Posts tagged with "paintings"

Camera illustration by Allison Christensen

The Untitled Space’s Online Exhibitions

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Lola Jiblazee: True World Story,” an online solo exhibition premiering on Tuesday July 21st. Lola Jiblazee is a New York based artist from Tbilisi, Georgia who primarily works with acrylic paint and digital forms. Influenced in her formative years by strong female role models during Georgia’s Civil War, Lola developed a passion to echo the empowerment of women. Lola Jiblazee’s latest series “True World Story” explores hope, love, and courage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Isolated during the lockdown, Lola turned to social media and asked her followers to share their positive quarantine stories. Those stories inspired her latest series, with each painting including the personal story of her subjects.

Jiblazee grew up in the Republic of Georgia in the nineties during their Civil War. She had been under curfew and isolated, went without water and electricity, and was separated from loved ones for months. She struggled to overcome the PTSD that ensued but the experiences also made her stronger. Through her artwork, she attempts to convey how others can find joy in simple things which can help overcome tough times and remind people how beautiful life can be.

In addition, the Untitled Space continues to present “Tom Smith: STRIP” the first in a series of online summer solo exhibitions. In celebration of LGTBQ Pride Month, “Tom Smith: STRIP” premiered his fantasy installations on Tuesday June 30th, 2020

Indira Cesarine Studio and The Untitled Space showcase “The Labyrinth,” an installation and exhibition of works featuring photography, video, painting, and sculpture, as well as a series of performances inspired by the artwork. The exhibition opened with an artist reception on March 12th, 2020 featuring a special performance by renowned modern dancer Katherine Crockett. Due to the pandemic, the exhibition closed on March 13th, and the updated exhibition dates are June 24 – August 28, 2020 by appointment according to CDC guidelines.

There is also select artwork from Sarupa Sidaarth, Anna Sampson, and Chistina Massey on virtual display at The Untitled Space. Be sure to explore their digital galleries and look forward to socially distant viewings in person.

Brandon Lipchik illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Robert Grunenberg – Brandon Lipchik

The Robert Grunenberg Art Gallery announces their upcoming solo exhibition by Brandon Lipchik. The show will open on Wednesday, September 9th, 2020 and will be available until October 24th, 2020 in Berlin. In response to regulations concerning COVID-19, the gallery is monitoring the situation and will adjust the opening event according to the rules of conduct. Please stay tuned.

Brandon Lipchik’s work investigates the process of digital collage and painting within subjects of the male nude, queer identity, and Americana. He is often thought about in context with other contemporary painters which investigates identity between the sum of both real and digital spaces. Lipchik uses 3-D modeling software and other digital tools to reconstruct and re-stage figurative settings as a means to begin the painting process. During the process of translation between digital compositions to paintings, Lipchik emphasizes the importance of discovering new possibilities with paint as influenced by digital screens. Opposed to reproducing the flatness that the digital screen provides, Lipchik emphasizes areas of tactile and physical qualities of paint to simultaneously engage in a dialogue between tactility of real-world experience and the flatness and immateriality of digital spaces.

Follow Robert Grunenberg Berlin: Facebook | Instagram

Follow Brandon Lipchik: Facebook | Instagram 

Tom Smith, 360 Magazine

Tom Smith × The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Tom Smith: STRIP” as the first in a series of online summer exhibitions. In celebration of LGTBQ Pride Month, “Tom Smith: STRIP” premieres today, June 30th, and will be on view through September 30th, 2020. In addition to viewing Smith’s fascinating works, your visit helps support LGBTQ+ organizations. In particular, 20% of proceeds from sales of this exhibition will be donated to the Marsha P. Johnson Institute which organizes and funds programs supporting the black transgender community.

New York-based artist Tom Smith is firmly rooted in a generation of queer artists bridging our digital world with the tradition of painting. Smith spent the past 3 months quarantining in his studio where he created a series of 36 “strip paintings.” These meticulously hand-crafted pieces are made through a process of painting two works on paper in opposing colors. The paintings are then sliced into tiny strips and alternately glued to a panel. The end result? Each painting appears to be in motion or vibrating.

When asked about the suggestive imagery in the paintings, Smith comments, “In 2008 I made 36 fast drawings to unearth subconscious images. I immediately saw an unlimited supply of pictures connected to my sexuality without censorship. At the time I was openly gay but not yet comfortable showing pictures so apparently queer. At the beginning of the lockdown in New York I found the drawings and realized this was the perfect time to finish them as paintings because I had the time as well as privacy. Now that they’re finished I realize these things don’t just represent my own sexual impulses but that others see and interpret differently depending on their own imaginations.”

About Tom Smith:

Based in New York City, Tom Smith received a BFA from MICA, Baltimore, MD in 2006 and a MFA from the School of Visual Arts, NY in 2008. His work has been exhibited in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Ireland and Taiwan and he has participated as artist in residence at Largo das Artes in Rio de Janeiro as well as the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna, Florida. Smith is also the co-creator of DragOn, a drag and costume ball that has raised over $100,000 for HIV/AIDS related organizations in NYC. His work has been featured in publications around the world such as The New York Times, The Creators Project (VICE), Elle and Marie Claire (Taiwan) and The Sydney Morning Herald.

Detail of “Duct” by Artist Tom Smith, The Untitled Space Gallery, New York
Detail of “Quake” by Artist Tom Smith, The Untitled Space Gallery, New York

Tony Fitzpatrick – Inaugural Exhibition for CCMA

TONY FITZPATRICK ANNOUNCED AS INAUGURAL EXHIBITION FOR OFFICIAL OPENING OF CLEVE CARNEY MUSEUM OF ART

Jesus of Western Avenue, A Solo Show by Chicago Artist Tony Fitzpatrick to Open October 3 in Newly Expanded and Renovated Space

The Cleve Carney Museum of Art (CCMA) and McAninch Arts Center (MAC), located at 425 Fawell Blvd. on the College of DuPage campus, today announced that the museum’s inaugural exhibition, Jesus of Western Avenue, will feature more than 30 recent works by world-renowned multimedia artist and celebrated Chicago resident Tony Fitzpatrick. With work in the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami, Fitzpatrick has also created album art for music icons including Lou Reed, Steve Earle, and The Neville Brothers. Fitzpatrick is best known for his multimedia collages, printmaking, paintings, and drawings. The exhibition will run from Saturday, Oct. 3 to Sunday, Dec. 6 and will be free and open to the public.

Coinciding with the release of Fitzpatrick’s book, Jesus of Western Avenue, the exhibition will feature prints, drawings, and collages. These graphically rich and inventive works deliver messages and stories that reflect on the artist’s connection to Chicago, his social and political concerns and our shared changing reality. “While Tony’s artwork is deeply influenced by the Chicagoland area it is recognized around the world,” said Cleve Carney Museum of Art Curator Justin Witte. “Tony is one of the most well-known artists working in Chicago today and we are thrilled to be able to open our new space with an exhibition of his work.”

“We couldn’t think of a better artist than Tony to celebrate the opening of the new museum in an arts center,” said McAninch Arts Center Director Diana Martinez. “He is an actor, a writer, an alum of the College of DuPage, a world-renowned artist and was a close friend of the late Cleve Carney who is CCMA’s namesake, there is no one more fitting. We are honored to welcome him home for our inaugural exhibition.”

“It’s fitting that I have my final museum exhibition not far from where my work started. It’s fitting that it happens in a museum named for my dear friend and supporter Cleve Carney; he was a grand guy; whom I met while caddying for his father Marv Carney,” said artist Tony Fitzpatrick. “I chose to make art, not for a living, but for a life. Cleve chose to create opportunity and possibility for artists – myself being one of them. So much of my creative life began at the College of DuPage. I did my first acting here. I started to seriously write poetry here. I made artmaking my life here. This place has grown amazingly since I left. Mostly because of the great Hal MacAninch, another grand presence who led by example, and with great integrity. My fondest hope for my final museum show is that it honors these men. My city. And all who have passed through these doors.”

CCMA and MAC plan to implement timed entry and design social distancing measures into the layout of the museum in accordance with CDC regulations. Visitors will also be required to reserve tickets online in advance, in order for them to view the exhibition in the safest way possible.

About the Cleve Carney Museum of Art

The late Cleve Carney provided a significant legacy gift to establish the Cleve Carney Art Gallery at the College of DuPage. The gallery opened in February 2014 with its inaugural exhibition Selections from Cleve Carney’s Art Collection. The gallery will be expanding to a 2,500 square-foot museum, the Cleve Carney Museum of Art, scheduled to open this fall. The museum will maintain the standards set by the American Alliance of Museums. More information can be found at TheCCMA.org or by calling 630.942.3206.

About the MAC

The McAninch Arts Center at College of DuPage is located 25 miles west of Chicago near I-88 and I-355. It houses three indoor performance spaces (the 780-seat proscenium Belushi Performance Hall; the 236-seat soft-thrust Playhouse Theatre; and the versatile black box Studio Theatre), the outdoor Lakeside Pavilion, plus the Cleve Carney Museum of Art and classrooms for the college’s academic programming. The MAC has presented theater, music, dance, and visual art to more than 1.5 million people since its opening in 1986 and typically welcomes more than 100,000 patrons from the greater Chicago area to more than 230 performances each season.

About Tony Fitzpatrick

Tony Fitzpatrick is a Chicago-based artist best known for his multimedia collages, printmaking, paintings, and drawings. Fitzpatrick’s work are inspired by Chicago street culture, cities he has traveled to, children’s books, tattoo designs, and folk art. Fitzpatrick has authored or illustrated eight books of art and poetry, and, for the last two years has written a column for the Newcity. Fitzpatrick’s art appears in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the National Museum of American Art in Washington, DC. The Neville Brothers’ album Yellow Moon and the Steve Earle albums El Corazon and The Revolution Starts Now also feature Fitzpatrick’s art. In 2015, Fitzpatrick opened The Dime, an exhibition space in Chicago’s Wicker Park neighborhood. Before making a living as an artist, Fitzpatrick worked as a radio host, bartender, boxer, construction worker, and film and stage actor.

Featured Image: Tony Fitzpatrick, Jerusalem, 2002, color etching, COD permanent art collection, Gift of Cleve Carney

360 Magazine,art,Dennis Osadebe,design,exhibition,GR Galley,installation,Japan,Nigeria,nyc,Vaughn Lowery,ly painter,

NEO LUV

GR gallery is pleased to announce “Neo Luv” a duo exhibition showcasing new works by internationally known artists from Nigeria and Japan: Dennis Osadebe and LY painter. Dubbed after Ly’s main character “Luv” and Dennis own definition of his art as “Neo African,” the show will present 20 fresh paintings on canvas and two individual prints. Their work investigates and advance the discourse around the traditional cultural heritage, by decontextualizing, reinventing and mixing the old customs with new and cutting edge elements, pushing beyond the boundaries the figurative imagery in today’s art scene.

Neo Luv” aims to exhibit the creative output of these exceptionally gifted artists that, through a shared passion forimaginary characters, specific aspects of nowadays society, a unique color palette and a hint of melancholy, reinterpret thetraditional culture in two singular ways. This exhibition, esthetically characterized by Dennis vibrant, bright and alluring style, and LY’s more somber, contemplative and immersed approach, starts a discussion around contemporary topics such as cultural integration, economic exploitation and psychological conflicts.

For additional information regarding this exhibition go HERE.

five iron golf, painting, interior decor, nyc, 360 MAGAZINE

Why a Painting Is the Perfect Gift

For most of us, giving a present to a loved one means given the latest, expensive gadget because it goes to show the depth of our love for them. But do gadgets really express timeless love? Not in our opinion. For gifting something that would express your timeless love and commitment and how much you cherish your bond, paintings make it to the top of the list. You may wonder why a painting is the perfect gift. Well there are plenty of reasons why paintings are valuable gifts and here are some of them. 

Paintings last lifelong and hold more emotional value. But in addition to these, there are more reasons why paintings make a better choice.

Timelessness

When buying a present, most people wish to give something that will last lifelong. However, when items like gadgets, perfumes or such are given they last only for a short while and the essence of the gift disappears just as soon as the product becomes unusable. Even if it is something as expensive as an iphone it will certainly not last more than 3 years. 

Paintings on the other hand are priceless treasures whose value does not diminish with the passing of time. Of course new paintings are introduced in the art market regularly but that does not take away the value of the old ones even slightly. A painting becomes a steady and a permanent part of your life and its presence is something one never ceases to enjoy. 

Hence, if you’re looking for something that will forever remind your loved one about you and retain its value for years then a painting is truly the perfect choice for a gift.

Art Evokes Emotions

Gift items such as perfumes, gadgets, food items rarely evoke any emotions. Yes, they do make a person happy for that feeling does not last for a very long time. As long as a commodity is new and popular in the market, it gives a feeling of satisfaction to its owners, but once something better replaces it in the market, the value of it also diminishes in the eyes of the owner. The interest in using it is also thus lost. They also lose their place of honor in the lives of the people they are gifted to.

However, where paintings are concerned, people relate to them in their own individual ways. Often times, people can feel the emotions portrayed in paintings flowing through them. This is the primary reasons why paintings can make a perfect gift choice for someone. It is a great medium of expressing emotions.

Easy Maintenance and Eco-Friendly

Most other gift items are mode out of materials that cause great damage and harm to the nature. Look at gadgets for example. Not only do gadgets have to be handled with extraordinary care they also come with certainty of failure in future. Can one mobile phone function all of a person’s life? Most definitely not.

Paintings on the contrary require very little care by the owner. They can remain intact while being hung on the walls for years and still not lose their beauty. The only maintenance they require once in a while is for the dust to be wiped off. It really is that simple, eco-friendly and completely low on maintenance. 

Paintings Improve the Quality of Life

If the word of art lovers can’t convince you then science most certainly would. Art, as proved by science researches, promotes the quality of life and makes a person feel good emotionally and mentally.

A neurobiologist, Professor Semir Zaki from the University College of London says that when a person stares at an artwork, its effect is to stimulate the part of the brain the same way when falling in love does. The brain releases dopamine, which is a feel-good chemical when one falls romantically for another. In this process, feelings of affection and attachment are evoked which are quite pleasurable.

The same pleasurable feelings are evoked when a person closely observes great artworks. Artworks by Constable, Turner and Monet and masterpieces like Sandro Botticelli’s ‘The Birth of Venus’, are like therapy for the minds. 

Paintings also often motivate a person to positively change their ways of life. There are several paintings which portray moral ideas such as the painting of a Hindu Lord Krishna, uplifting and teaching a depressed Arjuna. Such paintings inspire the good in people and if your gift can do something similar for your beloved, how great it would be.

Paintings Also Have Affordable Options

It is true that original paintings usually require huge chunks of cash. But why not settle for the alternatives? It is after all the thought that counts, not the money spent that matters. Most other gift items do not come with affordable alternatives. If it is an expensive gadget you decide upon but don’t have the resources for, what would be your alternative? Possibly something that is cloned or a lower end version. 

This does not happen with paintings. There are multiple options suiting every budget range. You can settle for canvas prints, reproductions or posters. These alternatives only cost a fraction of the originals but do no compromise on any qualities which the originals offer except perhaps only the monetary appreciation of an original. But gifting your beloved a painting, you gift them a treasure that will last them a lifetime. What could be better than that?

Art is Treasure

With the passage of time, what is valuable today will become trash tomorrow. Paintings however, never become trash. They have their own way of becoming a person’s most valuable treasure which only increases in importance as the years advance. Any original but ordinary painting bought today can turn into tomorrow’s most priceless possessions, which rarely happens with any other item. 

One only needs to take a look around the art history for evidence. The most expensive and most sought after paintings today are the ones that were created centuries and decades ago. If you gift a painting to your beloved, you most likely give them a treasure for life.

Art is Personal

Gifts that hold personal value are even more special than the others. It is commonly believed that taste in art is considered personal. This works well when you want to gift something to someone you care deeply for. When you buy someone a painting suited to their tastes, you actually show them how well you understand their preferences, know what aligns well with their interests or reflect their vibrant personalities. This goes a long way in expressing the thought and effort you put in to make your loved feel special.

DREAMstate

Joseph Lee | Dennis Osadebe | Erik Mark Sandberg | Joshua Vides

September 12 – October 12, 2019

GR Gallery is thrilled to present “DREAMstate”, featuring for the first time artists Joseph Lee, Erik Mark Sandberg, Dennis Osadebe and Joshua Vides in a fresh, groundbreaking group exhibition. The show puts together 20 pieces, including paintings, works on paper and installations. The title is inspired by the unique creative energy that connects the four artists, able to forge, through different visions and techniques, an oneiric reality that misleads our visual realm.

Opening reception: Thursday September 12th, 6:00pm – 9:00pm(Exhibition Dates:September 12th– October 12th 2019). Members of the press can contact GR gallery in advance to schedule a private viewing and/or an interview with the artists before the exhibition is officially open. Visitors who want to attend the opening can RSVP by contacting the gallery.

Where: GR Gallery, 255 Bowery (between Houston & Stanton) New York, NY 10002 |  info@gr-gallery.com | tel: +1 212 273 2900

WhoJoseph Lee (1987, Indiana), Dennis Osadebe (1991, Lagos)Erik Mark Sandberg (1975, Los Angeles), Joshua Vides (1989, California)

DREAMstate” aims to exhibit the exclusive artistic approach of these four internationally known and trendsetting talents that are bringing new vitality into a specific technical and aesthetical idea, through the use of patterns, optical illusions, decontextualized images and ambiguous imaginaries that lead toward the creation of a new dimension. The strong familiarity of this with actual reality will destabilize the viewer, throwing him in a confused state of deja vu’. Solid bold lines, illusive interiors, surrealistic figures, hypnotic arrangements, thick brushstrokes, subconscious revelations and visual puzzling, will channel their energy into a clean and dreamy form that affects the whole environment, able to immerse the spectator into a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Painting by Joseph Lee

THIS VALENTINE’S DAY, MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES CELEBRATES LOVE!

*Featured art by Marc Chagall, Lovers in Grey (Jacques Lassaigne, m.194) 1957 Lithograph

Love is in the air this February at Martin Lawrence Galleries (MLG). All nine of its fine art locations (Soho, San Francisco, Las Vegas, La Jolla, New Orleans, Maui, Orange County, Schaumburg, Dallas) will be offering veteran and first-time collectors alike original and unique paintings, drawings, sculpture and limited-edition graphics from over 40 of the world’s most renowned 20th and 21st-century artists.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, MLG unveils works by Marc Chagall, Robert Indiana and André Masson, Among others. No expression of love is more eternal than a work of fine art.

“In our life, there is a single color, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love”. Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was born in Vitsyebsk, Belarus and his artistic view of romance and intrigue greets us in the captivating Chagall Les Amourex en Gris (Lovers in Grey), (Jacques Lassaigne, M.194)1957. Black strokes of the night envelope two lovers illuminated by the bath of light floating from the moon. With beautiful spots of bright colors masterfully placed about, the composition is light and fluid with a sense of movement and peace. The lovers touch their foreheads tenderly and gaze at one another though a grace and attitude that is purely and powerfully Chagall. This beautiful testament to the bond of love must be viewed to be fully appreciated

Honored for his distinct style and pioneering role, Marc Chagall painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. He worked in several mediums, including painting, printmaking, and book illustration, and his stained-glass windows can be seen in New York, France, and Jerusalem. Chagall emigrated to Paris in 1910 and began experimenting with Cubism, befriending painters Robert Delaunay and Fernand Léger. Chagall’s style has been described as a hybrid of Cubism, Fauvism, and Symbolism, and his supernatural subjects are thought to have significantly influenced the Surrealists. Though he actively engaged in the Parisian artistic community, art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He rightfully viewed his imagery and allegory as uniquely his own.

“It would be my intention that everybody should have love, and there are a lot of people in the world.” Robert Indiana

Robert Indiana (1928-2018) was an American Pop artist whose work drew inspiration from signs, billboards, and commercial logos. He is best known for his series of LOVE paintings, which employed bold and colorful letterforms to spell out the word “love.” “Oddly enough, I wasn’t thinking at all about anticipating the love generation and hippies,” he once explained. “It was a spiritual concept. It isn’t a sculpture of love any longer. It’s become the very theme of love itself.” Born Robert Earl Clark on September 13, 1928, in New Castle, IN, he adopted the name of his home state after serving in the US military. Indiana went on to receive his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1954. His work grew in popularity over the decades, with both his LOVE and HOPE motifs transformed into numerous public sculptures. In September 2013, the Whitney Museum of American Art proudly exhibited “Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE,” the artist’s first retrospective in New York.

The ‘Book of Love’ project was conceived by Robert Indiana as a portfolio of prints and corresponding poems that would make a definitive statement on his masterpiece LOVE, fulfilling his original vision as both a poet and a painter. Each poem has a highly raised embossment of LOVE, trapped in colors, just below the title, each poem hand pencil initialed by the artist.

Today, his works are held in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Gallery in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., among others. MLG is extremely proud to offer them to collectors.

André Masson (1896-28 October 1987) was born in Balagny-sur-Thérain, a town just north of Paris. A childhood spent close to nature made a lasting impression on Masson, and he drew inspiration from life and landscape imagery throughout his career. At age 11 he enrolled in the Académie Royale des beaux-arts and the École des arts décoratifs in Brussels, where he studied with the Symbolist painter Constant Montald. He first encountered modern art through the work of James Ensor before learning about the ideas of the Futurists and Cubists. At age 16, he was awarded the Grand Prix de l’Académie for painting. While in Paris, he became interested in Nicolas Poussin’s representations of mythological themes, subjects that he would later treat in his work.

During the early 1920s in Paris, Masson joined the new Surrealist group after one of his paintings had attracted the attention of the movement’s leader, André Breton. Masson soon became the foremost practitioner of automatic writing, which, when applied to drawing, was a form of a spontaneous composition intended to express impulses and images arising directly from the unconscious. Hi paintings and drawings from the late 1920s and the ’30s are turbulent, suggestive renderings of scenes of violence, eroticism, and

physical metamorphosis. A natural draftsman, he used curved, expressive lines to delineate biomorphic forms that border on the abstract.

Also included in MLG’s celebration of love are hand-signed serigraphs by Erté, the father of Art Deco, original paintings by Robert Deyber, whose works offer unique visual interpretations of clichés, euphemisms and idioms and Brad Faine, an internationally recognized artist and printmaker.

Please visit any of Martin Lawrence Galleries nine locations across North America, or visit them online at martinlawrence.com

André Masson, 360 MAGAZINE

Andre Masson, Pyramus und Thisebe (Les Ammanns Celebrex) hand-signed etching with acquaint, 15 x 18 inches.

MATRIX 181 × WADSWORTH ATHENEUM

MATRIX 181 at the Wadsworth Atheneum Features the paintings of 

Emily Mae Smith

MATRIX, the Wadsworth Atheneum’s groundbreaking contemporary exhibition series, has set some new goals. Upcoming projects will embrace experimental art, performance art, and explore new developments in painting. In looking at contemporary painting the Wadsworth found a unique vision in the work of Emily Mae Smith. The exhibition marks the first MATRIX show since 2013 to feature an artist who is solely a painter. For her MATRIX project, Smith engages with a masterpiece from the Wadsworth’s permanent collection: William Holman Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott (c. 1888–1905). Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181 will be on view February 7 through May 5, 2019.

 

Smith was chosen by Artsy as 1 of 20 female artists pushing figurative painting forward. With a nod to distinct painting movements from the history of art, such as Symbolism, Surrealism, and Pop art, Smith creates lively compositions that offer sly social and political commentary. Teeming with symbols, Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott (below) is the catalyst for this project, in which Smith provides a feminist reimagining of the narrative. For MATRIX 181, her first solo museum exhibition in the United States, Smith has selected seven paintings, dated 2015 to 2018, that relate to The Lady of Shalott, and created three new paintings, dated 2019, directly inspired by Hunt’s masterwork. 

In The Lady of Shalott Smith finds a familiar image, she’s had a postcard of the painting since she was a teenager. It became the perfect source to address the outdated psychology of female oppression, male authority, and implied violence, still pertinent today.

 

There is an uncanny affinity between the coded iconography of Smith and Hunt. According to Patricia Hickson, the Wadsworth’s Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art, “Emily Mae Smith offers a raucous and empowering retelling of The Lady of Shalott, leading with her eccentric broomstick avatar along with her usual toolbox of gendered symbols. She employs a refreshing, satirical approach to social commentary.”

 

Smith’s lexicon of signs and symbols begins with her avatar, inspired by the broomstick figure from Disney’s Fantasia (1940). Simultaneously referring to a painter’s brush, a domestic tool associated with women’s work, and the phallus, the figure continually transforms across Smith’s body of work. “The first broom I put in a painting was…a way for me to paint an object, figure, female, and phallus all at the same time. I thought it was funny and an ideal vehicle,” said Smith. “The ideas for my broom figure have changed and expanded since then; it has been molded to my painting needs. You can say more difficult things with a character.” Smith’s depiction of the female body is all visual wit and dark humor. By adopting a variety of guises, the broom and other symbols speak to contemporary subjects, including gender, sexuality, capitalism, and violence.

 

Artist Biography

Emily Mae Smith was born in 1979 in Austin Texas. She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She received her M.F.A. in Visual Art from Columbia University, New York in 2006 and her B. F. A. in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin. Recent solo and dual exhibitions include: Emily Mae Smith, Le Consortium, Lyon, France (2018-19); A Strange Relative, Perrotin, New York, NY (2018); The Sphinx or The Caress, Simone Subal Gallery, New York, NY (2017); Tesla Girls, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium (2016); Honest Espionage, Mary Mary, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (2016); Medusa, Laurel Gitlen, New York, NY (2015). Select group exhibitions include Summer, curated by Ugo Rondinone, Peter Freeman Inc., New York, NY (2018);Pine Barrens, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, NY (2018); Pharmacy for Idiots, Rob Tufnell and Tanya Leighton, Köln, Germany (2017); Women to the Front, Works from the Miller Meigs Collection, Lumber Room, Portland, OR (2017); Le Quatrième Sexe, curated by Marie Maertens, Le Coeur, Paris, France (2017); Scarlet Street, Lucien Terras. New York, NY (2016); Me, Myself, I, China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles, CA (2016); Surrreal, KoĴnig Galerie (St. Agnes), Berlin, Germany (2016); Untitled Body Parts, Simone Subal Gallery, New York, NY (2016).

Related Programs

February 7, Art After Dark: Color My World, 5-8pm

Celebrate the opening of Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181.  The evening includes an artist talk by Emily Mae Smith at 6pm, live music, free food, beer tasting, cash bar, watercolor workshop, and film. $10; $5 members.

 

March 9, Encounters: Emily Mae Smith and #MeToo, 10am

Join a dialogue that explores artistic responses to gender, sexuality, capitalism, and violence in the work of MATRIX artist Emily Mae Smith alongside the powerful, contemporary #metoo movement, which brings to light sexual harassment and sexual assault. Free, but RSVP to faculty@wadsworthatheneum.org to reserve a seat and lunch.

 

March 21, Gallery Talk: Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181, Noon

Curator Patricia Hickson leads a tour of MATRIX 181 discussing painter Emily Mae Smith’s flat, graphic imagery that visualizes issues like gender inequality, capitalism, and violence. Free with museum admission.

 

About MATRIX

Inaugurated in 1975, MATRIX is the Wadsworth’s groundbreaking contemporary art exhibition series featuring works by artists from around the world. From its inception, MATRIX has been a forum for art that is challenging, current, and sometimes controversial. Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities. Many MATRIX artists, such as Christo, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and Carrie Mae Weems are now considered seminal figures in contemporary art.

 

Exhibition and Program Support

The MATRIX program is generously supported by the Wadsworth Atheneum’s Contemporary Coalition. Public programs at the Wadsworth Atheneum are supported by the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Fund. Sustaining support for the Wadsworth Atheneum provided by Newman’s Own Foundation and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign.

 

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Founded in 1842, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States. The museum’s nearly 50,000 works of art span 5,000 years, from Greek and Roman antiquities to the first museum collection of American contemporary art. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings-representing architectural styles from Gothic Revival to modern International Style-are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm. (860) 278-2670. thewadsworth.org.

 

Images:

Emily Mae Smith images courtesy of the artist and Simone Subal Gallery, New York. Left: Emily Mae Smith, The Drawing Room, 2018, Oil on linen. Private collection. Photo by Dario Lasagni. Center: Emily Mae Smith, Still Life, 2015, Oil on linen. Private collection. Photo by Charles Benton. Right: Emily Mae Smith, Unruly Thread, 2019, Oil on linen. Photo by Charles Benton.

 

William Holman Hunt, The Lady of Shalott, c. 1888-1905. Oil on canvas. The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund. 1961.470

 

 

“YOUNG THUG AS PAINTINGS” EXHIBIT

During Miami Art Basel, Young Thug is teaming up with Netherlands-based artist, Hajar Benjida for their SCOPE Miami Beach installation, “Young Thug As Paintings,” an iteration that Benjida originated on Instagram (@YoungThugAsPaintings).
Originally a school project, Benjida’s “Young Thug As Paintings” pays homage to the cultural capital of Thug, by juxtaposing him with some of history’s most revered works of art. Each combination offers a glimpse into Young Thug’s fluid sense of style and musicality. “I jokingly answered an interview question with “I hope to discuss renaissance paintings with Thug someday.” 1.5 years later and I’m bringing my project to life together with Young Thug himself,” stated Benjida.
The exhibit will be available for viewing December 4th through December 9th at the 18th Annual SCOPE Miami Beach Art Fair. SCOPE is one of the most important satellite art fairs that takes place during Miami Art Basel. The exhibit is sponsored by Young Stoner Life Records and 300 Entertainment. “Young Thug is one of the most profound artists of this generation and we’re going to continue to celebrate him in the most innovative ways. Hajar Benjida’s display of Thug’s influence through art disruption is incredible. This is also a celebration of Hajar’s talent and her appreciation of the culture,” says Rayna Bass, Head of Cultural Marketing at 300 Entertainment.
Thug’s exhibit comes shortly after the release of his latest EP, On the Rvn, which featured surprise appearances from Elton John, Jaden Smith, 6lack, and Offset.
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