Posts tagged with "career"

Why Professionalism Is Important in Every Age – from School to Work

Skill alone does not make you impactful at work, school, or life as a whole. You need qualities that will help you inspire and impress others and fulfill your role to the best of your ability. One such quality is professionalism. 

Professionalism definition is consistently achieving visible and invisible high standards regardless of the role or profession. In other words, it is how you accomplish a task and not just about the task you do. It is about your approach to a role and not how prestigious the position is. Professionalism means you hold yourself accountable to maintain a high standard in assigned tasks. 

In our world today, the way you work, complete assignments, carry yourself, and the attitude you communicate to others create an impression. Although many of us would want to think we are professionals, bridging the gap between our personal and professional values is not the easiest. In this article, we will discuss how to be a professional in every sphere in our life. 

How professionalism influences learning 

Imagine you come to class late and turn in an essay assignment on the last day of submission as a student. But somehow, you always end up with one of the best scores. Are you brilliant? Yes. Are you professional? No. 

Professionalism in school is not a checklist of things you want to achieve. Say, for example, get the highest grade. Instead, the concept is a way of living that cuts across your communication, appearance, manner, approaches, skills, approach, and willingness to improve. 

Professionalism requires that you identify the importance of your role and what you must do. This way, you can act in the most acceptable way. Imagine you need to turn in a 100 points paper sample to demonstrate your level of comprehension in the classroom. The best way to reach professionalism papers is to submit the assignment on time and ensure it does not contain any form of plagiarism, cheating, and academic dishonesty. 

The punishment for cheating or plagiarism varies in severity depending on the rules of the college. So, you should do your best to check your written work for grammatical errors, typos, and related mistakes. Then, you will package it in the best possible way and submit it to your lecturer. A student with this type of consciousness knows there is no room for late submission or a mediocre mentality. Here are ways you can mark yourself as a professional. 

● Display competence: match your abilities with the requirement of any role to produce exceptional results. 

● Update your knowledge: Strive for mastery in your field by always adding to what you know. Even if you won’t need it, the confidence from your knowledge will ultimately help you succeed. 

● Stay conscious: set high standards for yourself to show that you care about your education. Also, hold yourself accountable for your actions and words. 

● Show integrity: don’t compromise your value as a student when things get tough. Instead, show that you are true to your word so that everyone can see you as genuine. Honesty will align your belief and your behavior. 

● Respect everyone: professionalism is not trying to impress anyone. Distinguish yourself as a role model with good manners by taking the needs of others into account. 

 Why professionalism at work 

There are only a few things that employers value more than employees who display professionalism while they fulfill their duties. You will come off as reliable and credible. Professionalism is performed in a context. That means it requires you to identify what is vital and necessary for each role. 

In organizations, you will work with people with different levels of knowledge, personalities, and background. Also, there will be levels of hierarchy and status. Therefore, a professional must see himself and his role in the contexts of organization, department, and team. This means you must respect the organization’s hierarchy and structure. 

A professional obeys codes of conduct, policies, and ethics when at work. However, you must ask for clarifications, especially in places that contrast your personal values. More importantly, you must always pay attention to detail, commit to upholding agreed values and practices and show respect. Below are how to be a professional in every sphere in our life

Values 

Again, professionalism is about how you do the work and not about the work. So, you don’t do things because you are told to do. The best way to get results at an organizational level is to let your professional values mix with intrinsic motivations. They include: 

● Sincerity, patience, honesty, integrity 

● Equality, respect, trust, discretion, and justice. 

● Hard work, balance, dedication, commitment, and perseverance. 

Willingness 

You must be willing to perform a task at the highest standard. For effectiveness, you should be open to learning and developing in a particular role. After gaining mastery, you must present yourself as confident without being arrogant. A professional is open to constructive criticism so that he can learn from his mistakes. Not only your mistakes, but you should learn from others as well. 

Professionalism is the willingness to do a bit extra by taking creative initiative. You should also display a willingness to see from different perspectives to yours and accept feedback to improve. Ask for help and listen to the advice. Also, learn to work individually and as a team. 

Behavior 

As a professional, you must set boundaries through your conduct and behavior. This means keeping your personal problems out of your work life. Also, you must be able to calmly make decisions and deal with problems. Unlike others and how they are behaving, a professional must maintain professional standards. Stay flexible, versatile, and collaborate with others rather than compete to show yourself a worthy professional. 

Conclusion 

The importance of professionalism at every stage of our life embodies a commitment to continual development. Therefore, you must seek to improve your competence and knowledge to gain a deeper insight into how things work around you. An awareness and acceptance of your weaknesses and strengths will help you grow and evolve into any role. 

Mixed media art by Vaughn Lowery in 360 MAGAZINE

Three Things You Should Know Before Starting an Art Career

A career in something you’re passionate about means every day at work can feel like an opportunity for self-satisfaction and personal growth. If you love being creative and artistic, then you may have considered a career in art before today and asked whether it was an opportunity for someone like you. The good news for would-be professional artists, is there are a multiple of fantastic ways to monetize your skills today. 

Everything from hand-drawn designs on Etsy to print-on-demand selling and custom art websites give you an opportunity to sell to people all over the world. You can even get hired by professional companies as an in-house artist for their branding and marketing campaigns. However, there are some important things to know before you jump in.

A Degree Does Help

While experience can go a long way in the art world, along with a strong portfolio, a degree can help you to unlock opportunities that other artists simply can’t access. With a degree, you can prove yourself to potential companies who might be willing to hire an up-and-coming artist to join their team. A degree also helps you to attract potential clients as a freelancer or business owner. Getting a degree might seem like a complex task, but with access to various forms of funding like Earnest student loans, you can find the cash you need and start your degree in no time. There’s even the option to learn online for some people.

Greatness Takes Time

The road to success for a lot of professionals can be very long, but for an artist, it often feels particularly complex. It takes a lifetime to build your craft, and there’s likely to be a lot of tears and headaches along the way. People can be cruel and unconstructive in the art world, and you’ll need to make sure you can achieve a positive mindset and that you are patient enough to move past it. If you really want to succeed in this complex space, you’ll need to focus on consistently working on your craft, looking for new opportunities, and building your network, so you can get your work in front of as many people as possible. 

Running Your Own Business Could Be Your Best Bet

Finally, while there are traditional hiring opportunities out there for artists, most find they get better opportunities in the freelance route. Today, countless platforms exist for different kinds of artists to offer their services with everything from custom portraits, to animation and logos. Running your own business could be the best way to make sure you’re constantly earning a source of income from different clients. However, there are pros and cons of being a small business owner, so this also means you’ll need to tackle the challenges that come with it, from learning how to market yourself, to making sure you keep an accurate inventory at all times. Becoming a professional artist won’t always be an easy road, but it could be worth it if it means you get to start a career in something you truly care about.

*Featured art by Vaughn Lowery

Netta Walker via Sarah Krick for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Netta Walker

All-American: Homecoming, spinoff series to The CW’s hit sports drama All American, recently aired the first episodes. Up-and-coming actress Netta Walker plays a large role in the series. She talked with 360 about the role, her life, and her career as an actress.  You can follow her on Instagram and Twitter, and you can find her biography HERE.

1. What was your upbringing like?

I grew up on Westside in Jacksonville, Florida with 3 older brothers (all 10 years plus older than me). We were military kids—my dad was in the Navy, he met my mom in Manila when they were basically teenagers. My mother moved to the states when she married my dad and brought all of her Cebuan/Tacloban culture with her to Jax. Culture, family, and tradition were wildly important in our house. Our Christmas meals consisted of crab boils, squid adobo, greens, lumpia, baked beans, sometimes chicken feet if we could afford it. We didn’t have much money, so on weekends my mom would set up a booth at the Romona Flea Market and we’d sell whatever she could make. At one point she was hand-making dresses for child pageants and had me walking around Wal-Marts with her while she handed out her business cards. It’s wild because my parents really taught us how to hustle and made sure we knew that culture, practical life skills, and intellect were the only things that couldn’t be taken from us. I attended two historically black schools in the area for both middle and high school. My middle school, James Weldon Johnson, was on an HBCU campus (Edward Waters University) at the time. Every morning we sang Lift Every Voice and Sing, and during PE we watched the University have marching band and majorette practice on the field next to us. My high school, Stanton College Preparatory, was the first school made for black students in Florida. Both were highly competitive academic magnet schools in all-black neighborhoods with black women principles—I got WILDLY lucky. My parents were very serious about my education, and my dad made sure I knew the importance of academics in southern black culture. He was one of the first black students sent to an all-white school in Jacksonville when white folk threw bricks at him for simply pursuing an education. He prepped me for a world that wasn’t guaranteed to be kind to me, he taught me that I’d have to work 3 times as hard to get where I wanted to and that I could never slip up. My mom was on the road to being an Olympic swimmer for the Philippines and was a model in Japan, but when she got pregnant pretty young she took to the life of raising us and making sure we would want for nothing. She taught me that love is what keeps us all connected, and that so long as I lead with love I won’t regret my life. I was raised by fighters.

2. What is your relationship with Chicago, the city you worked and lived in?

Chicago is the city that made me the artist I am today. I can’t praise it enough. I always saw Chicago as the place artists go to get better at their craft, because lord knows we don’t go there to make money or get famous. The love people carry for their craft there is outstanding. I’d tell any young person aspiring to be an actor to go to Chicago and study. Go to Steppenwolf or The Gift and see the greats do the work up close and personal, and then decide if this is the field for you. I’d never felt so compelled to be an artist until I moved there and got to see the work the artists there create. It’s hands down one of my favorite cities in the world and I plan to rep it as mine for the rest of my life.

3. Who are your biggest influences?

My family. My parents showed me that the world wasn’t always going to be kind to me, but in spite of whatever it threw at me that I could still do anything I put my mind to. My dad encouraged me to remember how smart I actually am and to never back down from what’s right. He was the biggest influence in my life hands down. I live every day for him, in hopes of making him proud. My mom taught me how to live in love and solely move in love, she is truly my heart, I’d do anything for her. My brothers are the coolest men I’ve ever met, for real. My brother Eric is 10 years and 2 days older than me, so I’ve been trying to be him since I was 4. I dress like him to this day and watch only the anime he tells me to. My brother Anthony has inspired me by standing in his truth his whole life, I never would’ve learned how to trust and love myself without him. My oldest brother AJ showed me that we can make life whatever we dream of making it. My family has shaped every facet of who I am today and I love them all so deeply for it, as much as they get on my nerves.

4. Why did you decide to become an actress?

I had an incredible high school theater teacher, Shirley Sacks Kirby, who saw potential in me and was the first person to seriously encourage me to pursue a career in acting. She made me feel like I was actually good at something, and I never felt that way before. I was content in fading into the background and leaving my emotions to the side in my everyday life, but in theater, I was allowed to express all my pent-up emotions. She told my mom to put me in dance classes and voice lessons and monologue coachings, she helped me write and submit all of my college theater applications and put together all of my auditions. She shouted words of affirmations at me when I felt insecure and told me that I was special and talented when I felt like I wasn’t ever going to be good enough. She was my theater mom, and I owe my career to her.

5. You’ve been an actor for several years. What has been your favorite role?

My favorite role is always the next role, honestly. I love the challenges of diving into a new person, figuring them out, and falling in love with them—and exploring new characters feels like falling in love. But strictly speaking, Ophelia in Hamlet (at The Gift Theater directed by Monty Cole) may have been the most cathartic and challenging. My father had just passed that summer and playing a woman who loses herself in the grief of her father was really visceral and scary, but that excited me. Monty is also one of my favorite directors to exist, The Gift is my artistic home, and Shakespeare was how I started acting—so that role meant an indescribable amount to me.

6. What is your favorite part about being in All-American: Homecoming?

It feels like I’m participating in history. These stories, it’s an honor. The characters and their relationships feel monumental to me simply because we’re at an HBCU and representing culture.

7. Tell us a little bit about your character on the show?

Keisha is trouble, there’s no doubt about it. She’s a very strong and intelligent woman who isn’t afraid to stand on all ten toes and say “This is who I am, this is what I believe, and I’ll fight you if you have a problem”. She’s a pre-med major with an intense passion for dancing and a deep love for those she allows into her life. She’s the type to give you the shirt off her back—but also tell you how you can get your own shirt so we don’t have to do this again. She hits very close to home. I adore her.

8. On your Instagram, it’s clear you’re a big fan of Japanese anime. What are your favorite shows/movies?

Ah man, there are so many good ones. In terms of classics, Trigun hands down, it gives me hope and serves the retro style and storyline I adore. Inuyasha was my first anime crush, so Yashahime has also been nostalgic and sweet. My big brother Eric introduced me to Demon Slayer because he thought Nezuko reminded him of me so that show holds a lot of sentiment (my brother honestly is the reason I watch anime at all). Of course Attack on Titan and Sword Art Online, they both make me terribly anxious but I can’t stop watching them. The Boondocks isn’t Japanese but it makes me laugh like nothing else, it feels like an intersection of culture for me. Guilty pleasure watch is fully Ouran High Host Club, don’t judge me on that, I’m a romantic!

9. What’s your dream role?

I think my dream role is whatever thing is next. Getting to act is already such a dream, but I’m always dreaming about what story I get to tell next. There isn’t a definitive narrative to the dreams, but I do love playing characters who would never be in the same room together.

10. What’s next for Netta Walker?

We’re gonna see! Hopefully, I can scam my way into some exciting movies or into some provoking plays in New York. I’ve dreamed of being on Broadway for as long as I’ve wanted to an actor, so fingers crossed that happens! I never know what’s next honestly, my career has lowkey felt like a fever dream. But I’m so excited to see what the future holds.

Muni Long 'One Night Only' performance poster art via Austin Thach for use by 360 MAGAZINE

MUNI LONG ANNOUNCES ‘ONE NIGHT ONLY’

Muni Long teams up with Femme It Forward and Amazon Music to celebrate her new music with a single ‘One Night Only’ live performance showcase in Los Angeles. Throughout the show, fans will have the opportunity to see Muni stage hits like “Hrs and Hrs” live.

Taking place at Moroccan Lounge on Valentine’s Day 2022, you’ll want to grab at ticket to see Muni’s impeccable vocality in person. Buy your tickets HERE.

Muni Long

Acclaimed R&B/pop songwriter and artist Muni Long has perfected her craft over the years. Originally known as Priscilla Renea, she began her journey with music as a songwriter for the likes of Rihanna, Madonna, Mariah Carey and Selena Gomez, working for the best of the best in the music industry. After making the decision that she wanted to bask in the spotlight for herself, she hit the scene as Muni Long, opening up her own solo career. Her debut EP Black Like This was full of innovative R&B/pop tracks about personal experiences with relationships. Muni released the Public Displays of Affection EP in November of 2021 with her record label Supergiant Records. This EP housed her viral hit “Hrs and Hrs,” which swiftly rose to No. 17 on the Billboard 100.

Femme It Forward

Producing musical concerts, festivals, content/music and more, Femme It Forward serves as a female-led entertainment firm that aims to lift up and showcase women in the industry of music. Nurturing inventive and inspired women in the field, Femme It Forward cultivates one-of-a-kind events to celebrate the power of women.

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

SPOTLIGHT: CARSON MACCORMAC

While chasing his dreams of becoming an actor, Canadian actor Carson MacCormac has established himself in the industry, and has plans to only expand his career as we head into 2022.

Carson can be found starring in East of the Middle West in the role of “Chris.” The film follows “Chris” as he navigates his life following his involvement in a fatal accident that leaves a mother and child dead. Through his interpretation of “Chris” in the film, Carson has been honored with the Best Actor award at the Montreal Independent Film Festival. Moreover, East of the Middle West was the closing film at the Chelsea Film Festival and won Best American Indie at the Fort Lauderdale Film Festival.

Carson additionally joined the cast of the withstanding Netflix series Locke and Key for both Season 2 and 3. The series follows the three Locke siblings as they work through their father’s peculiar murder. The siblings seek refuge in their mother’s ancestral home, also known as Keyhouse. Carson takes on the role of “Benjamin Locke,” a vague ancestor of the siblings, whose storyline is set in the 1700s. Season 2 of Locke and Key premiered in October 2021, and Season 3 premieres TBD in 2022.

Notorious for his role in DC Comics superhero movie SHAZAM!, Carson plays “Brett Breyer.” Carson can soon be found in the upcoming Netflix and Lionsgate thriller, Luckiest Girl Alive. 360 MAGAZINE had the opportunity to chat with Carson about his acting career, and what we can expect to see for the future of his career.

When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in acting?

Before I realized how much work it would take to become one. When I was a kid, I would sit and watch movies and think “I could totally do that.” Little did I know just how much training goes into becoming an actor with even a basic level of competency. However, I knew I would pursue it for a living near the end of high school. Interestingly enough, it was once I started having to seriously work at the craft that I fell I became obsessed. A career is a kind way of putting what I lovingly refer to as an addiction. Once I fell in love with the work my course was kind of set for me.

What is the process that you go through to prep for a new role?

A lot of writing initially. I have a 5-page cheat sheet I made to ensure I always flesh out my characters, but that is only usually the initial prep. The fun work comes in the imagining of who my character is and why. Writing I find helps me organize my thoughts. It also ensures that any fleeting ideas I have to add depth to a role are jotted down for me to refer to later. Physicality is an important one for me, getting a character into my body as at the end of the day, that physical work is the majority of what the camera picks up. When I get my head around a character, get my body into the role and get my lines down, I just let it all go and have fun with it.

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned from the acting world?

One of my personal favorites is the reminder to stay curious and imaginative through all assets of life. Curiosity of self, of others and of things is, in my opinion, one of the purest forms of purpose humans can have. Acting has forced me to question everything, oftentimes myself included, and plunge into characters with circumstances and motives far removed from my own. That curiosity I find is a stream to the more pleasant qualities of people such as empathy, perspective, and self-reflection.

What is a bucket list goal that you want to accomplish in your career?

I would love to star in something that I wrote. It would have to come down the line, as I still have a lot to learn as a writer, but to take a page out of Good Will Hunting, I think the chance to build-a-bear a role that I could then portray would be incredibly enjoyable. That, to me, is also one of the most terrifying tasks I can think of for myself, which is why I think it excites me so much.

What is your #1 piece of advice for aspiring actors/ actresses?

Number one is to always ask why. Ask it about everything, as curiosity and a questioning mind is what I found helped me grow the most as an actor. Another important one that I found helped me a lot is to not take yourself too seriously. Actors are asked to play make believe for a living, oftentimes in highly emotional situations. The industry and the world is going to be hard enough on you, and so I find it important to be forgiving and understanding with yourself if the industry starts to wear you down. Your instrument will grow much faster in a healthy mindset than in one that is self-deprecating or judgmental.

What was the biggest takeaway from being a part of “East of Middle West?”

Externally, a lot of friends. I wish I could have taken that whole cast and crew home with me back to Canada but alas, airlines have a baggage limit. Personally, East of Middle West helped me learn to trust myself. Our shooting schedule was incredibly fast paced, with emotional scenes and high stakes. With such little prep time, a large part of my process became just letting go and flowing within scenes and seeing what would happen. It was at first, terrifying, but as filming went along, I found it to be an incredibly freeing experience. It forced me to trust myself as our timing constraints allowed for no other choice.

How was your experience joining a withstanding show/ team on “Locke and Key?”

It helped that I could watch season 1 and get a sense for how I fit into the cast but more than anything, I noticed the benefits in how efficiently everything was running. Even with the added pressure that COVID put on the production, the whole set was one giant, well-oiled machine. Outside of the whole ‘acting; part of my job, I find that being on set can often feel like being a toddler sitting at the parents’ dinner table: don’t interject in the adult conversations you barely understand and make sure you stay in your spot and listen carefully to your parents’ direction. Locke and Key made me feel as if that internal child was being spoiled rotten at every step of the way. It was truly a joy to be part of such a talented team.

What role, would you say, pushed you out of your comfort zone the most thus far?

Maybe because it’s still fresh in my memory, but my upcoming role in Luckiest Girl Alive. It is such a far cry from anything I have played before, with stakes higher and more brutal than a lot of my previous work. Not to mention the director, Mike Barker, was incredibly gracious in allowing me to experiment with improvisation in my scenes. Scary at first, but with time thinking about ‘what can I throw into this scene?’ became something I looked forward to every day.

What can we expect from Carson MacCormac in the future?

Luckiest Girl Alive, as I mentioned, is coming out sometime in 2022 and I couldn’t be more excited for audiences to see it. I think this film is necessary, timely, and pushes the industry as a whole in an important direction. It also just happens to be one entertaining ride. I worked on a show premiering in January called Astrid and Lily Save the World and boy oh boy, is it crazy. The show is outrageous, wild, and I’m thrilled to be part of it. I have a few projects coming out in 2022 that I can’t quite talk about just yet… and another feature film being released in 2023 that I am very excited to share…. Stay tuned!

Jonny Marlow for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Image via Booksavvy Public Relations for 360 Magazine

Karen Gershowitz – Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust

Yes, You CAN Fit Travel into a Busy Career. It Just Takes Planning.

By Karen Gershowitz

I know what you’re thinking: Travel is opening back up and I’m itching to go. But when I’m drowning in deadlines and work and want to spend time with family and friends, how can travel possibly fit in? The answer is, with planning.

My career as a marketing researcher and strategist is intense. Yet in 5 decades, I’ve managed to travel to 90 different countries. Travel is my passion. Reducing or giving it up, even for work, is out of the question. These competing priorities have taught me to plan ahead and be creative.  I talk about some of the many ways I’ve done this in my memoir Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust.

At the beginning of my career, two weeks of vacation was the maximum allowed. I planned those weeks around long weekends to get the most out of them. Four vacation days became nine-day trips.

Another possibility I discovered is to rollover vacation time, allowing for a longer trip.  You might take one week the first year, then plan for a three-week trip the next. That strategy allowed me to go to Tanzania for a photo safari and then climb Mt. Kilimanjaro.

If you can afford it, consider unpaid leave. I did that for a trip to Australia that took me across the globe when after the flight and recovering from jetlag, two weeks would have been whittled down to just over a week of satisfying travel. That extra vacation time is unlikely to change your career trajectory and will leave you with memories for a lifetime. Negotiating extra travel time when taking a new job is a great tactic, and in this post- COVID world where labor supply is short, now might be the perfect time. Two weeks is far too short to satisfy a travel itch. In negotiating for extra vacation time when changing jobs—four weeks in total—I only brought it up after we had settled on pay. The deal with my boss was that the month had to be split into three periods scattered across the year. That worked for the company; my absence didn’t stop any projects from proceeding. It also satisfied my desire for travel. 

You might also consider taking an extended break prior to starting with a new employer. time off between jobs. It’s a magical time with no stresses about what you’ve left behind. When I negotiated for four weeks of vacation time, I also negotiated my start date. I gave myself a full month, which allowed me to take three separate trips–Hawaii, Spain and Puerto Rico. I began my new position fully rested, with a clear head and excitement about the work. 

If you do find yourself with a quiet stretch take advantage of it. Rather than fretting about not having work or creating make work, scour the internet for last minute deals. Traveling to a lesser known place may lead to fabulous, unexpected finds. Years ago, I went to Venezuela at the last moment and discovered nearly empty pristine beaches and an Italian village in the Andes.

Here are some tips for making whatever time you have enjoyable, worry-free and non-jeopardizing to your career.

  • Give everyone lots of advance notice if you will be gone for more than a few days.  No one likes surprises, least of all clients and colleagues. This gives them time to discuss what should happen while you are away.
  • Try to anticipate any issues, problems, or questions and make sure you’ve dealt with them before you leave. 
  • Update your boss and co-workers on any current projects in detail and in writing so they have a reference document if they need information. 
  • Make it clear that you will be unreachable during your away time (you don’t want to be brought back to “reality” while traveling).  If necessary, tell them wi-fi is likely to be unreliable where you will be staying.

For much of my career I have also traveled for business, both domestically and internationally. This allowed me to see the world while my clients paid for my flights and other expenses. If you are also lucky enough to travel for business, here are some ideas for how to experience the location beyond meeting rooms. 

  • Try to plan the trip near a weekend, then stay a couple of extra days. Or even plan your whole vacation in some desirable destination. I traveled for two weeks in Asia, following a meeting in Singapore.
  • Once virtual conferences become an option instead of a necessity, if you attend them and can choose, find ones that meet your needs and are in a destination you’d like to see. 
  • Ask local business associates what to see and do. Because they live there, they may have some great tips for restaurants and sites off the usual tourist routes.
  • Before going, look for events taking place while you’re there—concerts, ball games, walking tours, cooking classes, art or antique shows. 

I hate clichés, but where there’s a will, there’s a way really applies to fitting travel into a career. If you want it enough, plan ahead, don’t keep it a secret and enjoy every moment.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Karen Gershowitz, author of Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust, has been traveling since age 17 when she boarded a plane to Europe and stayed there for three years. She has since traveled to more than 90 countries, experiencing countless bold, once-in-a-lifetime adventures: climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, trekking atop an elephant in Thailand, hiking in the blistering heat of the Moroccan desert—and much more. While studying ceramics as an undergraduate at the Kansas City Art Studio, Karen proposed and received a grant to photograph ceramics studios, potters and their work throughout Japan. She later built a career as a marketing strategist and researcher with companies who sent her around the globe to conduct focus groups, interviews and meetings. She lives in New York City, but is a citizen of the world.

Tara Reid Image provided by Jennifer Gulley and Full Scale Media for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

Tara Reid Opens Up

Tara Reid burst onto the scene as the flawless blue-eyed babe of the iconic 1999 camp comedy American Pie, a Fast Times at Ridgemont High for twenty-something Gen-Xers and precocious Millennials. Her flawless all-American looks led to films from cult favorite The Big Lebowski, to Urban Legend, Van Wilder, Josie and the Pussycats, Dr. T & the Women and My Boss’s Daughter. She starred and held her own alongside Ryan Reynolds, Ashton Kutcher, Rosario Dawson, Kate Hudson, Richard Gere and other movie heavyweights.

And then… something happened. Reid was young, stunning and famous; and the media began taking more of an interest in her after-hours role as Hollywood’s resident party girl.

A painful public breakup with then-fiancé Carson Daly and a bout with botched plastic surgery further spun Reid’s public narrative out of control. She recently told E! news, “They almost make a cartoon character out of you, and they keep going with it,” referring to the rampant tabloid journalism of the 2000s.

The experience sent Reid reeling, and into a self-imposed exile where she learned to reflect, regroup, and re-emerge focused on her craft, and with a healthy sense of humor as she displays in her willingness to embrace the camp genre with the Sharknado film series. In addition to working in front of the camera, she’s added film producer to her resume, with an upcoming slate of releases under her production banner, Hi Happy Films.

The following are excerpts from internationally syndicated columnist Allison Kugel’s latest interview, featuring Tara Reid. The interview is available for re-publication in its entirety, or in select quotable excerpts.

On working with the late DMX on his last film:
“It’s a movie called Doggmen. It’s his last film and it was really interesting, because he didn’t get to finish the whole film. They had to do what they did with Paul Walker (in his last Fast & Furious role). They make these facial sculptures and they put it on a face, and it looks exactly like him. It’s crazy. The last couple of scenes that he has to film, that will be what they are doing. It’s incredible and it looks so real. So, that is how they are going to film his last scenes, and I’ll be in those scenes with him. I think everyone was absolutely broken by DMX’s [death].  He wasn’t just a great rapper, but he was a poet. I think he was one of the best rappers of our time, and this movie explains that. The last person that really did that was Tupac. I think it will be a great film. He’s a great actor, he’s a voice, and that mattered a lot to him. I think he will be really happy about how this movie comes out and looks. It’s DMX, and just to be a part of that history with him is pretty much incredible.”

On forgiving the tabloid media for how they treated her in the past:
“I didn’t [for a long time], and I was upset about it when I was younger. But I realized the only way I was going to grow and get out of that situation was to grow as a woman. So therefore, I do forgive them now. I have moved on, and my press has changed. I’m not angry about it anymore. When you finally let something go, it goes. It’s like taking a balloon and putting it up in the air, and it’s gone. I’m 45 years old and I’m not a child anymore. I’m not the little girl from American Pie.”

On one historical event she would love to witness if she could time travel:
“I wouldn’t want to change anything, but if I were to go back in time to a historical event that was fun, I would have loved to have been Marilyn Monroe singing “Happy Birthday” to the president [John F. Kennedy] (laugh). It was such a legendary moment.”

On freezing her eggs for a maybe baby:
“Will I have kids?  Let’s see what is in store for me. It’s not a no, and it’s not a yes. I have gotten my eggs frozen so there is definitely the potential of that. If it is meant to be, it will happen. If not, I’m very comfortable where I’m at.”

How prayer and listening to Deepak Chopra changed her life:
“I do pray, and who I pray to depends on what situation I am in. I pray to Jesus, but I also pray to my parents all the time. They are probably my number one. And I pray to my guardian angels; I pray to St. Jude, St. John, or St. Christopher. They have different meanings depending upon what you are in need of. I also listen to tapes by Deepak Chopra which has helped me tremendously. His tapes help you break down, ‘Who am I close to? Who am I? What do I want? What do I not want?’ And you really have to write it out in a diary form. My life started changing. A lot of us don’t know how to direct that positive energy, and I think that he is someone that really knows how to give that to you.”

Katie Sandler illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Motivation with Katie Sandler

How to Get Off Autopilot to Move Your Career (and Life) Forward

Katie Sandler, career development and impact coach, offers tips on how people can get things moving again

Millions of people feel like they are living their life on autopilot. This is the word to describe when day in and day out, it’s the same thing, to the point that many feel they are sleepwalking through life. Polling by Strada Education Network finds that many people feel stuck in their career and don’t know what will help them improve their circumstances. In fact, 32% of those people say they don’t even know where to begin in order to make things better and become unstuck. The good news is there are things that can be done to get off of autopilot and move your career and life along in a better direction.

“Oftentimes, people simply suggest training or educational programs in order to move your career along, but there are plenty of other things you can do,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “We need to get off autopilot in life as a whole, not just in our careers. Once you do this, you will become more successful and ultimately enjoy life a lot more.”

Those who feel stuck, both in their careers and in life in general, can take action to change those feelings. It all comes down to knowing what to do and how to get started. Sandler has helped many people to move past such a place and says some of the things that people can do include:

  • Get help. First and foremost, people need to start recognizing that you cannot do it alone and you need to hire someone to be a coach, a sounding board, and a catalyst.
  • Set the intention. You must set the intention and energy around creating new shifts in order to move in a different direction or at a different pace. AKA you have to decide to get off of autopilot in the first place.
  • Discover yourself. Recognize that you need to become familiar with yourself and your patterns of being – again, something you cannot do alone – in order to be able to make adjustments. This takes time, and it takes working with someone to help you see your patterns, to draw connections, to build understanding, and then to support you in reprogramming for desired outcomes.
  • Answer to yourself.  You also have to stop meeting society’s ideals, your family’s ideals, etc. and be open-minded and willing to do you, to be your authentic self and to honor what that means so that your career and life is filled with purpose and impact.
  • Making a decision. Oftentimes, people feel stuck because they are not sure what to choose. They consider various options and can’t decide what to do, so they don’t make any decision at all. That will keep you stuck, so make a decision so you can move forward with something.
  • Try new things. One of the most common reasons that people get stuck in life is that they don’t try anything new. They do the same things over and over, which ends up being autopilot. Make a point to try something new every month, whether it be for fun or for your career. This will help get you energized and so you can engage in life in a different way.
  • Start small. If you don’t like being stuck but fear making big changes, start small. Making small changes in various areas can add up to big results. Commit to the first small change, and then go from there as you get more empowered along the way.

“Nobody enjoys feeling like their life or career is stuck in one place,” added Sandler. “If that’s where you are, then it’s time to do yourself a favor and make shake things up. Working on honoring yourself will bring joy and peace to your life. Think of it as a gift to yourself, which ripples and benefits those around you as well.”

Sandler has provided professional support to many people to help them achieve their personal and professional goals. She routinely works with people to help them identify areas to focus on, paths for personal achievement, how to reach their life goals, and more. She also works with companies, providing impact trainings and workshops and developing and promoting purposeful and inclusive organizational cultures.

In addition to one-on-one coaching and corporate services, Sandler also offers low-key luxury impact retreats. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master’s degree in mental health counseling, has a strong foundation in mindfulness-based stress reduction, and has worked in hospitals and private practice. She previously spent time as a research assistant while at Johns Hopkins focusing on purpose in life. To learn more about Katie Sandler and her services, or to see the retreat schedule, visit Katie Sandler’s website.

About Katie Sandler

Katie Sandler is the popular Impact Coach and provides health & wealth coaching and personal and professional development. She offers retreats around the world, as well as private coaching and corporate impact coaching opportunities. She focuses on helping people become more successful so they can live with purpose and make an impact in our world. To learn more about Katie or her services, visit the site: her website.

Heather Ann illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Heather Ann

Dreaming the Impossible and Accomplishing the Unbelievable

Her name is Heather, and she is a statistic. Since the age of sixteen, she has been a statistic due to becoming pregnant with her firstborn son, Zachary. Heather had always believed that she would only be known as that: a teenage mom. She worked hard and graduated high school a semester early to entirely focus on being a full-time mother. Heather then put off college and any thought of childhood dreams because she felt they were unattainable. She worked minimum wage jobs to try and raise her son the best that she could.

Heather’s daughter, Tyanna, came along when she was 21 years old.  In that time, Heather found herself in an unhealthy relationship. She fought hard to pull herself and her children out of the situation; she eventually did. However, she found herself turning to alcohol to cope with the pain she had endured through the years. Alcohol became Heather’s best friend for over a year, and she was faced with losing her children and eventually becoming pregnant with her youngest son, Jaxson. He was her saving grace. An angel sent from above to remind Heather that she was worthy of love and that she was stronger than she had ever known. It took her a few months to get back on her feet for herself and children, but she did it with her head held high.

Fast forward to 2011 where Heather was working as a cashier at Walmart, barely making ends meet for her family. She met her now-husband, Joshua. In 2013, they became a big, blended family with six children. Heather gained three more beautiful children: Emmanuel, Lyric, and Benjamyn. Their children now range in age from ten years old to 22 years old! Also, Heather is a proud grandma to two beautiful grandchildren – Lydia and Jaxton, a.k.a. her Sweetpea and Monkey.

It hasn’t been an easy road, but it has been full of love and memories. Heather’s husband has been the sole provider for their family, sometimes working over sixty hours a week. It was decided that Heather stay at home with the children for many reasons. The most important reason was due to the emotional abandonment that Emmanuel, Lyric, and Ben went through due to their biological mother. Although they have learned coping techniques, it has been a stressful and emotional journey. It was always best for the children if Heather was available at all times for them.

In addition to the chaotic life they live with a large family, Heather’s oldest daughter was diagnosed with Chiari Malformation and Ehlers Danlos Syndrome in 2016, which led to an emergency brain surgery to better Tyanna’s quality of life. This is a lifelong disease with no cure, so there have been quite a few struggles for her to find her new normal. She will never lead a “normal” life; however, she is doing her best to make life fun, and that is all Heather can hope for. Heather also has these health conditions, but they are nowhere as severe as Tyanna’s are. Heather also suffers from a dead talus bone in her ankle, along with two collapsed joints surrounding that ankle. This has contributed to continuing on as a stay-at-home parent as well. Heather’s family is big and unique, but they are full of love, and that’s the best thing she could ask for.

Heather has spent years being unable to provide for her family financially. As a parent to six children, this has always weighed heavily on her. She has watched her husband work from four in the morning to close to midnight in the same shift. He is hardworking and very dedicated to providing for his family. In 2018, Heather decided to start exploring the idea of college. She knew that she wanted to be in something art related. Art has been a coping mechanism throughout life; sketching, painting, and inks are her mediums of choice. She believed that the career she landed with should be something that she loved and would be proud to do. This led Heather to enroll at Independence University to obtain her associate degree in graphic design. This career choice allows Heather to share her art with the world and also contribute to her family.  She has worked hard to keep an impressive grade point average while learning as much as she can about graphic design.

Heather will officially graduate in January 2022 with a bachelor’s degree in graphic design. She decided after a year into her associate degree that she wanted to pursue her bachelor’s degree. Obtaining this degree would open opportunities for Heather to work within public relations, publishing, and digital media businesses.

Heather had been asked by quite a few people why she wanted to pursue her bachelor’s degree so soon after graduating with an associate degree. Many assumed that she wanted to stay focused on her education; that is true. However, that was not the decision-maker for Heather. This decision comes from a life-changing situation that her family encountered at the beginning of 2020. You see, Heather’s father was taken away from her when she was three years old. She found him again when she was sixteen and had not been away from him since then. Her father, Mike, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as ALS, in March of 2020. This disease has continually cursed her family throughout the years. It has taken her great-grandmother, paternal grandmother, an aunt, an uncle, a distant cousin, and now her father. Heather always doubted that she would be able to attend college and succeed, but Mike was always the voice telling her that she could and that he was so proud of her. Mike was an amazing person and had always been Heather’s biggest cheerleader in life. She has many reasons to continue creating art; however, her passion comes from wanting to pursue more for her family, especially her father. She would love the opportunity to make him proud continually, even though he has been watching her from heaven since November of 2020.

In February of 2021, Heather took a big breath and reached out to Vaughn Lowery, President of 360 Magazine, in hopes of obtaining an internship through the magazine. 360 Magazine stands out from other magazines on many levels. 360 is an edgy fashion, lifestyle, and culture magazine. The founding members have over 30 years of collective experience both as notable talent and uber professionals within fashion, music, art, design, and entertainment. They are an LGBTQIA-friendly publication. Quality art content is the constant goal – No magazine like it is available today, constantly celebrating racial and sexual ambiguous talent and artists. Interning with 360 Magazine was definitely an opportunity she was ready to take on!

The morning Heather interviewed with Vaughn, she was battling the flu that was running its course through her household – she nailed the interview and started the next day! Heather continues to learn every day during her internship and through her classes. She has become increasingly more confident in her illustrations with Vaughn’s guidance. In addition to her internship with the magazine, Heather is also the Communications Director for her school’s AIGA Student group. She was recently nominated and is looking forward to learning her new role within the group!

While Heather stays really busy with art-related things, she really does enjoy doing other things! Her family has five dogs (Beethoven, Duchess, Ruby, Lucky & Alaska) and six cats (Pepper, Chewy, Tom, Jerry, Ebony & Dolly) that fill their home with fur and love. Heather and Josh try to hop on the ps4 a few times a week and play some Warzone. They have always been gamers! They enjoy having game nights, outdoor experiences, and hiking. Her husband is in the process of finishing their home gym – which they are pretty excited about it! Oh, can’t forget reading! Heather has a ton of books that she has bought over the years or have been given to her. She loves being able to curl up and spend an entire day just reading. Music. Music is her saving grace as well! Heather has such a unique playlist(s) – pop, country, r&b, hip-hop, rap… the list could go on!

Heather has a new mantra that she tries to tell herself daily: Keep going until YOU’RE proud. Heather has always doubted herself…but she needs to remember – like many others – that she needs to keep pushing and straighten her crown!

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Rob Kenner book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rob Kenner × Nipsey Hussle

Rob Kenner is one of the most prolific and influential voices in hip hop publishing and a founding editor of Vibe magazine. 

After meeting Nipsey Hussle in the offices of Vibe, Kenner spent the next ten years tracking the life and career of the hip hop mogul, artist, and activist. THE MARATHON DON’T STOP: The Life and Times of Nipsey Hussle by Rob Kenner (Atria Books; Hardcover; March 23, 2021; $27.00; ISBN: 9781982140298) ​is the first in-depth biography of Nipsey Hussle, whose transformative legacy inspired a generation with his motivational lyrics and visionary business savvy—before he was tragically shot down two years ago, on March 31, 2019 in the very neighborhood he was dedicated to building up.

Combining on-the-ground reporting and candid interviews with Hussle’s friends, family, and peers, THE MARATHON DON’T STOP traces the life and work of an extraordinary artist, placing him in historical context and unpacking his complex legacy.

Some details of Hussle’s life that Kenner can discuss in an interview include:

  • Ermias Asghedom, before he was Nipsey Hussle, was a brilliant, soft-spoken, and underestimated young man who loved hip hop with a passion and was determined to build his own successful music label and clothing business—as well as other businesses that would employ many members of his community.
  • His life in the Crenshaw District starting in 1985, placing Hussle in historical context within the evolution of Hip Hop, Los Angeles, and America.
  • Hussle’s genius as a teenager who built his own computers and went on to push the envelope of technology in growing his businesses as well as innovating new revenue models for independent musicians that have since been adopted by the mainstream music industry
  • Hussle’s life-changing trip to Africa to visit his father’s family in Eritrea, as well as his little-known first meeting with Afeni Shakur, long before he called himself the ‘Tupac of My Generation’ or even took the rap name Nipsey Hussle.
  • Hussle’s impact as an activist, and his efforts to re-align L.A. gang culture with the mission of organizations like the Black Panthers…AND MORE.

Rob Kenner is one of the most prolific and influential voices in hip-hop publishing. A founding editor of Vibe, Kenner joined the start-up team of Quincy Jones’ groundbreaking hip hop monthly in 1992. During a nineteen-year run at Vibe he edited and wrote cover and feature stories on iconic cultural figures ranging from Tupac Shakur to Barack Obama as well as writing the acclaimed column Boomshots. Kenner’s writing has appeared in ComplexGeniusMass AppealPigeons & PlanesEgo TripPoetry magazine, The New York Times, and Billboard. He’s also produced and directed documentary shorts on the likes of De La Soul, Nas, and Post Malone. As an editor at Vibe Books, Kenner worked on the New York Times bestseller Tupac Shakur and contributed to The Vibe History of Hip Hop. He went on to co-author VX: 10 Years of Vibe Photography and produced the book Unbelievable, a biography of The Notorious B.I.G. by Cheo Hodari Coker Jr., which was optioned for the motion picture Notorious.