Posts tagged with "dance"

Ballet by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

CATHY MARSTON – SNOWBLIND

CATHY MARSTON’S SNOWBLIND REPLACES MRS. ROBINSON ON PROGRAM 05, APRIL 22–MAY 12, 2021

 

 Marston’s Mrs. Robinson will premiere in the 2022 Season

 

 Program 05 also features Helgi Tomasson’s 7 for Eight and David Dawson’s Anima Animus

 

 San Francisco Ballet (SF Ballet) announces the postponement of Mrs. Robinson, Cathy Marston’s world premiere which was scheduled to debut on Program 05, April 22–May 12, until the 2022 Season. Mrs. Robinson was choreographed for the stage in the 2020 Season and was reimagined for film in the 2021 Digital Season. As COVID-19 related obstacles created unforeseen delays with the film capture at the War Memorial Opera House this month, Helgi Tomasson and SF Ballet made the joint decision with the American Guild of Musical Artists to postpone filming to put the health and safety of staff, crew, and artists at the forefront. An archival capture of Marston’s Snowblind, created for the 2018 Unbound Festival, will replace Mrs. Robinson for Program 05, which also includes archival captures of Helgi Tomasson’s 7 for Eight and David Dawson’s Anima Animus. Members of the public can still see a short film “prelude” to Marston’s Mrs. Robinson, captured at the Fairmont San Francisco in November of 2020, beginning today through February 25 in a digital program featuring excerpts from SF Ballet’s January 14 Virtual Benefit. It will be available via YouTubeIGTVFacebook, and SF Ballet’s website.

 

San Francisco Ballet’s complete 2022 Season will be announced later this spring. Images of Program 05 are available at this link, and casting is available here.

 

ABOUT PROGRAM 05:

Helgi Tomasson’s 7 for Eight from 2004 is an “exceptionally musical Bach essay” (San Francisco Chronicle) highlighting a series of solo and ensemble numbers for eight dancers, set to portions of keyboard concertos by J.S. Bach. The 2021 Digital Season capture of 7 for Eight is from 2016, the last time the work was seen at SF Ballet, and features principal dancers Yuan Yuan Tan and Tiit Helimets, and former principal dancers Vanessa Zahorian, Gennadi Nedvigin, and Taras Domitro throughout. 7 for Eight is Tomasson’s second ballet set to Bach (his first, Aurora Polaris, premiered in 1991), and includes black-on-black costume designs by Sandra Woodall and lighting designs by David Finn. Martin West leads the SF Ballet Orchestra in 7 for Eight and throughout each ballet in Program 05.

 

Cathy Marston’s Snowblind “gripped from first moment to last” (San Francisco Chronicle) at its world premiere during the 2018 Unbound: A Festival of New Works. Based on Edith Wharton’s novella Ethan Frome (1911), Snowblind narrates a heart-rending love triangle between central characters Ethan Frome; his hypochondriac wife, Zeena; and Mattie, kin to Zeena, who captivates Frome after she’s hired to provide domestic support. The 2021 Digital Season stream was captured on April 25, 2018 at the War Memorial Opera House and includes principal dancers Sarah Van Patten as Zeena, Mathilde Froustey as Mattie, and Ulrik Birkkjaer as Ethan Frome. Philip Feeney arranged Snowblind’s music, which includes pieces by Wharton’s contemporaries Amy Beach and Arthur Foote, as well as Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. Snowblind includes scenic and costume designs by Patrick Kinmonth and lighting designs by James F. Ingalls.

 

Program 05 closes with David Dawson’s Anima Animus, the choreographer’s first commission for SF Ballet, also created for the Unbound festival in 2018. Set to Ezio Bosso’s “Esoconcerto,” Anima Animus is, as Dawson puts it, “physically emotional virtuosity combined to make something human,” playing on Jungian concepts to reveal the rich contrasts between male and female psyches. Anima Animus toured with SF Ballet to Sadler’s Wells Theatre in 2019 and was “easily one of the highlights” (Seeing Dance) of the Company’s four-program London performances. The 2021 Digital Season stream of Anima Animus was captured on April 25, 2018 and includes former principal dancers Maria Kochetkova, Sofiane Sylve, and Carlo Di Lanno, and current principal dancers Luke Ingham and Wei Wang among its cast of ten.

 

Tickets to Program 05 are available now as single stream tickets for $29, or within the Premium Plus Digital Package, which offers unlimited viewing of the remaining programs in the 2021 Digital Season, in addition to exclusive bonus content, for $289. Tickets and packages may be purchased online at www.sfballet.org. Click here to view digital viewing tips.

 

PRODUCTION CREDITS

I. 7 for Eight
Captured on Saturday, January 30, 2016

Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
Choreographer: Helgi Tomasson
Costume Design: Sandra Woodall
Lighting Design: David Finn
Rehearsal Assistant: Anita Paciotti

World Premiere: February 26, 2004—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

 

II. Snowblind
Captured on Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Composers: Amy Beach, Philip Feeney, Arthur Foote, and Arvo Pärt
Music arranged by: Philip Feeney
Choreographer: Cathy Marston
Scenic and Costume Design: Patrick Kinmonth
Lighting Design: James F. Ingalls
Assistant to the Choreographer: Jenny Tattersall
Rehearsal Assistant: Anita Paciotti

Adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome by Cathy Marston and Patrick Kinmonth

World Premiere: April 21, 2018—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

 

III. Anima Animus
Captured on Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Composer: Ezio Bosso
Choreographer: David Dawson
Scenic Design: John Otto
Costume Design: Yumiko Takeshima
Lighting Design: James F. Ingalls
Assistant to the Choreographer: Rebecca Gladstone
Rehearsal Assistant: Felipe Diaz

World Premiere: April 21, 2018—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

 

ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO BALLET
San Francisco Ballet, long recognized for pushing boundaries in dance, has enjoyed a long and rich tradition of artistic “firsts” since its founding in 1933, including performing the first American productions of Swan Lake and Nutcracker, as well as the first 20th-century American Coppélia. SF Ballet is one of the three largest ballet companies in the United States and currently presents more than 100 performances annually, both locally and internationally. The mission of SF Ballet is to share its joy of dance with the widest possible audience—in its community and worldwide—and to provide the highest caliber of dance training in its School. Under the direction of Helgi Tomasson, the Company has achieved an international reputation as one of the preeminent ballet companies in the world.

SF Ballet Announces Digital Season in 2021

San Francisco Ballet (SF Ballet) announces details for two world premieres of its groundbreaking 2021 Digital Season: a new ballet by Myles Thatcher and Wooden Dimes by Danielle Rowe, opening February 11 and March 4, respectively, during Programs 02 and 03. Each premiere has been filmed under strict safety protocols in compliance with the San Francisco Department of Public Health guidelines, which protect artists, production crews, and the greater public. Single program stream access and the Premium Plus Digital Package are on sale now. Full ticketing and calendar information is listed below, and casting can be found on SF Ballet’s website.

Streaming during Program 02 (February 11– March 3) of the 2021 Digital Season, Myles Thatcher’s new ballet is set in San Francisco locations including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Heroes Grove at Golden Gate Park, Yerba Buena Gardens, and the stage of the War Memorial Opera House, SF Ballet’s performance home. Thatcher’s work emphasizes saturated colors in its design and explores parallels between consuming art—as one might at an art museum—and creating it. “First and foremost, I want this piece to embody the joy that art of all kinds has afforded me in my life,” says Thatcher. “Yes, it has brought much needed beauty through this especially challenging year. But more importantly, art allows me to get a glimpse of someone else’s perspective. It allows me to see through another person’s eyes and walk in another person’s shoes. Art has a unique way of showing us that through all our beautiful differences, we still may share common truths. And ultimately, it teaches us empathy, one of the greatest gifts we can share.” Thatcher’s world premiere ballet is his fourth repertory season creation for the company. Thatcher is also a soloist with SF Ballet. His new ballet is set to Steve Reich’s Variations for Vibes, Pianos, and Strings and is directed for film by Ezra Hurwitz, with costume designs by Susan Roemer, and lighting design by Jim French. Click here to watch the first episode of a video series following Thatcher’s creative process.

Thatcher’s new ballet will stream on Program 02 (February 11—March 4) alongside archival captures of Dwight Rhoden’s LET’S BEGIN AT THE END and Mark Morris’ Sandpaper Ballet. Created for Unbound: A Festival of New Works in 2018, Rhoden’s LET’S BEGIN AT THE END is set to music by J. S. Bach, Philip Glass, and Michael Nyman and was noted for its “off-kilter moves, spinning promenades in arabesque and consistent drive” (Bachtrack) at its premiere. LET’S BEGIN AT THE END was the first work created for SF Ballet by Rhoden, who is co-artistic director of Complexions Contemporary Ballet. Mark Morris’ Sandpaper Ballet, created in 1999 with costumes by Isaac Mizrahi, is a rare work in the repertory that sets neoclassical ballet to “funny” music—in this case, nostalgic pop-orchestral tunes by Leroy Anderson: “Sleigh Ride,” “Fiddle-Faddle,” “The Typewriter,” and more. “I didn’t trust ballet orchestras,” the choreographer writes in Out Loud, his memoir written in collaboration with Wesley Stace. “It turned out that the San Francisco Ballet orchestra was very good.” It was then Morris’ “apology and joke” to set the ballet, his second work for the Company, to Anderson’s novelty tunes. Sandpaper Ballet is one of seven ballets that Morris has created for SF Ballet.

Danielle Rowe’s Wooden Dimes premieres on Program 03 (March 4–24). Filmed at the War Memorial Opera House, Wooden Dimes is Rowe’s first ballet created for SF Ballet’s repertory season. “My appreciation for the art of filmmaking has developed tremendously throughout the creation of Wooden Dimes,” says Rowe, who also directs the film. “I adore the necessity and value given to details, the ability to transform a moment and play in post-production, and the attention and forward thinking required to piece a story together cohesively.” The ballet’s rehearsal process involved Director of Photography Heath Orchardworking both in person and remotely over Zoom, and remote collaboration with costume designer Emma Kingsbury, lighting designers Jim French and Matthew Stouppe, and composer James M. Stephenson, who has created an original score for the ballet. The ballet’s title alludes to the American idiom, “don’t take wooden nickels,” a warning to protect oneself from swindling and manipulation. Set in the roaring ‘20s with art deco stylings, Wooden Dimes follows two characters, Betty and Robert Fine, whose love becomes jeopardized as Betty soars to stardom. Click here to see an interview with Rowe about her creative process.

Wooden Dimes will stream alongside archival captures of Alexei Ratmansky’s Symphony #9and Yuri Possokhov’s Swimmer on Program 03 (March 4—24). Ratmansky’s Symphony #9from Shostakovich Trilogy, co-commissioned by SF Ballet, premiered in 2012 at American Ballet Theatre and is set to Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9 in E-flat major, opus 70. Drawing on ideas and themes from Shostakovich’s life, Symphony #9 features two leading couples and a soloist man who suggests the character of the Soviet composer. The ballet includes scenic designs by George Tsypin and costume designs by Keso Dekker. Program 03 closes with SF Ballet’s Choreographer in Residence Yuri Possokhov’s Swimmer, a smash hit at its premiere in 2015. Swimmer is set to music by SF Ballet Orchestra double bassist Shinji Eshima, who incorporates recorded songs by Tom Waits and others into his score. Inspired by John Cheever’s short story of the same name from 1964, Swimmer includes animated projections by Kate Duhamel, costumes by Mark Zappone, and scenic design by Alexander V. Nichols.

TICKETS

The Premium Plus Digital Package, which offers access to all seven programs in the 2021 Digital Season in addition to bonus content, is priced at $289 and is on sale until April. Single program streams are on sale now and priced at $29 for 72-hour access. Tickets and packages may be purchased online at sfballet.org. For more information, call Ticket Services at 415-865-2000, Monday through Friday from 10 am to 8 pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 12 pm to 8 pm. Click here to view digital viewing tips.

CALENDAR AND CREDIT INFORMATION 

LET’S BEGIN AT THE END

Archival capture from Saturday, May 5, 2018

Composers: Johann Sebastian Bach, Philip Glass, and Michael Nyman
Choreographer: Dwight Rhoden
Scenic Design: Alexander V. Nichols
Costume Design: Christine Darch
Lighting Design: James F. Ingalls
Assistant to the Choreographer: Clifford Williams
Rehearsal Assistant: Ricardo Bustamante

World Premiere: April 26, 2018—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

Myles Thatcher World Premiere

Composer: Steve Reich
Choreographer: Myles Thatcher
Director: Ezra Hurwitz
Costume Design: Susan Roemer
Lighting Design: Jim French
Director of Photography: Ricardo Campos
Editor: Ezra Hurwitz
Executive Producer: Christopher Dennis
Producers: Lauren Finerman and Lindsay Gauthier
Rehearsal Assistant: Katita Waldo

World Premiere: February 11, 2021—San Francisco Ballet

The 2021 world premiere by Myles Thatcher is made possible by Lead Sponsor Mary Jo and Dick Kovacevich; Major Sponsors Brenda and Alexander Leff, and Mrs. Joyce L. Stupski; and Sponsor Kacie and Michael Renc, with additional support from the TeRoller Fund for New Productions of the SF Ballet Endowment Foundation.

Sandpaper Ballet

Archival capture from Sunday, February 16, 2020

Composer: Leroy Anderson
Choreographer: Mark Morris
Staged by: Tina Fehlandt
Costume Design: Isaac Mizrahi
Lighting Design: James F. Ingalls
Rehearsal Assistants: Betsy Erickson and Tina LeBlanc

World Premiere: April 27, 1999—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

Symphony #9

Archival capture from Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Composer: Dmitri Shostakovich
Choreographer: Alexei Ratmansky
Staged by: Nancy Raffa
Scenic Design: George Tsypin
Costume Design: Keso Dekker
Lighting Design: Jennifer Tipton
Rehearsal Assistants: Ricardo Bustamante, Katita Waldo

Shostakovich Trilogy was co-commissioned by San Francisco Ballet and American Ballet Theatre.

World Premiere: October 18, 2012—American Ballet Theatre, New York City Center; New York, New York

San Francisco Ballet Premiere: April 2, 2014—War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

Wooden Dimes (World Premiere)

Composer: James M. Stephenson
Director and Choreographer: Danielle Rowe
Costume Design: Emma Kingsbury
Scenic Properties Design: Alexander V. Nichols
Lighting Design: Jim French and Matthew Stouppe
Director of Photography: Heath Orchard
Editor: Lindsay Gauthier
Executive Producer: Christopher Dennis
Producers: Lauren Finerman and Lindsay Gauthier
Rehearsal Assistant: Felipe Diaz

World Premiere: March 4, 2021—San Francisco Ballet

The 2021 world premiere of Wooden Dimes is made possible by Grand Benefactor Sponsor Margaret and Will Hearst; Lead Sponsors Beth and Brian Grossman, Kelsey and David Lamond, and Catherine and Mark Slavonia; and Sponsors Karen S. Bergman, Brian and Rene Hollins, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Smelick, with additional support from the Osher New Work Fund of the SF Ballet Endowment Foundation. 

Swimmer

Archival capture from Sunday, March 20, 2016

Composers: Shinji Eshima, Tom Waits, Kathleen Brennan, and Gavin Bryars
Choreographer: Yuri Possokhov
Scenic Design: Alexander V. Nichols
Costume Design: Mark Zappone
Lighting Design: David Finn
Video Design: Kate Duhamel
Rehearsal Assistant: Anita Paciotti

World Premiere: April 10, 2015—San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House; San Francisco, California

ABOUT MYLES THATCHER

Myles Thatcher is a dancer with San Francisco Ballet and a choreographer. After training at The Harid Conservatory, Ellison Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet School, he joined SF Ballet in 2010. As a dancer, he has performed principal or featured roles in many classical and contemporary ballets, including Lensky in Onegin, and Paris in the 2015 film of Tomasson’s Romeo & Juliet for Lincoln Center at the Movies’ Great American Dance. Thatcher began choreographing while a Trainee at SF Ballet School and has created five works for the School. His In the Passerine’s Clutch premiered at SF Ballet’s 2013 Repertory Season Gala; followed by Manifesto, which premiered as part of the 2015 Repertory Season; Ghost in the Machine, which premiered as part of the 2017 Repertory Season; and Otherness, which premiered during 2018 Unbound: A Festival of New Works. In 2015, Thatcher also created Passengers for The Joffrey Ballet, Polaris for New York City Ballet, and Body of Your Dreams for the Rolex Arts Weekend in Mexico City. In 2018, Thatcher’sRedbird premiered at Charlotte Ballet, and in 2020, his dance film Frontiers debuted at My Light Shines On: An Evening with Scottish Ballet. He has also choreographed for Cincinnati Ballet and Kansas City Ballet. Thatcher was selected by Alexei Ratmansky to participate in the 2014–15 Rolex Mentor & Protégé Arts Initiative. He has been nominated for Isadora Duncan Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography for Manifesto and Ghost in the Machine.

ABOUT DANIELLE ROWE

Choreographer Danielle Rowe danced with Australian Ballet, Houston Ballet, and Nederlands Dans Theater. She originated roles in creations by Lightfoot/Leon, Wheeldon, McGregor, Ekman, Pite, and Goecke, and performed the title roles in Giselle, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty. Rowe has created works for San Francisco Ballet, Nederlands Dans Theater’s SWITCH program, Royal New Zealand Ballet, Co.Lab Dance, Ballet Idaho, Grand Rapids Ballet, SFDanceworks, Diablo Ballet, Oakland Ballet, and Berkeley Ballet Theater. She also choreographed for the award-winning dance film Sirens Tango(featuring SF Ballet Principal Dancers Sasha de Sola and Luke Ingham), and the cross-disciplinary immersive theater productions of FURY (a collaboration between SF Ballet, Alonzo King LINES Ballet, and indie-pop band YASSOU) and Before You Had A Name (a collaboration between Barak Ballet, SF Ballet Principal Dancer Sarah Van Patten, violinist Heather Powell, and multi-media artist Alisa Lapidus). During the COVID-19 pandemic, Rowe has pivoted to filmmaking, creating Shelter with Garen Scribner and Alexander Reneff-Olson; Wilis in Corps-en-tine and I Am Spartacus with Scribner (The Australian Ballet); and The Animals (Ballet Idaho). The films garnered positive attention from Vogue, The New Yorker, The Guardian, and Dance Magazine.

ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO BALLET

San Francisco Ballet, long recognized for pushing boundaries in dance, has enjoyed a long and rich tradition of artistic “firsts” since its founding in 1933, including performing the first American productions of Swan Lake and Nutcracker, as well as the first 20th-century American Coppélia. SF Ballet is one of the three largest ballet companies in the United States and currently presents more than 100 performances annually, both locally and internationally. The mission of SF Ballet is to share its joy of dance with the widest possible audience—in its community and worldwide—and to provide the highest caliber of dance training in its School. Under the direction of Helgi Tomasson, the Company has achieved an international reputation as one of the preeminent ballet companies in the world.

CONNECT WITH SAN FRANCISCO BALLET

Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

*Photo: Sarah Van Patten in Danielle Rowe’s “Wooden Dimes”. By Lindsay Gauthier*

Illustration for 360 Magazine by Rita Azar

San Francisco Ballet Virtual Benefit

San Francisco Ballet (SF Ballet) announces details for its first-ever virtual benefit, Leap Into the New Year, to be held online via Socio on Thursday, January 14, 2021 to mark the opening of SF Ballet’s historic 88th Digital Season.

With a performance curated by Artistic Director and Principal Choreographer Helgi Tomasson, the event includes delivered items, such as a meal, caviar, and gifts provided by McCalls Catering & Events; and wine provided by Rodney Strong Vineyards. The evening’s programming includes the SF Ballet performance debut of two of the Company’s new Principal Dancers, Nikisha Fogo and Julian MacKay, in the Act III pas de deux from Don Quixote, and an excerpt from a new work by Helgi Tomasson created on members of SF Ballet’s corps de ballet—click here to see a video about this work.

Leap Into the New Year also includes a newly produced prelude to Mrs. Robinson by Cathy Marston, featuring Principal Dancers Sarah Van Patten and Joseph Walsh, and excerpts from the Digital Season’s additional world premieres, Wooden Dimes by Danielle Rowe and a new work by Myles Thatcher. Complete programming and casting are included at the bottom of this release.

Proceeds from Leap Into the New Year will benefit a wide range of SF Ballet artistic initiatives, including new works, accessible digital content, scholarships and financial aid programs for San Francisco Ballet School students, and community education programs for youth, families, and seniors. The event begins at 6 pm with access to private virtual tables; a wine education session with the event’s wine sponsor, Rodney Strong Vineyards; and behind-the-scenes content from rehearsals, followed by a 7 pm performance.

Ticket holders at the Artistic Director, Principal, Producer, and Soloist levels will enjoy VIP programming, including the pas de deux from William Forsythe’s In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, rehearsed by Forsythe on Soloist Sasha Mukhamedov and Principal Dancer Aaron Robison, and the White Swan Pas De Deux from Helgi Tomasson’s Swan Lake performed by Fogo and MacKay.

Under the direction of Music Director Martin West, San Francisco Ballet Orchestra recorded music for the event using approved safety protocols at Skywalker Studios, 25th Street Recording, and the SF Conservatory of Music, which was produced, engineered and mastered by Leslie Ann Jones.

The evening is hosted by SF Ballet Soloist Madison Keesler, who will be styled by Neiman Marcus. All table guests will enjoy a private, virtual meet-and-greet with a Company dancer during the event and will have access to a virtual social wall where they can share photography and messages with other benefit-goers. Artistic Director and Principal level table guests will also have the option to request an on-site, socially-distanced photo-op with Drew Altizer Photography.

Tickets to the event start at $3,000 for a pair of guests or $1,600 for a virtual table of four for ENCORE! members. Guests who wish to receive a meal, wine, and gifts delivered to their home day-of must RSVP by December 31, 2020. Reservations may be made online or by contacting Emma Lundberg, SF Ballet’s Special Events Manager, at elundberg@sfballet.org or 415.865.6629.

LEAP INTO THE NEW YEAR’S PERFORMANCE PROGRAM 

Premier Presenting Producer

Osterweis Capital Management 

Presenting Producers

Frederick and Shelby Gans

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Linnea and George Roberts

Denise Littlefield Sobel

Excerpt from new work by Helgi Tomasson 

Composer: Jean Phillippe Rameau

Artistic Director Sponsor: Dr. Sunnie Evers

Featuring: JULIA ROWE, LEILI RACKOW, BIANCA TEIXERIA, NATASHA SHEEHAN

DIEGO CRUZ, LUCAS ERNI, LUCA FERRÒ, LLEYTON HO

Dedicated To… by Yuri Possokhov

Composer: Victor Osadchev

Artistic Director Sponsor: Jennifer and Steven Walske

Featuring: YUAN YUAN TAN 

Excerpt from Wooden Dimes, Danielle Rowe’s world premiere

Composer: James M. Stephenson

Artistic Director Sponsor: Alison and Michael Mauzé

Featuring: LUKE INGHAM, DORES ANDRÉ, MAX CAUTHORN 

Pas de Deux from Coppélia by Arthur Saint-Léon

Composer: Léo Delibes

Artistic Director Sponsors: Richard C. Barker; Yurie and Carl Pascarella

Featuring: MISA KURANAGA, ANGELO GRECO 

Excerpt from Myles Thatcher’s world premiere

Composer: Steve Reich

Artistic Director Sponsor: Christine Russell and Mark Schlesinger

CASTING TO BE ANNOUNCED 

Short film of Mrs. Robinson world premiere by Cathy Marston

Composer: Terry Davies

Artistic Director Sponsor: Fang and Gary Bridge

Featuring: SARAH VAN PATTEN, JOSEPH WALSH, LUKE INGHAM 

Act III Pas de Deux from Don Quixote by Alexander Gorsky and Marius Petipa

Staging and Additional Choreography by Helgi Tomasson and Yuri Possokhov

Composer: Ludwig Minkus

Artistic Director Sponsor: Diane B. Wilsey

Featuring: NIKISHA FOGO, JULIAN MACKAY

Pas de Deux from In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated by William Forsythe (VIP ONLY)

Composer: Thom Willems

Artistic Director Sponsor: James C. Hormel and Michael P. N. Hormel

Featuring: SASHA MUKHAMEDOV, AARON ROBISON

White Swan Pas De Deux from Swan Lake by Helgi Tomasson (VIP ONLY)

Composer: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Featuring: NIKISHA FOGO, JULIAN MACKAY

ABOUT HELGI TOMASSON

Helgi Tomasson, one of the most venerated classical dancers of his generation, embarks on his 36th season with San Francisco Ballet in 2021. Born in Iceland, he danced with Harkness Ballet, The Joffrey Ballet, and New York City Ballet, where he distinguished himself as a dancer of technical purity, musicality, and intelligence. Tomasson assumed leadership of SF Ballet in 1985. Under his direction, SF Ballet has become a company widely recognized as one of the finest in the world.

Tomasson has balanced devotion to the classics with an emphasis on new works, cultivating frequent collaborations and commissions with choreographers such as William Forsythe, Christopher Wheeldon, Alexei Ratmansky, Trey McIntyre, Cathy Marston, and Mark Morris, among many others. He has choreographed more than 50 works for the Company, including full-length productions of Swan LakeThe Sleeping BeautyRomeo & Juliet (taped for Lincoln Center at the Movies’ Great American Dance), Giselle, and Nutcracker (taped for PBS’s Great Performances).

He conceptualized the 1995 UNited We Dance festival, in which SF Ballet hosted 12 international companies; the 2008 New Works Festival, which included 10 world premieres by 10 acclaimed choreographers; and 2018 Unbound: A Festival of New Works. Tomasson has also connected SF Ballet to the world, through co-commissions with companies including American Ballet Theatre, The Royal Ballet, and Dutch National Ballet; and major tours to Paris, London, New York City, China, and his native Iceland. In 2020, Tomasson received the San Francisco Arts Medallion, created by the Museum of Performance + Design to recognize those individuals whose leadership, action, and generosity have benefited the cultural life of the San Francisco Bay Area.   

ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO BALLET

San Francisco Ballet, long recognized for pushing boundaries in dance, has enjoyed a long and rich tradition of artistic “firsts” since its founding in 1933, including performing the first American productions of Swan Lake and Nutcracker, as well as the first 20th-century American Coppélia.

SF Ballet is one of the three largest ballet companies in the United States and currently presents more than 100 performances annually, both locally and internationally. The mission of SF Ballet is to share its joy of dance with the widest possible audience—in its community and worldwide—and to provide the highest caliber of dance training in its School. Under the direction of Helgi Tomasson, the Company has achieved an international reputation as one of the preeminent ballet companies in the world.

Dance Your Dance – Laurieann Gibson

Thomas Nelson/W Publishing (a division of HarperCollins) today announced the pre-order for Emmy-nominated choreographer, creative director and entrepreneur Laurieann Gibson’s debut book Dance Your Dance: 8 Steps to Unleash Your Passion and Live Your Dream, set for release on February 16, 2021. The pre-order bundle includes access to exclusive video content from Laurieann and a first look at chapter one of the book. Additionally, the first 500 to pre-order will receive a limited-edition promotional item. Pre-order Dance Your Dance here.

Dance Your Dance highlights Gibson’s evolution from a young dancer training in New York City to a well-respected and in-demand creative visionary with an eye for cultivating music artists from the ground up. The book unveils the ultimate blueprint to achieving your dreams—a blueprint she’s implemented countless times to develop some of the world’s greatest superstars including Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, Katy Perry, Diddy and The Jonas Brothers, among others. Packed with personal anecdotes from her 20+ year career in entertainment and messages of empowerment, Dance Your Dance speaks to the dreamer in you: the artist, the singer, the writer, the entrepreneur, the mogul, the mover, the shaker, the thinker.

Reflecting on the power of the book’s message, Laurieann shares, “Dance Your Dance is an explosion of inspiration, passion and empowerment—an entertaining and transformative unstoppable ride to your greatness. I can’t wait for people to start reading it. I believe it can be life-changing.”

ABOUT LAURIEANN GIBSON

Laurieann Gibson is one of the most important pop culture influencers in entertainment today. Having served as creative director and choreographer for numerous international superstars, Gibson’s expertise in developing artists’ performance skills earned her an Emmy nomination for directing Lady Gaga’s HBO concert special Lady Gaga Presents the Monster Ball Tour: At Madison Square Garden. Laurieann also directed and choreographed Nicki Minaj’s sold out “Pink Print World Tour” and Diddy’s “Bad Boy 20th Anniversary Reunion Tour.” More than a choreographer, Gibson is a business force whose presence is felt across TV/commercials, film, gaming, and now publishing. She can currently be seen as a judge on FOX’s hit show So You Think You Can Dance and will serve as creative director/choreographer on MTV’s highly anticipated return of Making the Band. On top of film appearances and commercial work (previously choreographing for the likes of Pepsi and Google), she is producing a number of television projects that are currently in development. Laurieann lives in Los Angeles, California, with her doggie “son,” Samson. Connect with her here.

 ABOUT THOMAS NELSON

Thomas Nelson is a world leading publisher and provider of Christian content and has been providing readers with quality inspirational product for more than 200 years. As part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing, Inc., the publishing group provides multiple formats of award-winning Bibles, books, gift books, cookbooks, curriculum and digital content, with distribution of its products in more than 100 countries. Thomas Nelson is headquartered in Nashville, TN. For additional information, visit here.

pineappleCITI photograph curtsey of Alex John at Red Bull Records

pineappleCITI- “Dance”

Rising hip-hop artist pineappleCITI returns with visuals to her single “Dance,” out today. Flipping the script on Dancing with The Stars, CITI’s latest video offers a clever play on the popular dance competition, adding a unique and comedic hip-hop flair. Featuring slick lyricism alongside an upbeat tempo, “Dance” blends melodic rhythms with Latin-influenced guitar and percussions, making an irresistible track that lives up to its name. 

One of TIDAL’s Rising Hip-Hop cover artists this year and featured on NBA2K20, NBA2K21, and Netflix’s Sneakerheads, pineappleCITI is equal parts rapper, singer, and acclaimed songwriter. Named one of Okayplayer’s 25 Underrated Female Rappers, she has penned works for Twista and Kelly Rowland. In the same year, she celebrated the release of her viral hit “Rose Colored” and suffered a near-fatal car crash, causing her to learn how to walk again over the course of two years. 

With a focus on songs that feature motivational lyricism and powerful messages, she has released a number of recent singles, including “Recognize,” “Believe,” and “Lift Me Up,” the latter of which was dedicated to the Black Lives Matter movement and victims of police brutality.

For pineappleCITI, rhymes and raps spring right from the heart as she approaches each song, project, album, and show with equal reverence for nineties East Coast storytelling and old-school Motown catharsis. Endorsed early on by The FADER, PAPER, Complex, and Billboard and streamed over 2 million times as of 2019, the New Jersey-born MC provides a simultaneously unique and universal perspective to her music.

To keep up with pineappleCITI visit her Website or follow her on Instagram,  Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

Parris Goebel joins MasterClass

MasterClass × Parris Goebel – Creativity in Choreography

Justin Bieber, Jennifer Lopez and Rihanna. Janet Jackson, Ciara, and Jason Derulo. Nicki Minaj, Blackpink, and Shakira. Parris Goebel, the renowned choreographer, has worked with them all.

MasterClass, the streaming platform where anyone can learn from the world’s best across a wide range of subjects, today announced that award-winning choreographer Parris Goebel—known for her powerful work for some of the biggest names in the music industry—will teach a class on Creativity in Choreography. For the first time ever, Goebel will not only reveal her process for creating viral dance sensations, but also share insights on how to unlock creativity and turn goals into reality. Goebel’s class is now available exclusively on MasterClass, where subscribers get unlimited access to all 90+ instructors with an annual membership.

“Parris has choreographed for some of the biggest names in the music industry,” said David Rogier, founder and CEO of MasterClass. “Her MasterClass teaches us how to unleash the creative being within—it is both a how-to and a how-to-be, offering invaluable lessons and inspiration for anyone looking to find their creative voice.”

A New Zealand native, Goebel found her love of dance at the age of 10 before she formed the all-female dance group ReQuest, and later opened her own studio, the Palace Dance Studio, in Auckland. In 2012, she caught the eye of global superstar Jennifer Lopez, who hired Goebel to choreograph some numbers for her “Dance Again” world tour. Goebel went on to choreograph and direct Justin Bieber’s global hit video for “Sorry,” currently holding more than 3.3 billion views on YouTube; it’s one of the 13 videos she directed that make up Bieber’s “Purpose: The Movement” series. Now one of the most coveted choreographers of all time, Goebel has worked with some of the most iconic artists, including Janet Jackson and Nicki Minaj. She’s also worked extensively with Rihanna for more than five years, collaborating on the singer’s Savage X Fenty show, which led to a 2020 Emmy nomination for Goebel. She dominated headlines when she released her own dance video for Bieber’s 2020 single “Yummy,” followed by choreographing Jennifer Lopez’s halftime show for Super Bowl LIV, which showcased members of her award-winning dance crew, the Royal Family. Goebel is set to direct her first feature film “Murder on the Dance Floor,” which is an adaptation of her acclaimed street-dance-based production.

“I always knew that I wanted to create things that inspired young people and I turned that into my superpower,” Goebel said. “In my MasterClass, I’ll share the secrets and techniques to my creative process because when you can express confidence as a leader, choreographer and director, it’s contagious.”

Designed for anyone who wants to find their creative voice, Goebel’s MasterClass will give members a unique window into her creative process, from the inner work she has done to hone her style to a breakdown of how she choreographs and directs live dance performances and music videos. Through honest and vulnerable storytelling, Goebel will open up about her personal journey, from starting a studio at age 17 to pursuing her passion around the world, sharing insights on how to unlock creativity, develop your brand and harness the power of what makes you unique. Goebel will show members how to find their unique voice by letting their spirit go free, allowing them to unleash the creative being within.

For members looking to elevate their skills as a choreographer or music video director, Goebel will break down how to choreograph a large-scale dance routine, including selecting music, building choreography, adding dynamics and perfecting every detail and movement. Goebel will give members rare access to never-before-seen case studies of some of her most iconic choreography for Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” and Ciara’s “Level Up,” offering tips on how to work with artists, approach directing for the screen, casting and finding the best camera angles. Members will not only discover how to use dance and creativity to become masters in any field, they will also come away feeling inspired to find their own voice.

View the trailer here:

https://youtu.be/A9TczekUE3M

ABOUT MASTERCLASS:

Launched in 2015, MasterClass is the streaming platform where anyone can learn from the world’s best. With an annual membership, subscribers get unlimited access to 90+ instructors and classes across a wide range of subjects, including Arts & Entertainment, Business, Design & Style, Sports & Gaming, Writing and more. Step into Anna Wintour’s office, Ron Finley’s garden and Neil Gaiman’s writing retreat. Get inspired by RuPaul, perfect your pitch with Shonda Rhimes, and discover your inner negotiator with Chris Voss. Each class features about 20 video lessons, at an average of 10 minutes per lesson. You can learn on your own terms—in bite-size pieces or in a single binge. Cinematic visuals and close-up, hands-on demonstrations make you feel like you’re one-on-one with the instructors, while the downloadable instructor guides help reinforce your learning. Stream thousands of lessons anywhere, anytime, on mobile, tablet, desktop, Apple TV®, Android™ TV, Amazon Fire TV® and Roku® players and devices.

Follow MasterClass:

Twitter @masterclass

Instagram @masterclass

Facebook @masterclassofficial

 Follow Parris Goebel

Twitter @ParrisGoebel

Instagram @ParrisGoebel

Facebook @ParrisProject 

220 Kid New Music Video

220 Kid released a new music video Wednesday for his latest track “Too Many Nights.”

Fans of classic cinema will get a kick out of 220 Kid and JC Stewart connecting the Los Angeles and Hollywood social scene to fan favorite films in this video, which you can see by clicking right here.

Neon lights, clever production design and well-thought out costuming is sure to grab your attention for three minutes, and if they don’t, the song is pretty catchy all by itself.

It takes things we’re all very familiar with, like popular movies and pop dancing, and customizes them with 220 Kid’s style.

220 Kid’s original hit follows remixes of songs like Anne-Marie‘s “To Be Young,” which features Doja Cat and Little Mix‘s “Holiday.” He also released “Don’t Need Love” with GRACEY in 2019.

You can follow 220 Kid on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

You can learn more about JC Stewart by clicking right here, and you can follow him on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, as well.

Stomp illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Stomp Wars Virtual Homecoming Experience

Stomp Wars, the celebrated national stepping competition and cultural institution, insisted the show must go on for 2020, and that’s exactly what’s going to happen!

In order to engage, rally, and uplift students, the Stomp Wars program announces a historic first with the launch of The Stomp Wars HBCU-KNOW Virtual Homecoming Experience on September 26 – October 28. The event will be powered by The Thurgood Marshall College Fund and broadcast live from stompwars.com, with a live simulcast on Facebook and YouTube. The Top 2 Step Team Winners will go on to compete in the World Of Dance Championships.

Now on the event’s 13th year, on-air personality Rock-T returns as the host. In this latest installment of the program, The Collegiate Edition will celebrate the HBCU community by showcasing incredible stepping by the Greek organizations Divine 9, HBCU-KNOW Battle of the Bands, HBCU-KNOW Cheerleaders, HBCU-KNOW Majorettes, and more.

Since its inception, Stomp Wars has consistently inspired generations to graduate high school and pursue higher education. To date, more than 10,000 students have been galvanized by the event as the initiative rewrites the rules and brings us one step closer to the eradication of social injustice and systemic racism. For 2020, the core messageTomorrow can be better than today will be transmitted to the online audience.

Check out the impactful message for yourself by watching the virtual Stomp Wars.

About Rock-T:

Rocky Turner is an American Radio-TV Personality, Host, DJ, Producer, Sports Announcer, Author, and entrepreneur. Known to listeners as Rock-T and currently a member of the phenomenally successful Rickey Smiley Morning Show, Rock-T reaches 7 million listeners daily through this nationally syndicated show with markets that include Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia, and Orlando. He is also a member of the wildly popular TV show, Dish Nation and Rickey Smiley For Real.

Rock-T is also the founder and creator of Stomp Wars, the most successful stomping competition in the country. As Rock-T’s vision for these disenfranchised youngsters continued to grow and expand, as did the reach of the event. Today, Stomp Wars is not only an annual sell-out on the campus of the University of Texas Arlington, it is also a hit with thriving teens across the country teaching students about the power of perseverance and diligence.

Follow Rock-T: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Website

Netflix – Cuties

By Cassandra Yany

One of Netflix’s newest films, Cuties, has garnered much attention and backlash since its Sep. 9 release on the streaming platform. The coming-of-age film depicts a young girl as she tries to navigate her life as a pre-teen growing up in a Muslim family living in Paris.

Many critics have spoken out against the film, which currently holds the no. 7 spot in Netflix’s ‘Top 10,’ for its depiction of 11-year-old girls dancing and behaving in an indecent manner. According to the New York Times, the movie was first deemed controversial in the U.S. in August when Netflix released the promotional artwork. The original marketing for the film displayed an image of four young girls in skimpy dance costumes posing provocatively.

This, along with the trailer, prompted opposers to start petitions online and call for the removal of the film from Netflix’s catalog. Netflix apologized and changed the artwork for the film to a more innocent photo of the same four characters walking down the street with shopping bags, donning bras and underwear over their clothes.

Last week’s release of the film has sparked conversation once again amongst parents, politicians and others, causing #CancelNetflix to trend on Twitter. Lina Nealon, the Director of Corporate and Strategic Initiatives at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has spoken out against the film saying “While we commend Director Maïmouna Doucouré for exposing the very real threats to young girls having unfettered access to social media and the internet, we cannot condone the hypersexualization and exploitation of the young actresses themselves in order to make her point.” She called for Netflix to cut the “sexually-exploitive” scenes from the film, or remove the film from the platform altogether.

On Friday, Hawaii Rep. Tulse Gabbard tweeted, “@Netflix child porn ‘Cuties’ will certainly whet the appetite of pedophiles & help fuel the child sex trafficking trade. 1 in 4 victims of trafficking are children… Netflix you are now complicit.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz penned a letter to Attorney General William P. Barr Friday calling for the Department of Justice to start an investigation into the production and distribution of the film to “determine whether Netflix, any of its executives, or anyone involved in the making of ‘Cuties’ violated any federal laws against the production and distribution of child pornography.”

Cruz wrote that “the film routinely fetishizes and sexualizes these pre-adolescent girls as they perform dances simulating sexual conduct in revealing clothing, including at least one scene with partial nudity” falsely claiming that there’s a scene exposing a “minor’s bare breast.” The Associated Press reported that one of Cruz’s representatives, Lauren Aronson, said that the senator has not seen the film.

According to the Washington Times, some critics are even calling on the Obama’s— who have a production deal with Netflix— to take action against the film. Deadline stated that “The reality appears to have been lost in the storm, and the truth is very few of the people reacting so strongly will have actually seen the film.”

Netflix told USA TODAY “‘Cuties’ is a social commentary against the sexualization of young children. It’s an award winning film and a powerful story about the pressure young girls face on social media and from society more generally growing up— and we’d encourage anyone who cares about these important issues to watch the movie.”

Director Maïmouna Doucouré defends the film, saying that it works to shed light on these issues so they can be fixed. Cuties first premiered at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 23, where it won the Directing Jury Award for the dramatic film category. According to the New York Times, the movie did not stir up much conversation in France after its theatrical release (as Mignnonnes in French) in August.

Deadline reports that Doucouré did not see the promotional material prior to when it was circulated on the internet. She said that she received death threats as the outrage grew over these images. She told the news site that the film is not apologetic about the hypersexualization of children, but instead is her “…personal story as well as the story of many children who have to navigate between a liberal western culture and a conservative culture at home.”

Cuties was Doucouré’s feature directorial debut. Similar to the film’s main character, Amy, Doucouré is of Senegalese descent and grew up in a Muslim culture in Paris. In an interview at Sundance, she said she first had the idea for the movie after attending a neighborhood gathering in Paris where she saw a group of 11-year-old girls doing a stage performance of a “sensual” dance. She was shocked to see girls that age dance like that in short clothing. “We can’t continue to close our eyes about that,” she told the interviewer.

Doucouré researched for a year and a half, meeting with hundreds of pre-teens who told her their stories. She learned about their ideas of femininity, and how their self image is affected by the emphasis of social media in today’s society. According to IndieWire, the young actresses’ parents were on board with the project to spread awareness of the issue, and there was a psychologist working with the girls throughout filming who is still helping them throughout the release process.

The film is centered around Amy, an 11-year-old girl who has recently moved to a housing development in a poor suburb of Paris with her Senegalese, observant Muslim family. She looks out for her brothers, takes care of responsibilities around the house, and is in the process of being taught how to ‘be a woman’ by  her aunt.

One day after prayer, Amy walks by the laundry room and sees a girl her age dancing to music playing from her phone. In a subsequent scene, Amy is seen trying to straighten her hair with a clothing iron, burning part of it off as a result. 

Amy learns that her father, who is still in Senegal, has taken a second wife and will be coming to Paris soon to have the wedding. Her mother, Mariam, tries to hide her reaction to the news, but Amy sees her grow upset and take her frustrations out on herself. This is where Amy’s behavior begins to shift; she starts to reject her culture and identity, and instead tries to conform to fit in with the other girls at school. 

At school, Amy is teased for her clothes and lack of fashion sense, so she begins to wear her younger brother’s t-shirt to match the crop tops that her classmates wear. After seeing a group of girls her age dancing after school, Amy steals her cousin’s iPhone to learn how to dance, herself. She comes across their social media accounts and begins taking selfies, imitating what she sees on their profiles. 

Amy finds herself a spot in the girls’ friend group and dance troupe, and as a result, begins to neglect her responsibilities at home. Amy starts to show more self expression, wearing her hair natural rather than pulling it back. She also begins to explore the internet more, finding videos of almost-naked women dancing rather suggestively and moving their bodies in ways that an 11-year-old probably shouldn’t be watching. 

Taking what she found online, Amy practices dancing with her friends and teaches them how to twerk. This is where the movie begins to make viewers slightly uneasy. It was jarring to see these young, innocent girls tainted by this inappropriate content and doing dance moves that they didn’t understand the implications of. It appears that this was the intention of director Doucouré, as she stated in an interview with Netflix that the film is “…a mirror of today’s society; a mirror sometimes difficult to look into and accept but still so true.”

Some of the scenes, frankly, are very disturbing to watch. These include the girls dancing provocatively for two older male workers at a laser tag facility so that they wouldn’t get in trouble for sneaking in, as well as Amy beginning to undress for her cousin once he found she had stolen his iPhone in an attempt to smooth over the situation. Perhaps the most disturbing scene is when Amy takes a picture of her genitals to post on her social media profile so that people at school would think she’s mature. While there was no nudity shown in this scene, the implied action was horrifying to watch. 

At the end of the film, Amy performs with her dance troupe at a local competition. Dressed in revealing outfits, they dance immodestly in front of a crowd of people who quickly seem unsettled. (This is the scene from which the original promotional photos were taken.) Toward the end of the song, Amy freezes as she begins to think about her mom, then runs off the stage crying. She goes home where she asks her mom not to attend her father’s wedding. Her mom continues to get ready for the event, but tells Amy that she doesn’t have to go.

Instead of going to the wedding, Amy steps outside and begins jumping rope. This scene depicts a mixture of her two identities: she is wearing jeans and a crop top with her hair down, but is surrounded by people of her culture dressed in traditional garments. After suppressing her family’s background for a majority of the movie, Amy is finally able to find the balance where her multiple cultures intersect in order to be her honest self. 

After watching Cuties, it is evident that it is not meant to promote this behavior among young girls, but instead provide commentary on what is happening today and warn the adults who see the movie. The harsh reality is that more pre-adolescents are exposed to this type of content than we think. Any child who has access to a smart device and social platforms have the potential to see a video not meant for them. Take TikTok for example: racy dances to Cardi B and Meg Thee Stallion’s “WAP,” as well as a recent trend where women make “thirst traps” to Beyoncé’s “Rocket” are some of the most popular videos on the app right now. Young TikTok users can easily see creators on their For You Page enjoying themselves while engaging in these trends, causing the young viewer to want to do the same.

When speaking to Deadline, Doucouré said, “What happens is young girls see images of women being objectified, and the more the woman becomes an object, the more followers and like she has— they see that as a role model and try to imitate these women, but they’re not old enough to know what they’re doing.” In a separate interview, she posed the question, “Isn’t the objectification of a woman’s body that we often see in our Western culture not another kind of oppression?”

Overall, Cuties shows the dangers of uncensored media for young children and displays how impressionable they can be. It also shows the journey of Amy’s self-discovery and learning how to blend her multiple cultures in order to shape her identity. Unfortunately, the risqué nature of the film overshadows the storyline and the message is lost for a number of audience members.

In various articles, Doucouré is quoted discussing the meaning of the film in the broad context of femininity and what it means for young girls to enter womanhood in this digital age. During her aforementioned interview with Netflix, she stated “The real question of Cuties is can we, as women, truly choose who we want to be, beyond the role models that are imposed upon us by society?”

Becky Hill – The Art of Rave

Today, Becky Hill released the third episode of her podcast, The Art of Rave. Over the course of the series Becky discusses rave culture with some of its legendary pioneers, including DJ Zinc, Andy C, Pete Tong, Sister Bliss, Groove Armada, Fabio & Grooverider and more.

In episode three of The Art of Rave Becky and Roni Size cover a wide range of topics including: how the ‘Size’ in Roni Size came from “a dating game vibe”; the 90s Bristol music scene, the evolution of Reprazent and their groundbreaking ‘live’ sound, winning a Mercury Music Prize, why Roni’s first record was released under someone’s else name, how Margaret Thatcher killed the free party (with the criminal Justice and Public Order Act in 1994), ‘digital reggae’ and David Rodigan, how the rave scene has moved on and ravers’ dancing has moved on with it (from “giraffes” to mosh pits).

As with all Becky’s guests on The Art of RaveRoni Size brings along records that mean or say something to him, whether that’s because they’re by an artist that influenced him, remind him of a specific place or time, or feature a beat that defined his sound. These records are:Under Me Sleng Teng” by Wayne Smith, “Pressure Dub” by Ability ii, “Rhythm Takes Control” by Unique 3 and “Wicked Ones” by 3 Way Split with DJ Easygroove.

Meanwhile, Becky selects the Roni Size (& Reprazent) record that exemplifies why she handpicked him as a guest for the series: “Brown Paper Bag.”

While Becky Hill has an irrefutable aptitude for writing chart smashing pop music, her roots are firmly ensconced in electronic music. The Art of Rave provides the perfect platform for Becky to delve deep into the dance music scene she is so passionate about.

Episode 3 of Becky Hill’s The Art of Rave podcast is available here.

FOLLOW BECKY HILL: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook