Posts tagged with "humanitarian"

Skye Drynan illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE cover.

Skye Drynan

Skye Drynan has everything anyone could ever dream of. Surrounded by glitz and glamour and sparkle to whatever occupation she holds, there is more than meets the eye. Behind the physical observation, there is a powerful tour de force that the world will soon recognize as a household name, simply, Skye. From climbing the echelons of Wall Street, to researching mysteries in scientific labs, philanthropic pursuits, struggling with the pen-to-paper tasks of an author and budding song writer, to sharing her life in front of a live camera, and now designing and creating a fashion empire, Skye Drynan tells us exactly why “The Beast in You is the Best in You.”

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Skye Drynan makes a brief appearance inside 36p MAGAZINE

Covid-19 Impact on Artists

Story × Art: Alex Rudin

As we head into the eighth month of Covid-19, the distractions of apple picking, pumpkin carving, and outdoor dining are behind us. Lockdowns have long been lifted and social gatherings have become commonplace. The ominous inevitability of a deadly third wave looms. This guaranteed “dark winter” begs one to reflect on the early days of the pandemic. A time when fear, disinformation, and isolation plagued every household, no matter its inhabitants. 2020 has been a year of postponement, grief, isolation, and reckoning. Yet with struggle comes the opportunity for growth, change, and creation… If you let it. As Andy Warhol once said, “they always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.”

As a self-employed artist, uncertainty is a language I speak well. Prior to Covid-19 I spent my days in the School of Visual Arts printshop in NYC. From conceptualizing and prototyping new products for my business, Rudin Studios LLC, to fumbling around for an answer to the age-old question of “what to make,” it is clear I was lost in an artistic haze of looking for purpose. Then Coronavirus hit. Instantaneously everything turned upside down. Suddenly, I was in an unfamiliar town, without the ability to work (silkscreen), miles away from the studio I call home. I remained glued to the news awestruck by the infection and mortality rates. I racked my brain for something to do, how to help, what to make.

I became focused on those who were not as privileged as me. Those who were struggling to find housing, to feed themselves, to protect themselves from this deadly virus which was clearly and disproportionately hurting people of color. I began working on a series of paintings to be auctioned off, 100% of the proceeds going to homeless and trafficked youth in NYC. While the fundraiser was a success, I could not help but feel the conceptual aspects of the work were not important, relevant, or impactful. If I learned anything from my education at Parsons School of Design, it is that concept is king. My artwork slowly began to shift towards the idea of documentation. Buzzwords like “historical” and “unprecedented” flew across the airwaves and fueled my desire to capture and document the struggles of 2020. This was just the beginning.

Soon to follow were the atrocious murders of George Floyd, Ahmed Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, which brought racial justice to the forefront of the American conscience. While the President continuously fanned the flames of racism, the cries for equality and allyship were deafening. It was time to allow my artwork to reflect the times and struggles of our country which so deeply affected me and so many others. Black Lives Matter, and it is the white person’s responsibility to be educated allies; to use the privilege we are born into to advocate for our oppressed brothers and sisters. I wanted to help acknowledge, reflect, and correct the institutional racism that is so insidiously intertwined with our institutions and the American way of being.

Concurrently, the 2020 Presidential election was ramping up. Climate change’s incendiary winds pillaged the west. The wearing of masks became a polarizing political tool. And all the while, the current administration refused to acknowledge or accept responsibility for any of it. Rather shifting blame, denying, and lying became the governing practice. The global importance of what was taking place in the United States was apparent. Election 2020 was to be a reckoning. On the docket: racial justice, women’s rights, climate change, science, and healthcare, to name a few. A polarizing choice between Id and empathy.

For the first time in my career, my purpose seemed clear. I began making work that focused on the progression of human rights, equality, and fairness relying on my trusty formula of stylized portraiture and anecdotal commentary. I firmly believe that artists have a social responsibility to reflect the times we live in. The majority of my work has focused on uncovering and expressing truths about what it means to be a woman in 2020. However, one cannot comment on the feminine experience without addressing the current political situation and the oppression experienced by American minorities. While the Trump Administration continued to attack women’s rights, promote violence, ignore climate change, and fan the flames of racism, I relied on my creative voice to talk about the challenges we faced not only as women, but as a nation. That being said, I decided to devote my time to creating a series of posters for the 2020 election to help galvanize the female vote. This included partnering with Women for Biden Harris 2020, Women for the Win, and Article 3 among numerous other female-run organizations.

While the trials and tribulations of 2020 have forever altered the fabric of American reality, so has it altered me. A year such as this begs internal personal reflection if not metamorphosis. To find purpose, love, and empathy through the chaos of hate and violence is the silver-lining we all need. In a time where division is the name of the game, we must transcend the idea of the “other.” As the most recent Covid-19 wave surges across the country, I implore anyone with the creative impulse to say something, to do so. Pick up the pen. Document the times, the thoughts, the fears that come along with living through such tumultuousness. Follow the empathy, the creativity, and the voice inside telling you to advocate for those less fortunate. As Thomas Paine aptly stated, “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection.” If you find yourself in a place of privilege, take it upon yourself to seize the opportunity in front of you. It is not an opportunity for financial incentive or career advancement, but for internal revolution. Soon, life will “go back to normal,” but there’s nothing normal about what we have witnessed. Allow the intensity of experience to alter you. For when the time has come and gone, and you reflect upon 2020, wouldn’t it be nice to say that through all the sadness, grief, and fear a better version of yourself was uncovered?

Eminem illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

EMINEM’S MMF

EMINEM’S MARSHALL MATHERS FOUNDATION TO RELEASE EXCLUSIVE DOWNTOWN BOXING GYM COLLAB ON BLACK FRIDAY

Just in time for Black Friday, the Marshall Mathers Foundation is releasing a limited-edition line of clothing for a good cause. The designs also make a nod to “Stan” and the 20th anniversary of The Marshall Mathers LP. 

The Marshall Mathers Foundation x DBG #Stan #MMLP collab on Carhartt gear will raise funds to help the Downtown Boxing Gym (DBG Detroit) knock out COVID-19 related learning loss. DBG is a free academic and athletic program on Detroit’s east side that’s working around the clock to prevent students from falling behind during the pandemic. 

“We’re facing a crisis like we’ve never seen and we’re doing everything we can to support our kids and help them make it through,” said Khali Sweeney, DBG’s founder and CEO. “To have Eminem and the Marshall Mathers Foundation step up during this time and help raise much needed funds means the world to us. This is what we do in the D. We take care of each other. And we are truly grateful.” 

Royce Da 5’9”, Director of Community Engagement and Social Justice Initiatives for The Marshall Mathers Foundation, said: “I’ve experienced firsthand the discipline, commitment, and focus that boxing training instills in young people. I’m passionate about the sport, and I’m passionate about the role that DBG plays in our community.  We need to make sure the important work they do continues.” 

The t-shirts and hoodies sell for $30 and $60 and are available online at the Eminem Store (shop.eminem.com) while supplies last. 100% of the proceeds will support DBG’s tutoring, mentorship, enrichment programs, college and career prep, social-emotional skills building, and basic needs support like transportation, meals, and more. Learn more at dbgdetroit.org

The Marshall Mathers Foundation is a charitable organization dedicated to disadvantaged and at-risk youth in Detroit, Michigan and its surrounding communities. Our mission has expanded to stand as an ally in the fight against social injustice and for racial equality nationwide.  

Isabelle Fries makes a brief splash inside 360 MAGAZINE

ISABELLE FRIES

At 22 years old, Isabelle Fries has started to make a name for herself in the music industry. Not only is she gifted in her art, she has an extremely large heart.

Born in Sydney, but raised in Denver, Colorado, Fries found her inclination for singing at a young age. “I knew I wanted music to be a part of my life since I was about 7, but as I got older I was able to recognize that it is a labor of love for me,” she expressed. “I have never searched for fame through my music.” 

Not long after, she discovered her heart had room for another love, philanthropy. At just 15 years old, Fries became the first youth board member and youth leader for the Global Livingston Institute (GLI) an NGO in Uganda who’s mission is to educate students & community leaders on innovative approaches to international development and empower awareness, collaboration, conversations and personal growth. 

Through working with this organization, Isabelle travelled to Uganda to teach, perform and empower. In 2017, Fries performed in front of 20,000 people in Uganda at the annual iKnow HIV Awareness Concert Series along with other musicians from around the world, using music to breakdown barriers, bring people together and provide free medical testing and awareness for HIV for over 8,500 Ugandans.  

“I became a part of GLI when I was 15 and fully threw myself into their mission and their work. It is what opened my eyes to one of my passions I am now pursuing in international education. They really focus on young voices and drawing on perspectives from all types of individuals which is why I was asked to be on the board at such a young age. GLI is truly one of the most important things in my life so I could not be more thankful to be a part of it.” 

This wasn’t the only organization Fries carried out philanthropic work with. She volunteered in Haiti with The Road to Hope, an International Affairs Intern with Creative Visions in Malibu, California and a community worker with CEPIA in Costa Rica.

Isabelle still wanted to do more for Eastern African communities. She founded the “Bulamu Raise Your Voice Community Foundation (BCF)” and was able to draw on inspiration from one of her other life-long devotions: swimming. 

For twelve years, she swam competitively breaking records, winning State Championships and being a leader on her teams until complications from several autoimmune disorders forced her out of the water. This was never a part of her plan, but she was able to alter her life’s path and kept pushing through

“It is not something that I let control my life or hold me back from living. I take care of myself in every way I can and find strength in what I am able to do and learn new ways to improve my way of life,” she expressed. 

One of Fries’ missions with both GLI and BCF is to raise awareness for water safety on Lake Bunyonyi in Uganda by teaching swimming to prevent drownings. By working closely with GLI and the headmaster of the Kazi Primary School, Fries has been able to carry out this initiative, as well as implementing academic, music and sports curriculum.  

She said that the community of Lake Bunyonyi changed her life by seeing how they are such powerful and driven people. “I don’t go for my own benefit or to be a ‘white savior’ ,” she asserted. “When I work in Uganda, I give the individuals I work with support and resources and they truly do the rest.”

Isabelle was fortunate enough to meet one of her long time role models, Michael Phelps. Fostering a relationship with someone who has shaped her life in so many ways in and out of the water has been such a blessing, says Fries. This lead to her working with the Michael Phelps Foudation (MPF), where she took the opportunity to become certified in their “IM Water Safety Program” which is implemented in The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

When given the opportunity again to combine her music and philanthropy through the MPF, she couldn’t resist. Isabelle was asked to open for country singer, Eric Church, at a MPF benefit concert in Chicago at the iconic Arcada Theater. “Swimming is an incredibly big part of my life as I was a serious competitive swimmer from the ages of 5 to 18, therefor having the chance to combine my music with my love and passion for swimming and water safety was very special and meaningful.” 

Now a recent graduate of The University of Southern California, Fries splits her time living between Denver and Los Angeles, continuing to pursue her passions: music and philanthropy, while working in Denver at a non-profit dedicated to mentoring students. Isabelle holds a degree in International Relations with minors in Spanish as well as  Non-Profits, Philanthropy and Volunteerism. 

While studying at USC, Isabelle was fortunate enough to catch the eye of Grammy-winning, multi-platinum producer/mixer Rob Chiarelli, who she’s fostered an incredibly close relationship with. 

She began releasing music signed with Chiarelli’s label Streetlamp records this year, already finding a widespread and loyal audience across all music platforms using her rich, soulful vocal that could be compared to the sound of Lauren Daigle or Adele. She recently released her 6th single, a raw piano ballad called “All We Had. When people listen to her music, Fries always wants to make them truly feel – whatever that feeling may be. Through channeling lyrics with her songwriters from her own life experiences, the emotions she is able to elicit are special to her. 

While the music may be interpreted differently for each unique individual, her raw style is something she hopes help guide those listeners on whatever journey they want to take. “I’ve always said, I love music because it lets you feel something you didn’t think you could.”

This is definitely something she mirrors artistically with one of her musical inspirations, Amy Winehouse. Growing up performing jazz music, Fries describes this genre as a big part of her musical identity, so she was instantly drawn to Winehouse’s style which she catalogs as “authentic, raw and groundbreaking. Amy created music unapologetically.”

But Fries’ number one music icon is Sir Elton John. “His music was always around me when I was growing up. My parents loved all music from that time and exposed me to it at a very young age which is one of the reasons it is the type of music I love the most. 

However, Elton John’s music was different for me, it felt like poetry and real emotion. His sound and songs are like stories that you never want to end. When I began to listen to him more I realized this is the type of music I want to sing and be a part of.” 

Feeling very blessed to have found such a supportive team, guiding her in finally being able to put her own original songs out there into the world, she is excited to evolve using her music to help create change, perform live again, and continue to build upon her body of work. While she’s away in the studio recording, we’ll be out here patiently waiting for more music, while she continues to use her voice to make the world a better place. 

American Cancer Society charity digital pop up for MCM illustration by Maria Soloman for 360 MAGAZINE

MCM x ACS

By Armon Hayes

On Wednesday, October 14 MCM and style architect Misa Hylton will go LIVE promptly at 10:55am from Soho for an exclusive virtual shopping event. An RSVP only experience for their partnership with the American Cancer Society; together they fight relentlessly for a world free of Cancer. This year, I was welcomed to support the first-ever virtual shopping event, hosted by iconic stylist and MCM’s Global Creative Partner, Misa Hylton. With intense purpose, she inspires us by remixing her vision with functionality. Provided with live updates leading up to the event via text, coupled with the means to interact and shop look-book in a touchless society.

How it works: 

Request desired favorites with SKU and await an invoice by email to complete transaction. 20% of proceeds from sales of this event will be donated to support the ACS. The 30-minute live event will feature MCM’s Fall 2020 pink assortment. At 11am the full assortment preview will begin, followed by a Q&A from Hylton. Qualifying orders will additionally receive a gift. Misa will style six looks on-model and show different ways you can wear these must-have pieces. With the goal being to shop to one’s content, if you ever needed a reason to shop until you drop, this event would be it. No trick, but certainly a treat for a cause we all know and are too familiar with. For those survivors and current fighters, their families and community warriors stand proudly with them through the fight despite at times feeling hopeless. This month in particular creates a driving force within me. Currently, I am approaching the five year anniversary of Liam Maurice Fields; my cousin who transitioned during his fight with leukemia. Only a child and here for a short time, it’s often the smallest things that are the most impactful. 

MCM and the American Cancer Society are providing an opportunity to join the fight against cancer. Funds raised through the 2020 campaign will assist cancer patients in a variety of ways, including:

Education: The American Cancer Society educates the public, providers, community members and employers regarding cancer screening guidelines.

Advocacy: The American Cancer Society Cancer Action NetworkSM, the American Cancer Society’s nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate, advocates on behalf of cancer patients at local, state and federal levels (including access to no-cost COVID-19 testing for insured and uninsured individuals).

Research: The American Cancer Society has dedicated over $4.9 billion dollars toward cancer research since 1946.

Service: The American Cancer Society provides cancer information and support through its 24/7 helpline at 1-800-227-2345 and online at cancer.org.

MCM is proud to participate this year with innovative concepts in these times. Last October, MCM’s pink product campaign raised over $20,000. The American Cancer Society’s mission is to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer. The coronavirus pandemic has brought challenges for cancer patients worldwide, but cancer hasn’t stopped and neither has the American Cancer Society. Together, both organizations are committed to moving us closer to a world without cancer and appreciate the support from supporters, clients and friends. 

About The Host: 

Misa Hylton’s global influence can’t be overstated; she reaches +3.1 billion people worldwide through her relationships and collaborations with networks and publications, celebrities and brands. She has the admiration and ear of today’s biggest household names in music, entertainment and popular culture. She continues to revolutionize fashion at various levels – collaborating with luxury fashion house MCM as Global Creative Partner, styling private celebrity clients, featuring as a commentary subject in two documentaries on music epochs, leading a new generation of creatives at her Misa Hylton Fashion Academy and instructing professional studies courses at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Misa continues to transcend categories by constantly redefining modern style.

Community service illustration by Nicole Salazar for 360 MAGAZINE.

Nonprofits in a COVID-19 World: Engaging Stakeholders in Times of Crisis

By Jenny Perez, Executive Director, Herbalife Nutrition Foundation

The ability to quickly adapt to change is a key aspect of running any successful organization. However, in times of crisis, that change can often come quicker than the organization and its stakeholders could imagine. Unfortunately, for nonprofit organizations and their beneficiaries, the COVID-19 global crisis has drastically changed the world. The need in our communities is greater. However, the opportunities for raising much needed funds have been hampered by social restrictions. So how does a nonprofit organization keep their donors engaged in times of crisis?

Communications

Communicating with our stakeholders is an integral part of telling our story. In a normal operating environment, we share with people who know us and those who don’t, who we are and what we do. We explain our challenges and needs, and we celebrate our successes with thanks to donors for their collective support.

But our story, much like the operating environment, has now morphed. We have quickly recognized the need to change how and what we communicate. We understand that donors are being bombarded with information about all the current needs in our society. So rather than get lost in the noise, we are finding a balance of increasing communication without being overwhelming, through impactful storytelling – where donors can clearly see the need and the impact of their donation.  And, we are adjusting the way we raise funds, while continuing to lend support to the organizations that have been a part of our flagship program.

We also understand that there are many who will undoubtedly rise to the occasion, even before we can ask for a helping hand. And for that, we are grateful.

Technology

Our focus at the Herbalife Nutrition Foundation is simple and globally unifying – help bring nutrition to children and families in underserved communities around the globe. So, with donors spread throughout the world, engaging with them can sometimes be a challenge, but that is something we’ve adapted to, and now relish in that global reach.

The challenge we are facing today as a result of COVID-19 is that we are an event-driven organization that raises 90% of funds from events, to one where events have been eliminated. So, since we are limited on the ability to host events and gatherings, and failing our communities is not an option, we must adapt and move forward.

Thanks to technology, we found a way to offer peer-to-peer fundraising tools that allow those who want to help, to create their own fundraisers. Donors can share heartwarming videos about why the cause means so much to them. They can inspire others by snapping photos of their outreach. Without social media, it would be much more difficult to bring a global audience together, to share in our collective work and our reach, helping so many along the way.

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

English poet John Donne famously wrote, “No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.” These words are evident in the way people have come together to support each other in these critical times, and the way organizations have stepped up or partnered with others to lend a hand to those in need.

Our partner organizations around the world are doing amazing work and setting examples of how adaptation in times of crisis can be done right – from changing the way they operate daily, to offering services to more than children. For example, SOS’s Children’s Villages is working to educate and reduce the spread of COVID-19, offering psychosocial support and alternative childcare in developing countries. Other organizations like Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA), are helping provide meals to children and families who otherwise would go without, while also working to provide adequate technology to students who are now studying from home.

This is who we are and what we do. We adapt and we overcome. We use technology to help us tell our story. And our story will be shared again and again, helping us not only to raise awareness, but allowing us to collect funds that will make an impact in the lives of children and families, all around the globe.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Marsha's House in the Bronx for 360 MAGAZINE.

Marsha’s House: Shelter for LGBTQ+

In Greenwich Village near where Stonewall Inn resides, a monument will be built to honor the legacy of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, trailblazers and history-makers for the LGBTQ+ community. Marsha P. Johnson was a black transgender woman and drag queen, whose outspoken activism and radical vision during the Gay Liberation Movement continues to inspire people today.

A monument isn’t the only place bearing her memory. Marsha’s House- operated by the nonprofit Project Renewal- opened on February 15, 2017 to continue to serve the community as Marsha did, by taking in homeless LGBTQ+ young adults. With the added risks and discrimination that they face, Marsha’s House seeks to provide valuable resources and shelter to these LGBTQ+ youth.

According to a report done by the National Institutes of Health, around 62% of homeless LGBTQ+ youth have faced discrimination from their families. Jazmine Pérez, Program Director of Marsha’s House, stressed the importance of having a “safe space dedicated to [LGBTQ+ homeless youth]” as “New York City had never had housing tailored to their needs.”

These youth face particular adversities that are further complicated when alternative housing options do not have the facilities to aid them, or are outright discriminatory towards them. A study done by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln shows that 41% of homeless and runaway LGBTQ+ adolescents they interviewed have major depression, in comparison to 28% of homeless heterosexual adolescents interviewed.

 Marsha’s House boasts a variety of programs catered towards some of the issues that LGBTQ+ individuals face. Pérez outlines services which include “referrals to legal supportive services, education, healthcare, and employment programs.”

Additionally, clients that come to Marsha’s House are assured personalized living arrangements that assist each individual in finding employment and housing. “Our Case Managers and Peer Counselors meet with clients to ensure compliance with their individual living plan. They work closely with our Job Developer, Vocational Counselor, and Housing Coordinator to secure employment and housing.”

Concerns over Covid-19 pandemic are ever prevalent in the context of shared living facilities, like homeless shelters. However, Marsha’s House eases some of this concern by screening potential clients for the virus, enforcing social distancing, and cutting down accommodation from 81 beds to 60 in its 5-floor-walk-up facility. The facility maintains 20 rooms of various sizes, from single rooms to larger rooms that accommodate up to 6 people.

But Covid-19 hasn’t been the only adversity Marsha’s House has faced in recent years. The Trump administration has continued to be a source of disparaging policies and remarks against the LGBTQ+ community. On July 23, 2020, the Department of Housing and Urban Development formally announced a proposal that would reverse the 2012 Equal Access Rule, which warrants protection for homeless transgender people against discrimination by homeless shelters and other federally funded alternative housing. 

This comes as a setback and large blow to the transgender community. A 2015 survey done by The National Center for Transgender Equality shows that “70% of respondents who stayed in a shelter in the past year reported some form of mistreatment, including being harassed, sexually or physically assaulted, or kicked out because of being transgender.” The HUD’s rollback on the Equal Access Rule would only serve to undo the progress that has been made to make homeless shelters more safe to the marginalized people that need them.

    “The rhetoric and policies of the Trump administration have disregarded the very identities of our clients and staff, especially when it comes to the intersectionality of our existence,” said Pérez. “Speaking personally, as a woman of color with trans experience, I feel like I have three strikes against me in the eyes of this administration.”

Despite these incredible challenges they face, Marsha’s House continues to receive equally incredible help- from the support coming from their progressive state of New York, to the generous donors that help fund Project Renewal, to the operations staff that help run things every single day. “Our Marsha’s House Heroes are our operations staff. As essential workers, they have not skipped a beat with reporting to work and providing the support our clients needed. Being that we are a shelter, we operate 24/7/365, and our operations staff members are always here for their full 8-hour shifts.”

Mina Tocalini provides illustration for Kylie Jenner story in 360 MAGAZINE.

Kylie Jenner Appears on Vogue Hong Kong Cover

By Elle Grant

In recent months, the metropole Hong Kong appears almost daily in news feeds: ongoing protests, clashes with Beijing, the impacts of the new security law, and more. This week, however, Hong Kong finds itself in the news with a less then predictable name: Kylie Jenner.

The 22-year-old makeup and reality television mogul graces Hong Kong Vogue’s self-titled “Action Issue.” She poses in cranberry latex with white hot nails with the text “Act Now” printed across her lap. While the imagery of the cover is elegant, many are calling into question the decision to have Jenner fronting the issue, citing the ongoing dynamics currently in Hong Kong. The cover reveal comes just two days after Hong Kong delays its election, in what many are calling an effort to support the growing pro-Beijing presence in the city and cripple pro-democracy candidates. Both revelations follow years of protests in favor of democracy, with heightened tensions over the last few months due to the coronavirus and a new national security law imposed at the end of June.

Vogue Hong Kong cites on Instagram: “At the age of just 22, her beauty brand #KylieCosmetics has achieved far reaching success, and she is also active in charitable causes including funding surgeries for children with cleft lips and palate through Smile Train” as its reasons behind making Jenner the cover star. Similarly, Jenner gushed about her excitement on her own Instagram, but made no reference to the current political situation in the region. The cover appears especially interesting in context of the September issue of Vogue U.K. which features 20 different activists photographed in black and white.

Diet Prada on Instagram, a notorious critic of the fashion community, writes “Y tho?” when questioning the “Kendall for Pepsi move.” The latter statement is in reference to Kylie’s older sister Kendall Jenner’s own brush with controversy. Severe backlash and accusations of political tone deafness followed her now infamous 2017 Pepsi ad. In the ad, Kendall Jenner hands a police officer a Pepsi at a protest, seemingly in reference to the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests.

Comments, especially on social media, have called out Jenner and Vogue Hong Kong for the decision. “$5 she doesn’t even know what’s going on in Hong Kong,” joked one Instagram user. Another argued for criticism to be steered away from Jenner and instead towards the magazine: “How about you actually put an activist on the cover that stands for the message you’re trying to portray?” Currently, neither Vogue Hong Kong nor Kylie Jenner have commented on the criticism.

See full issue here.

Soccer for Success at Home

Young people and their families can stay active and healthy with Soccer for Success at Home

Staci Wilson kicks off a new video challenge

Families across the country are grappling with fear and uncertainty right now, but the organization leading the nation’s efforts to bring soccer to young people in underserved communities is stepping up to ensure kids stay healthy and active.

The U.S. Soccer Foundation recently launched Soccer for Success at Home, an online hub offering kids and their families fun drills, activities, and useful tips that will get them back in the game. In addition to a weekly e-newsletter, the initiative includes videos from experienced coaches and even the occasional professional athlete, including a new video from Olympic Gold Medalist Staci Wilson challenging kids to improve their speed and agility with line hops.
In some cases, all it takes to participate is a ball (or even just a couple pairs of socks)!
“It’s so important for all of us, especially children, to stay connected and active during this challenging time,” said Ed Foster-Simeon, President & CEO of the U.S. Soccer Foundation. “That’s why we’ve created and collected resources from trusted sources to help young people and their families stay active, healthy, and informed while schools are closed and they’re at home.”

For more information on Soccer for Success at Home, visit www.soccerforsuccess.org/athome.

About the U.S. Soccer Foundation

The U.S. Soccer Foundation’s programs are the national model for sports-based youth development in underserved communities. Since its founding in 1994, the Foundation has established programs proven to help children embrace an active and healthy lifestyle while nurturing their personal growth beyond sports. Its cost-effective, high-impact initiatives offer safe environments where kids and communities thrive. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Soccer Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) organization. Follow us on Twitter at @ussoccerfndn and Facebook at facebook.com/ussoccerfoundation.

CHRYSLER PROVIDES MEALS

As previously communicated to the company’s employees from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) CEO Mike Manley, the company is in the process of converting its first plant to produce face masks for donation to first responders and health care workers. The first machinery has been delivered and installed with supply and donation coming on stream in the coming weeks.

FCA is expanding its program of measures to support coronavirus relief efforts, focused on two principal areas: charities providing food services to children and support for a range of technical, logistical and manufacturing programs, such as face mask production.

“There has never been a more important moment to help children and their families with vital needs in our communities than during this time of great uncertainty,” said FCA CEO Mike Manley. 

Food programs for children in our communities
FCA will work in partnership with non-profit organizations and foundations that are providing food to children until schools return to session. Starting immediately, FCA will help provide more than 1 million meals to school-age children in the communities around our principal manufacturing plants in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio. The program will then be extended nationwide in the U.S. and to Canada and Mexico, supporting similar relief efforts for kids who would normally access school meal services.

Mobilizing company resources
Following the first actions taken to start face mask production, the company is now investing technical, logistical and manufacturing resources at medical equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE). With the donation of face masks produced by the company starting in the coming weeks, the company will invest to extend that production capacity to other plants and ultimately donate masks to first responders and health care workers across the world. Drawing on experience from the company’s engineering and logistics team in Italy who are assisting a local ventilator manufacturer, FCA is engaged with other companies producing ventilators and other much needed medical equipment and PPE.

“In this time of need, we’ve focused our resources on those actions we can implement quickly and that will have the greatest impact, as we did in Italy as soon as the emergency started,” added Manley.

FCA
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) is a global automaker that designs, engineers, manufactures and sells vehicles in a portfolio of exciting brands, including Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Chrysler, Dodge, Fiat, Fiat Professional, Jeep®, Lancia, Ram and Maserati. It also sells parts and services under the Mopar name and operates in the components and production systems sectors under the Comau and Teksid brands. FCA employs nearly 200,000 people around the globe. For more details regarding FCA (NYSE: FCAU/ MTA: FCA), please visit www.fcagroup.com.