Posts tagged with "art exhibit"

Immersive Shevchenko via Vladimir Kevorkov for Carol Fox Associates for use by 360 Magazine

Immersive Shevchenko: Soul of Ukraine

Lighthouse Immersive is proud to announce it raised $250,000 to support Ukraine through Immersive Shevchenko: Soul of Ukraine showings in multiple North American cities. Emboldened to assist Ukraine with its ongoing crisis, Lighthouse Immersive, the producers of the Original Immersive Van Gogh, arranged to have an existing immersive exhibit celebrating the work of Ukrainian artist, poet, philosopher and public figure Taras Shevchenko brought to North America.   

Premiering March 15 in Toronto, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Boston; April in Pittsburgh and Cleveland; ticket sales from Immersive Shevchenko directly supported First Theatrical Charitable Foundation, which focuses on humanitarian needs of Ukrainians with a specific focus on elderly arts and culture workers and other social priority groups who have been left without adequate support at this time and to the National Bank of Ukraine Fund.  

In 2021, Ukraine-born Lighthouse Immersive Associate Producer Valeriy Kostyuk, working with a Ukraine-based team including Producer Natalia Delieva, Creative Director Tais Poda, Composer Timur Polyansky, and Curator-Consultant Dmytro Stus, developed and launched an immersive exhibit of Shevchenko’s work in Odesa. Kostyuk sought to apply the artistry and innovation that Lighthouse Immersive practiced with Vincent Van Gogh to one of Ukraine’s most beloved cultural figures. He was able to work with the National Museum of Taras Shevchenko in Kyiv to obtain access to their collection of paintings, resulting in a one-of-a-kind sensory experience that President Zelensky himself visited before the war began. Lighthouse Immersive worked with the Ukrainian producers in Kyiv and Odesa to bring the exhibit to North America so they can share Ukrainian art and culture with audiences abroad while raising funds for a righteous cause. 

“I was happy to find a way to use my experiences producing in North America to promote Ukrainian artists,” comments Kostyuk. “Ukrainian culture is as beautiful and moving and important as the culture of any other country in the world, and Shevchenko is, in many ways, a father of the independent Ukrainian nation. I have been moved and inspired beyond words by the endurance and resilience of the Ukrainian people in this moment and I am deeply thankful to the incredible team in Ukraine who partnered with me on this project, as well as to the producers at Lighthouse Immersive for standing with me in this moment.” 

The war continues in Ukraine as invading Russian forces continue to encounter fierce resistance. Amidst the bombardments and firefights, workers at the National Museum of Taras Shevchenko crate away valuable pieces of artwork in the exact same containers used to shield them from invading Nazi forces in 1941 to hide the valuable national artwork from the invading Russian Military forces as gunfire erupts just down the street. An artist, poet, writer and political activist of the mid-19th century, Shevchenko was known for expressing themes of Ukrainian oppression by the Russian government in his art.  

“It was inspiring to see everyone come together to support the people of Ukraine and be able to donate to Ukrainian charities including the National Bank of Ukraine Fund, Ukrainian Red Cross Society, and First Theatrical Charitable Foundation,” says Lighthouse Immersive Producer Corey Ross

Taras Shevchenko (March 9, 1814-March 10, 1861) is largely considered a cultural trailblazer of the independent Ukrainian nation. Born a serf, Shevchenko was freed in 1838 while a student at the St. Petersburg Academy of Art. A master of Ukrainian painting/graphic art and a spiritual leader, Shevchenko was the founder of critical realism and the folk element in Ukrainian fine arts. Shevchenko’s creative output primarily reflected the socio-political reality of the Ukrainian people of that period and largely expressed themes of Ukrainian oppression by the Russian government and calls for Ukrainian liberation.  

About Lighthouse Immersive 

Lighthouse Immersive creates, produces and distributes innovative digital immersive art experiences through its experiential entertainment multiplex digital art galleries, aiming to cultivate community and creativity through large-scale events and exhibitions of all art forms. Lighthouse Immersive offers versatile spaces for creators to present their work while engaging audiences in unique art experiences that encourage dialogue and inspire new artistic creations. Lighthouse Immersive has produced the world premiere of Immersive Van Gogh, Immersive Frida Kahlo and Immersive Klimt: Revolution to more than 21 North American cities. Recognized as the leader in immersive art experiences, Lighthouse Immersive custom-designs each of their venues, named Lighthouse ArtSpace, to distinctly envelop the various architectural settings they inhabit. It operates galleries in a range of historic venues including refurbished industrial and retail spaces. Since 2021, the company has opened or is opening 21 new galleries in North American cities including New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Las Vegas, Boston and Denver, and is currently expanding into additional markets. To date, Lighthouse Immersive has sold 5 million tickets to Immersive Van Gogh across North America, with Artnet calling it “one of the largest coordinated art phenomena of all time.”

UKRAINIAN artist, painter, professor via 360 MAGAZINE

Yana Bystrova

Yana Bystrova is a third-generation Ukrainian artist, born to create undeniably conceptual, enticing pieces of art. Having her body of work showcased in galleries around the world, Yana has continuously stunned audiences with her meticulous creations full of color, concept and mixed media.

Listen to Yana’s full conversation with the 360 team on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

No stranger to pouring her countries rich history into her designs, we now see Yana’s paintings amongst the traveling exhibition Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993,” originally set to be showcased in her homeland of Ukraine.

Engulfed in the world of artistry since before she can remember, Yana often questions whether she had a choice on becoming an artist. Her professional ability has been evident from a young age; with Yana’s mother often telling a story about a painting she created in her adolescence. The piece, showcased at a children’s museum, was suddenly stolen from their home. Yana created the painting at the mere age of three years old.

Having doubted her position as an artist, Yana, too, experimented with differing professions before returning to her craft. She dabbled in design and programming, in which she gained mass success with. Nonetheless, she knew that the corporate environment did not suit her appropriately and went back to her original passion for creating art.

Amidst the ongoing war in Ukraine, Yana has been deeply affected by the destruction to her country. A daunting task, Yana spoke about the devastation she felt from hearing about the Russian invasion when stating, “It is horrible, I was in shock and very disoriented in the beginning [of the war].”

Yana’s thoughts pour into her work, evoking a new era of her works. She finds that her most recent paintings are a version of the distilled reality of the situation at hand. Each hue used in her art represents something deeper than the color wheel could ever encompass, it exemplifies the weight of Ukraine on Yana’s heart.

She often considers the conflict endured by everyone affected by the war; those who have fled and those who are still in the country. The situation at hand in Ukraine has had an everlasting affect on her personal and professional wellbeing.

“[It is] one thing is to be a tourist; another thing is to be a refugee.”

Her latest participation in the new exhibition “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993” was organized a few years back, postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Held at the Coral Gables Museum through October of 2022, the showing was originally conceived by the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. The project embraces a life of its own, taking a new shape and meaning modernly with the tragedy occuring in Ukraine.

Yana utilizes delicate use of color to personify her artistry, creating new narratives. In the way that verbal communication only accounts for a small portion of human interaction, Yana attributes color to bridging these gaps and expressing what cannot be stated in words. Often investigating new mediums for her artistry, Yana carefully crafts art that is theoretical and impactful.

Amongst her upcoming exhibitions, Yana has a New York residency opening on June 3. Entitled “Yana Bystrova: Approaching a Chaotic Reality,” the showing will be held at Gallery Arte Azulejo. A gallery walk will be sported on June 16 as well.

Additional resource on Yana.

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

Yana Bystrova Ukranian artist image via Yana Bystrova for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Exhibition created by Heather Shovlund from 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

ART IS × Pilar Zeta

NFT driven agency ART IS and Pilar Zeta welcomed VIP attendees to “The Space of Variations  solo exhibition on Saturday, May 14, at the Praz Delavallade Gallery in L.A. Presented and produced by ART IS, “The Space of Variations” marks Zeta’s first solo exhibition in the United States, following the success of her recent large-scale immersive artwork—”Hall of Visions— commissioned by Faena Art in Miami Beach during Art Basel 2021. Artworks are also currently on display HERE.

The Argentinean artist and Creative Director has manifested her aesthetic in numerous mediums from her fine artwork to music videos, album artwork, set design, and live performances, having collaborated with influential musical artists such as Coldplay, Lil Nas X, Camila Cabello and Katy Perry. Now with this ART IS partnership, Zeta moves into the metaverse. 

Through their partnership, ART IS and Pilar Zeta sought to transcend fine art’s traditional material limitations and explore infinite digital platforms and otherworldly dimensions. Zeta showcased physical works alongside animated NFT artworks produced by ART IS, each in dialogue with each other and presenting myriad variations of Zeta’s iconic egg forms, a universal token of rebirth and creation, and a series of arches that offer glimpses into parallel universes.

Physical artworks on display included oil paintings and large and small-scale totemic mixed-media sculptures (combining different semi-precious minerals such as opal, agate, jade, and gold). A series of animated NFT artworks was also presented, and opening night event attendees enjoyed the opportunity to interact live with the artist and commission customized NFTs, minted to their specifications by ART IS blockchain experts.

ART IS Founder Dom Wojnarowski said, “At ART IS, we are proud to partner with artists like Pilar Zeta, minting NFTs and producing digital and physical exhibitions to amplify their artwork in the Metaverse and beyond. This event encapsulates the value and utility that ART IS promises to our exclusive NFT collector community: unforgettable experiences with some of the leading new artists of our generation and first access to their remarkable artworks.”

Artist Pilar Zeta said, “ART IS was the perfect partner for this exhibition as they understand my vision and worked closely with me to capture the essence of each physical work of art as an NFT work that also unfolds in the digital realm.”

ART IS also partnered with Zeta to produce an exclusive NFT art series featuring her signature egg motif, with six distinct one-of-one designs. The series represents the third chapter in Zeta’s recent narrative journey, following “Hall of Visions” and “The Space of Variations.”

Leading with the egg’s central themes of creation, rebirth, spirit, and intuition, the nascent 1/1 NFT egg series entered the Metaverse on May 4, 2022.

Art Basel Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Primamore

Coral Contemporary Gallery will present an exhibition of Argentinian artist Maria Chiara Baccanelli on May 19, 2022. Titled “Primamore,” this exhibition reflects the striking spontaneity of Baccanelli’s work, characterized by powerful colors that decant into floral forests. The aroma of these bouquets comes off as in a sunny spring afternoon in the countryside and surpasses her creations, enthralling the viewer. This enchantment is also due to the strength that emerges from her canvases, thanks to a varied palette of bright, pleasant and energetic colors. To further enrich this experience, she adds ceramic sculptures of organic forms of exquisite elegance, recreating, in its entirety, a fantasy refuge where the power, appearance and light of color irrefutably prevail. 

Founded by Isabel Tassara in 2018, Coral Contemporary Gallery is a contemporary art gallery that represents emerging and established artists worldwide. The gallery works as a commercial space to buy art as well as a place to enjoy different art shows. All exhibits are planned, and most works are site-specific. The gallery works together with the artists to help them expand and show whatever they have on their minds. 

“By providing a space to immerse the public into various forms of art, the gallery serves as a place to contemplate, acquire and connect the art and the viewer, while expanding their boundaries,” says Tassara. “I consider it extremely important to love the art that we show and nurture an effective and trustful relationship with the artists that we work with,” she adds.

Located at 30 NW 34th Street in Midtown Miami, the gallery program not only includes exhibitions but also Artist Talks, discussion panels and gallery lectures, all free and open to the public. 

Coral Contemporary Art Gallery also has created the Coral Contemporary Store, which is an online platform to bring art closer to the public. The shopify store features artwork of over 30 emerging and established artists from all over the world.

About Coral Contemporary Gallery

Coral Contemporary Gallery, located in Midtown Miami, and founded by Isabel Tassara in 2018, specializes in contemporary visual art from Latin America. The Gallery works with young and mid-career artists, and incorporates artists of great renown and trajectory, favoring the link, particularly, between Buenos Aires and Miami. The gallery works with a select group of artists, and manages the exhibition, sale, and promotion of their works. It offers private tours, dinners, and studio visits, with the intention of generating an experience through art with its clients. Coral Contemporary Gallery also has a unique educational program that aims to nurture and develop the relationship between art, viewer and community. Artist talks, discussion panels and conferences in the gallery are some of the actions it develops. By providing a space to immerse the public in various forms of art, the gallery serves as a place to contemplate, acquire, and connect the art and the viewer, while expanding its boundaries.

IAM NYC Opening

IAM is the inverted experience of the self as reflected through the eyes of established and upcoming local and international artists. The museum’s mission is to showcase the various facades of New York City through an inverted perspective, forcing audiences to re-envision the city’s topologies and structures in a new and creative light.

The inverted museum welcomes its guests in the heart of Soho, one of New York City’s best-known neighborhoods for fine art and culture. The museum’s lobby acts as an orientation point, a place where individuals can gain more insight into various art installations and their historical relevance to the city. The IAM Inverted Art Museum encourages individuals to tap into the complex spectrum of human emotion while they traverse through an array of vibrant exhibition rooms. As they are guided through these thematic rooms, time halts, and guests become fully immersed in the singular moment of time as the visual storytelling of each exhibition unravels in front of them.

The uniqueness of IAM comes from the museum’s ability to capture a visual record of history, igniting feelings of nostalgia, happiness and curiosity in its audiences. Each room acts as a different urban landscape unfolding the various personalities of New York City. From the gritty to the luxurious, the uptown bound trains to the empty apartments in Billionaires Row, the unexpected nature of the inverted rooms can be described as physical surrealism, showing off the unanticipated and often illogical juxtapositions of the city’s identity. 

IAM recognizes that each unique piece of art acts as an entryway to the artist’s cultural, political, and socio-economic circumstances. Culture and art are created by ordinary people, and their collective experiences shape the perception of the world around them. Similarly, New York City’s art scene is multifaceted, a melting pot of artistic expression that transcends any physical bounds dictated by borders or bodies of water. The museum wishes to highlight each artist’s unique perception of the world through an inverted lens, encouraging its viewers to pause and digest each and every little detail that surrounds them. IAM hopes to be a place of inspiration for artists and visitors alike, allowing artists to create work as their full unique selves while promoting tolerance, respect, and equality.

Our exhibition rooms

  • IAM Statue of Liberty
  • Oversized Kids Bedroom
  • Authentic New York’s Antique Shop
  • Plasma Room inspired by Nikola Tesla
  • Diorama inspired by Stan Lee
  • LEGO® Bathroom

Exhibition rooms of New York Artists’ work

Staying true to its mission of visual storytelling, the IAM Inverted Art Museum is also prioritizing work installations by Ukrainian artists in the hopes of aiding those who are affected by the unjust war. A percentage of ticket purchases go towards rebuilding schools and helping kids in Ukraine. IAM works directly with a number of charities to ensure that all donations are going towards rebuilding Ukraine and aiding families in need. The museum will also hold an auction for a large-scale Ukrainian flag built out of lego blocks and 100% of the profits made from the auction will go towards war relief efforts in Ukraine.

The IAM Inverted Art Museum is also proud to be supporting Ukrainian artists seeking to come to the United States Under the O-1B visa, otherwise known as the Artists Visa. Selected artists will receive assistance with navigating through the O-1B petition process. Please note that we do not cover the cost of application fees or lawyers, rather we help applicants fill out their petitions as an alternative route to hiring a lawyer. Our team members have first-hand experience with applying for the O-1B visa and can help applicants with the completion of their own Visa application.

Although artists from all around the world are welcome to apply to this initiative on our website HERE, we are currently prioritizing Ukrainian artists.

Untitled via Adam Rabinowitz for use by 360 Magazine

THE OFFICE. – Unusual Perceptions

THE OFFICE., an experiential showroom founded by Matthew Chevallard, is launching an exclusive partnership with Memphis Milano as one of its only distributors in the US. In an exhibition called “Unusual Perception,” visitors will expect to see irrational shapes, unique patterns that simulate precious materials, and many other classic stylistic offerings from Memphis Milano furniture designers. From chairs to desks to lighting and shelving pieces, the public is welcome to browse 7 beautiful furniture selections. Among the artists displaying their work is Adam Rabinowitz, Maru Jensen, Eduardo Sarabia, Alyss Estay and Thrush Holmes

About THE OFFICE

Founded by Matthew Chevallard, a young collector and passionate supporter of the arts, in 2017, THE OFFICE. is in the heart of Miami Design District above OTL Café. This experiential gallery celebrates an extensive portfolio of vetted and rising artists such as Adam Rabinowitz, Matt McCormick, Thrush Holmes, Eduardo Sarabia and local Miami artist Jason Seife.

THE OFFICE. gives a twist to the concept of a traditional gallery, bringing in the concept of both fashion and art for guests to enjoy a unique lifestyle experience under one roof. Throughout the calendar year, THE OFFICE. showcases several groups and solo exhibitions open to the public. Its carefully selected artist portfolio provides a blend of regions and techniques to create a tranquil and alluring ambiance.

About Memphis Milano

The first collection of 55 products of the Memphis-Milano brand, under the guidance of Ettore Sottsass and the artistic direction of Barbara Radice, was presented in Milan on September 19, 1981 at the Arc ’74 showroom of Brunella and Mario Godani at number 2 Corso Europa. This was the period of the Salone del Mobile, and more than 2,000 people crowded outside the gallery, blocking the city traffic, for what immediately felt like an epoch-making event. The new language mixed elegance and kitsch, dialoguing with absurd and irrational shapes, using plastic laminates with patterns that simulate precious materials, but most of all it introduced the pleasure of play into the rational language of industrial production: Memphis-Milano quickly conquered public press and attention from all over the world.

Nadir Souiri via Gnazzo Group for use by 360 Magazine

New Miami Exhibits

In the Miami Design District, a new pop-up exhibition debuted: Metonym, by Nadir Souirgi, which displays paintings that challenge human positionality in relation to other animals. Additionally, an eclectic group of Ukrainian artists are featured in the pop-up exhibition: The Memory on Her Face Pt. 2 which addresses issues of national identity from creators Nikita Kadan, Lesia Khomenko, Nikolay Karabinovych, Maria Sulymenko, Vlada Ralko and Oleksiy Sai

Nadir Sourigi: Metonym | April 4 – May 27, Palm Court

This pop-up exhibition of new paintings by Nadir Souirgi challenges human positionality in relation to other animal realms through disorientation, interweaving, and framing. Souirgi’s work ranges from moments of ludic evolutionary force in Pink Light, where the background creates a levity to a scene that could otherwise be interpreted as simply agonizing, to moments of upturned abstraction which upon further examination reveal a code of phantom spaces and faces as in Carnival. The exhibit is presented by Bas Fisher Invitational as part of “Waterproof Miami,” a series of environmentally-informed projects done in collaboration with Bridge Initiative.

Ukrainian Artists: The Memory on Her Face Pt. 2 | April 2 – 25, Laverne Building

Presented by Voloshyn Gallery, The Memory on Her Face. Part 2 is a collective exhibition of Ukrainian artists. Addressing issues of national identity, destruction and renaissance, the exhibition highlights the artists’ take on historical events and processes, interactions between the past and the present, and ideas for the future. The first iteration of this exhibition, The Memory on Her Face, was presented in Miami between February 5–March 28, 2022. After the Russian Federation invaded Ukraine on February 24, the exhibition project gained new relevance. Documenting the events that unfolded in Ukraine over the last 8 years, the works in the show trace the physical

destruction and collective anguish caused by unfathomable events that demand global attention.

Amani Lewis | Baltimore’s Finest: Mr. Girlyoucrazy and Dev

Amani Lewis, known exclusively for canvas work, unveiled their first-ever mural in The Miami Design District‘s  Jade Alley. Being a Black and nonbinary artist, Amani Lewis creates works of art with the mission to move and inform. They pull from their personal adversity and social and creative circles to make stunning portraits that point out prevailing narratives and societal misconceptions. 

In the mural, Amani constructed a double portrait highlighting a creative couple from their hometown of Baltimore. Spanning a massive 40ft x 12ft, the mural depicts musician Mr. GirlYouCrazy and fashion stylist Devrene in tender embrace. 

Fainzilber | Melin Windows

This window installation comprises three photographic series: Somewear, 2014; Wild Flowers, 2016; and The Cookbook, 2019) by New York-based Argentinian photographer Lucía Fainzilber. Arranged in the Melin Building windows, these highly stylized visual compositions trigger an enhanced sensorial perception through a deliberate manipulation of the artist’s preferred subjects: fabrics, food, and color. As an immigrant female artist working in New York City, the experiences of cultural and gender difference inform Fainzilber’s approach to photography, and distinguish her idiosyncratic body of work. 

0.83 RP via Guggenheim Museo Bilbao for use by 360 Magazine

Guggenheim Museum Collection

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao’s Motion, Autos, Art, Architecture, covers over a century’s worth of automotive creation, exploring its multiple connections with the visual arts and architecture. The impressive selection of vehicles, works of art and architectural documents that it comprises, covers the main technological achievements in the sector and melds them with their enormous social and cultural implications.

Practically since the invention of the automobile, both its fabulous appearance and its association with speed, a sense of adventure, autonomy, modernity and progress seduced artists and architects to the point of quickly becoming a constant in their creations. Likewise, ideas and forms originating in the artistic avant‐garde impregnated automobile design, giving rise to the important collaborations of figures from art and architecture that we all know today. In addition to proposing a complete review of the nearly two hundred years of creation, the exhibition addresses the unstoppable trend towards electrification that the automobile shares with so many other productive sectors and even ventures to sketch out future scenarios for this industry. Scenarios that, according to the experts, share three major axes: the use of new digital technologies, innovation in design, and maximization of care for the environment through renewable energies and the circular economy. 

The car was born mainly to solve the problems of pollution and traffic jams caused by horse‐drawn carriages in the emerging big cities. At the time, internal combustion vehicles were considered the more sustainable option. Nearly two centuries later, we find ourselves at a similar crossroads, which, thanks to technological progress, leads us to the adoption of the electric vehicle as the most efficient and environmentally responsible solution. In reality, electricity has always been present in the history of automotive invention.

Right from the beginning, propulsion by means of an electric motor competed with prototypes based on steam and gasoline, and, in the 1830s, Robert Anderson developed the first fully electric car, which Sibrandus Stratingh designed and manufactured on a small scale.

This major exhibition of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, curated by Norman Foster, affords us a splendid opportunity to contemplate the past and present of this sector. It also acts to imagine a future in which the automobile goes even further in contributing to social progress and sustainable development—both of which are hallmarks of Iberdrola—while it continues to be the best example of the industry’s capacity to combine aesthetics, function and technology. 

Individual mobility is a major driver of our freedom. The most emotional and most-used mode of transportation is the car. And the car is here to stay. By 2030, the world of mobility will have undergone the greatest transformation since the transition from horse-drawn carriages to automobiles at the beginning of the twentieth century. The journey of individual mobility is exciting and greatly reflected in automobiles, art and architecture; and is being turned into an extraordinary experience in one of the most remarkable museums in the world. The exhibition brings together around forty automobiles—each the best of its kind in such terms as beauty, rarity, technical progress and a vision of the future. 

These are placed center stage in the galleries and surrounded by significant works of art and architecture. Many of these have never before left their homes in private collections and public institutions, and as such are being presented to a wide audience for the first time. The exhibition is spread over ten spaces in the museum. Seven galleries are themed in roughly chronological order. They start with Beginnings and continue as: Sculptures, Popularising, Sporting, Visionaries and Americana, closing with a gallery dedicated to what the future of mobility may hold. The remaining four spaces comprise a corridor containing a timeline and immersive sound experience, a live clay-modeling studio and an area devoted to models. Unlike any other single invention, the automobile has completely transformed the urban and rural landscape of our planet and in turn our lifestyle. We are on the edge of a new revolution of electric power, so this exhibition acts as a requiem for the last days of combustion.

Jean Debufet art via The Guggenheim Museum for use by 360 Magazine

Jean Debufet: Ardent Celebration

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration, sponsored by BBK, an exhibition surveying the defining decades of the career of Jean Dubuffet, spanning his first years of committed artistic production in the 1940s through his final fully developed series, completed in 1984. The exhibition is drawn primarily from the rich holdings of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and supplemented by important selections from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. At the end of World War II, Jean Dubuffet (b. 1901, Le Havre, France; d. 1985, Paris) began exhibiting paintings that defied entrenched artistic values. He rejected principles of decorum and classical beauty, along with pretensions of expertise. Instead, he looked to the commonplace and the unheralded, employing crude materials, mundane subjects, and a style that spurned any outward sign of academic training. In this approach, Dubuffet was challenging norms that he believed obstructed authentic expression and devalued everyday experience. However, his goal was not only to reveal how threadbare cultural conventions were; he also wanted to illustrate the vitality of life freed from them. As he once claimed, “I would like people to see my work as a rehabilitation of scorned values and… make no mistake about it, a work of ardent celebration.” 

Dubuffet was committed to this aim throughout his career, though he continually transformed the means he used to pursue it. He tested different mediums, including painting, drawing, collage, lithography, sculpture, and performance. Meanwhile, he moved fluidly between figuration and abstraction, explored multiple compositional strategies, and periodically reinvented his palette. Throughout these changes, Dubuffet’s work stayed grounded in its dedication to sharing new and revitalizing perspectives with viewers, as well as its refusal of convention. Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration will focus on this celebratory impulse, as it offers an overview of the breadth of Dubuffet’s production. The ability to present a full survey of the artist’s career largely from the collection of New York’s Guggenheim Museum is thanks to the close relationship the museum established with Dubuffet. The museum hosted three major exhibitions on the artist during his lifetime, including Jean Dubuffet 1962– 66 (1966), Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective (1973), and Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective Glance at Eighty (1981). The institution also collected his work in depth, beginning with the acquisition of the Door with Couch Grass (Porte au chiendent) (1957) in 1959. 

About Jean Debufet 

Dubuffet was born in Le Havre, France, in 1901. At seventeen, he began studies at Académie Julian, a respected art school. However, he soon became disenchanted with the curriculum’s distance from real-world concerns and dropped out. In the following years, he remained engaged with the creative community in Paris, circulating with artists like Raoul Dufy, Juan Gris, Fernand Legér, André Masson, and Suzanne Valadon. In 1923, he came across the work of the visionary artist Clémentine Ripoche, and the next year, he discovered Dr. Hanz Prinzhorn’s book Artistry of the Mentally Ill. These two encounters began Dubuffet’s life-long, integral engagement with art made by psychics, children, and people experiencing mental illness— a kind of artistic production he would later term “Art Brut.” For much of the 1920s and 1930s, Dubuffet worked in his family’s wine distribution business. It was not until 1942, at the age of forty-one, while living in Nazi-occupied Paris, that he decided to devote himself to being an artist. The works he made in the ensuing years were a direct challenge to commonly held ideals about beauty, skill, and the elevated status of art, as revealed in Miss Cholera (Miss Choléra) and Will to Power (Volonté de Puissance), both made in January of 1946. Dubuffet complemented this production with publications and talks in which he explicated his belief that the mechanisms of mainstream culture were moribund, stifling, and should be cast aside. Alongside his clear criticality, Dubuffet was experimenting with alternate paths forward, paths that he believed would lead to more fruitful, genuine modes of expression. During the 1940s and 1950s, he invited audiences to fundamentally reconsider the concept of beauty and demonstrated how worthy of admiration ordinary things could be. His work of this era delights in the qualities of quotidian and base materials. To emphasize the physicality of his paint, he used additives like lime, cement, or sand to thicken his oil paint into a paste he called “haute pâte.” With this medium, he could create deeply textured, complex surfaces, and he could shape his compositions in more immediately physical ways. Dubuffet sometimes went a step further in his explorations of materials, using found objects like rocks, rope, and, later, aluminum foil in his paintings. In parallel, he sought to overthrow socially enforced notions of beauty with nontraditional choices of subjects and the inventive ways in which he depicted them. This goal is particularly apparent in his early portraits, like Portrait of Soldier Lucien Geominne (Portrait du soldat Lucien Geominne) (1950) and his series of nudes, Ladies’ Bodies (Corps de Dames) (1950–51), but it extends to his depictions of frequently ignored objects, including dilapidated walls, rustic doors, soil, and rocks. From 1962 into the 1970s, Dubuffet pursued his most extended body of work, the Hourloupe cycle. These paintings and sculptures are distinguished by networks of interlocked cells, many filled with parallel stripes, most often in red, blue, and white. Though this cycle marks a significant stylistic shift, it continues Dubuffet’s commitment to constructively realigning his and his audiences’ engagement with art and the world more broadly. With the Hourloupe, cycle, which is represented in this exhibition with the works Nunc Stans (1965) and Bidon l’Esbroufe (1967), Dubuffet established a vocabulary that enabled him to create and explore an ever-expanding, fantastical universe, unified by its shared visual expression. It also allowed him to more pointedly take on phenomenological and epistemological issues. The intricacy of the patterning can lead to visual ambiguity, especially when multiple pieces are seen together. This enigmatic quality suggests the transience of what seems permanent and the contingency of an object’s supposedly defining form. Together these effects occasion a rethinking of the relationship between perception and reality, an aim that was of deep importance to the artist. For the last decade of his life, Dubuffet continued to focus on the workings of the mind, especially as they relate to the external world. By drawing attention to these mental functions, he hoped to inspire new, liberated ways of thinking. In the Theaters of Memory (Théâtres de mémoire) series (1975–79), Dubuffet established a vocabulary for expressing how the mind mixes perception, memories, and concepts as it tries to make sense of events and surroundings. His last two series, Sights (Mires) (1983–84) and Non-Places (Non-lieuxs) (1984), represented in this exhibition by Sight G 132 (Kowloon) (Mire G 132 [Kowloon]) (1983), and Given (Donnée) (1984), respectively, are characterized by tangles of lines and are largely absent of recognizable imagery. With these paintings, Dubuffet considered what experience would be like if the mind did not sort the outside world into preconceived, socially defined categories—extending even to the distinction between the real and imagined. Free of such constraints, the artist believed people would be able to access new, limitless possibilities of experience and creativity.

LA Art show via Birdman for use by 360 Magazine

Kaia Gerber × LA Art Show

The LA Art Show 2022 Opening Night premiere party was hosted by international model and actress Kaia Gerber, kicking off the Los Angeles 2022 art season. The event was held at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Wednesday, January 19 from 7-11 p.m.

Gerber, known for her love of fashion, art, and culture, was a perfect voice for the next young generation of collectors and a great supporter of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the LA Art Show. With a passion for fostering community, whether it be her social media-based book club or lending her platform to others for the sake of education, Gerber was an exciting addition to this year’s LA Art Show. For eight years, the LA Art Show has been a strong and unwavering supporter of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as it leads the way the world understands, treats, and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. In 2022, St. Jude continues to be the beneficiary, with 15% of all ticket proceeds going towards its lifesaving mission: Finding cures. Saving children.

In addition to food, beverages, and art, opening night attendees were given a special sneak peek of the LA Art Show’s exciting new programming. As opening night guests navigated the fair, they discovered some of the latest trends in art, experienced new technology, and participated in discussions about the ecological state of our world. The LA Art Show returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center from January 19-23, safely uniting the contemporary art community. As the city—and the West Coast’s—largest art fair, and one of the most diversely programmed in the world, the LA Art Show features a comprehensive lineup of local and international exhibitors ranging from traditional contemporary and modern art to digital art and more!

About Kaia Gerber

Kaia Gerber is a muse to many. She made her debut for the Young Versace ad campaign at the age of ten. Since then, she has worked with the likes of Chanel, Marc Jacobs, Isabel Marant, Loewe, Saint Laurent, Miu Miu, Versace, and countless other luxury brands. Having graced numerous international and US magazine covers, as well as being honored with the Daily Front Row’s 2017 Breakout Model of the year and the 2018 Model of the Year at the British Fashion Awards, she has established herself in the new generation of fashion icons. Kaia has swiftly made her mark, working with celebrated photographers like Steven Meisel, Inez & Vinoodh, Craig McDean, Mikael Jansson, and David Sims. She has been the face of campaigns for Marc Jacob’s Beauty and the brand’s Daisy fragrance since 2016 and has been a brand ambassador for OMEGA as of 2017. In 2018 Gerber became the face of YSL Beauté and partnered with the late Karl Lagerfeld to create the Kaia x Karl collection which combined Lagerfeld’s iconic Parisian chic with Kaia’s laid-back California style.

About the LA Art Show

The LA Art Show creates one of the largest international art fairs in the United States, providing an exciting, immersive, insider art experience to sponsors, their select guests, and VIP clients. The show attracts an elite roster of national and international galleries, acclaimed artists, highly regarded curators, architects, design professionals, along with discerning collectors. This innovative, exceptional cultural environment attracts executives and board members of Southern California businesses, state, county, and municipal government representatives, as well as leaders of the region’s cultural institutions. Attendees are trendsetters, influencers, and alpha consumers, who seek and demand the newest and the best in all areas of their lives—art, design, food, technology, and travel being specific passion points.