Posts tagged with "Pride Month"

image from Ernest Dukes for use by 360 Magazine

EBHONI — “ROTATION”

“Reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” — Pitchfork

Toronto R&B star Ebhoni returns today with an edgy, enthralling video for her dreamy single “Rotation.” The cut comes from her July project Good Dick & Weed, and finds Ebhoni over a woozy instrumental, singing an ode to taking control of your love life and keeping your options open. The video echoes that carefree spirit, featuring the artist riding a bike and flexing amidst a crowd of friends and dancers on a summer afternoon. Watch the video for “Rotation” HERE.

In the visual, Ebhoni flaunts a new look that showcases her badass side. With long, colorful nails and blown-out vintage film fuzz, Ebhoni looks like an icon from pop’s past transported to the modern day. Armed with a fun-loving crew, a few low-riding bicycles, a neon pink chore jacket and matching eyeshadow, Ebhoni radiates a cool that feels entirely her own.

The new video arrives amid a hot streak for the singer/songwriter. In May, Ebhoni released the unfiltered, melancholic “Rep It,” the single that kicked off the Good Dick & Weed era. That stunning drop wasn’t even her first of 2021, however. Good Dick & Weed followed February’s “X” EP, which garnered considerable critical acclaim. In addition to Pitchfork plugging the release, HotNewHipHop wrote, “Ebhoni has been one artist to keep an eye out for in the 6ix,” and The Root wrote that her music “makes you feel like you’ve been sipping on a fancy cocktail for the last few hours.” It’s no wonder FLAUNT crowned her “Our favorite new R&B artist.”

Over the last few years, Ebhoni’s string of animated R&B singles has won both commercial and critical success. In the middle of a productive 2019, Pitchfork wrote that she is “reclaiming the Toronto R&B crown for women.” Throughout her career, Ebhoni has made a point to partner with Black-owned businesses, support other women artists and workers, and to uplift the local LGBTQ+ community, which she’s done through efforts like hosting Pride Toronto. Visuals like “Rotation” only bolster the rep she’s built as one of R&B’s most magnetic young stars.

illustration by Alex Morgan for use by 360 Magazine

Lil Nas X Breaks Internet at the BET Awards

Lil Nas X took the BET Awards red carpet by storm. The Old Town Road rapper stepped into the runway in not one, but two gender-fluid looks at the awards show on Sunday evening, and fans are going crazy.

The 22-year-old rapper arrived in a full scale, blue and white toile-print skirt with a matching corset, suspenders and jacket by designer Andrea Grossi. The look was featured in the designer’s debut collection, where Grossi explored themes and prints around Catholicism – the same theme that Lil Nas X touched on his latest single MONTERO (Call me By Your Name). According to Vogue, the first look Lil Nas X donned featured graphics that reflect Grossi’s feelings on politics and religion. He later posted a picture of him in the outfit on Instagram with the caption “doll.”

The rapper re-appeared on the carpet in a full body floral and lace suit by Richard Quinn from his 2021 fall collection. The flared pants, crystal embellishments and baroque-style florals allowed Lil Nas X to really make an Elton John-esque appearance.

Later on, Lil Nas X further stunned him fans as he took the stage with a golden ancient Egyptian theme, perfectly matched with his dress and dancers and stage. The rapper paid tribute to Michael Jackson’s hit song Remember the Time when he performed MONTERO at the awards show. What really stole the show, though, was sharing a passionate kiss with one of his male dancers at the end of the performance. BET described this as “a boundary-breaking gesture particularly fitting during Pride Month, when the gay community is encouraged to show solidarity for the community and to advance LGBTQ rights.”

MONTERO has been platinum and hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in April. Lil Nas X previously opened up about the release of the track to his fans, dedicating the song to his childhood self (birth name Montero Lamar Hill), “Dear 14-year-old Montero, I wrote a song with our name in it. It’s about a guy I met last summer. I know we promised to never come out publicly, I know we promised to never be ‘that’ type of gay person, I know we promised to die with the secret, but this will open doors for many other queer people to simply exist. You see this is very scary for me, people will be angry, they will say I’m pushing an agenda. But the truth is, I am. The agenda to make people stay the f— out of other people’s lives and stop dictating who they should be. Sending you love from the future.”

While not everyone is supportive of his actions, the rapper remains unbothered and unapologetic, taking time out of his day to clap back at haters on Twitter. Fans are taking it to social media platforms to praise and celebrate Lil Nas X, “On the last day of #pride 2021 @LilNasX got on the #BETAwards stage and kissed another guy. If you grew up Black and gay, you know how major this is.” Lil Nas X has been under scrutiny and criticism ever since coming out as gay on Twitter in 2019. One of the biggest controversials was when Lil Nas X tried to explain why he came out as gay, and then Kevin Hart interrupted him with a “so what?”

As Pride Month comes to an end, the pressure to highlight the importance of respecting someone’s decision in coming out (or not) is bigger than ever. In a viral Instagram post by feminist, “When someone comes out, it’s important to remind them that they’re loved, and that you don’t view them as a fundamentally different person because they’re queer. But it’s also important to acknowledge – and validate – the struggles they’ve endured while being in the closet, and the courage it took them to come out.” As Pride Month comes to an end, the pressure to highlight the importance of respecting someone’s decision in coming out (or not) is bigger than ever.

And Lil Nas X’s BET Awards kiss is without a doubt, a historical moment for the LGBT+ community.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Q×A

Reese Sherman is a talented photographer who creates stunning portraiture. The photographer has been featured by the likes of Town & Country, Essence, Ambassador Digital Magazine, W Magazine, Muze, and more. The vibrant portfolio of Sherman’s evocative, striking, beautiful photographs can be viewed on their website or Instagram. Sherman looks to empower viewers with their photography and highlight gender-neutral inclusivity and LGBT+ acceptance. During this pride month, we sat down with the artist to discuss their latest photography project, which involves self-exploration, unity, and love.

Could you tell us about your photographic approach to this project?

This all came about during the BLM and Trans Lives Matter movement, where I was noticing so many people were standing up and showing up as themselves. Such an array of different people showed off their style and spoke loud and proud about who they are. [It] really inspired me to pick up my camera and shoot my husband wearing masculine clothes mixed with feminine jewelry against bright, bold and colorful backdrops. [These photos] showcase[ed] him being 100% comfortable within the style of art and fashion. I wanted to explore incorporating feminine elements within a masculine framework in a way that transcends sexuality. This is all about style and freedom and identity that goes beyond any pre-conceived category.

“This is all about style, freedom, and identity…” Was your model, Jamarr, a part of the creative process as well? 

Jamarr is a creative individual… I love to collaborate with him and have him give his input into projects, especially this one, where we both styled the wardrobe and jewelry. Also having my husband a part of this, I wanted the story to stay true to his own authentic style, since his normal everyday accessory wear isn’t geared towards feminine pieces. But, styling him with a pink beaded necklace, yellow roses and eyeliner really took him out of his norm—but he was confident in wearing it all.

Did photographing your partner make this project more intimate/personal?  

Absolutely! We just know each other so well to the point when we first started to talk about this project, we spoke about the issues the LGBTQ+ community was going through. The issues that the Black community was dealing with made this personal to us. Seeing Jamarr model and stay grounded in his sexuality was inspiring to me. This made us both proud of what we’re hoping to accomplish, which is gender-neutral inclusivity.  

Some of your images are more detailed and some of them not, could you tell us what this mean/how you would like the viewers to interpret your photos?

I want the viewers to see timeless, intimate and non-conforming pictures. I want viewers to feel confident to do whatever is it that makes them happy. if you want to pile on a bunch of jewelry head-to-toe, do it! If you’re a man and you come across an accessory that is traditionally feminine, wear it and be proud! If you’re a woman, same thing applies, if you want to wear clothing that’s traditionally male. Be proud of how you present yourself. I just want people to feel empowered.

What is the most important component of this collection of work?
Two words: unity and love.

What is the most challenging component of this collection of work? 

The challenge was putting this all together and hoping the result would match what we envisioned in our minds.

Could you comment on the styling of choice and what inspired you to choose these colors in particular? (Apart from the colors of the pride flag!)

The unapologetic energy of the model, the juxtaposition of the traditionally feminine jewelry against his body hair, the structured clothing made of shiny, flowing fabrics—they all promote the idea that masculinity is what you make it. Initially the pink just felt fun and exciting. Yellow felt like sun kissed skin plus it reminded us of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” The orange/red was striking and sexy. And a lot of the jewelry was my grandmother’s, so that added an even more personal aspect to the work.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

PrideHouseLA Image via Jessica Katz and Melanie Du Pont at Katz Public Relations for use by 360 Magazine

PrideHouseLA Q×A

PrideHouseLA has created major buzz this June during pride month. The accepting, rainbow-emblazoned content house supports the LGBTQIA+ community and is a judgement free zone for all. The content house’s members consist of Mollee Gray, Jeka Jane, Kent Boyd, and Garrett Clayton. Together, the Pride House collective looks to spread tolerance and supports everyone being the most authentic version of themselves. We spoke with the members of the house about their coming out stories, advice for those who may be afraid to come out, and how PrideHouse fosters queer expression.

What was the original concept for PrideHouseLA?

PrideHouseLA was always intended to be an inclusive platform for people in the LGBTQ+ community and our allies! We wanted to create a positive space that radiates acceptance and love, regardless of your sexual orientation or gender identity!

If you’re comfortable saying so, how does everyone in the house identify and what are their pronouns?

Of course!

Mollee Gray: I’m queer and my pronouns are She/Her.

Jeka Jane: I’m straight and my pronouns are He/Him.

Kent Boyd: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Garrett Clayton: I’m gay and my pronouns are He/Him.

Besides PrideHouseLA members being part of the LGBT community, in what ways does the PrideHouse foster and feature queer expression?

We truly feel that queer expression is what makes us PrideHouseLA! Whether it be “gender bending” how we identify, or simply just being, we represent our community in all facets! The community is really big on self-expression. Through the arts, makeup and creative collaborations, PrideHouseLA is extremely vibrant and loud with how we choose to showcase our life!

What are the biggest ways in which PrideHouseLA is contributing to the LGBT community?

PrideHouseLA is very involved with GLAAD and is openly supporting The Trevor Project as our charity on social media. Apart from being an advocate for big organizations, we personally take the time to respond to our DM’s, support small LGBTQ+ businesses, and always make sure to be extremely active in elections to make sure our community is being fought for and to demand that our rights be as important as others!

If they’re comfortable answering, what were all of your coming out experiences like?

Mollee: I grew up Mormon in Utah, so I was extremely nervous to come out. I do believe it was a shock to some people and others responded with, “I’ve been waiting for you to tell me.” I had to be okay with it being a process for everyone and not just myself. I didn’t come out until I was about 20, so I know it was a change for others! I gave people who needed time, time and they were able to witness my relationships and see that love is love! They realized that who I love is just as valid as who they love.

Garrett: When I came out to my mom, I accidentally dramatized it by saying I had something really important to tell her…she got nervous and thought I was doing drugs! I immediately told her no, and that I just needed her to know I was gay. Right away, she said she knew and that she loved me so much. The response was the same with my step dad! The relationship with my brother is very different. Ever since I came out, our relationship has been estranged. He does not believe I should have the right to get married, which is obviously very hurtful and unacceptable, so we have not spoken in years.

Jeka: My coming out story is pretty crazy, and I feel like a lot of trans people can relate. In elementary school I had my first realization that I wasn’t a girl, but back then transgender wasn’t a big topic so my feelings just fell away. I always knew I was attracted to girls and the only label, and I use that lightly, that made sense was lesbian. Something about that didn’t sit right. My mom was very accepting but some other family member weren’t so inviting. They told me it was a phase. I didn’t let that affect me! I lived with this mask on for years. Then, one of my really good friends came out as transgender a few years back and my gut just sank. I remember the feeling of being weirdly jealous. Not in a bad way, but in a way that he was living his truth and I was stuck wearing this mask. First came top surgery, which was a slow filter into what I was really feeling without actually realizing it. After some time with this internal battle I told my wife “I am transgender.” Oh the weight that I felt lift off my shoulders. Since then, I’ve been educating myself on trans issues and really connecting with my community. I want people to know that there’s no timeline for coming out. So do it at your own pace and safely.

Kent: I actually was very lucky, being from Ohio. I came out to each of my family members, and gratefully enough, they were all so supportive. My sister was the first one I told, and she was so sweet and accepting. She later wrote me a letter explaining that she was just sad that I hadn’t let her in sooner, but she was so happy I finally did.

What advice would you have for fans of PrideHouseLA who are afraid to come out?

Coming out is YOUR process and YOU deserve the right to handle it how you want. Please know that you always have a safe space with PrideHouseLA, and we will love you unconditionally!

 PrideHouseLA has already collaborated with internet personalities such as Todrick, Jojo Siwa, and Ruba. Can fans expect any other internet collaborations to come?

Yes! We have some really fun ones coming up, so follow us on TikTok and Instagram to stay up to date!

 Does PrideHouseLA have any exciting, upcoming plans for Pride Month?

Most definitely! We will be hosting our own event as well as teaming up with our community to bring you all the joy and excitement this month!

MARATHOn via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

The Fastest Woman in the United States

By: Skyler Johnson

Sha’Carri (Shu-Carry) Richardson sported bright orange hair and long painted fingernails as she ran a record 10.86 second time leading her to win first place and become the fastest woman in America. Because of her unique style and short stature she certainly stood out amongst the competition. 

The track athlete is only 21 years old but is proving to be a name you should look out for. After all, she’s set to potentially win gold in Tokyo for the 100m which an American hasn’t won since 1996. 

It was an emotional day for Richardson who after winning went up to her grandmother in the stands. Only two weeks prior, her biological mother died, which she talked about during an interview after the event, where after weeks of having to put on a straight face she finally was able to break and get emotional about her mother’s passing, though despite the tremendous sadness she surely felt she was able to keep herself composed throughout the interview. 

The athlete’s Instagram page proves how much of a legend he is, with the exuding confidence every Olympic athlete must have in order to win. When she was about to re-dye her hair from red, she stated: “Bye bye Red head you put it on them too tuff… what will the next color be.” Her confidence is unmatched, and her performance is as well.  

Sha’Carri sported the orange hair because of a suggestion from her girlfriend, who stated it was loud, encouraging and dangerous. Despite the power it carried on the turf, it’s Sha’Carri and Sha’Carri alone that allowed her to win first place with a solid 0.12 seconds ahead of her competitors. 

You’ll be likely to hear a lot about her during these upcoming Olympics, as while right now she’s the fastest woman in the U.S., she could soon become the fastest woman in the world. 

Rainbow Washing + Slacktivism During Pride Month for use by 360 Magazine

RAINBOW WASHING + SLACKTIVISM DURING PRIDE MONTH

By: Clara Guthrie

June is Pride Month, although many Americans may be more familiar with it as the month where big corporations drench their logos, merchandise and window displays in rainbow colors. This predictable phenomenon has been coined as “rainbow washing”—the act of using rainbow imagery to effectively advertise and signal allyship to a more diverse audience of consumers, with little genuine support of the LGBTQ+ community behind it.

The heart of the controversy surrounding rainbow washing and businesses’ celebrations of Pride Month lies in inconsistency. Many big-name brands—ranging from Bloomingdale’s to Amazon—brandish themselves in rainbow flags for the 30 glorious days of June, but then fall seemingly silent on LGBTQ+ issues for the remaining 12 months of the year. There is something about this kind of activism that is inherently performative. Sadly, this half-hearted performance almost makes sense when one considers that, according to LGBT Capital, the LGBTQ+ community holds roughly 3.9 trillion dollars of purchasing power globally. Rainbow washing during Pride Month is an effective capitalist strategy to garner more profit, while also looking like you care.

Let’s first consider McDonald’s as an example (among countless others) of this inconsistency…

According to Forbes, for Pride Month this year, McDonald’s has formed an unlikely alliance with Revry, “the world’s first global queer streaming network.” Their content is curated for the LGBTQ+ community and is boundlessly inclusive, highlighting both queer characters and queer content creators. The unlikely collaboration between a mega-fast food joint and a queer streaming platform has taken the form of a variety show, “House of Pride,” which is sponsored by McDonald’s and streamed via Revry. The show premiered June 6th, and you can watch it HERE.

This partnership is revolutionary and undeniably exciting; however, McDonald’s is not quite unified when it comes to its actions towards and support of the LGBTQ+ community. According to Business Insider, the fast food corporation has its own political action committee (PAC) through which it donates money to a wide array of politicians’ campaigns in the hopes of eventually influencing how these bipartisan lawmakers vote on issues that have a more direct impact on McDonald’s business (like working wages). Thus, McDonald’s has donations on opposing sides of key issues, LGBTQ+ rights being one of them. Most recently, McDonald’s PAC—and the PACs of other big corporations, including aforementioned Amazon—had a portion of their donations operating behind Republican representatives in the House who voted against the Equality Act, a bill with an overarching goal to protect LGBTQ+ Americans from discrimination. Between 2019 and 2020, according to the same Business Insider article, “McDonald’s PAC donated a total of $213,000 to lawmakers who voted against the bill.” These donations have very real repercussions in the world of legislation and in the intimate worlds of LGBTQ+ individuals who are consistently at risk of discrimination in their everyday lives. A sparkly new partnership with a queer streaming service may be more attractive and easily marketable, but it has far less real-world impact. 

This fact is especially true when one takes into account the rates of workplace discrimination and harassment against LGBTQ+ employees. CNBC recently reported on a survey of working LGBTQ+ individuals conducted by Linkedin in which “25% of respondents [said] they have been intentionally denied career advancement opportunities (such as promotions and raises) because of their identity.” Another 31% of people from the study said they have been the target of “blatant discrimination and microaggressions in the workplace.” So while businesses may change their logo to the colors of the rainbow for the month of June, current legislation and inner-company culture is ignoring the lived experiences of queer workers.

Other examples of rainbow washing and inconsistent activism include J.Crew’s new “Love First” merchandise campaign—from which only 50% of the proceeds are going to an LGBTQ+ organization, PFLAG—and Nike’s “BETRUE” campaign. As with the McDonald’s case study, these Pride efforts are not to be singularly praised or criticized; they are far too complicated for that sort of a response.

In support of these campaigns, one could argue that heightening queer visibility by emblazing shirts and sneakers with rainbow logos and then donating at lease some proceeds to organizations that support LGBTQ+ individuals is doing some good. Going even further, many companies are using Pride Month and their colorful campaigns to amplify queer voices, which is another positive outcome. For example, J.Crew asked a handful of queer individuals “what it means to support and be supported in their community,” and then published their answers and photos online. Similarly, fast fashion company H&M recently launched their “Beyond the Rainbow” campaign, an interactive web app on which people can scan any rainbow flag to read others’ or share their own Pride stories.

On the other side of the coin, however, one could point to the lack of action taken by these companies outside of the month of June or the lazy “slacktivism” that their Pride campaigns promote. Slacktivism is the practice of supporting a social movement or cause but in a way that requires little commitment or effort. An example of slacktivism would be posting a graphic expressing protest or dissent on social media, without any further action taken. Within the context of Pride Month, slacktivism takes the form of companies commodifying the rainbow flag and mass-producing rainbow gear which then consumers can easily buy and feel validated as an ally to the LGBTQ+ community. What these efforts lack is follow-through: supporting LGBTQ+ organizations, amplifying and showcasing queer creators and models and workers, lobbying for protective legislation, and informing consumers on the true meaning of Pride, all year long.

LGBT flag illustration by Symara Wilson for 360 Magazine

ABC Owned TV Stations Pride Content

ABC OWNED TELEVISION STATIONS FURTHER SOLIDIFY THEIR COMMITMENT TO SERVE THE LGBTQ+ COMMUNITY AND THEIR ALLIES WITH PREMIUM CONTENT AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES ACROSS ITS EIGHT STATIONS IN CELEBRATION OF PRIDE MONTH 2021

In a Range of Annual Pride Parade Coverage Across Linear—Including the Exclusive Streaming Special ‘Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be,’ Daily News Reporting, Educational Town Halls and Community Resources—Pride is on Display Across the Eight-Owned Stations’ Markets

ABC Owned Television Stations announce their content for Pride Month, with the addition of educational town halls and community resources for the LGBTQ+ community and viewers across their markets of New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston, San Francisco, Raleigh-Durham and Fresno.

Yesterday, ABC Owned Television Stations released the two-episode premiere of Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be, with full episodes of the series available for viewers beginning June 21 on the station group’s connected TV apps. The eight-episode short documentary series amplifies the voices of the transgender community across America through first-person narratives. OnJune 23, the “Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be”town hall will be available to stream across the station group’s connected TV apps. The post-documentary will discuss issues impacting the transgender community. The town hall will be co-hosted by transgender activist and award-winning writer Raquel Willis and KGO-TV reporter Reggie Aqui.

ABC7/KABC-TV Los Angeles, Southern California’s most-watched station, will exclusively air “Thrive with Pride Celebration,” SATURDAY, June 12, (9:00-10:00 p.m. PDT). The special is co-produced by ABC7 Los Angeles and Christopher West. Actress Raven-Symoné and ABC7 “Eyewitness News” anchors Ellen Leyva and Brandi Hitt host the one-hour special, with correspondents Karl Schmid and Eric Resendiz. Highlights from the special include how the LGBTQ+ community has evolved over the past five decades, where the community stands today in terms of equality, honors LGBTQ+ frontline heroes, and revisits the tragedy of the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando on the fifth anniversary. The special also includes several pride performances from award-winning musicians such as the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles and the Backstreet Boys’ AJ McLean, performing his song “Love Song Love,” which celebrates the transgender community. Special appearances include “Grey’s Anatomy” star Jake Borelli, “Pose” stars Billy Porter and Mj Rodriguez, Freeform’s “Everything’s Gonna be Okay” star Adam Faison, and the cast of Hulu’s “Love, Victor.” Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

ABC7/WABC-TV, the most-watched station in the nation, is the broadcast partner for the “2021 NYC Pride March” for the fifth year in a row. Throughout the month, the No. 1 station will feature local LGBTQ+ leaders and provide resources and local news coverage celebrating Pride, leading up to a three-hour celebration of the “2021 NYC Pride March,” airing on SUNDAY, June 27 (12:00-3:00 p.m. EDT) and available on streaming platforms. Grand Marshals Wilson Cruz, Ceyenne Doroshow, Menaka Guruswamy and Arundhati Katju, Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, and Aaron Philip are heading this year’s celebration. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

An overview of Pride Month programming across linear and streaming includes the following:

ABC7/WLS-TV Chicago celebrates Pride month featuring extensive news coverage of LGBTQ+ issues, events and activities. ABC7 will air a half-hour special, “Our Chicago: Celebrating Pride” on SATURDAY, June 26 (6:30 p.m. CDT) with a rebroadcast on SUNDAY, June 27 (11:00 p.m. CDT).In addition, ABC7 Chicago hosts two streaming Our Chicago: Voices of the Community” town halls hosted by WLS’s “I-Team” consumer investigator Jason Knowles. The first town hall, “Issues Facing the LGBTQ+ Community,” airs on THURSDAY, JUNE 10 (2:00-3:00 p.m. CDT). The forum will share programs to address anti-gay hate, legislation impacting transgender people, and whether the lesbian community feels heard within the general LGBTQ+ discourse. Expert panelists will discuss “Northalsted” (the new name for the historically gay neighborhood known as “Boystown”) and the petition to change the name, and the controversy surrounding current FDA (Food and Drug Administration) restrictions on blood donations from gay men. The second town hall,“LGBTQ+ Youth Town Hall” is available on THURSDAY, June 24 (2:00-3:00 p.m. CDT) and focuses on LGBTQ+ youth issues – including homelessness, coming out, transgender youth and trans-youth sports.  Additional pride-focused content will air on ABC7’s “Windy City Live” which features weekly pride segments all month long. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

6abc/WPVI-Philadelphia’s “FYI Philly” Pride episode airs on SATURDAY, June 19 (7:00 p.m. EDT) with a rebroadcast the next day. The following week, WPVI’s long-running diversity-focused community affairs program, “Visions,” will spotlight events happening in the LGBTQ+ community. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC13/KTRK-TV Houston presents a streaming town hall “Protecting Our LGBTQ+ Youth” on TUESDAY, June 22 (7:00–8:00 p.m. CDT), followed by an ABC13 Localish: Houston Pride” half-hour Pride special on SATURDAY, June 26 (6:30 p.m. CDT). Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC7/KGO-TV San Francisco plans to air weekly content that includes discussions about the transgender community, proper terminology, and a community-led town hall focusing on issues that impact the LGBTQ+ community. There will be ongoing news coverage of local pride events—leading up to the “San Francisco Pride 2021” celebration taking place on SUNDAY, June 27. Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long at HERE.

ABC11/WTVD-TV Raleigh Durham will have ongoing news coverage of local pride events and initiatives throughout the month and will host a digital Pride town hall, “Why Terminology Matters,” on THURSDAY, June 24 (6:00 -7:00 p.m. EDT). Viewers can find uplifting pride content all year long HERE.

Each owned station will post resources on its websites that are relevant to the LGBTQ+ community and allies who would like to have more information or educate themselves. Additionally, all station websites have pride content that displays positive and uplifting stories about the LGBTQ+ community all year round.

Regardless of where viewers live, they can stream ABC Owned Television Stations pride content, including full episodes of “Our America: Who I’m Meant to Be” by downloading one of the following free news apps: ABC7/WABC-TV New YorkABC7/KABC-TV Los AngelesABC7/WLS-TV Chicago6ABC/WPVI-TV PhiladelphiaABC7/KGO-TV San Francisco, ABC13/KTRK-TV HoustonABC11/WTVD-TV Raleigh-Durham and ABC30/KFSN-TV Fresno on their mobile device or streaming platforms Fire TV, Android TV, Apple TV, and Roku

About ABC Owned Television Stations 

Disney Media Entertainment & Distribution’s eight owned ABC stations are multiplatform leaders in local news and information. Collectively No. 1 across all U.S. television, reaching 23% of households and more than 34 million Total Viewers and 62 million digital visitors a month, the eight stations are comprised of WABC-TV New York, KABC-TV Los Angeles, WLS-TV Chicago, WPVI-TV Philadelphia, KGO-TV San Francisco, KTRK-TV Houston, WTVD-TV Raleigh-Durham and KFSN-TV Fresno. The stations also deliver locally sourced storytelling to more than 17 million viewers across America through its multiplatform lifestyle network, Localish. In 2020, the stations received five Broadcast & Cable awards, including in the 2020 Best in Local TV Awards category as Station Group of the Year for its innovative and next-generation news reporting, and in the major market category for 2020: Best News Coverage, Best Digital Multiplatform or Website, Best Investigative Reporting Station Group and Best Public Affairs Programming, illustrating the group’s strength and ever-increasing growth and reach in the multiplatform space.

LGBTQIA via Gabreille Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

The Importance of One Percent

By: Yuval David

At the start of Pride Month I am feeling proud and challenged.  Proud of the advocacy I do along with other LGBTQ individuals and organizations who are engaged and active in the fight and telling their stories, engaging with their elected officials and with their families and communities. 

A record number of adults in the US identify as LGBTQ.  This increase is propelled by the successes of advocacy and activism. A 2020 survey by Gallup made a more than 1% jump from the last poll in 2017.  According to this poll, 5.6% of Americans openly identify as LGBTQ.  86.7% of Americans identify as heterosexual or straight.  7.6% do not answer the question. And, 5% had a “no opinion” response.

Being counted matters.  18 million adults identify as LGBTQ.  This reflects the greater acceptance in our society and the ability for people to more comfortably express themselves.

For the first time, Gallup more specifically focused on sexual orientation, which also created more awareness of identity. In the past, they only had a yes or no option. But, this poll informed that among adults, 54.6% identify as bisexual, 24.5% identify as gay, 11.7% identify as lesbian, and 11.3% identify as transgender. 

Among the younger adults, from ages 18 to 23, 15.9% identify as LGBTQ. 72% of them identify as bisexual.

What is the takeaway from this?  Advocacy matters. LGBTQ youth are growing up in a more accepting reality. The older generations of activists have paved the way for the younger generations to have the freedoms and acceptance they have today.

A larger percent of the older generations dealt with more family rejection, job losses, loneliness, depression, and even knowing that LGBTQ identity and activity could be a punishable offense. A larger percent of the younger generations have not experienced the same level of needing to be in the closet.

This does not mean that all people, especially younger more impressionable LGBTQ people, are impervious to harsh anti-LGBTQ rhetoric, actions, and legislation. Prejudice against LGBTQ people is still being taught and discussed openly. 

We especially see this from religious communities and leaders who use religion as an excuse to discriminate. For example, the Catholic Church announced again that homosexuals are “objectively disordered.”

The Equality Act is a bill in Congress, that, if passed would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, federally funded programs, credit, and jury service. But, its failing is that is still provides a religious exemption for those who feel that accepting LGBTQ people is against their religious beliefs.

So, I and my other partners in advocacy are still challenged. The LGBTQ Community is also the LGBTQ Movement.  We are striving to empower people to publicly claim their identity, to authentically express who they are.

The Gallup poll numbers provide context and give a perspective to the advancement of the LGBTQ Movement.

I fell in love with my husband before we legally could get married.  We celebrated together with countless supporters of marriage equality when the Supreme Court passed their legislation.  We understood and appreciated the advancement of the movement and our successes that allowed us to express our love and bond in matrimony.  We were recognized in Holy Matrimony in my Jewish faith, but not in my husband’s Catholic faith. 

So, yes, I am proud, but I am also challenged.  We have a long way to go.

To learn more about Yuval Davis, follow him on Instagram and Facebook, or view his imdb profile or Youtube page.

Mary Wilson from Cathy Williams from UMe for use by 360 Magazine

Honoring Mary Wilson’s Memory – Black Music × Pride Month

Legendary artist/author and original and founding member of the Supremes, Mary Wilson was also known as a tireless advocate for the Black and LGBTQ+ communities. 

 

The Motown/UMe April release of Mary Wilson: Expanded Edition represented an ongoing effort to honor her memory and her passion for celebrating life through music. Her work to raise awareness of the need for tolerance and equality is especially poignant during June, which is dedicated to Black Music Month and Pride Month; her music provides a fitting backdrop to celebrations and events — from intimate events to large-scale community celebrations.  

 

Ms. Wilson believed in the power of music, especially the joy The Supremes brought to the world. She carried on that legacy throughout her career and right up to the days before her untimely passing in February, just weeks before the release of Mary Wilson: Expanded Edition.  

 

“The music was inclusive. It didn’t matter who you were, the music touched your soul. Music, to me, brought all the souls together. I’ve always said that Motown was an ambassador for love and for friendship because it brought people together.” – Mary Wilson in a 2015 interview with Pride Source.

Mary Wilson: Expanded Edition was originally announced to celebrate her 77th Birthday and honor her history and legacy with the first of her album projects. Ms. Wilson, who retained ownership of her solo recordings, wanted to make the album – and much more – available to her many fans around the world. Mary Wilson: Expanded Edition is a newly compiled version of her solo album, originally released by Motown in 1979, that will now be available on all digital platforms for the first time. Added to the album are eight incredible bonus tracks, four of them unreleased, including the legendary tracks recorded as a follow-up to the album produced by Gus Dudgeon (Elton John, Joan Armatrading, Chris Rea, et al). Featured as the lead single is a brand-new song, “Why Can’t We All Get Along,” produced by Richard Davis and co-written with Angelo Bond, who previously had great success as a co-writer with General Johnson and Greg Perry for “Bring The Boys Home.”

 

Mary Wilson, who had many fond memories around recording her solo debut, was so excited about the release of this album that, after finalizing details with UMe, she created an impromptu “teaser,” posting what was to be her final YouTube video. “I finally decided how to work with Universal, and they are going to release new Mary Wilson recordings,” she said. “Yes! At last! At last,” adding that the expanded version of the album, known by her and to fans as “Red Hot,” referring to its lead single, will include the Dudgeon productions – and something new. “It was four wonderful songs that were never released… and I also have some other songs, some surprising new songs… Thank you Universal for chiming in with me and helping this come true. Hopefully some of that will be out on my birthday, March 6th… I’ve got my fingers crossed.”

 

Sadly, the world mourned the sudden passing of Mary Wilson on February 8th, which also marked the 56th anniversary of The Supremes’ #1 hit, “Stop! In the Name Of Love.” She was a world-renowned singer, best-selling author, a humanitarian, artist rights advocate, philanthropist, cultural ambassador for the U.S. appointed by Colin Powell, but she was best known as a “Supreme.” She was the co-founder of the original Supremes, along with Diana Ross and Florence Ballard, which signed to Motown in January 1961, making this year their 60th anniversary. The group broke down barriers by becoming the world’s most popular female singing trio, with an unprecedented string of 12 number one hits, 33 top 40 singles, a record breaking 5 consecutive number ones, and the first number one album for a female group. Mary Wilson is the only member with the group from their signing in 1961 to their disbanding in 1977. Their legendary history is the foundation for dozens of books, movies, and even three Broadway musicals.

 

But the often-overlooked history is of the solo careers of Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard. Ballard had previously released an album on ABC Records while, upon leaving the Supremes, Mary Wilson released her self-titled solo album debut on Motown, her label for the previous 18 years. Mary Wilson had the potential of becoming a dance classic. Famed Motown Producer Hal Davis, known for #1 hits on the Jackson 5, Thelma Houston and Diana Ross crafted a lush disco album for Wilson, with six dance tracks and a mid-tempo ballad. Wilson recorded the album while pregnant with her youngest son, Raphael, and for the album’s cover shoot she was wrapped in a jacket to hide the pregnancy.

 

“Red Hot” was the obvious lead single. But just prior to the release of the album the infamous Disco Demolition Night took place at Comiskey Park in Chicago on July 12, 1979. The “Disco Sucks” movement impacted the release of Mary Wilson, and the single reached #85 on the dance chart and #95 on the R&B chart. This new collection retrieves for history the song’s rare 12” and 7” mixes, which were unique from the album’s version. Despite being loved by fans, and the release of a second single, “Pick Up the Pieces” in the U.K., the Mary Wilson album did not get the recognition it deserved.

 

In 1980, Mary Wilson headed to Europe to record with Elton John’s producer, Gus Dudgeon. The late Dudgeon, who started as Decca Records’ in-house recording engineer, became a key creative collaborator with Elton John, producing seven No. 1 albums, in addition to creating masterworks with David Bowie, Joan Armatrading, Chris Rea, and many more.

 

Wilson wrote in her second autobiography, Supreme Faith: Someday We’ll Be Together, “I was very excited about these four songs. It wasn’t the formula disco of my first album. Two of the songs were big ballads. The other two were rock and roll in the style of Tina Turner’s mid-eighties hits; I was certainly ahead of the time.” Three of the four songs were never released. The fourth song, “You Dance My Heart Around the Stars,” first made available in 2015 on a collection of the co-writer’s, Steve Kalinich, a frequent collaborator of the Beach Boys, is considered one of Wilson’s finest performances. 

 

In 1986 Mary Wilson wrote her best-selling autobiography, Dreamgirl: My Life As A Supreme, followed by two more books, Supreme Faith: Someday We’ll Be Together, and Supreme Glamour. Although Mary continued to record and release music through the rest of her career, fans have continually requested to hear this music. These songs remain among the most requested items in the Motown catalog.

 

While recording more music over the last 10 years, Mary Wilson reconnected with Richard Davis, executive of Gold Forever Music, a publishing company established by Eddie Holland after leaving Motown. In the early days of Motown, Holland-Dozier-Holland was the songwriting team responsible for The Supremes’ string of hit records.

 

While Mary continued to record, she kept a journal with her most personal thoughts, perspective, outlook, philosophy on life, beliefs based on her experiences and topics of the day. Richard Davis discussed this song with Wilson. Mary told Davis and Bond that their lyrics were able to capture and articulate her feelings into song and help her tell her story. As she was watching and writing about her feelings about the political unrest and the division in the country, Mary felt strongly about releasing “Why Can’t We All Get Along,” now in the hopes of spreading a positive message through music.

 

TRACKLISTING:

Mary Wilson

Mary Wilson: Expanded Edition

 

1.   Red Hot (6:06)

2.   I’ve Got What You Need (5:08)

3.   You Make Me Feel So Good (5:51)

4.  (I Love A) Warm Summer Night  (4:07)

5.   Pick Up the Pieces * (5:01)

6.   You’re the Light That Guides My Way (3:18)

7.   Midnight Dancer (3:08)

 

#1-7: Produced by Hal Davis

* Co-Produced by Hal Davis & Bobby Belle

Originally issued as Motown M7-927 R1 (1979)

 

Bonus Tracks

 

The Red Hot Singles

8.   Red Hot 7” Single Version (3:53)

9.   Red Hot 12” Disco Version – Remixed by Rusty Garner (7:12)

10. Red Hot 12” B-Side Promo Version – Remixed by Rusty Garner (3:53) – previously unreleased commercially

 

The Gus Dudgeon Sessions – previously unreleased except **

11. You Dance My Heart Around the Stars** (4:34)

12. Love Talk (4:05)

13. Save Me (3:53)

14. Green River (3:36)

 

The Richard Davis Sessions – previously unreleased

15. Why Can’t We All Get Along Single version (4:50)

“Be Myself” by Montana Tucker featuring Todrick Hall via Monica Rosales at coeurcomm for use by 360 Magazine

Montana Tucker × Todrick Hall – Be Myself

Today, renowned recording artist Montana Tucker released self-confidence anthem and surefire summer banger “Be Myself,” featuring social media mega-star Todrick Hall via Universal Music Group’s “Aftercluv” label. Produced by LASH and the mastermind of Justin Bieber’s “Peaches”, shndō, the undeniable beat is sure to deliver to fans who’ve been anticipating this track around the globe, whether in a Zumba® class, at a pool party, parading for PRIDE, or just cleaning the house! Stream it HERE.

Zumba, the world’s largest branded fitness company, even launched a choreography challenge with Zumba instructors in 186 countries to raise money for the It Gets Better Project. For each video made to the song and posted with hashtag #BEMYSELFchallenge, Zumba will donate $1 (up to $10,000) to the It Gets Better Project.

The track focuses on themes of self-acceptance, confidence, and standing proud– something that both Montana and Todrick are passionate about emulating on their platforms. The video, which will premiere at a Tik Tok live Event on June 10, follows the story arch of their respective lives and the troubles they faced to get to where they are now. They never gave up, they never conformed, they persevered through people telling them they were not good enough, they stayed true to being themselves, and now they are here.

MORE ABOUT MONTANA TUCKER:
Montana Tucker is an award-winning singer/songwriter, dancer, actress and social media sensation best known for her work alongside music’s biggest names such as Pitbull, Flo Rida, and Ashanti. She is widely adored by her combined following over 10M across platforms for creating viral dances on TikTok with well-known stars, and has shared the stage with the likes of Ciara, Lil Wayne and JLo, to name a few. A role model for so many, Montana has always been a huge advocate for inclusion and acceptance across all walks of life. Her world-renown musical project “I’m Not Alone” has received high praise from the community for “saving the lives” of those who are lost, confused or feeling down, and she contributes to the community as a “Celebrity Champion” of National Alzheimer’s Association. Montana just announced her big plans to create a music and dance program with Miami Jewish Health that will incorporate movement and brain chemistry to boost the wellbeing of those with cognitive impairment. It will be rolled out across the globe, and the goal is to help millions diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease stimulate different parts of their brains, stay active, boost wellbeing, and bring some joy into their days.

Montana Tucker image PHOTO CREDIT: Dylan Perlot “Be Myself” by Montana Tucker featuring Todrick Hall via Monica Rosales at coeurcomm for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Dylan Perlot