Posts tagged with "director"

Netflix – Cuties

By Cassandra Yany

One of Netflix’s newest films, Cuties, has garnered much attention and backlash since its Sep. 9 release on the streaming platform. The coming-of-age film depicts a young girl as she tries to navigate her life as a pre-teen growing up in a Muslim family living in Paris.

Many critics have spoken out against the film, which currently holds the no. 7 spot in Netflix’s ‘Top 10,’ for its depiction of 11-year-old girls dancing and behaving in an indecent manner. According to the New York Times, the movie was first deemed controversial in the U.S. in August when Netflix released the promotional artwork. The original marketing for the film displayed an image of four young girls in skimpy dance costumes posing provocatively.

This, along with the trailer, prompted opposers to start petitions online and call for the removal of the film from Netflix’s catalog. Netflix apologized and changed the artwork for the film to a more innocent photo of the same four characters walking down the street with shopping bags, donning bras and underwear over their clothes.

Last week’s release of the film has sparked conversation once again amongst parents, politicians and others, causing #CancelNetflix to trend on Twitter. Lina Nealon, the Director of Corporate and Strategic Initiatives at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has spoken out against the film saying “While we commend Director Maïmouna Doucouré for exposing the very real threats to young girls having unfettered access to social media and the internet, we cannot condone the hypersexualization and exploitation of the young actresses themselves in order to make her point.” She called for Netflix to cut the “sexually-exploitive” scenes from the film, or remove the film from the platform altogether.

On Friday, Hawaii Rep. Tulse Gabbard tweeted, “@Netflix child porn ‘Cuties’ will certainly whet the appetite of pedophiles & help fuel the child sex trafficking trade. 1 in 4 victims of trafficking are children… Netflix you are now complicit.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz penned a letter to Attorney General William P. Barr Friday calling for the Department of Justice to start an investigation into the production and distribution of the film to “determine whether Netflix, any of its executives, or anyone involved in the making of ‘Cuties’ violated any federal laws against the production and distribution of child pornography.”

Cruz wrote that “the film routinely fetishizes and sexualizes these pre-adolescent girls as they perform dances simulating sexual conduct in revealing clothing, including at least one scene with partial nudity” falsely claiming that there’s a scene exposing a “minor’s bare breast.” The Associated Press reported that one of Cruz’s representatives, Lauren Aronson, said that the senator has not seen the film.

According to the Washington Times, some critics are even calling on the Obama’s— who have a production deal with Netflix— to take action against the film. Deadline stated that “The reality appears to have been lost in the storm, and the truth is very few of the people reacting so strongly will have actually seen the film.”

Netflix told USA TODAY “‘Cuties’ is a social commentary against the sexualization of young children. It’s an award winning film and a powerful story about the pressure young girls face on social media and from society more generally growing up— and we’d encourage anyone who cares about these important issues to watch the movie.”

Director Maïmouna Doucouré defends the film, saying that it works to shed light on these issues so they can be fixed. Cuties first premiered at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 23, where it won the Directing Jury Award for the dramatic film category. According to the New York Times, the movie did not stir up much conversation in France after its theatrical release (as Mignnonnes in French) in August.

Deadline reports that Doucouré did not see the promotional material prior to when it was circulated on the internet. She said that she received death threats as the outrage grew over these images. She told the news site that the film is not apologetic about the hypersexualization of children, but instead is her “…personal story as well as the story of many children who have to navigate between a liberal western culture and a conservative culture at home.”

Cuties was Doucouré’s feature directorial debut. Similar to the film’s main character, Amy, Doucouré is of Senegalese descent and grew up in a Muslim culture in Paris. In an interview at Sundance, she said she first had the idea for the movie after attending a neighborhood gathering in Paris where she saw a group of 11-year-old girls doing a stage performance of a “sensual” dance. She was shocked to see girls that age dance like that in short clothing. “We can’t continue to close our eyes about that,” she told the interviewer.

Doucouré researched for a year and a half, meeting with hundreds of pre-teens who told her their stories. She learned about their ideas of femininity, and how their self image is affected by the emphasis of social media in today’s society. According to IndieWire, the young actresses’ parents were on board with the project to spread awareness of the issue, and there was a psychologist working with the girls throughout filming who is still helping them throughout the release process.

The film is centered around Amy, an 11-year-old girl who has recently moved to a housing development in a poor suburb of Paris with her Senegalese, observant Muslim family. She looks out for her brothers, takes care of responsibilities around the house, and is in the process of being taught how to ‘be a woman’ by  her aunt.

One day after prayer, Amy walks by the laundry room and sees a girl her age dancing to music playing from her phone. In a subsequent scene, Amy is seen trying to straighten her hair with a clothing iron, burning part of it off as a result. 

Amy learns that her father, who is still in Senegal, has taken a second wife and will be coming to Paris soon to have the wedding. Her mother, Mariam, tries to hide her reaction to the news, but Amy sees her grow upset and take her frustrations out on herself. This is where Amy’s behavior begins to shift; she starts to reject her culture and identity, and instead tries to conform to fit in with the other girls at school. 

At school, Amy is teased for her clothes and lack of fashion sense, so she begins to wear her younger brother’s t-shirt to match the crop tops that her classmates wear. After seeing a group of girls her age dancing after school, Amy steals her cousin’s iPhone to learn how to dance, herself. She comes across their social media accounts and begins taking selfies, imitating what she sees on their profiles. 

Amy finds herself a spot in the girls’ friend group and dance troupe, and as a result, begins to neglect her responsibilities at home. Amy starts to show more self expression, wearing her hair natural rather than pulling it back. She also begins to explore the internet more, finding videos of almost-naked women dancing rather suggestively and moving their bodies in ways that an 11-year-old probably shouldn’t be watching. 

Taking what she found online, Amy practices dancing with her friends and teaches them how to twerk. This is where the movie begins to make viewers slightly uneasy. It was jarring to see these young, innocent girls tainted by this inappropriate content and doing dance moves that they didn’t understand the implications of. It appears that this was the intention of director Doucouré, as she stated in an interview with Netflix that the film is “…a mirror of today’s society; a mirror sometimes difficult to look into and accept but still so true.”

Some of the scenes, frankly, are very disturbing to watch. These include the girls dancing provocatively for two older male workers at a laser tag facility so that they wouldn’t get in trouble for sneaking in, as well as Amy beginning to undress for her cousin once he found she had stolen his iPhone in an attempt to smooth over the situation. Perhaps the most disturbing scene is when Amy takes a picture of her genitals to post on her social media profile so that people at school would think she’s mature. While there was no nudity shown in this scene, the implied action was horrifying to watch. 

At the end of the film, Amy performs with her dance troupe at a local competition. Dressed in revealing outfits, they dance immodestly in front of a crowd of people who quickly seem unsettled. (This is the scene from which the original promotional photos were taken.) Toward the end of the song, Amy freezes as she begins to think about her mom, then runs off the stage crying. She goes home where she asks her mom not to attend her father’s wedding. Her mom continues to get ready for the event, but tells Amy that she doesn’t have to go.

Instead of going to the wedding, Amy steps outside and begins jumping rope. This scene depicts a mixture of her two identities: she is wearing jeans and a crop top with her hair down, but is surrounded by people of her culture dressed in traditional garments. After suppressing her family’s background for a majority of the movie, Amy is finally able to find the balance where her multiple cultures intersect in order to be her honest self. 

After watching Cuties, it is evident that it is not meant to promote this behavior among young girls, but instead provide commentary on what is happening today and warn the adults who see the movie. The harsh reality is that more pre-adolescents are exposed to this type of content than we think. Any child who has access to a smart device and social platforms have the potential to see a video not meant for them. Take TikTok for example: racy dances to Cardi B and Meg Thee Stallion’s “WAP,” as well as a recent trend where women make “thirst traps” to Beyoncé’s “Rocket” are some of the most popular videos on the app right now. Young TikTok users can easily see creators on their For You Page enjoying themselves while engaging in these trends, causing the young viewer to want to do the same.

When speaking to Deadline, Doucouré said, “What happens is young girls see images of women being objectified, and the more the woman becomes an object, the more followers and like she has— they see that as a role model and try to imitate these women, but they’re not old enough to know what they’re doing.” In a separate interview, she posed the question, “Isn’t the objectification of a woman’s body that we often see in our Western culture not another kind of oppression?”

Overall, Cuties shows the dangers of uncensored media for young children and displays how impressionable they can be. It also shows the journey of Amy’s self-discovery and learning how to blend her multiple cultures in order to shape her identity. Unfortunately, the risqué nature of the film overshadows the storyline and the message is lost for a number of audience members.

In various articles, Doucouré is quoted discussing the meaning of the film in the broad context of femininity and what it means for young girls to enter womanhood in this digital age. During her aforementioned interview with Netflix, she stated “The real question of Cuties is can we, as women, truly choose who we want to be, beyond the role models that are imposed upon us by society?”

Beyoncé - Black is King illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

A Gift From Beyoncé

‘Superb. Reminiscent of Michael Jackson’s Remember The Time!’Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

By Mina Tocalini

Beyoncé’s new film “Black is King,” a celebration of the “breadth and beauty of Black ancestry”, released on Disney+ today. Similar to Beyoncé’s 2016 film, “Lemonade,” “Black is King” acts as a visual album to her soundtrack, “The Lion King: The Gift.” Black Is King” explores the “timeless lessons” from Lion King in a visually rich modern journey of Black empowerment and resilience.

Beyoncé announced her excitement for the film’s release via Instagram, while further acknowledging the impact of its release and message: “The events of 2020 have made the film’s vision and message even more relevant, as people across the world embark on a historic journey… I believe that when Black people tell our own stories, we can shift the axis of the world and tell our REAL history.”

Beyoncé’s prideful film explores the Black experience and history through a young king’s story of “betrayal, love and self-identity.” Additionally, given the timing of its release, the film presents the necessity of honoring and telling stories from the Black perspective and that of any underrepresented community.

Simply put, the film is a celebratory visual journey of the Black experience. Initially the flow of the story seems interrupted and fast paced, but further on, it becomes clear that instead of following a linear narrative, it challenges the audience to find the connections within the short moments that frame each message.

Reiterating the same story we know and love is unnecessary, so rather, “Black is King” reinvents the Lion King through thematic experimentation intended to ignite pride in the Black identity. In a stunning collage of Afro-Soul music, narrative driven reflections and strikingly beautiful imagery, the film successfully expresses inspirational messages of hope, growth, love and community.

Some have critiqued the lavish presentation of Blackness via art, dance and fashion to be excessive and fast paced. Yet, this film’s message is focused on individuality and self love derived from the appreciation of Black culture. A culture of an entire continent and of Black communities around the world, it is anything but simple.

The immense detail in this film celebrates the complexity of Black beauty and the fast paced editing can not only be considered a reference to music video styles. It may originate from there, but can we not interpret it as being part of the overwhelming journey of defining your identity while struggling with the racial tensions in society.

Beyoncé did not create this to simply further enhance her image in a display of wealth, popular culture already associates her persona this way, we expect it and should not disregard the artistry for embracing it. She is simply using her power as a superstar to lead the unifying celebration, as should be done by those who can.

Additionally, Beyoncé is not the only star in “Black is King”, although American audiences may mainly recognize her. Emerging African artists such as Wizkid, Busiswa, Shatta Wale, Salatiel, Mr Eazi, Tiwa Savage, Yemi Alade, Burna Boy, Tekno, Moonchild Sanelly and Lord Afrixana were part of the album and in some in the film. Black American artists also include Kelly Rowland, 070 Shake, Childish Gambino, Jessie Reyez, Pharrell Williams, Nija, and Tierra Whack. The presence of these Black American legends establishes the familiarity necessary to create an alliance between both Black cultures and induce a movement of African diaspora celebration.

Follow Beyoncé: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Teyana Taylor, Kehlani, 360 MAGAZINE

Teyana Taylor × Kehlani

LISTEN TO “MORNING” 
 
WATCH THE VIDEO

EARLY LISTEN TO “MORNING”HERE
WATCH THE VIDEO HERE
 

Teyana Taylor – multi-hyphenate R&B superstar singer, songwriter, producer, director, dancer/choreo­grapher, actor, fitness guru, model, mother and Harlem native  – announces the release of “Morning” featuring Kehlani, the brand new single and steamy video, both available today via G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam Recordings.  “Morning” is the second advance track from THE ALBUM, following up the R&B smash “How You Want It? (HYWI?)” featuring King Combs.
 
THE ALBUM is the long-awaited follow-up to Teyana’s KTSE, one of the five G.O.O.D. Music/ Def Jam albums produced by Kanye West during his 2018 sojourn in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  Released in June, KTSE (acronym for Keep That Same Energy) set off an 18-month chain reaction for Teyana, starting with its summertime RIAA- certified Gold smash “Gonna Love Me.”  Teyana performed “Gonna Love Me” (in a medley with “Rose In Harlem,” also from KTSE) on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.  Hip-hop audiences embraced the Gonna Love Me” remix featuring Wu-Tang Clan’s Ghostface KillahMethod Man and Raekwon, whose video was directed by Teyana herself.
 
KTSE spun off a hot new single and video for Teyana in early 2019, the explicit “WTP (Work This P***y).”  The video was nominated last week for “Best Dance Perform­ance” at the upcoming BET Soul Train Awards, airing live from Las Vegas on November 17. The third single from KTSE was the evocative “Issues/Hold On.”  After slaying the audience with the song live on Ellen in April 2019, Teyana was surprised on-air when Ellen presented her with the RIAA gold award plaque for “Gonna Love Me,” bringing it all full circle.
 
As she continues to direct her own videos, Teyana – aka ‘Spike Tee’ – was again at the helm of the clip for her recent single, How You Want It? (HYWI?) featuring King Combs, released in August. 
 
About TEYANA TAYLOR:
Being a jack of trades has allowed Teyana Taylor to become a master of all. From her smoky melodic vocals to her dynamic dance moves, the entertainer dips in dives between her talents that also include producing, songwriting, acting, directing and everything in between. When it comes to describing herself, the Harlem native can only think of one word: Everything.
 
“I literally can do everything. I never look at anything as being impossible,” she explains. “I exhaust all options to make what happen when I need to make happen.” Her mantra made her an early favorite to artists like Pharrell, who she signed her first deal with, and later choreographed videos for artists like Beyonce and Jay-Z. Her love for the arts and R&B later earned her the title of the first woman signed to Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music imprint.
 
Between R&B’s identity crisis in the 2010s, Teyana dropped her debut album VII, with tracks like “Maybe” (featuring Yo Gotti and Pusha T) and the sultry “Just Different” shaping her musical persona. The critically acclaimed album debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart in 2014, cementing her position in today modern R&B field. “I fought for that raw, hood necessary R&B and now I feel like it’s better than ever,” she says.
 
After spicing up the R&B charts, Teyana was blessed with the arrival of her daughter Junie with husband and NBA star Iman Shumpert in 2015. “I do all of this for my baby. She’s who I do it for,” she says about Iman “Junie” Tayla Shumpert Jr., her main source of inspiration. “I always show her how to be a leader and a businesswoman. I want her to believe that she can be anything she wants to be and it not be a shocker that she’s a female doing it all.” Soon after, Teyana went on to star in the internet-breaking video for Kanye West’s “Fade,” and scored her first MTV Moonman for “Best Choreography” at the 2017 MTV Video Music Awards.
 
But it wasn’t until the release of her sophomore project K.T.S.E. in June 2018 that the world experienced Teyana’s talents. With her all-female production company The Aunties, Teyana self-directed videos for “WTP,” the Gold-selling single “Gonna Love Me,” and recently, “Issues/Hold On.” She has also directed videos for her peers like T.I. (“You”), Monica (“Commitment”) and Lil Duval (“Pull Up” featuring Ty Dolla $ign) with fans like Ms. Lauryn Hill and Elton John praising her boss moves.
 
Part of what makes Teyana stand out from the rest is her ability to move with precision and poise in everything she does. From the studio to the stage, every idea is a project with the singer front and center with a vision all her own. With her musical inspirations like Aaliyah, Teena Marie, Mint Condition and Janet Jackson speaking to her soul, Teyana is aware her mission is larger than life. “I’m working on me every day and I think that’s my purpose,” she says, comparing her life to a never-ending book. “I’m still going, still mastering and being a better me.”
 

New Era, 360 MAGAZINE, Spike Lee, Yankees

New Era x Spike Lee New York Yankees Championship Collection

Today, international sports and lifestyle brand, New Era Cap Co., Inc., and renowned film director Spike Lee unveil the New Era x Spike Lee New York Yankees Championship Collection. The line features seven unique designs that pay tribute to the unmatched 27 World Series Championships of the New York Yankees. The New Era x Spike Lee New York Yankees Championship Collection will be available on www.neweracap.com and at select headwear retailers for a price range of $42.99-$51.99 USD. 

“We are honored to work with Spike Lee on the New Era x Spike Lee New York Yankees Championship Collection, our largest combined collection to date, which celebrates the New York Yankees 27 World Series titles,” said Tim Shanahan, Director of Baseball at New Era Cap. ”The Yankees logo has become a symbol that extends beyond sports, into entertainment and culture, and this collection celebrates the team’s iconic status.”

Available in seven different designs, these 59FIFTY® fitted caps feature either baseball bats or gloves that represent each year the Yankees won the World Series, as well as a sweatband that reads, “A Spike Lee Joint designed for New Era.”

ABOUT NEW ERA CAP: 

New Era Cap Co., Inc. is an international lifestyle brand with an authentic sports heritage that dates back over 99 years. Best known for being the official on-field cap for Major League Baseball and the National Football League, New Era Cap is the brand of choice not only for its headwear collections, but also for its accessories and apparel lines for men, women and youth. The brand is worn as a symbol of self-expression by athletes, artists and some of the most interesting people around the globe. New Era Cap encourages people to truly express their personal style and individuality through its products. The Company is headquartered in Buffalo, NY and is marketed and distributed in over 125 countries through its affiliate offices in London, Tokyo, Paris, Hong Kong, Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Cologne, Shanghai, Barcelona, Seoul, Melbourne, Toronto, and Bologna.  For more information, visit www.neweracap.com.

Filmmaker Ethan Paisley is Breaking the Mold and Reshaping Hollywood

Photo by @AndresHernandez

Ethan Paisley is a force to be reckoned with. He is a filmmaker driven by social change with over twenty film and TV projects under his belt that are being distributed internationally. Paisley is currently hosting and executive producing a six-part episodic project for DVD Netflix (a Netflix company) titled Set Life and hopes to inspire young artists into their passions with the release of the show. This new endeavor will add “host” to Paisley’s extensive resume of talents, which include writing, directing, producing, and acting. Even though he is busy making headlines with his on-camera work, Paisley is even busier breaking down barriers with his recent film and TV projects. Last year, he was the inaugural recipient of the Best Young Director Award for his film Indelible at the Young Entertainer Awards, an awards show that included nominees Peyton List and Anthony Gonzales. He recently produced two short films now in post-production titled Tell Me When To Forget and Go with the Flow, and will begin shooting his third feature film Turn Out later this year along with a Manhattan-based TV Series titled Screwed. Learn more about Ethan Paisley, and do not miss out on his upcoming releases. For all things Ethan Paisley go HERE.

Canadian EV Company Rivaling Tesla Adds New Board Member

Electra Meccanica Vehicles Corp. (NASDAQ: SOLO) (“Electra Meccanica” or the “Company”), a designer and manufacturer of electric vehicles, has appointed Joanne Yan to the Electra Meccanica Board of Directors. Ms. Yan replaces Dr. Robert Tarzwell, who has resigned as a Director of the Company. “Dr. Tarzwell  joined our Company’s Board of Directors in 2015. He has been an active and valued director who has made a significant contribution,” stated Jerry Kroll, CEO.

Ms. Yan brings 25 years of experience in advising and managing both publicly traded and private companies. She serves as the President of Joyco Consulting Services, which she founded in 1994 to provide consulting services in the areas of corporate structuring, business development and strategic planning initiatives.

Ms. Yan has served on the Board of Directors of several public and private companies, including the Zongshen Industrial Group, Electra Meccanica’s strategic manufacturing partner. Recently, she led a transaction that enabled a Chinese company to acquire a 49% interest in Harbour Air, the largest sea plane operator in North America.

“We are fortunate to have Joanne Yan join our Board of Directors,” said Steven Sanders, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Electra Meccanica. “Ms. Yan is a strategic decision maker and investor with extensive business development experience. Her activities in the cross-border investment and M&A space, including the significant role she has played in our relationship with Zongshen and others, make Ms. Yan an ideal fit for our Board of Directors. I look forward to her contributions during this exciting time for Electra Meccanica.”

“Ms. Yan’s appointment to the Electra Meccanica Board of Directors is a testament to the strength of the relationship between Electra Meccanica and our manufacturing partner, the Zongshen Industrial Group,” said Jack Austin, Independent Director on Electra Meccanica’s Board of Directors.

“I am very pleased to accept my appointment to the Electra Meccanica Board of Directors,” said Joanne Yan. “I look forward to working closely with the board of directors particularly at this exciting time in the Company’s development as it initiates deliveries of the SOLO EV to customers in 2019.”

ALMA Releases New Single & Music Video for “When I Die”

Finnish pop powerhouse ALMA releases new single and music video for “When I Die” via Casablanca Records / Universal / Warner / Virgin EMI & PME today.  Listen HERE.  Watch HERE.

Produced and written by ALMA, Justin Tranter, and Mike Sabbath “When I Die” is the second installment from her highly anticipated debut album Have You Seen Her? set for release on the 5th of April 2019. It also marks the start of a period of continuous activity, which will see fans receive a new track with accompanying visual episodically into its release.

Shot in her native Finland and directed by celebrated Finish director Miikka Lommi, the video for “When I Die”depicts a gothic last supper scene and ALMA digging her own grave. “This song was born from a big conversation about when and how we leave the world is so out of our control. We spend so much time worrying about things out of our control, we’re always trying to be better, richer, more successful. We rarely appreciate the moments in front of us. Go to the party, blow your money (even if you have work tomorrow) you will survive!” says ALMA. “I wanted the video to look like our last party, what might the night look like if we knew this was it.” 

“When I Die” highlights ALMA’s unique voice as a writer; honest, brave and fresh. As she says, “I’ve spent a lot of my life being told who to be, what to say or how to behave by the world. There’s constant pressure on us all to fit in and my music is about exactly the opposite. I want my fans to feel like they can be whoever, say whatever and look however when they listen to my music. Here you are accepted no matter what.”

ALMA – a 23-year-old with neon green hair, a magnetic punk attitude and a voice that could demolish buildings is part of a new wave of female powerhouses that have something say. Engaged and opinionated on issues from women’s rights to body positivity and sexuality ALMA is forward thinking and making a change.

Following her critically acclaimed EP “Dye My Hair” with platinum single “Chasing Highs”, smash track “Phases” FT French Montana (including an exclusive Charli XCX directed video) and her 2018 mixtape Heavy Rules;  ALMA has garnered over 350 million combined Spotify plays and topped iTunes charts around the world.

ALMA’s worked extensively with her friends Charli XCX, Tove Lo, Zara Larsson, Dua Lipa, Halsey, and Miley Cyrus but to name a few, both live and in the studio and garnered support the world over.

Wrapping up 2018 on the road with long term collaborator and friend  this year’s headline dates promise an entirely new show, new music and some very special surprises along the way.

Josie Ho x Annual Critics’ Choice Awards

This past Sunday, January 13th, the 24th Annual Critics’ Choice Awards was hosted by acclaimed film, television and stage star Taye Diggs. The ceremony took place at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, California.

In attendance for the first time was Josie Ho a very famous actor from Hong Kong. This was on the heels of Josie winning Sitges Film Festival’s “Time Machine” award at the end of 2018.

Josie Ho was at the Critics’ Choice Awards to present the “Best Foreign Language Film” award to the major award-winner of the night, Alfonso Cuarón, for his work as director of the film “Roma.”

Reflecting on the night, Josie Ho said: “This is so exciting, I have so much respect for Alfonso Cuarón and really wanted him to win big today. I love that I got to present one of my artistic heroes with the Best Foreign Language Film Award.”

After witnessing “Crazy Rich Asians” win the award for “Best Comedy,” Josie felt “amazing,” “It’s just time to see a more diverse faceinfilm than what we’ve seen in the past shown to audiences in North America,” she said.

Behind the lens of renowned Iranian cinematographers

Time Lapse is an exhibition of striking photographs by prestigious Iranian film directors. After enormous success in both London and Tehran, the exhibition will travel to the USA in November, to be shown at The Container Yard in Downtown Los Angeles.

Time Lapse features the work of Cannes Film Festival award-winning directors Jafar Panahi and Abbas Kiarostami, Cannes Film festival award nominee Nasser Taghvai, award-winning documentary maker Kamran Shirdel, San Sebastian International Film Festival award-winning director Majid Barzegar, World Press Photo award-winning Cinematographer Seifollah Samadian and celebrated actor and Cairo film festival award-winning director Hamid Jebeli. The exhibition celebrates Iranian cinema and its international reach, and simultaneously demonstrates the talent of the directors, stretching beyond dynamic filmmaking to the creation of fine art.

CAMA Gallery aims to provide a politically neutral platform on which to showcase the wealth of artistic talent in Iran. CAMA Gallery has three galleries in Iran, a gallery in London, and will soon open a permanent space in Los Angeles.

The exhibition opens with a private view on November 2 from 8pm and runs through November 14, 2018.