this project more intimate/personal?  

Absolutely! We just know each other so well to the point when we first started to talk about this project, we spoke about the issues the LGBTQ+ community was going through. The issues that the Black community was dealing with made this personal to us. Seeing Jamarr model and stay grounded in his sexuality was inspiring to me. This made us both proud of what we’re hoping to accomplish, which is gender-neutral inclusivity.  

Some of your images are more detailed and some of them not, could you tell us what this mean/how you would like the viewers to interpret your photos?

I want the viewers to see timeless, intimate and non-conforming pictures. I want viewers to feel confident to do whatever is it that makes them happy. if you want to pile on a bunch of jewelry head-to-toe, do it! If you’re a man and you come across an accessory that is traditionally feminine, wear it and be proud! If you’re a woman, same thing applies, if you want to wear clothing that’s traditionally male. Be proud of how you present yourself. I just want people to feel empowered.

What is the most important component of this collection of work?
Two words: unity and love.

What is the most challenging component of this collection of work? 

The challenge was putting this all together and hoping the result would match what we envisioned in our minds.

Could you comment on the styling of choice and what inspired you to choose these colors in particular? (Apart from the colors of the pride flag!)

The unapologetic energy of the model, the juxtaposition of the traditionally feminine jewelry against his body hair, the structured clothing made of shiny, flowing fabrics—they all promote the idea that masculinity is what you make it. Initially the pink just felt fun and exciting. Yellow felt like sun kissed skin plus it reminded us of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” The orange/red was striking and sexy. And a lot of the jewelry was my grandmother’s, so that added an even more personal aspect to the work.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

PrideHouseLA Image via Jessica Katz and Melanie Du Pont at Katz Public Relations for use by 360 Magazine

PrideHouseLA Q×A

PrideHouseLA has created major buzz this June during pride month. The accepting, rainbow-emblazoned content house supports the LGBTQIA+ community and is a judgement free zone for all. The content house’s members consist of Mollee Gray, Jeka Jane, Kent Boyd, and Garrett Clayton. Together, the Pride House collective looks to spread tolerance and supports everyone being the most authentic version of themselves. We spoke with the members of the house about their coming out stories, advice for those who may be afraid to come out, and how PrideHouse fosters queer expression.

What was the original concept for PrideHouseLA?

PrideHouseLA was always intended to be an inclusive platform for people in the LGBTQ+ community and our allies! We wanted to create a positive space that radiates acceptance and love, regardless of your sexual orientation or gender identity!

If you’re comfortable saying so, how does everyone in the house identify and what are their pronouns?

Of course!

Mollee Gray: I’m queer and my pronouns are She/Her.

Jeka Jane: I’m straight and my pronouns are He/Him.

Kent Boyd: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Garrett Clayton: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Besides PrideHouseLA members being part of the LGBT community, in what ways does the PrideHouse foster and feature queer expression?

We truly feel that queer expression is what makes us PrideHouseLA! Whether it be “gender bending” how we identify, or simply just being, we represent our community in all facets! The community is really big on self-expression. Through the arts, makeup and creative collaborations, PrideHouseLA is extremely vibrant and loud with how we choose to showcase our life!

What are the biggest ways in which PrideHouseLA is contributing to the LGBT community?

PrideHouseLA is very involved with GLAAD and is openly supporting The Trevor Project as our charity on social media. Apart from being an advocate for big organizations, we personally take the time to respond to our DM’s, support small LGBTQ+ businesses, and always make sure to be extremely active in elections to make sure our community is being fought for and to demand that our rights be as important as others!

If they’re comfortable answering, what were all of your coming out experiences like?

Mollee: I grew up Mormon in Utah, so I was extremely nervous to come out. I do believe it was a shock to some people and others responded with, “I’ve been waiting for you to tell me.” I had to be okay with it being a process for everyone and not just myself. I didn’t come out until I was about 20, so I know it was a change for others! I gave people who needed time, time and they were able to witness my relationships and see that love is love! They realized that who I love is just as valid as who they love.

Garrett: When I came out to my mom, I accidentally dramatized it by saying I had something really important to tell her…she got nervous and thought I was doing drugs! I immediately told her no, and that I just needed her to know I was gay. Right away, she said she knew and that she loved me so much. The response was the same with my step dad! The relationship with my brother is very different. Ever since I came out, our relationship has been estranged. He does not believe I should have the right to get married, which is obviously very hurtful and unacceptable, so we have not spoken in years.

Jeka: My coming out story is pretty crazy, and I feel like a lot of trans people can relate. In elementary school I had my first realization that I wasn’t a girl, but back then transgender wasn’t a big topic so my feelings just fell away. I always knew I was attracted to girls and the only label, and I use that lightly, that made sense was lesbian. Something about that didn’t sit right. My mom was very accepting but some other family member weren’t so inviting. They told me it was a phase. I didn’t let that affect me! I lived with this mask on for years. Then, one of my really good friends came out as transgender a few years back and my gut just sank. I remember the feeling of being weirdly jealous. Not in a bad way, but in a way that he was living his truth and I was stuck wearing this mask. First came top surgery, which was a slow filter into what I was really feeling without actually realizing it. After some time with this internal battle I told my wife “I am transgender.” Oh the weight that I felt lift off my shoulders. Since then, I’ve been educating myself on trans issues and really connecting with my community. I want people to know that there’s no timeline for coming out. So do it at your own pace and safely.

Kent: I actually was very lucky, being from Ohio. I came out to each of my family members, and gratefully enough, they were all so supportive. My sister was the first one I told, and she was so sweet and accepting. She later wrote me a letter explaining that she was just sad that I hadn’t let her in sooner, but she was so happy I finally did.

What advice would you have for fans of PrideHouseLA who are afraid to come out?

Coming out is YOUR process and YOU deserve the right to handle it how you want. Please know that you always have a safe space with PrideHouseLA, and we will love you unconditionally!

 PrideHouseLA has already collaborated with internet personalities such as Todrick, Jojo Siwa, and Ruba. Can fans expect any other internet collaborations to come?

Yes! We have some really fun ones coming up, so follow us on TikTok and Instagram to stay up to date!

 Does PrideHouseLA have any exciting, upcoming plans for Pride Month?

Most definitely! We will be hosting our own event as well as teaming up with our community to bring you all the joy and excitement this month!

LGBTQIA via Gabreille Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

The Importance of One Percent

By: Yuval David

At the start of Pride Month I am feeling proud and challenged.  Proud of the advocacy I do along with other LGBTQ individuals and organizations who are engaged and active in the fight and telling their stories, engaging with their elected officials and with their families and communities. 

A record number of adults in the US identify as LGBTQ.  This increase is propelled by the successes of advocacy and activism. A 2020 survey by Gallup made a more than 1% jump from the last poll in 2017.  According to this poll, 5.6% of Americans openly identify as LGBTQ.  86.7% of Americans identify as heterosexual or straight.  7.6% do not answer the question. And, 5% had a “no opinion” response.

Being counted matters.  18 million adults identify as LGBTQ.  This reflects the greater acceptance in our society and the ability for people to more comfortably express themselves.

For the first time, Gallup more specifically focused on sexual orientation, which also created more awareness of identity. In the past, they only had a yes or no option. But, this poll informed that among adults, 54.6% identify as bisexual, 24.5% identify as gay, 11.7% identify as lesbian, and 11.3% identify as transgender. 

Among the younger adults, from ages 18 to 23, 15.9% identify as LGBTQ. 72% of them identify as bisexual.

What is the takeaway from this?  Advocacy matters. LGBTQ youth are growing up in a more accepting reality. The older generations of activists have paved the way for the younger generations to have the freedoms and acceptance they have today.

A larger percent of the older generations dealt with more family rejection, job losses, loneliness, depression, and even knowing that LGBTQ identity and activity could be a punishable offense. A larger percent of the younger generations have not experienced the same level of needing to be in the closet.

This does not mean that all people, especially younger more impressionable LGBTQ people, are impervious to harsh anti-LGBTQ rhetoric, actions, and legislation. Prejudice against LGBTQ people is still being taught and discussed openly. 

We especially see this from religious communities and leaders who use religion as an excuse to discriminate. For example, the Catholic Church announced again that homosexuals are “objectively disordered.”

The Equality Act is a bill in Congress, that, if passed would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, federally funded programs, credit, and jury service. But, its failing is that is still provides a religious exemption for those who feel that accepting LGBTQ people is against their religious beliefs.

So, I and my other partners in advocacy are still challenged. The LGBTQ Community is also the LGBTQ Movement.  We are striving to empower people to publicly claim their identity, to authentically express who they are.

The Gallup poll numbers provide context and give a perspective to the advancement of the LGBTQ Movement.

I fell in love with my husband before we legally could get married.  We celebrated together with countless supporters of marriage equality when the Supreme Court passed their legislation.  We understood and appreciated the advancement of the movement and our successes that allowed us to express our love and bond in matrimony.  We were recognized in Holy Matrimony in my Jewish faith, but not in my husband’s Catholic faith. 

So, yes, I am proud, but I am also challenged.  We have a long way to go.

To learn more about Yuval Davis, follow him on Instagram and Facebook, or view his imdb profile or Youtube page.

HIV Dating App

Hzone, an innovative social networking app which is available on both Google Play store and Apple iTunes store, is designed to help HIV-infected singles to find companions and social support.

Hzone, a smartphone app specifically designed for HIV dating, was designed to make it possible for HIV-infected people to find the much-needed emotional support from society itself. Justin R, who was present at a recent press conference, claimed that the app could help people to increase their social engagements.

“People who are HIV-infected find dating and finding new friends excruciatingly difficult, as they are often subjected to HIV-related stigma as well as discrimination. However, medical science has proved that HIV-affected people can marry and even have kids. However, if someone is going to date an HIV-infected person or the other way around, both should be a little more careful and take a bit more responsibility than usual if they are going on a date or thinking about marriage,” said Justin, the CEO and managing director of Hzone.

“Hzone is a social networking app which we developed to help HIV singles and people from the LGBT community to socialize. It uses the location of the user’s phone to help people find similar-minded people nearby. The app also comes with a ‘Quick Match’ feature, which helps people to find and meet really interesting people by just swiping their screen to their ‘right’. If the other user likes back, it means that the duo can form a great pair as good friends. Our VIP members can even chat with other members as we do not put any restriction on chatting for our VIP members,” added Justin R.

As of now, Hzone is available on both Google Play store and Apple iTunes store.

The developer also informed that the users of the app can view other people who might be interested in the same fields or topics as them. Users are also allowed to share their experience on the social networking app with the entire community and express themselves in the most creative way possible.

Justin R said, “We cannot control all things in life and bad things sometimes happen, but we should always react to these changes positively. Our app could help HIV-infected people to find true love and emotional support from within society.”

About the company

Hzone is a social networking app specially designed for HIV-infected people.

To know more, visit http://www.hzoneapp.com.

IOS: http://stats.newswire.com/x/im?sum=WyJoa2ZlcSIsImhrZzNwIl0&act=WyJoa2czcCJd&final=https%3A%2F%2Fitunes.apple.com%2Fus%2Fapp%2Fhzone-1-hiv-positive-dating%2Fid967697521%3Fls%3D1%26amp%3Bmt%3D8

Android: http://stats.newswire.com/x/im?sum=WyJoa2ZlcSIsImhrZzNwIl0&act=WyJoa2czcCJd&final=https%3A%2F%2Fplay.google.com%2Fstore%2Fapps%2Fdetails%3Fid%3Dcom.mype.hzone%26amp%3Bhl%3Den_US