Posts tagged with "French artist"

black music month illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Stromae – Multitude Tour

Stromae continues to command audiences worldwide, as his North American arena tour sees new dates added and others sell out, including added shows at New York’s legendary Madison Square Garden and Montreal’s Bell Centre. A new show at the Shrine Auditorium has also been announced in Los Angeles.

Artist pre-sale begins Wednesday, April 6 at 10 AM (local) The pre-sale password is MULTITUDE. The general on-sale begins Friday, April 8 at 10 AM local time.

All previously announced tour dates are on-sale now HERE

Last month, the internationally acclaimed Belgian-born artist, writer, performer, producer, designer and director released his critically acclaimed third-studio album: Multitude. The album has been hailed by The New York Times, Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, NPR and countless other respected publications. The twelve-track masterpiece was composed by Stromae, produced by his creative label Mosaert, and features recent singles “Santé,” “L’enfer” and his most recent offering, “Fils De Joie.”

Multitude is available on digital, CD and vinyl, including special colored version for D2C. Listen HERE.

Ahead of his high anticipated Coachella appearances on Saturday April 16 and 23, Stromae will be performing live on ABC‘s Jimmy Kimmel Live! on Monday, April 11.

Multitude comes after a period of forced hiatus from the stage. With it came furlough and its silver linings: settling down, leading a more relaxed, structured life closer to family, making work exciting again, expanding his sources of inspiration, and, most of all, making what he went through worth it by reinvesting the dividends of this challenging phase into the core of new songs.

Far from any self-centered self-pity, Stromae took advantage of this time to identify more closely with others, putting himself in the others’ shoes. The unstable men in “La Solassitude and “Mon Amour,” the prostitute’s son in “Fils de Joie,” the depressed and suicidal protagonists of “Mauvaise Journée” and “L’Enfer,” the mismatched couple in “Pas Vraiment,” the invisible people in “Santé,” the suffering women in “Déclaration.” He embraces them all with kindness and altruism, providing each with a touching portrait.

By doing so, he gives the title Multitude a deep resonance, the same one that Walt Whitman conveys in his poem, of which Stromae bases the album off of: “I am large, I contain multitude, I am of every hue and caste, of every rank and religion.””Multitude is a window on the world, on people, and a rare moment of communion and pleasure to be shared. An alchemy of opposites, shaped by the will to testify without judgment or contempt to the human condition in all its diversity, and to the urge to explore the lives of others, sometimes your own (Que du bonheur on fatherhood, Invaincu on healing). Multitude is Stromae’s other way of exploring the world, while staying firmly attached to his roots.

Hold me tight 2 ©Vivi Film animation via Sara Bleger for use by 360 MAGAZINE

FIAF – ANIMATION FIRST FESTIVAL

The French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) recently revealed further installments to their 2022 Animation First Festival. FIAF, too, publicized that the animation festival will showcase a virtual programming of the animated film AN AMERICAN TAIL by esteemed filmmaker Don Bluth, with the US debut of the TV special THE MYSTERIES OF PARIS, revitalizing one of the earliest novel series of France.

The French animation festival commemorates its fifth anniversary in 2022. This year’s event showcases two programs: in person from February 11-13, and virtually from February 14-21.

Just Announced:

Past Announced Showcases:

About Animation First   

Serving as the single film festival in the United States that honors French animation, Animation First reviews the impacts of animation film. France serves as Europe’s leading curator and the world’s second runner up producer of animated film. The event aims to educate film lovers on the rich history of animation in France.

Jean Debufet art via The Guggenheim Museum for use by 360 Magazine

Jean Debufet: Ardent Celebration

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration, sponsored by BBK, an exhibition surveying the defining decades of the career of Jean Dubuffet, spanning his first years of committed artistic production in the 1940s through his final fully developed series, completed in 1984. The exhibition is drawn primarily from the rich holdings of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and supplemented by important selections from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. At the end of World War II, Jean Dubuffet (b. 1901, Le Havre, France; d. 1985, Paris) began exhibiting paintings that defied entrenched artistic values. He rejected principles of decorum and classical beauty, along with pretensions of expertise. Instead, he looked to the commonplace and the unheralded, employing crude materials, mundane subjects, and a style that spurned any outward sign of academic training. In this approach, Dubuffet was challenging norms that he believed obstructed authentic expression and devalued everyday experience. However, his goal was not only to reveal how threadbare cultural conventions were; he also wanted to illustrate the vitality of life freed from them. As he once claimed, “I would like people to see my work as a rehabilitation of scorned values and… make no mistake about it, a work of ardent celebration.” 

Dubuffet was committed to this aim throughout his career, though he continually transformed the means he used to pursue it. He tested different mediums, including painting, drawing, collage, lithography, sculpture, and performance. Meanwhile, he moved fluidly between figuration and abstraction, explored multiple compositional strategies, and periodically reinvented his palette. Throughout these changes, Dubuffet’s work stayed grounded in its dedication to sharing new and revitalizing perspectives with viewers, as well as its refusal of convention. Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration will focus on this celebratory impulse, as it offers an overview of the breadth of Dubuffet’s production. The ability to present a full survey of the artist’s career largely from the collection of New York’s Guggenheim Museum is thanks to the close relationship the museum established with Dubuffet. The museum hosted three major exhibitions on the artist during his lifetime, including Jean Dubuffet 1962– 66 (1966), Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective (1973), and Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective Glance at Eighty (1981). The institution also collected his work in depth, beginning with the acquisition of the Door with Couch Grass (Porte au chiendent) (1957) in 1959. 

About Jean Debufet 

Dubuffet was born in Le Havre, France, in 1901. At seventeen, he began studies at Académie Julian, a respected art school. However, he soon became disenchanted with the curriculum’s distance from real-world concerns and dropped out. In the following years, he remained engaged with the creative community in Paris, circulating with artists like Raoul Dufy, Juan Gris, Fernand Legér, André Masson, and Suzanne Valadon. In 1923, he came across the work of the visionary artist Clémentine Ripoche, and the next year, he discovered Dr. Hanz Prinzhorn’s book Artistry of the Mentally Ill. These two encounters began Dubuffet’s life-long, integral engagement with art made by psychics, children, and people experiencing mental illness— a kind of artistic production he would later term “Art Brut.” For much of the 1920s and 1930s, Dubuffet worked in his family’s wine distribution business. It was not until 1942, at the age of forty-one, while living in Nazi-occupied Paris, that he decided to devote himself to being an artist. The works he made in the ensuing years were a direct challenge to commonly held ideals about beauty, skill, and the elevated status of art, as revealed in Miss Cholera (Miss Choléra) and Will to Power (Volonté de Puissance), both made in January of 1946. Dubuffet complemented this production with publications and talks in which he explicated his belief that the mechanisms of mainstream culture were moribund, stifling, and should be cast aside. Alongside his clear criticality, Dubuffet was experimenting with alternate paths forward, paths that he believed would lead to more fruitful, genuine modes of expression. During the 1940s and 1950s, he invited audiences to fundamentally reconsider the concept of beauty and demonstrated how worthy of admiration ordinary things could be. His work of this era delights in the qualities of quotidian and base materials. To emphasize the physicality of his paint, he used additives like lime, cement, or sand to thicken his oil paint into a paste he called “haute pâte.” With this medium, he could create deeply textured, complex surfaces, and he could shape his compositions in more immediately physical ways. Dubuffet sometimes went a step further in his explorations of materials, using found objects like rocks, rope, and, later, aluminum foil in his paintings. In parallel, he sought to overthrow socially enforced notions of beauty with nontraditional choices of subjects and the inventive ways in which he depicted them. This goal is particularly apparent in his early portraits, like Portrait of Soldier Lucien Geominne (Portrait du soldat Lucien Geominne) (1950) and his series of nudes, Ladies’ Bodies (Corps de Dames) (1950–51), but it extends to his depictions of frequently ignored objects, including dilapidated walls, rustic doors, soil, and rocks. From 1962 into the 1970s, Dubuffet pursued his most extended body of work, the Hourloupe cycle. These paintings and sculptures are distinguished by networks of interlocked cells, many filled with parallel stripes, most often in red, blue, and white. Though this cycle marks a significant stylistic shift, it continues Dubuffet’s commitment to constructively realigning his and his audiences’ engagement with art and the world more broadly. With the Hourloupe, cycle, which is represented in this exhibition with the works Nunc Stans (1965) and Bidon l’Esbroufe (1967), Dubuffet established a vocabulary that enabled him to create and explore an ever-expanding, fantastical universe, unified by its shared visual expression. It also allowed him to more pointedly take on phenomenological and epistemological issues. The intricacy of the patterning can lead to visual ambiguity, especially when multiple pieces are seen together. This enigmatic quality suggests the transience of what seems permanent and the contingency of an object’s supposedly defining form. Together these effects occasion a rethinking of the relationship between perception and reality, an aim that was of deep importance to the artist. For the last decade of his life, Dubuffet continued to focus on the workings of the mind, especially as they relate to the external world. By drawing attention to these mental functions, he hoped to inspire new, liberated ways of thinking. In the Theaters of Memory (Théâtres de mémoire) series (1975–79), Dubuffet established a vocabulary for expressing how the mind mixes perception, memories, and concepts as it tries to make sense of events and surroundings. His last two series, Sights (Mires) (1983–84) and Non-Places (Non-lieuxs) (1984), represented in this exhibition by Sight G 132 (Kowloon) (Mire G 132 [Kowloon]) (1983), and Given (Donnée) (1984), respectively, are characterized by tangles of lines and are largely absent of recognizable imagery. With these paintings, Dubuffet considered what experience would be like if the mind did not sort the outside world into preconceived, socially defined categories—extending even to the distinction between the real and imagined. Free of such constraints, the artist believed people would be able to access new, limitless possibilities of experience and creativity.

DJ via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

DJ SNAKE × FUTURE

DJ SNAKE TAPS FUTURE FOR SPECIAL NEW VERSION OF “U ARE MY HIGH” 

Multi-platinum producer DJ Snake has recruited Future for a new version of “U Are My High” available via Interscope Records. Adding another dimension to this intoxicating banger, DJ Snake breathes fresh fire into the track. With a sample from iconic The Gap Band, the production instantly captivates as Future pulls up with an otherworldly verse and entrancing melody, blasting off with the hook. Watch the visualizer.

Earlier this summer, DJ Snake dropped “U Are My High” in its original incarnation “You Are My High.” Emerging as one of the year’s most viral dance songs, the latter exploded on TikTok, appearing in over 2.5 million user videos and tallying a staggering 4 billion-plus views. Meanwhile, it has cracked 100 million streams, posting up north of 300K streams daily on Spotify alone. It also continues a history of collaboration between these two superstars, dating back to DJ Snake’s historic headlining set at Ultra Miami 2017 when Future turned up as a surprise guest.

The most listened to French artist in the world, DJ Snake has also announced an exceptional hometown show in a place very symbolic to him: PSG’s Parc des Princes Stadium on June 11, 2022. A football fan and huge supporter of Paris-Saint-Germain, he will be the first to bring concerts to life in this legendary venue, which has not hosted a musical event for over 10 years. Tickets are on sale for the general public starting Friday, December 3rd at 10AM French local time (CET).

Watch the teaser video.

This fall, Snake continues to deliver unforgettable live performances across North America. Beyond holding it down with his residency at Zouk in Las Vegas, NV, he appears at festivals such as Decadence Festival in Denver and Phoenix on December 30, and finally Lights All Night Festival in Dallas, TX to ring in the New Year on December 31. Check out the full itinerary of confirmed dates below!

Tickets are available to buy here.

DJ SNAKE 2021 TOUR DATES: 

12/16 Saudi Arabia   Soundstorm Festival

12/28 New York, NY   Marquee

12/29 Los Angeles, CA  Academy

12/30 Denver, CO & Phoenix, AZ Decadence Festival

12/31 Dallas, TX   Lights All Night Festival

1/1 Las Vegas, NV  Zouk

ABOUT DJ SNAKE:

DJ Snake made his full-length debut with Encore, a 2016 album that reached #1 on Billboard’s Top Dance/Electronic Albums chart and debuted in the top 10 around the world. Since scoring his first #1 with the four-times-platinum “Let Me Love You” ft. Justin Bieber, DJ Snake has triumphed with such colossal hits as “You Know You Like It” (with AlunaGeorge), “Lean On” (with Major Lazer, featuring MØ), and “Taki Taki” ft. Selena Gomez, Ozuna & Cardi B. With its title translating to “the freedom to do whatever one chooses,” his sophomore album Carte Blanche arrived in July 2019 and shot to #1 on Billboard’s US Top Dance/Electronic Albums chart, in addition to reaching the top 50 on the Billboard 200. Thanks to the tremendous success of “Let Me Love You,” “Lean On,” and “Taki Taki,” DJ Snake now holds the distinction of being one of only two dance artists in the world to have three songs amass more than a billion streams on Spotify.