Posts tagged with "sculpture"

Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness

The Untitled Space is pleased to present a group exhibition and public art series “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” presented in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality. The two-part exhibition features an empowering public art series of 10 billboards each by different artists launching on September 21, 2020 in a variety of locations throughout New York City, to coincide with a gallery exhibition opening on September 26, 2020 at The Untitled Space featuring the work of over 50 contemporary artists. Revolving around the theme of “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” the public art series and group exhibition is curated by Indira Cesarine, founder of The Untitled Space and Art4Equality.

The gallery will feature the unique artworks displayed on the billboards (presented by SaveArtSpace) along with an exhibition of many additional works in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, photography, video, and sculpture inspired by the words “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” and “The Pursuit of Happiness,” which will be on view at the gallery through October 17, 2020. The Untitled Space is honored to collaborate with non-profit SaveArtSpace and support the programming of Art4Equality, an initiative that supports the creation of empowering equality themed exhibitions and public art.

Curatorial Statement:

“’What do these words mean to you: “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” “The Pursuit of Happiness”? We live in an unprecedented time, our liberties robbed by a global pandemic, which laid painfully bare the inequities that have plagued the most vulnerable in our society for far too long. Political polarization in the United States is reaching critical mass with a divisive political system at war. Realities of social inequality and racial injustice are challenging our ability to have confidence in a promising future. With the 2020 elections approaching, I felt that it was a crucial time to create an opportunity for artists to respond, with the artwork presented in a public platform where it can reach an audience of millions of people every day and promote an inclusive dialogue.

The billboard transformed into an art display is an innovative, and ultimately accessible way to present contemporary art, transforming spaces normally dedicated to advertising into public art that has power and impact. We received such an overwhelming response to the exhibit opportunity, which was presented via an open call, that I expanded the project to include a gallery group exhibition featuring over 50 artists who created artworks inspired by the theme – most of which were created during quarantine. The public art series and exhibition “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” seeks to empower, enlighten, and shed a ray of hope in a city that has been under a dark cloud, in a country that is in tatters not only by an invisible virus, but also by political and civil unrest. As we navigate through this difficult time, “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” celebrates art as activism, giving voices to a diverse array of contemporary artists from all backgrounds, ages, and genders. I’m honored to guest curate the public art series for SaveArtSpace and hope viewers will be inspired and motivated by the public art billboards and exhibition artwork.” – Artist & Curator Indira Cesarine

EXHIBITING ARTISTS:

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alison Stinley, Alysia Davis, Ann Lewis, Anne Barlinckhoff, Annika Connor, April Fitzpatrick, Ashley Chew, Buket Savci, Cabell Molina, Coco Dolle, D’nae Harrison, Dan Alvarado, Daniel Aros-Aguilar, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, David Siever, Dessie Jackson, Devynity Wray, Diana Zipeto, Dolly Faibyshev, Donna Bassin, Egypt H., Fahren Feingold, Faustine Badrichani, Geoffrey Stein, Hana Zhang, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jared Freschman, Jodie Herrera, Joel Tretin, Jose Baez, Karen Bystedt, Katya Zvereva, Kim McCarty, Leah Schrager, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lynn Bianchi, Meg Lionel Murphy, Michele Pred, Osaze Stigler, Panteha Abareshi, Paolo Morales, Q’shaundra James, Rachel Van Der Nacht, Rebecca Bird, Robin Tewes, Robyn Gibson, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Sarupa Sidaarth, Travis Rueckert, Tslil Tsemet, Valerie Carmet, and Vaughan Larsen.

PUBLIC ART BILLBOARDS (in collaboration with SaveArtSpace):

Anne Barlinckhoff – Pulaski Bridge 11th St & 53rd Ave, Queens Ashley Chew – Flushing Ave & Waverly Ave, Brooklyn Donna Bassin – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Fahren Feingold + Indira Cesarine – W 46th St & 12th Ave, Manhattan Jodie Herrera – Hamilton Pl & 12th St, Brooklyn Kim McCarty – Flushing Ave & Spencer St, Brooklyn Meg Lionel Murphy – Myrtle Ave & Cornelia St, Queens Panteha Abareshi – Park Ave & Emerson Pl, Brooklyn Sarupa Sidaarth – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Travis Rueckert – 11th Ave & W 45th St, Manhattan

ABOUT SAVEARTSPACE

Founded in 2015, in Brooklyn, NY, SaveArtSpace is a non-profit organization that works to create an urban gallery experience, launching exhibitions that address intersectional themes and foster a progressive message of social change. By placing culture over commercialism, SaveArtSpace aims to empower artists from all walks of life and inspire a new generation of young creatives and activists. Since 2015, SaveArtSpace has installed the artwork of 180 artists on 212 advertising spaces in 10+ major US cities, coast-to-coast. Beyond transforming advertisement space into public art, we work with a variety of community groups including: schools, senior residencies, shelters, youth groups, special needs programs, art collectives, galleries, and museums. Together, we aim to foster community and cultural enrichment through the arts. While supporting underprivileged and emerging artists by providing them the opportunity to display work in the public space.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT ART4EQUALITY

Art4Equality is an initiative supporting equality themed art exhibitions and special projects including films and public art by female identifying artists and allies. The mission of Art4Equality is to create empowering artwork and exhibitions that can impact social change, raise awareness and inspire our community. Art4Equality additionally facilitates opportunities by providing mentorship to artists, as well as special programming such as panel discussions, performances, and educational art events. Art4Equality empowers by creating a platform for progress. By supporting the work of underrepresented and marginalized artists, Art4Equality demonstrates the value, quality, and diversity of their contributions to the community, encourages an inclusive dialogue, and promotes equality for all.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Indira Cesarine’s curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, “SHE INSPIRES,” and internationally-celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

For more information click HERE.

 

“Entertainment Unit” by artist Sarupa Sidaarth, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Our Land” by artist Meg Lionel Murphy, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Behind The Flag” by artist April Fitzpatrick, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

EXHIBITION CONTACTS:

The Untitled Space: info@untitled-space.com

Exhibition Website: HERE

SaveArtSpace Billboards: HERE

Rhys Kelly’s New Installation

Rhys Kelly Bio

Born and raised in South Florida – Rhys gravitated toward finding beauty in the unexpected — often creating jewelry and art from things she found in nature.

While attending a small art school in Monessen, Pennsylvania, Rhys Kelly took a course on painting eyes and teeth for creatures that the students sculpted. From that class, Rhys noticed how much detail went into painting one eye – and how no two eyes are the same. This was a perfect representation for what Rhys always knew to be true: The eye represents perspective, uniqueness and individualism.

After school, Rhys started gifting the eye jewelry to friends and family, it gained attention from people beyond her inner circle and she started selling pieces in 2017, thus bringing the Rhys Kelly brand to life. Rhys’s collection of handcrafted pendants, rings and bracelets are timeless one of a kind pieces — each designed around the human eye. The eye has, for all of human existence (and probably beyond) been a symbol of power, protection, knowledge, good, evil and much more. What’s remained consistent is the fact that no two eyes are the exact same.

Rhys’s “What’s Your Perspective,” is a body of work comprising pieces of art and jewelry centered around the human eye. The collection is meant to inspire, fascinate and celebrate the unique perspective of every person. For Kelly’s art installation she casts eye forms using acrylic and acrylic paint, first pouring the acrylic into a mold and then painting. Her jewelry is handmade of precious metals including silver, gold and both semi-precious and precious gemstones. She most recently released her “Drippy Eye” installation – which is a large standing installation. Prices for Kelly’s work start at $195 for jewelry and range from $500 to $5,000 for art.

Rhys is now 24 years old and currently resides in Los Angeles where she continues to expand her following and create her artwork.

Dont Fret New Street Art

Dont Fret, one of Chicago’s most recognizable street artists, today unveiled a new, large-scale art installation on the Chicago Riverwalk. Titled The People in Your Neighborhood, the installation is located at the Riverwalk’s most western point, known as The Confluence between E Lake St and N Franklin St, and features 55 portraits of Chicagoans, all portrayed in Dont Fret’s inimitable sardonic style. The unveiling is accompanied by the release of his new book, Dont Fret: Life Thus Far, now available for purchase.

Offering a microcosmic reflection of Chicago’s scrappy and hard-working residents, the portrait subjects of The People in Your Neighborhood range from the well-known to the obscure. Designer and restaurateur Kevin Heisner stands alongside Claudio, Chicago’s beloved tamale vendor, who in turn rubs elbows with Maria, longtime owner of Maria’s Bridgeport and Howard Brown Health doctor Abby Baus. Each is depicted with both comedic and piercing insight, caricatures that are reminiscent of the archetypical Chicagoans who have lived in the city for generations. The portraits and subject bios can also be seen on Dont Fret’s Instagram page.

“There are certain character traits that I think define a true Chicagoan. Tough, full-browed with a sense of ingenuity and midwestern humbleness, but always toiling, working, moving forward with an almost absurd laugh and grin about this crazy, wonderful city,” said Dont Fret. “I was asked to paint 55 portraits of Chicagoans who I think contribute to the hard work that defines our city, although it can only scratch the surface of the millions of stories moving through our streets. These are the people in your neighborhood.”

“Dont Fret’s proposal for celebrating everyday Chicagoans who make our City go – from the beloved Tamale Man to artists to bridge engineers – was really appealing to enliven a long stretch of the Riverwalk that otherwise fades into the background,” said Lydia Ross, Director of Public Art at the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. “The artist’s distinctive style isn’t intended to capture an accurate portrait, but rather the heartfelt spirit of the great people that surround us, some of whom we know, some we recognize, others we may be more attuned to looking out for…it was conceived pre-COVID but felt even more resonant to celebrate people in the midst of social distancing.”

Dont Fret’s unpolished aesthetics paired with pithy one-liners are recognizable features of Chicago’s built environment, in addition to being painted and wheat-pasted on buildings around the world, from New York to Berlin, Miami, São Paulo, London and Helsinki. Don’t Fret: Life Thus Far, the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work, showcases a decade of his street and gallery work and features memories and anecdotes from fellow artists and friends including Louder Than A Bomb founder Kevin Coval, artist Cody Hudson and rapper Vic Mensa.

In the 256-page monograph, the figures and texts of consummate wise guy Dont Fret skewer the obvious and reflect the normalized-until-numbed issues of the city back at the passerby experiencing them firsthand. While his work populates city streets worldwide, he remains a true Wicker Park native, digging into the character(s) of Chicago—the stew of down-and-out and up-and-up, the meatpackers, the artists, the street-wise, and the stupid. Featuring 216 color images, this monograph also includes a foreword by writer and Brooklyn Street Art co-founder Steven P. Harrington.

In addition to The People in Your Neighborhood, the Chicago Riverwalk also recently unveiled a mural by Chicago-based artist Kate Lynn Lewis,The Radiance of Being, which celebrates 100 years of Art Deco. Lewis is also one of the 55 Chicagoans portrayed in Dont Fret’s installation.The Chicago Riverwalk has been going through a phased reopening which included the Community Marketplace opening July 17. Vendors are open by reservation for contact tracing purposes, walk-ups are welcome and will be asked for contact information. Vendor details are available at www.chicagoriverwalk.us.

About Dont Fret

Dont Fret is an artist born, raised, and currently working in Chicago. In addition to his wheat pasting, his practice includes drawing, painting, sculpture, performance, and installation-based work both on the street and in the gallery. He has produced large-scale public murals in a number of American cities, including Chicago, New York City, Miami, San Francisco, Grand Rapids, and Denver, as well as internationally in such cities as São Paulo, London, and Helsinki. His work has been in a number of galleries nationally and internationally, with shows in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, and London. Dont Fret’s work was also featured prominently in the Netflix original series Easy.

Le Kitsch × Virtual Exhibit

On View Now  – LE KITSCH: Anna Fasshauer, Matthias Schaufler

3D Virtual Tour

Robert Grunenberg is pleased to announce the double feature exhibition “Le Kitsch” with works by the painter Matthias Schaufler (1964) and the sculptor Anna Fasshauer (1975) – two artists, who both represent an original position in their respective discipline through their intensive formal and discursive engagement with the figurative and the abstract. Where Schaufler explores the possibilities and limits of oil painting, Fasshauer experiments with the material aluminum in space.

“Le Kitsch” is Schaufler’s first Berlin exhibition since 2014 and shows over 20 paintings in a variety of sizes from the past five years – a kind of mini-retrospective. In the three rooms of the gallery, the show is laid out as a chronological tour from 2016 to 2020, which at the same time provides an overview of Schaufler’s latest work, as well as the development of his practice, which documents a balancing act between abstraction and figuration.

“I often relate to myself negatively,” says Schaufler, describing his self-referentiality, “insofar as I do not continuously develop solutions to the problem that I once found.” Thus Schaufler always tries out new color combinations, tools such as spatulas or razor blades, sometimes he dilutes the colors, sometimes he works with more white space, sometimes he fills the canvas almost completely. Nevertheless, all of his works have a high recognition value, a signature that seems to lie in the energetic mark-making of the color. For Schaufler, the act of painting often requires the use of the body. The strong movement in front of the canvas, which can range from mere gestures to physical aggression, sometimes creates brute, but also sensual and poetic forms of expression.

Schaufler’s pictures are juxtaposed with four large-format sculptures by Anna Fasshauer from this year, which has a similarly high level of abstraction. In their material experiments, Fasshauer works with raw aluminum, such as is used in drywall and trade fair construction. To shape her pipe sculptures, she uses machines that are normally used for the industrial bending of metal. The wound, knotted and tangled sculptures appear as if they were sketches thrown onto paper, that then grow into three dimensions – like something that was created provisionally with a light hand. Therefore the weight, the dimensions, and the machinability of the work could not be in greater contrast.

With other sculptures, Fasshauer uses her body to model by literally hugging them, as in the case of the pink cuboid seen in the exhibition. The coloring comes before the molding. The mostly monochrome lacquer color of Fasshauer’s sculptures blurs the industrial character of the material from which they are made, sometimes it is in the greatest possible contrast to it, such as in the work “Tactical Reserve,” in which metallic hardness and pastel softness meet, and with its handle makes one think of a man-sized travel bag. Similar to Schaufler, Fasshauer plays with the association potential of form, which is just figurative enough that it stimulates the imagination to relate to real things. She succeeds in creating playful and humorous objects from the originally cool, technical material.

The title of the exhibition is a borrowed phrase from the Austrian poet Friederike Mayröcker. She lets this phrase appear in her breathless stream of consciousness whenever poetry threatens to become too clear, because it aims to create a certain feeling without going through the mind and thus threatens to become kitsch. The works in the exhibition also have a dual nature: they are based on a high degree of reflection, at the same time they reach the senses and feelings without detour. Similar to Mayröcker’s poetry, Schaufler and Fasshauer operate outside of defined narratives that lie outside of art itself. Their art is about art and at the same time tells us something about life.

INSTAGRAM

Opening Hours:
Wednesdays–Saturdays
12 am–6 pm
and by appointment

About Matthias Schaufler

Matthias Schaufler born in 1964 in Laichingen, Germany lives and works in Berlin. Schaufler studied Fine Art at Hochschule für Bildende Künste Hamburg (class of Erhard Walther and Mike Hentz) and at Städelschule Frankfurt (class Martin Kippenberger).

About Anna Fasshauer

Anna Fasshauer born in 1975 in Cologne, Germany lives and works in Berlin. Fasshauer studied Fine Art at the De Montfort University Leicester and received a Master of Fine Arts at the Chelsea School of Art and Design, London.

360 Magazine,art,artist,Brooklyn,design,Forbes,graphic,JENNA MORELLO,Macy’s,muralist,murals,New Jersey,sculpture,Super Bowl,The New York Times,The Ritz-Carlton,Universal Music Group,Vaughn Lowery,World Trade Center, NYC

JENNA MORELLO

Jenna Morello is a multi-disciplinary artist from Brooklyn. At home, she creates large-scale bold, expressive walls as well as meticulously crafted sculptures. She mixes and matches multiple mediums to create nature-based, sometimes anatomical art which speaks for itself. Her work is internationally sold; and her murals can be seen around the world. She has completed projects for The Ritz-Carlton, the World Trade Center, Universal Music Group, Macy’s and the Super Bowl. As of late, she’s been featured in both The New York Times and Forbes.

http://www.jennamorello.com/

Kusama, NYBG, Cosmic Nature, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Yayoi Kusama x New York Botanical Garden

New Work by Celebrated Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama  The New York Botanical Garden Announces Highlights of 2020 Exhibition

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature, Featuring New Work by Celebrated Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama

On view May 9‒November 1, 2020. Tickets go on sale February 26, at nybg.org/kusama 

The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) has announced highlights of its expansive 2020 exhibition KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature, featuring work by internationally celebrated Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929), including new experiences and immersive installations, four of which will debut at the Botanical Garden. NYBG is the exclusive venue for KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature. On view May 9 through November 1, 2020, the exhibition will be installed in and around the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, across the Garden’s 250 acres, and in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building.

Tickets for the landmark presentation go on sale February 26, 2020, at nybg.org/kusama. Visitors to New York can easily reach the exhibit in 20 minutes from Grand Central Terminal in Midtown via Metro North to the Botanical Garden Station. They can also take advantage of the Exclusive Grand Hyatt New York Hotel & Ticket Package. The property is located next to Grand Central and visitors can book online at grandhyattnewyork.com, using the code NYBG. They’ll receive 10% off the nightly room rate at Grand Hyatt New York, two round-trip Metro-North Railroad tickets to NYBG and two KUSAMA All-Garden Pass tickets.

New Kusama Works Debut

The exhibition reveals Kusama’s lifelong fascination with the natural world beginning in her childhood spent in the greenhouses and fields of her family’s Nakatsutaya seed nursery. Multiple installations will be on view, including her signature mirrored environments and organic forms, colossal polka-dotted sculptures of flora, and mesmerizing paintings of plants and flowers and their diversity of colors and patterns. Several of these works are newly completed and will be shown along with archival works that have never been publicly exhibited, and more that will be on view for the first time in the United States.

Among the new works debuting are: Flower Obsession (2020), Kusama’s first-ever obliteration greenhouse where visitors apply coral flower stickers throughout the interior; Dancing Pumpkin (2020), a monumental, 16-foot-high sculpture presented on the Haupt Conservatory Lawn; Infinity Mirrored Room—Illusion Inside the Heart (2020), an immersive outdoor installation responding to changing light throughout the day and seasons; and, I Want to Fly to the Universe (2020), a brightly colored, 13-foot-high biomorphic form with a yellow face and polka dots.

Complementing the artworks on view, Garden horticulturists will create spectacular in- and outdoor displays through the seasons. Glorious displays of tulips and irises in spring transform into masses of pumpkins and autumnal flowers in fall. Kusama’s plant-inspired polka-dotted sculptures will be installed across the Garden in dialogue with meadow grasses, bellflowers, water lilies, and other plantings. In the Conservatory, stunning floral presentations will bring one of Kusama’s paintings on view in the Library Building to life through a seasonal progression of violas, salvias, zinnias, chrysanthemums, and other colorful annuals. In fall, displays of meticulously trained kiku (Japanese for “chrysanthemum” and one of the country’s most heralded fall-flowering plants) will create a dramatic finale for the exhibition.

Sketchbooks, Paintings & Polka Dots

The Exhibition will include works from throughout Kusama’s prolific career and multifaceted practice. On display in the Mertz Library Building, her sketchbooks from adolescence signal the beginning of Kusama’s connection with the natural world that has inspired her aesthetic and practice across mediums. This early work also portends avant-garde ideas she developed while living in New York between 1958 and 1973, as a contemporary of Joseph Cornell, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, and Claes Oldenburg, and continues to explore rigorously today. The Library Building presentation will also feature examples of her botanical sketches, paintings, works on paper, biomorphic collages, assemblages, and recent soft sculpture and canvas works depicting flora and their limitless variety of patterns. Life (2015) provides an immersive experience as visitors navigate a circular space enclosing polka-dotted forms with mosaic surfaces. Pumpkins Screaming About Love Beyond Infinity (2017) comprises a mirrored cube reflecting an infinity of polka-dotted pumpkins. It is accompanied by a statement by the artist that reads, in part, “My pumpkins, beloved of all the plants in the world. When I see pumpkins, I cannot efface the joy of them being my everything, nor the awe I hold them in.”

Public Programs   

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature will be accompanied by a roster of public programs for all ages, including lectures; film screenings of Kusama Infinity (2018) and Kusama’s Self-Obliteration (1967); fun-filled Polka Dot Picnics in spring; and Pumpkin Power Weekends in October with activities amid thousands of pumpkins of myriad shapes and sizes. Artist-designed merchandise will be available for purchase at NYBG Shop and there will be special Kusama- inspired menu items offered in the Hudson Garden Grill and Pine Tree Café. The KUSAMA All-Garden Pass ticket includes access to the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building, Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, Flower Obsession (2020) obliteration greenhouse, and garden features, including the Rock Garden, Tram Tour, Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, and grounds. The KUSAMA All-Garden Pass + Infinity Mirrored Room ticket includes KUSAMA All-Garden Pass access, plus timed entry to the Infinity Mirrored Room—Illusion Inside the Heart immersive outdoor installation. Tickets go on sale for NYBG Patrons and Members on February 19, 2020, and to the general public on February 26, 2020.

Visit nybg.org/kusama for additional ticketing information and pricing and to sign up for e-mail alerts on the exhibition.  The New York Botanical Garden is a museum of plants located at Bronx River Parkway (Exit 7W) and Fordham Road. It is easy to reach by Metro-North Railroad, bus, or subway. The Garden is open year- round, Tuesday through Sunday and Monday federal holidays, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, please call 718.817.8700 or visit nybg.org The New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, New York 10458

Kanye West Statue Unveiled at Sneakertopia

By Chris Gates x Sam Berman
David Weeks NYC has been a a transcending designer and star in the art world. Recently, he unveiled his latest creation: a 5-foot-tall of Kanye West, showcasing his 4 sides of emotions.
Mr. weeks is the youngest innovative style award recipient and the leader
of a new wave of art. With his new series “Modern day Mount Rushmore”, the artist seeks to bring awareness to cultural legends in the black community who’ve helped shift the culture and provide a path for wealth, success and advocacy. The first in his series is a massive statue of his favorite artist Kanye West. The name of statue is perfect for its four-faced appearance: N.S.E.West.
The statue is now on display at Sneakertopiaa pop-up exhibit and store at HHLA. Inside, you see the restricted sneaker display and will be surrounded by a widespread variety of pricey kicks and very big street art pieces.

Average price to get a view is $20 a person, and you can grab your tickets here. The pop up shoe museum will be on full display with David Weeks NYC’s N.S.E.WEST masterpiece in Los Angeles thru Mar 1st, then will go on to hit other places around the globe.

LongHouse Reserve, East Hampton, 360 MAGAZINE

LongHouse Reserve

LONGHOUSE RESERVE AWARDED $46,756.50 GRANT FROM THE

ROBERT DAVID LION GARDINER FOUNDATION FOR OUTDOOR ART EXHIBITS

LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton has been awarded a $46,756.50 grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation. The purpose of the grant is to allow LongHouse to expand its reach into the Eastern Long Island community and beyond with outstanding and affordable cultural and historical experiences. These community outreach efforts center on the undeserved members of the local towns of the East End, primarily the immigrant population and their children. The grant directly assists in defraying rising costs in LongHouse’s Public Art in the Gardens Program, including costs associated with art acquisition, installation, marketing and outreach. 

LongHouse’s Executive Director, Matko Tomicic, says, “A grant from the Gardiner Foundation is a vote of confidence in LongHouse Reserve’s mission to illuminate the unique natural setting and artistic environment that has nurtured and inspired world renowned artists. It is a distinctive cultural designation for the region, nation and the world.”

Public Art in the Gardens is LongHouse Reserve’s year-long exhibition, the cornerstone of the art, garden and educational initiatives. It is open to the public in April and runs through December 2019. Each year, some of the art in the permanent collection is moved to different locations in the garden, providing a fresh perspective and renewed enjoyment to visitors. New art on loan from museums, galleries, artists and collectors is placed throughout the garden. Most of the art is in place for the Rites of Spring Season Opener in April. The placement and installation of the sculpture, often massive in size, is one of LongHouse’s biggest tasks and challenges. 

LongHouse strives to offer the local community programming at little or no cost. Year round programs that benefit from the grant include Rites of Spring, the LongHouse season opener; Family Day, a large community outreach event; Educational Programming, in which over 3,000 schoolchildren visit LongHouse Reserve annually with teachers free of charge; the Student Annual, an art competition that is open to kindergarten through 12th grade students throughout Long Island; Hand in Hand Treasure Hunt, an activity that drives growth of children visiting LongHouse; Garden Programming, or tours of the gardens, and Collaborative Relationships, such as partnerships with other cultural institutions. 

LongHouse uses its website, newsletter, and email marketing to reach its target population. The vibrant social media presence keeps visitors updated on happenings, events, and education programs. LongHouse reaches out to the undeserved members of the community with informal talks, flyers (printed in English and Spanish) and complimentary guest passes to be used during open days. LongHouse has formed an alliance with an English as a Second Language class and offers students and families complimentary bilingual tours. More than half the children who visit LongHouse are from Hispanic and African American households. Outreach events are added to all local media calendars and are featured in newspapers such as The East Hampton Star, The Independent, East Hampton Press, and Newsday. 

About The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation

The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, established in 1987, primarily supports the study of New York State history. Robert David Lion Gardiner was, until his death in August 2004, the 16th Lord of the Manor of Gardiner’s Island, NY. The Gardiner family and their descendants have owned Gardiner’s Island since 1639, obtained as part of a royal grant from King Charles I of England. The Foundation is inspired by Robert David Lion Gardiner’s personal passion for New York history.

About LongHouse Reserve 

Long House Reserve in East Hampton, NY exemplifies living with art in all forms. Its collections, gardens, sculpture and programs reflect world cultures and inspire creative life. LongHouse Reserve was founded by Jack Lenor Larsen, internationally known textile designer, author and collector. His home, LongHouse, was built as a case study to exemplify a creative approach to contemporary life. Mr. Larsen believes visitors experiencing art in living spaces have a unique learning experience – more meaningful than the best media.

LongHouse Reserve
133 Hands Creek Road
East Hampton, NY  11937
info@longhouse.org
www.longhouse.org

 

AMERICAN ART TO WEAR

Museum Presents Major Exhibition of Art to Wear

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear – November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features over one hundred one-of-a-kind works by more than fifty artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it will also include works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition will introduce to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.”

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013.

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving. In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. A highlight in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design. Katherine Westpahl’s indigo blue resist-dyed cotton work, A Fantasy Meeting of Santa Claus with Big Julie and Tyrone at McDonald’s, 1978, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. It also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974, inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). “Mother Earth,” a nod to the publication Mother Earth News Magazine, looks to nature and environmental concerns while This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1940) explores iconic American imagery including reference to the American West and Native American cultures. Examples in this section include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature.

Other Worlds explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with its flowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Bird Coat, 1972, Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas relating to after-images in Big Red, and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991.

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1969) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. JoEllen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.”

Publication
Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators
Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

Support
This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors. Credits as of July 8, 2019.

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Tom Burr at the Wadsworth Atheneum

Portraits by Tom Burr Propel MATRIX Exhibition Series at the Wadsworth Atheneum

Connecticut-born sculptor Tom Burr’s expansive body of portraiture takes a different approach to the relationship between the built environment, material, subjectivity, and historical personalities. Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and the museum’s presentation of two other portrait centered exhibitions, Tom Burr / MATRIX 182 / Hinged Figures unites a selection of the artist’s reclining figures, several of which are portraits of individuals from queer history and American Modernism. Burr began the series in 2005, and MATRIX 182 constitutes the largest museum presentation of the reclining figures to date. The sculptures will be shown both within the MATRIX Gallery and around the museum, in dialogue with specific artists and architectural spaces, and also at the Austin House.

“I wanted to see the figures spread throughout the different spaces in the museum–spaces that resonate with the history of 20th-century art being shown–but also in other, less expected settings, such as Chick Austin’s house,” says Tom Burr. “I wanted to create a constellation of figures and sites that would engage, in a sense, the museum and the house as a total stage set.”

Burr’s sculptures combine Minimalist forms with figures and material attributes, such as books, magazine pages, notecards, tinsel, and a Chanel dress. He is interested in the way certain figures shape and are shaped by the spaces they inhabit. In this MATRIX project, Burr directly addresses the Wadsworth’s prominent role in the history of Modernism in several portrait subjects, including former director A. Everett ‘Chick’ Austin, and two creatives, writer Gertrude Stein and composer Virgil Thomson. They were commissioned in the 1930s to make the opera Four Saints in Three Acts to inaugurate the newly completed Avery Memorial and its purpose-built theater. Two 33 rpm records of the opera and are featured in Burr’s Chicks, 2008

One foot in the grave (reclining), 2010 references photographer Robert Mapplethorpe whose career is embedded in the Wadsworth’s history.A MATRIX artist in 1984, Mapplethorpe’s work has also been presented in exhibitions in 1990, 2015 and will be included in Be Seen: Portrait Photography Since Stonewall opening June 22, 2019. Burr’s portrait of Mapplethorpe (below) includes a postcard featuring one of the photographer’s black-and-white flower images and a small pile of soil evoking a meditation on illness and the AIDS epidemic.

“Tom Burr’s continual engagement with queer historical figures and modernism identified him as a strong choice for an expanded MATRIX project for the summer of Stonewall 50,” says Patricia Hickson, Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art at the Wadsworth. “Although most of these sculptures were made some years ago, the personas

they evoke resonate with the Wadsworth’s history in terms of collections, exhibitions, and programming. Burr has remarked on the noteworthy inversion of these departed figures’ ‘return’ to the Wadsworth as memories in the form of sculptures.”

Artist Biography

Tom Burr was born in 1963 in New Haven, Connecticut. Burr has exhibited in group and solo shows throughout the world since 1988, in institutions and museums including the SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, GA; FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France; SculptureCenter, New York, NY; Skulptur Projekte, Münster, Germany; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX; Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; The New Museum, New York, NY, and the 2004 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. The works of Tom Burr are included in numerous private & public collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel; Lenbachhaus Museum, Munich, Germany; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY.

Related Programs

Tom Burr / MATRIX 182 / Hinged Figures opens during Art After Dark, Thursday, June 6 from 5-8pm, and the artist will give a Gallery Talk at 6:30pm. A docent-led Art In Focus tour of Tom Burr’s Chicks (2008) will take place on Friday, August 21 at noon. Curator Patricia Hickson will lead a Gallery Talk on Thursday, August 29 at noon.

About MATRIX

Inaugurated in 1975, MATRIX is the Wadsworth’s groundbreaking contemporary art exhibition series featuring works by artists from around the world. From its inception, MATRIX has been a forum for art that is challenging, current, and sometimes controversial. Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities. Many MATRIX artists, such as Christo, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and Carrie Mae Weems are now considered seminal figures in contemporary art.

Exhibition and Program Support

MATRIX 182 is generously supported by the Howard Fromson Exhibition Fund.

The MATRIX program is supported by the Wadsworth Atheneum’s Contemporary Coalition. Sustaining support for the Wadsworth Atheneum is provided by Newman’s Own Foundation and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art 

Founded in 1842 with a vision for infusing art into the American experience, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is home to a collection of nearly 50,000 works of art spanning 5,000 years and encompassing European art from antiquity through contemporary as well as American art from the 1600s to today. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings–representing architectural styles including Gothic Revival, modern International Style, and 1960s Brutalism–are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students, and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm. Public phone: (860) 278-2670; website: thewadsworth.org.

 Image:

Tom Burr, Chick, 2008. Plywood, paint, steel hinges, canvas medical straitjacket, white rubber, steel drafting lamp, steel ashtray. Installation view. SculptureCenter, 2008. Collection of Shelley Fox Aarons and Philip Aarons. © Tom Burr.