Posts tagged with "Architect"

Lauren Rottet courtesy of Sarah Fletcher for use by 360 Magazine

Rottet Studio Acquires Houston Headquarters

Houston architect and interior designer Lauren Rottet, closes on property for a new Houston headquarters, Rottet’s plan includes designs for new construction along with restoration of an historic building

Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, internationally celebrated architect, designer and founding principal/president of Rottet Studio, has closed on two adjacent properties totaling 1.72 acre located in the Briar Hollow neighborhood, which encompasses a house by iconic Houston architect Howard Barnstone built in 1960. Noted for his modernist style, Barnstone’s clients included Houstonians John and Dominique de Menil, who funded the Rothko Chapel, which was also designed by Barnstone with Eugene Aubry and Philip Johnson.

Houston’s population has grown exponentially in the past decade, as noted in the recent 2020 census and Rottet’s investment in her hometown is no coincidence. During the pandemic she decided to take steps in the development of her own property and purchased these unique lots with plans to restore the Barnstone structure as well as build an adjacent office. “We don’t want our new building to look like we’re trying to match a mid-century modernist style,” says Rottet about her concept for the new build, adding, “We want it to be constructed of glass because the site is so beautiful.” The remodeling of the Barnstone-designed three-story house, which was modeled on Mies Van Der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, will include a space that will serve as a showroom and accommodate furniture and accessories from the Rottet Collection. The new building is being envisioned as a new iteration of a hybrid office and will also include space for Rottet Studios’ design team and administrative staff. While Rottet does not anticipate everyone coming into the office every single day, “We need a desk for everybody, as well as a parking space,” she states. Detailed plans for the property are pending. Purchase price undisclosed.

About Lauren Rottet/Rottet Studio

Lauren Rottet is the Founding Principal and President of Rottet Studio, an international architecture and interior design firm, recognized as one of the Top 3 Most Admired Design Firms in the World. Their extensive portfolio of residential, hospitality, corporate and maritime projects for the world’s leading companies and brands, includes: Goldman Sachs, Disney, BGC3, New York Stock Exchange, Target, Four Seasons, Langham, Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt, Hilton, Belmond, Viking Ocean Cruises and more. “Rottet is facile whether it’s a client’s private home or a million-square-foot project. I am not sure I have seen someone who is as skilled in such a wide vernacular of design styles from contemporary minimal to elegantly traditional in such an authentic manner.”– from Authentic Design, Paul Goldberger.  Rottet’s product designs have received many accolades, including Interior Design’s Best of Year, four gold medals for Best of NeoCon and four Chicago Athenaeum Awards.  She serves on the board of the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston.

Learn more about Lauren and Rottet Studio by checking out their website here.

Empowering women by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lauren Rottet Pays Tribute

Architect and Interior Designer Lauren Rottet pays tribute
to Women’s History Month

Rottet’s ongoing commitment to her profession is female-forward

Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, internationally celebrated architect, designer, and founding principal/president and owner of Rottet Studio, acknowledges Women’s History Month, and her continuing commitment to the design industry and to women who create public and private spaces.

A WBE-certified business, Rottet Studio occupies a unique place in the industry – over 60% of their full-time staff are female. Rottet is also the first woman in history to be elevated to Fellow status, the highest membership honor, by both the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA).  In the past two decades, Rottet has broken new ground with award-winning furniture, office, workplace, and hospitality design.  Her firm’s output totals more than 65 million sq. ft. of built design.

“I was raised by a father who told me that there wouldn’t be a difference between men and women in my generation, and I needed a career so that I wouldn’t need to rely on anybody else.” This is how Rottet described her decision to study architecture, after forgoing a career in medicine. “Fewer than 10 percent of women graduated in my class, but I didn’t really think consciously about being a woman in architecture. I never really thought about it as a male field,” she adds.

“I think probably the best career advice I ever received, was just to listen. You want to immediately come up with a solution or an idea, and instantly respond, but I think if you sit back and listen to the parameters,
to what the client wants, what the surroundings tell you about a project, I think that’s probably the most helpful professional advice one can give.” 

“They always say, ‘Hire your replacement, because then you can do bigger and better things,’” she says about the hiring and mentoring process. “The key to being a good mentor is recognizing when you can’t do it all by yourself, and that you have to teach someone else how to do it. The education of our staff, and of our clients is absolutely key.”

Downtown Gateway Arches on Las Vegas Boulevard Photo Courtesy of City Of Las Vegas

Vegas’ New Gateway Arches Illuminated Tonight

Tonight, the City of Las Vegas will illuminate its new, 80-foot-tall Gateway Arches spanning Las Vegas Boulevard between St. Louis and Bob Stupak avenues at the base of The STRAT Hotel, Casino & SkyPod. Conceived and designed by Selbert Perkins Design and fabricated and installed by YESCO, the 100-year-old company synonymous with Las Vegas’ most iconic signs, the archway marks travelers’ official arrival into the City of Las Vegas.

“Las Vegas is known worldwide as the getaway for the best in entertainment, fun, dining and convention business,” Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman said. “What better way to invite everyone into historic downtown than by this passing through this massive, new archway into the heart of a revitalized Las Vegas.”

“Ward 3 is a dynamic part of the city of Las Vegas and I am so excited to represent the home of this beautiful new gateway,” Ward 3 Councilwoman Olivia Diaz said. “I am sure these iconic arches will become synonymous with the fun and excitement of our city, as well as being a point of community pride for years to come.”

The blue illuminated arches form a towering gateway to the city’s burgeoning Downtown and feature a pink, retro-inspired Las Vegas emblem suspended above the boulevard. While the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign at the south end of the Strip enjoys world renown, many people do not realize it lies outside the City of Las Vegas’ boundaries in unincorporated Clark County, Nevada. The new, brightly lit, Gateway Arches will welcome visitors to the city of Las Vegas as they travel north on Las Vegas Boulevard. 

“YESCO has a long history of fabricating, installing and maintaining Las Vegas’ most internationally recognizable signs, and the Gateway Arches represent the newest monumental addition to that portfolio,” said Jeff Young, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of YESCO. “This project is history in the making, and we’re proud to have partnered with the City of Las Vegas and Selbert Perkins Design to bring it to life.”

Added Stephen Thayer, vice president and general manager at The STRAT, “The Gateway Arches are a striking landmark to designate what has long been the gateway from the Las Vegas Strip to the City of Las Vegas. We are thrilled that this beautiful monument has been erected just steps away from our iconic tower.”

“Selbert Perkins Design has been designing city gateways, public art and landmarks for over 30 years. We are honored to have worked with the City of Las Vegas to design its newest gateway which welcomes all to historic downtown,” said Robin Perkins, partner of Selbert Perkins Design. “Our thanks to YESCO for fabricating and installing this complex work. It’s been a fantastic collaboration all around!”

FUN FACTS:

  • One leg of the Gateway Arches weighs 18,400 pounds
  • Number of lights on the arches: 13,016 
  • City Of Las Vegas emblem measures 20-feet x 40-feet and weighs 7,300 pounds
  • The entire arch draws over 61,000 watts of power
  • The arches are comprised of over 13,000 + RGB light-emitting diode (LED) pucks that are individually programmable
  • Over 700 feet of fully programmable RGBW LED Flex Neon, each pixel is 4.92 inches 
  • Fully programmable, the color-changing sign contains more than 170 IP addresses
  • Each arch leg spans 140 feet across Las Vegas Boulevard
  • 900-plus LED lamps in the southern face of the hanging “Las Vegas” cabinet
  • Four footings were drilled with a drill rig and are 20-feet in depth x 4-feet wide with a steel reinforced cage

Other high-profile Las Vegas projects YESCO has fabricated and installed during its centennial year include the sign package for Allegiant Stadium, as well as interior and exterior signage for Downtown’s new Circa Resort & Casino. 

The Gateway Arches will be illuminated every day beginning at dusk.

Design illustration for 360 magazine.

The Best Art Deco Household Designs You Can Create in Your Home

The roaring ’20s are back, and with them comes the art deco period once again.  This period, marked by the sleek design and vivid colors with a velvety texture, is one of the most iconic design history parts. Many homeowners are drawing inspiration from the era where a couch can define a room.  Here are the best art deco household designs you can create in your home, without pushing it too far into the past.

Pick An Accent Metal and Stick With It

The 1920s aesthetic is rife with shiny and beautiful surfaces.  To avoid making a room seem too cluttered or busy, stick to only one type of metallic color per room.  You can have a warm gold in your living room, copper in the kitchen, and silver in the bedroom or any other combination of these.  Reflective surfaces were significant because they screamed money in a time where many didn’t have much. You got to admire yourself in the sleek surfaces as you walked by them.

Sleek and Hard Designs

Following through with the last note, sleek and stiff designs are big.  A tall dresser with deep shiny wood and a lacquered surface can fit perfectly, but so could vintage lamps, mirrors, and art.  Look for things that scream luxury without being too flashy.  Try to think of it like camp fashion, nearly pushing the envelope but pulling back just enough that it’s fun and quirky.  Stained glass was significant during the 20s, so don’t be afraid to replace a window or two and cast some colorful light.

Avoid Oranges and Ochres- Embrace Yellow and Peach

Because the 1970s were so inspired by the 1920s, leaning into orange or ochre colors could quickly muddle which era your home is supposed to be based in.  If you love warm colors, go for a cooler red.  If you’re not sure about a piece, and you’ve been considering it for a while, try to research bedrooms, offices, and living rooms in the roaring twenties and see if anything similar matches up with it.

Wallpaper Is A Friend

When I say wallpaper is a friend, I don’t mean farmhouse floral.  Wallpaper was more vivid, like royal blues with gold accents, or deep reds with patterns in a darker red colored into their paper.  Pick a wallpaper that matches the aesthetic you have planned out- or if you don’t have one picked yet, you can choose the wallpaper and then build out from there!  Accent walls weren’t quite a thing, but if you want to modernize it by having a substantial fence through the wallpaper, you can do that.  This house is your home, and being inspired by the 20s doesn’t mean you have to replicate it perfectly!

Dark Hardwood

If you already have dark hardwood floors, then perfect!  Just polish them and make sure they gleam.  If you don’t, though, aim for furniture that replicates that feeling.  Lower side tables and coffee tables made of dark hardwood with metal details can bring through that 1920s flavor.

If you have lighter hardwood floors, and you’d consider staining your floors, you can easily do this over a weekend.  You save money by doing it yourself, but using a professional helps protect you against staining your belongings and ensuring that it gets sealed correctly.  If you do it yourself, make sure to sample the stain’s color first before applying it to your whole floor.  If you’re aiming for dark mahogany and up with light cherry wood, you’ll have to stain the wood all over again.

Embrace the (Almost) Minimal

The classic home we generally think of when trying to conjure up a thought of the 1920s is usually pretty spacious and empty.  Your eyes are drawn to the detail of marble flooring, tall ceilings, beautiful art on every wall.  Unfortunately, we can’t all turn our houses into mansions, so it’s essential to do what you can to embrace minimal while also creating a sense of spaciousness.  If you have shorter ceilings, replicate the feeling of spaciousness by using tall curtains that draw the eye upwards.  Mirrors, a very 1920s decoration, especially when they’re oversized, are a fantastic way to make any room feel larger.

Trim and Borders

Trim and borders need to be ornate as well!  Although some homes did include gold detailing in these, you don’t necessarily need to have a metal finish on them to make it seem spacious.  If you use too much gold, it might make your living room feel like the dining room of a Cheesecake Factory restaurant.  Go for ornate and period similar trim and borders around your walls and ceilings; make sure they’re cut to fit and that they suit the aesthetic of the rest of your room. 

Rich and Colorful Extras

Velvet was huge in the 1920s, leaving many to have it on nearly every surface.  If you don’t want to replace your furniture with this fussy fabric, you can easily use it in other ways.  Velvet curtains block out heat and cold while allowing you to darken a room.  Velvet pillows are a pleasingly soft and luxurious feeling.  Go for richer colors with velvet since it compliments the softness of the fabric.  

Rich colors should be used through many of the details.  Stick to one to two bold colors per room.  A red and purple room, or a navy blue and emerald green room can go entirely as long as you choose your pieces carefully and work to ensure they match well together.  

The 1920s were a tumultuous and wild time, much like the 2020s are shaping up to be.  Take the time and care to bring the parts you like with you into your modern home, and you can keep a little bit of the fun of the 1920s alive.

Design illustration for 360 magazine.

How to Design a Modern House

Being able to design a house with a modern look which will be set apart from the old and unappealing houses is a dream of many. The good news is that it can be done! Many people choose to design their own homes and find this is the only way they will be completely pleased with a house. It allows you to choose which features are a must and the odd things that you could just do without.

This article will tell you everything you need to know about starting the design process, what it involves and how you can have a great involvement in the creation of your house. You could design a house from start to finish or you could plan the renovation designs of a pre-built building.

First, Consider Getting Experience 

Architects are most often the ones behind the design process of a house build. They must have completed a wealth of years’ training and education to be allowed to work as an architect. If you wanted to design your home and work with an architect to do so, that would be your safest option. However, if you wanted to gain some of your own experience and be able to do more of the design process yourself you could consider taking a course in something like Structural Engineering, House Designing or something similar. These would allow you to tailor your designing to meet your modern house visions. It may not be something that an architect could do to meet your wants and needs. In a structural engineering course, you would learn things like engineering drawings, structural fundamentals, design and computing and more. These are all things that you would have to know to make any designing plans for your modern house.

Make the Plan

Before you begin throwing your ideas at construction workers, you will need to make a plan for your modern house. For example, the number of bathrooms and bedrooms, drawings of the structure of the buildings, the sorts of shapes you want to be consistent across the build and the way you would like to optimise light and incorporate insultation.

You will also have to work with the site, planning out which way your bedroom windows would face for the best view and how you would optimise the space.

You will then have to either work with your architect or on your own, draw 2D and 3D drawings of the site, and plan dimensions and measurements. This is when having experience really comes in useful and you will be able to incorporate more into the project before asking for additional help (which would also cost lots!)

One crucial aspect of the planning process is also considering materials and budgeting. The materials you choose could be highly expensive and you want to make sure your modern house design plans will fit with your chosen budget. 

In addition, you may want to plan the design in ways that you will like for the foreseeable future. For example, if you design a windy staircase which looks pretty but is hard to navigate, will you be comfortable with that staircase for years to come? Or will the way you have placed the windows allow you to have privacy when you need it? The great thing about modern designs is that they are quite simplistic, there would not be any crazy designs that you would be unsure on when your design tastes change. In addition, the style suits everyone in the household, male or female.

Planning a Modern Renovation 

You may want to have a modern house, but not build an entirely new one. You could decide to renovate your existing house with modern touches. In order to do this you might want to take an online course. There are many courses in design and especially for emerging trends in interior design. Of course, you may not want to take a course and you could find other ways of learning about designs such as using platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram. These are both filled with accounts on various interior design ideas. Further, you could watch programs like Grand Designs which are often modern builds. 

A modern house usually has a block-type style to it. They are usually very minimal and look clean and open. It is a great design style to aim for if you have a relatively small space and want it to appear larger and more open. 

After you have gathered your ideas and made 3D and 2D drawings for renovations then you will be able to hand them over to the construction workers and start the process. Plans for building need to adhere to a number of standards and therefore it is very important that the designs are suitable.

The great thing about renovations is that you can do a lot with an existing house framework. You may be able to cut costs by doing this rather than building a new one.

Final Thoughts

Planning to build a modern house is not easy. You will need a wealth of experience and drawing skills. The majority of people will work with architects and tell them what they would like before receiving housing plans to approve or edit. However, there is something about doing that whole process yourself which would be very rewarding. 

Designing can be hard as many people are not sure that they want but they know that they would like a combination of things. This is where having a designer for you can be very beneficial. You would be able to choose the right designer for you who specialises in modern houses. 

Some people even go on to take part in the building process themselves because they believe that they know exactly how the building should look or they simply enjoy the building process. A total DIY house project would be a lot of time though and may not be suitable for those who work full time or have other commitments. 

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Santa Monica Mid Century


This Santa Monica Mid Century was designed originally by Fredrick Monhoff in 1949. It was a 3 bedroom 1 bath home, a total of 1200 square feet. It has since received several additions including a green roof now in construction.
 
In 2013, homeowners Elaine and David contacted Abeer Sweis wanting to expand square footage to meet the needs of their growing family, and to make updates. Sweis designed a new wing that provides two additional bedrooms, two bathrooms and a den, using leftover space for a laundry room and pantry. Sweis also expanded the dining area and renovated the main living space with the exception of the original brick fireplace.

There were four specific elements driving the design: indoor/outdoor living, utilizing natural light, having an open floor plan with continuity of space and views, and the use of modern materials that fit seamlessly into the midcentury architecture.

Indoor-outdoor flow both to the patio and the den on the other side was created with the use of folding doors and large windows, and by carrying the tile from the interior living space out to the patio and spa area. The hall, typically simply a circulation space, became one of their favorite rooms in the house. It ties together the spaces in the new addition and accentuates the intersection of the angles existing and new.

The clients lived in the home during this phase of construction.

The north wing of the home is undergoing renovation now in construction. An accessory dwelling unit (ADU) will replace the existing one-car garage and guest room. The challenge was to add more square footage without sacrificing the outdoor living space. Although built with contemporary innovations, the green roof design of the accessory structure compliments the original home.

“Abeer, Jeff and their team did an amazing job expanding and renovating our mid-century modern architectural home. The design process was a true partnership-Abeer listened to our needs and incorporated our preferences, while executing an incredible design vision for our home. We enjoyed the process very much. Jeff did an exceptional job leading the construction process. Every detail was addressed and the end product is truly amazing. Every aspect of our new home meets our needs, both in terms of form and function. We highly recommend [them] and would hire them again without reservation.” – David + Elaine 

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TOYOTA – WOVEN CITY

At CES, Toyota revealed plans to build a prototype “city” of the future on a 175-acre site at the base of Mt. Fuji in Japan.

Called the Woven City, it will be a fully connected ecosystem powered by hydrogen fuel cells.

Envisioned as a “living laboratory,” the Woven City will serve as a home to full- time residents and researchers who will be able to test and develop technologies such as autonomy, robotics, personal mobility, smart homes and artificial intelligence in a real-world environment.

“Building a complete city from the ground up, even on a small scale like this, is a unique opportunity to develop future technologies, including a digital operating system for the city’s infrastructure. With people, buildings and vehicles all connected and communicating with each other through data and sensors, we will be able to test connected AI technology… in both the virtual and the physical realms … maximizing its potential,” said Akio Toyoda, president, Toyota Motor Corporation.

Toyota will extend an open invitation to collaborate with other commercial and academic partners and invite interested scientists and researchers from around the world to come work on their own projects in this one-of-a-kind, real-world incubator.

“We welcome all those inspired to improve the way we live in the future, to take advantage of this unique research ecosystem and join us in our quest to create an ever-better way of life and mobility for all,” said Akio Toyoda, president, Toyota Motor Corporation.

For the design of Woven City, Toyota has commissioned Danish architect, Bjarke Ingels, CEO, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG). His team at BIG have designed many high-profile projects: from 2 World Trade Center in New York and Lego House in Denmark, to Google’s Mountain View and London headquarters.

“A swarm of different technologies are beginning to radically change how we inhabit and navigate our cities. Connected, autonomous, emission-free and shared mobility solutions are bound to unleash a world of opportunities for new forms of urban life. With the breadth of technologies and industries that we have been able to access and collaborate with from the Toyota ecosystem of companies, we believe we have a unique opportunity to explore new forms of urbanity with the Woven City that could pave new paths for other cities to explore.” Bjarke Ingels, Founder and Creative Director, BIG.

Design of the City

The masterplan of the city includes the designations for street usage into three types: for faster vehicles only, for a mix of lower speed, personal mobility and pedestrians, and for a park-like promenade for pedestrians only.  These three street types weave together to form an organic grid pattern to help accelerate the testing of autonomy.

The city is planned to be fully sustainable, with buildings made mostly of wood to minimize the carbon footprint, using traditional Japanese wood joinery, combined with robotic production methods. The rooftops will be covered in photo-voltaic panels to generate solar power in addition to power generated by hydrogen fuel cells.   Toyota plans to weave in the outdoors throughout the city, with native vegetation and hydroponics.

Residences will be equipped with the latest in human support technologies, such as in-home robotics to assist with daily living. The homes will use sensor-based AI to check occupants’ health, take care of basic needs and enhance daily life, creating an opportunity to deploy connected technology with integrity and trust, securely and positively.

To move residents through the city, only fully-autonomous, zero-emission vehicles will be allowed on the main thoroughfares. In and throughout Woven City, autonomous Toyota e-Palettes will be used for transportation and deliveries, as well as for changeable mobile retail.

Both neighborhood parks and a large central park for recreation, as well as a central plaza for social gatherings, are designed to bring the community together. Toyota believes that encouraging human connection will be an equally important aspect of this experience.

Toyota plans to populate Woven City with Toyota Motor Corporation employees and their families, retired couples, retailers, visiting scientists, and industry partners. The plan is for 2000 people to start, adding more as the project evolves.

The groundbreaking for the site is planned for early 2021.

Interested in partnering with Toyota on the development of Woven City? Visit: Woven-city.global

COS × Studio Swine

COS CELEBRATES NEW SPRING, MIAMI BY STUDIO SWINE

Last night COS hosted a celebration of their collaboration with Studio Swine. The global art and design community gathered at The Temple House to toast New Spring, Miami.

As a satellite of Design Miami/ the immersive, multisensory installation created by the London-based duo has been reconceived in response to its environment, drawing inspiration from the history and culture of Miami Beach.

COS Creative Director, Karin Gustafsson noted, “We are so thrilled to be in Miami this week and to have the opportunity to share New Spring with the incredible community of creatives that are the fibre of our brand.” 

Guests were served champagne and Mezcal-infused cocktails and dinned on sashimi and tacos. DJ sets were from Hannah Bronfman & Brendan Fallis.

Notable attendees included:

●        Karin Gustafsson and Atul Pathak, COS

●        Azusa Murakami and Alexander Groves, Studio Swine

●        Rodman Primack, and Jen Roberts, Design Miami/

●        Alex Mustonen, Snarkitecture

●        Rafael de Cardenas, Architect

●        Caroline Daur

●        Candela Pelizza

●        Pari Ehsan

 

The installation is located at The Temple House, 1415 Euclid Ave, Miami Beach from Wednesday 6 December until Sunday 10 December 2017.

#COSxStudioSwine

Instagram: @cosstores

Facebook: facebook.com/cos

 

Karin Gustafsson, Alexander Groves, Azusa Murakami and Atul Pathak

 

 

Caroline Daur | Rodman Primack and Jen Roberts

 

         

Pari Ehsan | Brendan Fallis and Hannah Bronfman

   

Candela Pelizza |  Installation space

All images courtesy of COS

ABOUT COS

COS is a fashion brand for women and men who like modern, functional and considered design. We use traditional methods and new techniques to form understated collections made to last beyond the season. Committed to both timeless design and innovation, we have supported the arts since the launch of the brand through collaborations with established and emerging artists, galleries and creative studios. cosstores.com

ABOUT NEW SPRING

In April 2017 during Salone del Mobile in Milan, COS debuted New Spring, its collaboration with Studio Swine, and welcomed more than 20,000 visitors to the installation over the internationally renowned Design Week. The installation, which won the award for Most Engaging Exhibition during Milan Design Week, grew from an open brief from COS and exemplifies the Studio’s interdisciplinary sensibility.  COS has participated in Salone del Mobile since 2012 with collaborations including Gary Card, Bonsoir Paris, Nendo, Snarkitecture, and Sou Fujimoto.

ABOUT STUDIO SWINE

Studio Swine (Super Wide Interdisciplinary New Explorers) is a collaboration between Japanese Architect Azusa Murakami and British Artist Alexander Groves. Creating works that span across disciplines of art, design and film, Studio Swine explores themes of regional identity and the future of resources in the context of globalisation. Studio Swine work manifests a deep research into materials and modern industrialisation. Studio Swine has been widely exhibited at institutions such as the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Museum of Art and Design New York, and the Venice Art Biennale. studioswine.com

ABOUT DESIGN MIAMI/

Design Miami/ is the global forum for design. Each fair brings together the most influential collectors, gallerists, designers, curators, and critics from around the world in celebration of design culture and commerce. Occurring alongside the Art Basel fairs in Miami, Florida, each December and Basel, Switzerland, each June, Design Miami/ has become the premier venue for collecting, exhibiting, discussing, and creating collectible design. designmiami.com