Posts tagged with "black girl magic"

Design and cleanliness story illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

COVID GUIDANCE: The importance of TOP-DOWN CLEANING

Robin Wilson launched Robin Wilson Home in 2000 and created a conglomerate that covers eco-design, licensed products, interior design, and real estate development. Her brand has generated over $82 million in wholesale revenue from sales of cabinetry and textiles. She became the first Black woman with a line of hypoallergenic textiles sold nationwide at Bed Bath & Beyond (now in Wal-Mart), among other retailers. Her book, CLEAN DESIGN: Wellness for your Lifestyle was #1 on Amazon and focused on eco-friendly designs and hypoallergenic products for consumers.

Recently, the lifestyle expert introduced the practical aspect of Top-Down Cleaning. In this era of quarantines and lock downs, the last thing anyone wants to do is add to our work load – and a few simple tips will help you maintain a clean and healthier living space!

The Statistics

Sixty million Americans – that is one in five of us – have asthma and allergies. We sneeze, sniffle, and itch. Expose us to a whiff of dust, a gust of pollen, a sniff of perfume, or an encounter with an inquisitive dog or cat, and before we know it, our airways start to close up, and we begin to cough, wheeze or struggle to breathe.

With COVID in the air, the last thing we need is an inflammatory response. So cleaning your space has never been more important. Remember that asthma and allergies cannot be cured, but they can be managed. We can reduce symptoms by avoiding the allergens that trigger them. Unfortunately, the average home is full of allergy and asthma triggers, which means the place that should be your sanctuary can be a major source of allergenic triggers.

What is Top-Down Cleaning?

Most people create twice the cleaning work by first cleaning the floor, softa, tabletop or countertop and then cleaning the lights, ceiling fan or cabinets – only to see dust drift downward.

Solution: Clean from the top-to-bottom. In fact, if you have a second level, start upstairs and then work your way downstairs. Start at the highest point and make sure you have the following tools: paper towels, microstatic dust mitt/cloth, microstatic duster/floor sweeper, HEPA vacuum and a non-toxic cleaning solution. Cleaning solutions should include: baking soda, vinegar, toothpaste and Coca Cola.

Starting at the Top

We forget that walls are one of the largest surfaces in our spaces. Use a microstatic duster cloth/mitt to rub gently along the walls starting at the ceiling line and let the dust fall. As well, make sure to swipe over light receptables, ceiling fans or chandeliers.

Surfaces

Then clean the surfaces, starting with the highest-level lamp, bookcase, window treatments, cabinet or closet shelf. Allow dust/dirt to fall. As you work you way down, you will find that you need to vacuum or wipe down surfaces.

As mentioned earlier, there are a few tricks that involve cleaning solutions that are non-toxic.

1.       Toilet Ring Solution: Pour Coca Cola into your toilet overnight, and use toilet brush in the morning and the stubborn ring will disappear (may have to be repeated dependent on the level of stain) by morning.

2.       Crayon Marks: Use toothpaste. Smear on the mark and let sit for about 20 minutes. Using light brush strokes, and the crayon should be removed, or at least diminished.

3.       Stained Baking Sheets: to make them look new, use vinegar and baking soda. Coat pan with baking soda. Pour a layer of white vinegar on top. You may see slight bubbling. Let sit for 4 hours. Use gloves and a brush in circular motion. Watch the surface start to look new.

Finish at the Floor

The last thing that you need to do in your space is clean the floor.

1.       Make sure to invest in a HEPA filter vacuum as the dust and dirt is stored in a chamber (unlike older vacuum units that sometimes-added dust back into the space), and the canister can be emptied outside.

2.       Before you clean, you might want to make sure that you remove rugs and shake them outside.

3.       Run a microstatic dust cloth over the floor before you vacuum so that you can ensure that minimal dust flies around.

One tech solution that many working from home families are investing is an electronic robot vacuum that can be programmed to work during the day in various rooms. Some floor robot vacuums have HEPA filters, and can be a great option if you have a pet and want to make sure to limit buildup of dander and hair on your floor.

[SIDE BAR] For a space that follows CLEAN DESIGN protocols, it is important to replace a few items:

1.       Change your older model vacuum to a HEPA vacuum to effectively limit dust in the space. Especially important if your home is near any location that had recent fires.

2.       Change your vinyl shower liner to a nylon shower liner to minimize mold.

3.       Review the window treatments and find options that can be laundered and are not ‘dust catchers’ or which can be easily vacuumed.

4.       Replace your pillow after 3 years if it has not been washed frequently or covered with a zippered liner.

5.       Think about using your window screens so that you can open your windows for 5 minutes daily.

SIDEBAR

Leading triggers include:

  • Dust mites in beds and pillows
  • Dander from pets
  • Mold growth in walls, bathrooms and basements
  • Pollen from outdoor trees and grasses in your hair that infiltrates your sleep space or living room sofa
  • Fumes from cooking and chemical cleaners
  • Toxic or environmentally unfriendly building materials that permeate indoor air

Remember, you can change that by using the strategies in the book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle (Greenleaf, 2015). Create a healthy home environment that manages indoor air quality and protect your family from dust, mold, pollen, fumes, odors, airborne toxins, chemicals and other substances. Create a home environment that nurtures good health.

According to the American Lung Association, “poor indoor air quality can cause or contribute to the development of infections, lung cancer…headaches, dry eyes, nasal congestion, nausea, and fatigue” in anyone, not just those who suffer from asthma and allergies. We can all benefit from living in a more pure home environment.

More physicians are convinced that there is a link between environmental toxins, indoor air quality and allergies. Chemicals we are exposed to in our homes and offices have the power to make us sick, and we can improve our health and wellness using Clean Design principles.

Shopping for Hypoallergenic Options

The pandemic made both me and my clients realize that the CLEAN DESIGN HOME which sells our retail products is more important than ever – and that we should find non-toxic cleaning options and information for day-to-day living, especially since so many of us are working from home. I have pivoted to focus on building out the product line, and have just licensed our brand. So much information involves simple non-toxic options– the ideas are rooted in my bestselling book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle.

About Robin Wilson

Her design projects including the White House Fellows office, a part of President Clinton’s Harlem office, and the rustic beach cottage of Robert DeNiro – each project had a very quick turnaround and exacting standards. She was named to the Top 100 Female Founders List in 2020 by INC magazine. Her eponymous licensed brands of textiles is sold at retail and hospitality. She is also in the process of creating Design+Build projects. She is author of two award-winning books: Clean Design She is the first woman with a branded line of custom cabinetry that was sold by over 400 independent kitchen dealers nationwide (2009-2018). First featured in Oprah’s magazines and extensive media coverage since 2005. In May 2013, her furniture line, Nest Home by Robin Wilson, premiered at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in New York. In 2014, she partnered with consumer products giant Panasonic to promote their latest line of cutting edge products for the home.She is an ambassador to the Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, and previously served on the board of the Sustainable Furnishings Council.

Business woman article illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Isn’t it Time to Smash the Myths of Women in Business?

By Andi Simon, Ph.D.

How many times have you heard something said about women that was just not “true?”  The myths seem to be everywhere, even as women penetrate areas that seemed out of bounds in the past.

What do we hear? Women aren’t great leaders. They aren’t decisive or they are too collaborative or too caring. Then you watch Angela Merkel or Kamala Harris, or all the other women today who are leading the way forward in challenging times.

Maybe you are a young woman dreaming of becoming a surgeon, like my granddaughter wants to be, and your teacher suggests you might consider being a pediatrician instead. They might tell you that women don’t make great surgeons, except on “Grey’s Anatomy.” 
 
Maybe you just have great ideas about the fashion industry like so many of those women graduating from the Fashion Institute of Technology—and the graduates are almost all women. Those women look around wondering how to smash the ceilings holding them back when they see men running most of the major fashion companies. Women don’t run the companies as well as men do, or so you are told. Women do the work, create great fashion designs, while the men run the companies.

You aren’t even sure that becoming an attorney is the right career for you when you see that 40% of the lawyers are women today but only 19% of equity partners are women and women are less likely to get to the first level of partnership than their male counterparts. You aren’t sure why being a lady lawyer is going to be so tough for you. It is much the same in accounting firms where women are more than 61% of all accountants and auditors, yet less than a third are partners and principals.  

As a woman you feel your boldness emerging. You see the dreams that are becoming realities. You feel a sea change in public and private stories that are being told about what women can do and are doing. But you realize that we are not there yet. We still have a lot of myth-smashing to go before people expect women to be those leaders, surgeons, and great CEOs.

I bet that all you heard from others through much of your life is that your dreams “will never, or might never, happen.” In reply, you might have asked, “Why?” Well, they would tell you something like “that’s not what women do” or “women are meant to have and raise the children, not start their own business.”  You might have been encouraged to study IT, only to find that the world of coding is filled with men who are not particularly encouraging to you and your dreams. You find that, indeed, most surgeons are men, and women are discouraged from going into surgery, are rarely welcome, and often are held  to a higher standard than the men are. 

In the entrepreneurial arena, 40% of the businesses in the U.S. before the COVID-19 pandemic were owned and run by women. Yet less than 3% of the venture-capital investments were in women-owned businesses. The women were going to start and grow their businesses, and hope to succeed, by relying on family, friends, and revenue to underwrite their growth. If we dug deeper, we would find that their markets, often controlled by men, were not particularly supportive of those women-owned businesses, and neither bought from them nor helped them build their businesses. 

The gap between the achievements of women and the culture in which they are trying to succeed reflects the myths that men have created over centuries and reluctantly modified in more recent times. What is a myth? Think about the stories that we tell each other, our children, our friends, about what we believe to be those “sacred ways we do things” in our societies. 

As people, the secret of our success is in those imagined realities that we create to give meaning to our daily lives. Our cultural myths have driven how we believe our lives should be lived. Once we give these stories, these mythical “truths,” almost “godlike” power, these myths become what we believe are immutable realities. Are they “real”? Yes and no. They are what the stories in our minds believe to be our “reality.” But they can change, if we collaborate with our minds, change our stories, and share those new ones so our shared stories can change as well. This is not a solo act, even though it might feel that way.

These are myths that need to be smashed if we are going to change how men and women relate to each other, how women can succeed, and how organizations of all sizes and in all industries can find greatness in the women with whom they work and live. 

None of this is happening to diminish the value or importance of men. Many men are great mentors and coaches to their women employees.  It is just time for men to shift over and enable, encourage and empower women so both men and women can create better societies, businesses, schools, hospitals, and everything that is so important in our lives. Let’s change those men’s clubs enough to let women in without the men fleeing them. 

It is time to get past the gender fatigue that men are feeling about having to actually address the inclusion, equity and need for diversity in their workplaces, in their organizations, and in our government. The times demand it. Women are ready for it. And the shift is happening, despite the brick walls, the glass ceilings, the enduring men’s clubs. These are important times to rethink our myths about what women can do and what men will allow them to achieve. It is time for men and women to rewrite these myths so women can thrive, and our society can become the best that it can be. 

Andi Simon, Ph.D., author of the new book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants. A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Chloe x Halle illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

CHLOE X HALLE

RELEASE ALTERNATE VERSION “TIPSY” AND COVER OF “SENDING ALL MY LOVE” FOR SPOTIFY SINGLES

LISTEN HERE 

Chloe x Halle has shared two new tracks for the latest installment of Spotify Singles, marking the second-ever Are & Be-branded Spotify Singles release. 

Recorded in LA, Chloe x Halle performed a stripped-down version of their hit single “Tipsy” from their recently released album Ungodly Hour as well as a cover of Zhané’s “Sending My Love,” with Chloe x Halle adding their subtly electronic 90s-R&B-inspired twist. Listen to both songs HERE.

“We first fell in love with ‘Sending All My Love’ by Zhané because our parents would blast it all around our house in Atlanta,” says Chloe x Halle. “We fell in love with the fact that they’re a duo as well, and how their voices blended so nicely together.  It was very inspiring to us as a duo too!” 

Ungodly Hour is available HERE.  

www.chloexhalle.com
@chloexhalle

About Spotify Singles

Driving more than four billion streams since the program began in 2017, Spotify Singles was created to give artists an opportunity to record new versions of their own songs, and the songs of the artists they love. The Singles scope includes a unique version of each artist’s own song (Side A) and a cover song of their choosing (Side B). To date, there have been over 300 Singles recorded as part of the program.

360 Magazine, Good Girl

Good Girl – “Thirsty”

GOOD GIRL RETURNS WITH “THIRSTY” FT. MULATTO TRACK AND VIDEO

CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Today, Philadelphia-based R&B quartet Good Girl returns with the release of their new track and video, “Thirsty” featuring rising rapper, Mulatto via Starr Island/RCA Records. Click HERE to listen/watch.

“Thirsty” is produced by Grammy-nominated Kosine, who is one half of the producer duo Da Internz. The visual, which is an ode to OnlyFans, is directed by Jet Phynx.

Good Girl is Arielle, Bobbie, JL, and Megan.

Watch/Listen to “Thirsty” ft. Mulatto HERE

About Good Girl:

Good Girl is redefining what it means to be a “good girl”— as well as R&B as we know it. The Philadelphia-based quartet of Bobbie, Megan, Arielle, and JL have spent years honing their talents and building a considerable fanbase through their viral covers online.

All four members of Good Girl hail from the East Coast and met in various ways through dance, eventually convening in Philadelphia. Career inspiration struck when they performed a gig in the city, where they covered songs from musical inspirations like TLC and En Vogue.

They immediately got to work on building their group dynamic, regularly posting viral videos on Instagram of the four of them singing and dancing to classic R&B songs in their car. They eventually signed with RCA, heading out to Los Angeles to work on forthcoming EP that showcases their growth as artists and as human beings. “We’re really big on confidence and being true to yourself—girl power, black girl magic,” Bobbie enthuses. “We want everyone to be able to relate to our music, and for it to be timeless as well.”

L to R: Arielle (Yellow), Bobbie (Orange), JL (Red), Megan (Blue

Photo Credit: Shmaal

Keep Up With Good Girl: 

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter 

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, GirlTrek

GirlTrek Finale

More than 100,000 Black women and allies have participated in GirlTrek’s #BlackHistoryBootCamp, a 21-day walking challenge that celebrates a different Black woman of historic significance each day and the podcast has been downloaded nearly 225,000 times. The finale is June 30th.

Revolutionary Black women such as Stagecoach Mary, Rosetta Tharpe, Mamie Till-Mobley, Dovey Johnson Roundtree, Ida B. Wells and Ella Baker have been among those featured by GirlTrek cofounders T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison who co-lead the #BlackHistoryBootCamp discussions. Thousands listen in live and walk in solidarity as the two not only honor these little-known champions of Black culture and womanhood with rich and lively conversation, but share reading resources, speeches and a specially-curated playlist of songs dedicated to each hero highlighted.

“For three weeks straight, you have studied Black women, walked in their footsteps, and danced in the daily celebration of their lives –all of this– in the midst of a world that says you don’t matter,” Dixon said.

The accompanying #BlackHistoryBootCamp podcast has been downloaded nearly 220,000 times across Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Buzzsprout platforms. The most listened to episode features Audre Lorde, a beloved inspiration to GirlTrek’s very mission to inspire Black women to lead healthier, happier lives through radical self-care that starts with daily walking.  

The #BlackHistoryBootCamp has been covered by outlets such as  NPR, Essence, and Parade.

Listen to the 21st and final #BlackHistoryBootCamp call on Tuesday, June 30th at noon EST. The call-in info is 1 (646) 876-9923, code: 734464325.

With nearly 800,000 members and counting, GirlTrek as profiled on CNN, is the largest health movement and nonprofit for Black women and girls in the country. GirlTrek encourages Black women to use radical self-care and walking as the first practical step to leading healthier, more fulfilled lives. GirlTrek is on a mission to inspire one million Black women to walk in the direction of their healthiest, most fulfilled lives by the end of 2020 and it all starts with taking the pledge at GirlTrek.org.

Follow GirlTrek: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

KAMALA HARRIS × ESSENCE

Senator Kamala D. Harris (D-CA) speaks to ESSENCE.com during Black Maternal Health Week (April 11 – 17) on how COVID-19 has exposed the deep racial disparities in our country’s health care system. In her latest Kamala’s Corner column piece, We Can’t Let Up the Fight to End the Black Maternal Health Crisis – Especially Right Now, she talks to ESSENCE about:

  • The On-going Health Disparities Between Pregnant Black Women and White Women: “…Black women are three to four times more likely than White women to die from pregnancyrelated causes and twice as likely to suffer from life-threatening pregnancy-related complications. These disparities persist regardless of one’s income or education level. So, while this is a stressful time for any expectant mother, the potential ramifications that come with giving birth during a pandemic – and specifically a pandemic that is disproportionately impacting African Americans – is of particular concern to Black women…”
  • Underlying Health Conditions Affecting Black People During COVID-19: “We already know that people who have certain underlying health conditions are more at risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19. Sadly, data shows that Black people are 20 percent more likely to have asthma than our White counterparts. We are 40 percent more likely to have high blood pressure. And for Black women, we are three times more likely than White women to be diagnosed with lupus, an autoimmune disease that medical professionals warn could increase one’s chances of getting any kind of infection. Black women can’t afford not to be heard when their lives and babies are on the line, but they especially can’t afford to be shut out when we are going through a pandemic…”
  • The Black Maternal Health Momnibus: “That is why, this year, I was proud to partner with Rep. Lauren Underwood and Rep. Alma Adams to introduce the Black Maternal Health Momnibus. This historic package of bills that would tackle systemic health disparities by making much needed investments in social determinants that influence maternal health outcomes, like housing, transportation, and nutrition. It calls for more diversity in the perinatal workforce, so every mom is provided with inclusive care…”

For more on this story, visit ESSENCE.com.

met museum, 360 MAGAZINE, #dearblackgirl, 2015. Kaci Kennedy, The Beautiful Project Intern 2016, Virginia. Digital photograph. Image courtesy of The Beautiful Project

First New York Exhibition by The Beautiful Project to Open at The Met’s Education Center

On December 6, the exhibition Pen, Lens & Soul: The Story of The Beautiful Project will open in The Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where it will be on view through February 24, 2020. There will be an opening reception on Friday, December 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. Pen, Lens & Soul, the first New York exhibition created by The Beautiful Project, presents over a decade of work by image makers and storytellers, including young artists as well as their adult mentors and coaches, who create spaces for black girls and women to express their power and beauty.

Pen, Lens & Soul: The Story of The Beautiful Project is made possible by The 

William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust.

The Beautiful Project is a North Carolina-based collective that uses photography, writing, and care to advance the representational justice and wellness of black girls and women. It is one of 21 arts and cultural organizations—including The Metropolitan Museum of Art—that form the Collaborative for Creative Practice and Social Justice, which explores the impact of the arts in and with communities through themes of justice and equity, relationship building, sustainability, and social impact. 

The exhibition features photography and writing from young artists who have been trained to use the camera and pen to document how they see the world and their aspirations. Founded in 2004, The Beautiful Project is a collective of black artists, scholars, and educators who encourage and equip black girls and women to be the caretakers of their needs, images, and stories.

“This presentation is a celebration of the incredibly talented girls and women who have channeled their experiences into powerful art,” said Sandra Jackson-Dumont, the Museum’s Frederick P. and Sandra P. Rose Chairman of Education.  “We are proud to partner with a fellow member of the Collaborative for Creative Practice and Social Justice to host the first exhibition featuring the work of such a vital organization.”

“I hope when our young artists walk through the exhibition they will meet their undeniable selves, and see clearly what their creativity and diligence inspired. The world needs to hear their voices,” said Jamaica Gilmer, Founder and Executive Director of The Beautiful Project. “We wanted to offer black girls and women a space of sisterhood and hope.”

Pen, Lens & Soul: The Story of The Beautiful Project was organized by Jamaica Gilmer, Khayla Deans, Erin M. Stephens, and Pamela Thompson of The Beautiful Project.

Related Program

In celebration of this exhibition, on Saturday, December 7, 1–3 p.m., The Met and The Beautiful Project invite black girls and young women ages 12 and over to a creative workshop using storytelling and image making as wellness tools to affirm and empower and to disrupt harmful misrepresentations.

About The Beautiful Project

The Beautiful Project is a collective of image makers using photography, writing, and care to create spaces for black women and girls to confront the mass misunderstanding, misrepresentation, and misuse of their likeness in the media and in the world at large. For more information, visit www.thebeautifulproject.org and follow on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter

About The Met 

The Met presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in three iconic sites in New York City-The Met Fifth AvenueThe Met Breuer, and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online.

Since it was founded in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum’s galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures.

Dedicated to making art accessible to everyone, regardless of background, ability, age, or experience, The Met’s Education Department is central to the Museum’s mission and currently presents over 39,000 educational events and programs throughout the year. Exhibitions organized with the support of the department include the annual P.S. Art and New York City Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in the Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education.

Through its website and social media accounts on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter, The Met expands its visitor experience to people all over the world. For additional information about the Museum, visit www.metmuseum.org.

*Photo credit: #dearblackgirl, 2015. Kaci Kennedy, The Beautiful Project Intern 2016, Virginia. Digital photograph. Image courtesy of The Beautiful Project.
 

Neecole Cockerham

Neecole Cockerham is a Berkeley-born actress who entered the business as the first African American woman to grace the television ad campaigns of fashion stalwart’s Banana Republic. She continued on and garnered an overwhelming number of commercials for industry giants like Sears and IBM. Ad agencies cast her in more than 120 national commercials to date. She maintains the same humility she had before appearing in Vogue, O Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, and Martha Stewart. Neecole has also appeared on Billboards for Dockers, Kraft & other major print campaigns.

Her theatrical career began early in life as she gathered family and neighborhood children in the downstairs den of her family home and did different characters of sketch comedy skits, complete with wardrobe changes. Shaped as a promising creative being at the Bay Area-based Berkeley Arts Magnet, Neecole furthered her fervor for the theatrical arts at Cal State Northridge where she studied Acting for Television under the consummate professional, Lillian Lehman. She, additionally, studied with Eden Harmon at Estelle Harmon’s acting school in Los Angeles.

She has performed in such shows and films as: for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf, Heroine Helen, Love Thy Neighbor, Significant Others, Do Over, The Life, Jesus’ secretary. However, her decade-long truth, passion project, and stand out performance was her dramatic one-woman show entitled I Am Not My Mother. She actually sold this show, which transcended race and economic status, as well as created a theater experience that was relatable, brought people together and told the story of an unexpected All-American girl.

After the show sold, her father, who she was extremely close to, unexpectedly passed. Tragedy ensued as she was in a near fatal car accident, where she broke her neck but survived. In her words, she was given new life…life with a purpose.
While still recovering from her horrific car accident, Neecole continues to push her limits as an artist, producer, and businesswoman with purpose. Due to her savvy business acumen and keen production skills after her accident in February 2017 she decided to devote her skills to being in service of others as a humble humanitarian for causes such as feeding several hundred women on Skid Row at The Downtown Women’s Center in Los Angeles at Christmas.

As of late, Neecole produces the annual West Adams Block Party. Her responsibilities include seeking and procuring strategic partners, aligning with the west adams citizens, partners and policymakers, and birthing a music stage with innovative talent and compelling storytellers. The Block party is a new business model that partners Non Profit organizations with the event for direct impact on urban areas.

When she’s not producing mega events or influencing the culture, she is back to her grind acting and has recently signed with Media Artist Group Agency. In 2016 she was in the running for a Pulitzer Prize as an American author for her One Woman Show “I am not my mother.” Additionally, she continues her quest as an artist by writing and producing multiple projects.

(*featured photo credit: Darien Davis)

For media inquiries regarding Neecole Cockerham and more information on the 2nd Annual West Adams Block Party, please contact Karen Lewis at (323) 424-9400