Posts tagged with "black girl magic"

Trans woman, actress, entertainer, TV personality Monroe Alise shot Corey Fletcher speaks to Vaughn Lowery via 360 Magazine podcast

Monroe Alise

Listen to Monroe Alise’s full conversation with Vaughn Lowery on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE

Monroe Alise is an actress, LGBTQIA+ advocate, model and comedienne. As a transgender woman, she has fulfilled her childhood dream of working in the entertainment industry. Her philosophy on life is described in her mantra, “If you can’t laugh at life, you will never find a reason to live it.”

Born and raised in Washington DC, Monroe grew up passionate and inspired by media and entertainment. Her admiration for her father’s successful career as a DJ ignited her insatiable desire to entertain. Thus, she began singing in church, propelling her into the world of artistic expression. 

For Monroe, a great singer consists of emulating your favorite idols while taking advantage of the potential of one’s own voice. As a child, she recalls being compared to artists like John Legend and Luther Vandross because of her tonality and courage. Another favorite is Nina Simone, whom she references while belting evangelical hymns. 

As a youth, Monroe was a very active and social child. She studied sports public relations but fancied theatre. These disciplines were conducive to her discovery of sexuality. Further, she began to notice a direct correlation with her mother’s maternal responsibilites, rather than her father and two brother’s machismo profile. 

According to Monroe, “While they were playing games and sports, I was in the kitchen doing my mom’s hair.” In addition, her openly gay aunt was influential in her gender transformation due to her immense pride and confidence.

Monroe’s gender bender was painstakingly challenging but became easier over time. For instance, while preparing for an acting role as a Trans woman, she became comfortable in this new skin. After the audition, she gave herself permission to continue to live within this newfound reality.

A year later, Monroe made the decision to come out, “I was like, well this is who I am, so I socially reinvented myself and this is the girl you see.” Eventhough the transition embraced authenticity, it was extremely taxing on her family as well as father’s religious convictions.

Lacking legit representation and management, Monroe began to utilize social media to seek opportunities within the realms of fashion and Hollywood. As a thespian, Monroe became enthralled by the portrayal of becoming another homosepian while subsequently having an impact on the world. This year’s main objective is New York City’s Broadway. Her short-term is to star in a sci-fi like Star Trek or Star Wars as well as a fantasy film similar in type to Harry Potter and Twilight. Longterm, Monroe aspires to host a namesake talk show directed and produced by herself.

As an emerging Trans Community activist, Monroe is deeply concerned about the increasing rate of violence against her people. She hopes to alleviate the suffering of her collective, especially at the hands and ignorance of the narrow-minded. 

Monroe’s Five Principles:

1.) Adequate preparation;

2.) prevention of underachievement;

3.) working while you wait without worry;

4.) preparing for your mission;

5.) and continuing to work because you know you’ve been doing the best you could.

Credits:

Article: Andrea Esteban, McKinley Franklin, Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery

Photo: Corey Fletcher

Resources:

Trans Lifeline

Human Rights Campaign

Follow Monroe Alise:

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter YouTube | Spotify

Check out Monroe on the latest season of P-Valley on Starz.

Makeup Tips for Black Women

These are the Best Makeup Tips for Black Women

Finding the correct makeup that works specifically for you can be difficult no matter your skin type. And for women of color, this challenge is intensified. Luckily in 2022, women from all walks of life are catered for, and if we look at full coverage foundation alone, especially for black women, there is every shade available; we couldn’t be happier! What should I know to make up a dark skin? Today we leave you some #MakTips

Gentle but effective cleaning

For this type of skin, we must use mild cleansers with decongestant and purifying properties that help balance sebaceous secretion, and thus we can avoid the appearance of pimples.

Hydration

Skins of color have a strong need for hydration. These have a greater loss of water by having more sweat glands, so they feel more dehydrated. This is one of the reasons why it is important to apply moisturizers.

Get the right foundation color

Probably the biggest one out of the lot! Finding the correct color foundation is tricky, maybe not as problematic as it was 10 or so years ago. However, it can still be difficult especially if you are new to makeup – and if you are, you are in luck as UK Black Girl Makeup is a beauty trend to help you on this journey. The first thing to remember is that no one has perfect skin and that you should embrace the skin you are in, blemishes, pimples, wrinkles, and all! The foundation helps you here and there are a few magic tricks, like using a yellow-based foundation! Foundation can smooth out any of those kinks you are self-conscious about. However, it’s truly magical when you find the foundation that matches your skin tone. You can use a foundation shade finder to help you pick out the shade you need, or you can head to the drug store and check with any of the ladies at the makeup counter to help you.  

Although remember, the ideal is to apply products with light textures that maintain a good level of hydration without making the skin feel heavy. A good option is the MAC Matchmaster SPF15 Foundation makeup base. This has intelligent pigments that have the ability to adapt to the different skin tones that the client may have.

Use the correct brush

Using the correct brush is an essential part since it serves to give light to this type of face. But there are some useful ways in which to use makeup brushes. Let’s look at how to apply makeup using a foundation brush. For black women or ladies with darker skin, try this. When applying your foundation, whether liquid or powder, apply it across your face in broad strokes. The next step is to start at the center of your face working outwards. After this, buff the product into your skin in circular motions using the foundation brush. After this, you need to buff your product until it blends evenly across your face and looks natural or to your desire. If done correctly, your foundation will be smooth and last all day.  

Build some layers

All of us want the all-day coverage, and some days our skin just does not have the natural glow we are used to. But there are ways to get that look you want. Now, building layers will allow for greater coverage and do this in a few ways. If you are after light coverage, you need to apply a lighter amount of product and go over your face with your brush a maximum of two times. For a fuller coverage look, opt for applying more product and go over your face with your brush several times and work the product into your skin in layers. Here is a pro tip from makeup artists: Apply primer before applying your foundation if you are after an all-day look. It’s also great for oil control.  

Use concealer

If you didn’t know, concealer is the makeup type you use to cover up any dark spots, blemishes or pimples, or breakouts. It is particularly wonderful for darker tones, so try to find one that complements your skin. Apply concealer to all areas you wish to cover, paying particular attention to the T-zone. Another trick for ladies with darker skin is to use concealer to highlight some of your features. Here you can apply it below your eyes, above the cheekbones, and on your chin. This way, you are using your concealer as a form of highlighting.  

Spice it up

When using bronzer and blush, especially if you have dark skin, you might end up with a completely weird makeup look if you are not careful. Now, you can use bronzer and blush, but you need to use them correctly. Since these are makeup basics, they are also easy to apply. So, you need to dust some bronzer on the side of your face, the hollow sections of your cheeks, and then on your nose as well. Then apply some blush on the apple of your cheeks. Once you smile, you will see your work of art! Get it, girl!  

Go for the perfect pout

In the past, lipstick colors didn’t favor black women, but over time the different lipstick shades started to include other colors that work for darker women. Today, black women can find a range of lipsticks that work so well, and we couldn’t be happier. The advice here is to test out different shades to find the ones you know will work with your skin tone. This year there are so many makeup trends that are going to look great on every black woman out there!  

Cheats – wildcard:

  1. Putting a bronze or peach color is always a success on dark skin.

2. For a fresh and beautiful look, draw a line with cream eye pencil on the inner part of the lower eyelid, so they will look more rested and larger. Then apply magnetic lashes.

3. If you prefer to wear a more basic makeup, it would be to prepare the skin by applying a light base and make a colored eyeliner (for example purple or blue), these colors serve to highlight the look.

LEADERS APPLAUD JUDGE KETANJI BROWN JACKSON

PROMINENT NATIONAL BLACK WOMEN LEADERS APPLAUD JUDGE KETANJI BROWN JACKSON ON HER HISTORIC U.S. SENATE CONFIRMATION HEARING FOR SUPREME COURT

The Black Women’s Leadership Collective, a coalition of 11 national Black women’s organizations networks and leaders, applauds Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson for her historic appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week. Judge Jackson demonstrated why she belongs on the United States Supreme Court, despite false, unwarranted and vitriolic Republican attacks on both her character and her nearly decade-long tenure as a federal judge. 

The Black Women’s Leadership Collective — an organizing hub of national leaders who represent millions of advocates and supporters — is urging the Judiciary Committee to advance Judge Jackson’s nomination to the full Senate for confirmation as the first Black woman to serve on our nation’s highest court.

Judge Jackson’s appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee deepened the pride and joy Black women across America have felt since she was nominated by President Biden.  She did us and our ancestors proud. Day after day, hour after hour, Judge Jackson’s character, integrity, deep knowledge, and respect for the Constitution were eminently clear. She cut through the noise and partisan rancor to discuss her record with such grace, transparency, and thoughtfulness that it’s no surprise the Senate previously confirmed her for three positions, including two judgeships, with bipartisan support. 

Judge Jackson faced distortions of her record, attacks, hostility, and downright rudeness from Senate Republicans, who should be ashamed of their actions during these proceedings. The interruptions, barely coded dog whistles and disrespect mirrored the lived experience of Black women in America and serve as a reminder why representation matters and why Judge Jackson’s historic nomination is an inspiration.  As our children watched these hearings, they saw yet another moment in Judge Jackson’s inspirational life as she faced baseless attacks with grace, strength, and incredible poise.

Grounded in core values of faith, family, and service, it’s also no surprise that Judge Jackson the has earned a wide range of endorsements, including the Fraternal Order of Police, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, former attorneys general, lawyers and retired federal judges of both parties. These endorsements prove beyond doubt that Judge Jackson is a strong supporter of law enforcement and works to protect the public from criminals.

We urge the Senate Judiciary Committee and the full Senate to vote swiftly — and overwhelmingly — approve Judge Jackson for the Supreme Court.

About The Black Women’s Leadership Collective

The Black Women’s Leadership Collective is a leadership and organizing hub for Black women’s organizations, advocates, and supporters, utilizing the power of our collective efforts to support the nomination of the first Black woman to the Supreme Court. We are a collective of intergenerational, intersectional Black women leaders throughout the nation. Within our collective are organizational leaders, business leaders, political strategists, student leaders, faith leaders, tech leaders, labor leaders, pioneers in sports, music and entertainment, movement leaders and more. 

To learn more about the Black Women’s Leadership Collective please visit HERE.

Design and cleanliness story illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

COVID GUIDANCE: The importance of TOP-DOWN CLEANING

Robin Wilson launched Robin Wilson Home in 2000 and created a conglomerate that covers eco-design, licensed products, interior design, and real estate development. Her brand has generated over $82 million in wholesale revenue from sales of cabinetry and textiles. She became the first Black woman with a line of hypoallergenic textiles sold nationwide at Bed Bath & Beyond (now in Wal-Mart), among other retailers. Her book, CLEAN DESIGN: Wellness for your Lifestyle was #1 on Amazon and focused on eco-friendly designs and hypoallergenic products for consumers.

Recently, the lifestyle expert introduced the practical aspect of Top-Down Cleaning. In this era of quarantines and lock downs, the last thing anyone wants to do is add to our work load – and a few simple tips will help you maintain a clean and healthier living space!

The Statistics

Sixty million Americans – that is one in five of us – have asthma and allergies. We sneeze, sniffle, and itch. Expose us to a whiff of dust, a gust of pollen, a sniff of perfume, or an encounter with an inquisitive dog or cat, and before we know it, our airways start to close up, and we begin to cough, wheeze or struggle to breathe.

With COVID in the air, the last thing we need is an inflammatory response. So cleaning your space has never been more important. Remember that asthma and allergies cannot be cured, but they can be managed. We can reduce symptoms by avoiding the allergens that trigger them. Unfortunately, the average home is full of allergy and asthma triggers, which means the place that should be your sanctuary can be a major source of allergenic triggers.

What is Top-Down Cleaning?

Most people create twice the cleaning work by first cleaning the floor, softa, tabletop or countertop and then cleaning the lights, ceiling fan or cabinets – only to see dust drift downward.

Solution: Clean from the top-to-bottom. In fact, if you have a second level, start upstairs and then work your way downstairs. Start at the highest point and make sure you have the following tools: paper towels, microstatic dust mitt/cloth, microstatic duster/floor sweeper, HEPA vacuum and a non-toxic cleaning solution. Cleaning solutions should include: baking soda, vinegar, toothpaste and Coca Cola.

Starting at the Top

We forget that walls are one of the largest surfaces in our spaces. Use a microstatic duster cloth/mitt to rub gently along the walls starting at the ceiling line and let the dust fall. As well, make sure to swipe over light receptables, ceiling fans or chandeliers.

Surfaces

Then clean the surfaces, starting with the highest-level lamp, bookcase, window treatments, cabinet or closet shelf. Allow dust/dirt to fall. As you work you way down, you will find that you need to vacuum or wipe down surfaces.

As mentioned earlier, there are a few tricks that involve cleaning solutions that are non-toxic.

1.       Toilet Ring Solution: Pour Coca Cola into your toilet overnight, and use toilet brush in the morning and the stubborn ring will disappear (may have to be repeated dependent on the level of stain) by morning.

2.       Crayon Marks: Use toothpaste. Smear on the mark and let sit for about 20 minutes. Using light brush strokes, and the crayon should be removed, or at least diminished.

3.       Stained Baking Sheets: to make them look new, use vinegar and baking soda. Coat pan with baking soda. Pour a layer of white vinegar on top. You may see slight bubbling. Let sit for 4 hours. Use gloves and a brush in circular motion. Watch the surface start to look new.

Finish at the Floor

The last thing that you need to do in your space is clean the floor.

1.       Make sure to invest in a HEPA filter vacuum as the dust and dirt is stored in a chamber (unlike older vacuum units that sometimes-added dust back into the space), and the canister can be emptied outside.

2.       Before you clean, you might want to make sure that you remove rugs and shake them outside.

3.       Run a microstatic dust cloth over the floor before you vacuum so that you can ensure that minimal dust flies around.

One tech solution that many working from home families are investing is an electronic robot vacuum that can be programmed to work during the day in various rooms. Some floor robot vacuums have HEPA filters, and can be a great option if you have a pet and want to make sure to limit buildup of dander and hair on your floor.

[SIDE BAR] For a space that follows CLEAN DESIGN protocols, it is important to replace a few items:

1.       Change your older model vacuum to a HEPA vacuum to effectively limit dust in the space. Especially important if your home is near any location that had recent fires.

2.       Change your vinyl shower liner to a nylon shower liner to minimize mold.

3.       Review the window treatments and find options that can be laundered and are not ‘dust catchers’ or which can be easily vacuumed.

4.       Replace your pillow after 3 years if it has not been washed frequently or covered with a zippered liner.

5.       Think about using your window screens so that you can open your windows for 5 minutes daily.

SIDEBAR

Leading triggers include:

  • Dust mites in beds and pillows
  • Dander from pets
  • Mold growth in walls, bathrooms and basements
  • Pollen from outdoor trees and grasses in your hair that infiltrates your sleep space or living room sofa
  • Fumes from cooking and chemical cleaners
  • Toxic or environmentally unfriendly building materials that permeate indoor air

Remember, you can change that by using the strategies in the book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle (Greenleaf, 2015). Create a healthy home environment that manages indoor air quality and protect your family from dust, mold, pollen, fumes, odors, airborne toxins, chemicals and other substances. Create a home environment that nurtures good health.

According to the American Lung Association, “poor indoor air quality can cause or contribute to the development of infections, lung cancer…headaches, dry eyes, nasal congestion, nausea, and fatigue” in anyone, not just those who suffer from asthma and allergies. We can all benefit from living in a more pure home environment.

More physicians are convinced that there is a link between environmental toxins, indoor air quality and allergies. Chemicals we are exposed to in our homes and offices have the power to make us sick, and we can improve our health and wellness using Clean Design principles.

Shopping for Hypoallergenic Options

The pandemic made both me and my clients realize that the CLEAN DESIGN HOME which sells our retail products is more important than ever – and that we should find non-toxic cleaning options and information for day-to-day living, especially since so many of us are working from home. I have pivoted to focus on building out the product line, and have just licensed our brand. So much information involves simple non-toxic options– the ideas are rooted in my bestselling book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle.

About Robin Wilson

Her design projects including the White House Fellows office, a part of President Clinton’s Harlem office, and the rustic beach cottage of Robert DeNiro – each project had a very quick turnaround and exacting standards. She was named to the Top 100 Female Founders List in 2020 by INC magazine. Her eponymous licensed brands of textiles is sold at retail and hospitality. She is also in the process of creating Design+Build projects. She is author of two award-winning books: Clean Design She is the first woman with a branded line of custom cabinetry that was sold by over 400 independent kitchen dealers nationwide (2009-2018). First featured in Oprah’s magazines and extensive media coverage since 2005. In May 2013, her furniture line, Nest Home by Robin Wilson, premiered at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in New York. In 2014, she partnered with consumer products giant Panasonic to promote their latest line of cutting edge products for the home.She is an ambassador to the Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, and previously served on the board of the Sustainable Furnishings Council.

Business woman article illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Isn’t it Time to Smash the Myths of Women in Business?

By Andi Simon, Ph.D.

How many times have you heard something said about women that was just not “true?”  The myths seem to be everywhere, even as women penetrate areas that seemed out of bounds in the past.

What do we hear? Women aren’t great leaders. They aren’t decisive or they are too collaborative or too caring. Then you watch Angela Merkel or Kamala Harris, or all the other women today who are leading the way forward in challenging times.

Maybe you are a young woman dreaming of becoming a surgeon, like my granddaughter wants to be, and your teacher suggests you might consider being a pediatrician instead. They might tell you that women don’t make great surgeons, except on “Grey’s Anatomy.” 
 
Maybe you just have great ideas about the fashion industry like so many of those women graduating from the Fashion Institute of Technology—and the graduates are almost all women. Those women look around wondering how to smash the ceilings holding them back when they see men running most of the major fashion companies. Women don’t run the companies as well as men do, or so you are told. Women do the work, create great fashion designs, while the men run the companies.

You aren’t even sure that becoming an attorney is the right career for you when you see that 40% of the lawyers are women today but only 19% of equity partners are women and women are less likely to get to the first level of partnership than their male counterparts. You aren’t sure why being a lady lawyer is going to be so tough for you. It is much the same in accounting firms where women are more than 61% of all accountants and auditors, yet less than a third are partners and principals.  

As a woman you feel your boldness emerging. You see the dreams that are becoming realities. You feel a sea change in public and private stories that are being told about what women can do and are doing. But you realize that we are not there yet. We still have a lot of myth-smashing to go before people expect women to be those leaders, surgeons, and great CEOs.

I bet that all you heard from others through much of your life is that your dreams “will never, or might never, happen.” In reply, you might have asked, “Why?” Well, they would tell you something like “that’s not what women do” or “women are meant to have and raise the children, not start their own business.”  You might have been encouraged to study IT, only to find that the world of coding is filled with men who are not particularly encouraging to you and your dreams. You find that, indeed, most surgeons are men, and women are discouraged from going into surgery, are rarely welcome, and often are held  to a higher standard than the men are. 

In the entrepreneurial arena, 40% of the businesses in the U.S. before the COVID-19 pandemic were owned and run by women. Yet less than 3% of the venture-capital investments were in women-owned businesses. The women were going to start and grow their businesses, and hope to succeed, by relying on family, friends, and revenue to underwrite their growth. If we dug deeper, we would find that their markets, often controlled by men, were not particularly supportive of those women-owned businesses, and neither bought from them nor helped them build their businesses. 

The gap between the achievements of women and the culture in which they are trying to succeed reflects the myths that men have created over centuries and reluctantly modified in more recent times. What is a myth? Think about the stories that we tell each other, our children, our friends, about what we believe to be those “sacred ways we do things” in our societies. 

As people, the secret of our success is in those imagined realities that we create to give meaning to our daily lives. Our cultural myths have driven how we believe our lives should be lived. Once we give these stories, these mythical “truths,” almost “godlike” power, these myths become what we believe are immutable realities. Are they “real”? Yes and no. They are what the stories in our minds believe to be our “reality.” But they can change, if we collaborate with our minds, change our stories, and share those new ones so our shared stories can change as well. This is not a solo act, even though it might feel that way.

These are myths that need to be smashed if we are going to change how men and women relate to each other, how women can succeed, and how organizations of all sizes and in all industries can find greatness in the women with whom they work and live. 

None of this is happening to diminish the value or importance of men. Many men are great mentors and coaches to their women employees.  It is just time for men to shift over and enable, encourage and empower women so both men and women can create better societies, businesses, schools, hospitals, and everything that is so important in our lives. Let’s change those men’s clubs enough to let women in without the men fleeing them. 

It is time to get past the gender fatigue that men are feeling about having to actually address the inclusion, equity and need for diversity in their workplaces, in their organizations, and in our government. The times demand it. Women are ready for it. And the shift is happening, despite the brick walls, the glass ceilings, the enduring men’s clubs. These are important times to rethink our myths about what women can do and what men will allow them to achieve. It is time for men and women to rewrite these myths so women can thrive, and our society can become the best that it can be. 

Andi Simon, Ph.D., author of the new book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants. A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Chloe x Halle illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

CHLOE X HALLE

RELEASE ALTERNATE VERSION “TIPSY” AND COVER OF “SENDING ALL MY LOVE” FOR SPOTIFY SINGLES

LISTEN HERE 

Chloe x Halle has shared two new tracks for the latest installment of Spotify Singles, marking the second-ever Are & Be-branded Spotify Singles release. 

Recorded in LA, Chloe x Halle performed a stripped-down version of their hit single “Tipsy” from their recently released album Ungodly Hour as well as a cover of Zhané’s “Sending My Love,” with Chloe x Halle adding their subtly electronic 90s-R&B-inspired twist. Listen to both songs HERE.

“We first fell in love with ‘Sending All My Love’ by Zhané because our parents would blast it all around our house in Atlanta,” says Chloe x Halle. “We fell in love with the fact that they’re a duo as well, and how their voices blended so nicely together.  It was very inspiring to us as a duo too!” 

Ungodly Hour is available HERE.  

www.chloexhalle.com
@chloexhalle

About Spotify Singles

Driving more than four billion streams since the program began in 2017, Spotify Singles was created to give artists an opportunity to record new versions of their own songs, and the songs of the artists they love. The Singles scope includes a unique version of each artist’s own song (Side A) and a cover song of their choosing (Side B). To date, there have been over 300 Singles recorded as part of the program.

360 Magazine, Good Girl

Good Girl – “Thirsty”

GOOD GIRL RETURNS WITH “THIRSTY” FT. MULATTO TRACK AND VIDEO

CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Today, Philadelphia-based R&B quartet Good Girl returns with the release of their new track and video, “Thirsty” featuring rising rapper, Mulatto via Starr Island/RCA Records. Click HERE to listen/watch.

“Thirsty” is produced by Grammy-nominated Kosine, who is one half of the producer duo Da Internz. The visual, which is an ode to OnlyFans, is directed by Jet Phynx.

Good Girl is Arielle, Bobbie, JL, and Megan.

Watch/Listen to “Thirsty” ft. Mulatto HERE

About Good Girl:

Good Girl is redefining what it means to be a “good girl”— as well as R&B as we know it. The Philadelphia-based quartet of Bobbie, Megan, Arielle, and JL have spent years honing their talents and building a considerable fanbase through their viral covers online.

All four members of Good Girl hail from the East Coast and met in various ways through dance, eventually convening in Philadelphia. Career inspiration struck when they performed a gig in the city, where they covered songs from musical inspirations like TLC and En Vogue.

They immediately got to work on building their group dynamic, regularly posting viral videos on Instagram of the four of them singing and dancing to classic R&B songs in their car. They eventually signed with RCA, heading out to Los Angeles to work on forthcoming EP that showcases their growth as artists and as human beings. “We’re really big on confidence and being true to yourself—girl power, black girl magic,” Bobbie enthuses. “We want everyone to be able to relate to our music, and for it to be timeless as well.”

L to R: Arielle (Yellow), Bobbie (Orange), JL (Red), Megan (Blue

Photo Credit: Shmaal

Keep Up With Good Girl: 

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter 

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, GirlTrek

GirlTrek Finale

More than 100,000 Black women and allies have participated in GirlTrek’s #BlackHistoryBootCamp, a 21-day walking challenge that celebrates a different Black woman of historic significance each day and the podcast has been downloaded nearly 225,000 times. The finale is June 30th.

Revolutionary Black women such as Stagecoach Mary, Rosetta Tharpe, Mamie Till-Mobley, Dovey Johnson Roundtree, Ida B. Wells and Ella Baker have been among those featured by GirlTrek cofounders T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison who co-lead the #BlackHistoryBootCamp discussions. Thousands listen in live and walk in solidarity as the two not only honor these little-known champions of Black culture and womanhood with rich and lively conversation, but share reading resources, speeches and a specially-curated playlist of songs dedicated to each hero highlighted.

“For three weeks straight, you have studied Black women, walked in their footsteps, and danced in the daily celebration of their lives –all of this– in the midst of a world that says you don’t matter,” Dixon said.

The accompanying #BlackHistoryBootCamp podcast has been downloaded nearly 220,000 times across Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Buzzsprout platforms. The most listened to episode features Audre Lorde, a beloved inspiration to GirlTrek’s very mission to inspire Black women to lead healthier, happier lives through radical self-care that starts with daily walking.  

The #BlackHistoryBootCamp has been covered by outlets such as  NPR, Essence, and Parade.

Listen to the 21st and final #BlackHistoryBootCamp call on Tuesday, June 30th at noon EST. The call-in info is 1 (646) 876-9923, code: 734464325.

With nearly 800,000 members and counting, GirlTrek as profiled on CNN, is the largest health movement and nonprofit for Black women and girls in the country. GirlTrek encourages Black women to use radical self-care and walking as the first practical step to leading healthier, more fulfilled lives. GirlTrek is on a mission to inspire one million Black women to walk in the direction of their healthiest, most fulfilled lives by the end of 2020 and it all starts with taking the pledge at GirlTrek.org.

Follow GirlTrek: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

KAMALA HARRIS × ESSENCE

Senator Kamala D. Harris (D-CA) speaks to ESSENCE.com during Black Maternal Health Week (April 11 – 17) on how COVID-19 has exposed the deep racial disparities in our country’s health care system. In her latest Kamala’s Corner column piece, We Can’t Let Up the Fight to End the Black Maternal Health Crisis – Especially Right Now, she talks to ESSENCE about:

  • The On-going Health Disparities Between Pregnant Black Women and White Women: “…Black women are three to four times more likely than White women to die from pregnancyrelated causes and twice as likely to suffer from life-threatening pregnancy-related complications. These disparities persist regardless of one’s income or education level. So, while this is a stressful time for any expectant mother, the potential ramifications that come with giving birth during a pandemic – and specifically a pandemic that is disproportionately impacting African Americans – is of particular concern to Black women…”
  • Underlying Health Conditions Affecting Black People During COVID-19: “We already know that people who have certain underlying health conditions are more at risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19. Sadly, data shows that Black people are 20 percent more likely to have asthma than our White counterparts. We are 40 percent more likely to have high blood pressure. And for Black women, we are three times more likely than White women to be diagnosed with lupus, an autoimmune disease that medical professionals warn could increase one’s chances of getting any kind of infection. Black women can’t afford not to be heard when their lives and babies are on the line, but they especially can’t afford to be shut out when we are going through a pandemic…”
  • The Black Maternal Health Momnibus: “That is why, this year, I was proud to partner with Rep. Lauren Underwood and Rep. Alma Adams to introduce the Black Maternal Health Momnibus. This historic package of bills that would tackle systemic health disparities by making much needed investments in social determinants that influence maternal health outcomes, like housing, transportation, and nutrition. It calls for more diversity in the perinatal workforce, so every mom is provided with inclusive care…”

For more on this story, visit ESSENCE.com.