Posts tagged with "Venice"

L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY press image via Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board for use by 360 MAGAZINE

L.A. Tourism × OBEY × House Industries

Bouncing back from the prolonging COVID-19 pandemic, Los Angeles Tourism announced their brand-new partnership with OBEY Clothing and House Industries on an exclusive, limited-time-only collection that captures the SoCal essence enthralled by the city of Los Angeles.

The collection dropped on February 11 and sports Los Angeles Tourism’s latest logo with a set of three other designs on a selection of tees and sweatshirts. Los Angeles Tourism, OBEY Clothing and House Industries have pledged to contribute all funds from the project to The Midnight Mission, a non-profit that aims to fight the problem of homelessness in L.A.

The energy that encapsulates the city of L.A. is like no other, often chased throughout differing locations across the nation. The distinctive cities that encompass the area are rich in culture, experience and opportunity, entailing everything that L.A. is notorious for.

For this upcoming collection, the collaboration sees this celebration of four differing locations in the L.A. area. Designs range from the price points of $34 – $77, honoring the distinguished cities of Venice, Griffith Park, Echo Park and the city of Los Angeles in total.

The collection is available for purchase at obeyclothing.com NOW!

Don Skeoch, Chief Marketing Officer for Los Angeles Tourism spoke to the new collection, stating, “When we launched our new brand identity, we received so many awesome messages from fans who wanted to see it on a shirt they could buy. We’re thrilled to partner with House Industries and hometown-based OBEY Clothing to create a special LA-themed line that also contributes to the higher good. It was important to us that 100% of Los Angeles Tourism’s proceeds go towards a cause so critical in Los Angeles –homelessness.”

CEO of OBEY Clothing, Steve Ternosky, expressed the excitement behind the collaboration, stating, “It’s exciting to get to work on a project based on your own backyard and the icing on the cake is getting to work on it with your friends. In this case, having the opportunity to represent the city we love and co-design a collection with House Industries, of which we have so much respect and history, is a perfect scenario for us. We would like to thank Los Angeles Tourism for solidifying the opportunity and their generosity to ensure the project gives back to the community in its support of The Midnight Mission.”

Andy Cruz with House Industries elaborated on the power of the collection, stating, “The fact that our artwork can help support people that are struggling makes the L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY collaboration even more impactful than just designing a defining logo for an iconic city.”

G. Michael Arnold, President and CEO of The Midnight Mission, detailed what the profits would be supporting, stating, “The Midnight Mission is delighted to be a beneficiary of this limited-edition capsule collection. Our goal is to restore people to self-sufficiency and combat the issues surrounding homelessness, and the proceeds from this project will help us provide individuals and families experiencing homelessness with a secure place to sleep and three nutritious meals a day.”

To find out more, visit @discoverla on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. If you plan on visiting soon, travel carefully and adhere to guidance from Los Angeles County Public Health.

L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY press image via Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board for use by 360 MAGAZINE
L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY press image via Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board for use by 360 MAGAZINE
L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY press image via Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board for use by 360 MAGAZINE
L.A. Tourism/HOUSE/OBEY press image via Los Angeles Tourism and Convention Board for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Conrad Marca-Relli nel suo studio a Long Island for use by 360 Magazine

MATTIA DE LUCA

MATTIA DE LUCA presents CONRAD MARCA-RELLI Il Maestro Irascibile in collaboration with Archivio Marca-Relli from October 9th, 2021

Galleria Mattia De Luca is proud to present Conrad Marca-Relli – Il Maestro Irascibile (The Irascible Master), an exhibition entirely dedicated to the Italian-American artist, a key figure of American Abstract Expressionism. After the historic exhibition at the Galleria La Tartaruga in 1957, this first Roman retrospective, organized in collaboration with the Marca-Relli Archive, will be inaugurated on Saturday, 9 October 2021, on the premises of the Palazzo Albertoni Spinola at 2 Piazza di Campitelli, Rome.

Conrad Marca-Relli, aka Corrado Marcarelli, was born in Boston on 5 June 1913 to Italian parents from the Campania region. An indomitable spirit and a tireless traveler, Marca-Relli grew up traveling continuously to Italy, making him perfectly bilingual, literally and artistically speaking. A lover of the monumentality of Rome, where he worked for several years, and of great Italian Renaissance painting, the Italian-American artist was the true classicist soul of the New York School. The birth of the Eighth Street Club and the organization of the famous 1951 Ninth Street Show is attributable to his fervent temperament. Marca-Relli, imbued not only with classical culture, but also with a certain pragmatism of American origin, undertook from the 1950s a successful and endless path of research into the collage technique. The compositional results of this research would be brought to the ultimate outcome of speaking of his art as “painting-collage”. This modus operandi emerged as a balanced combination of compositional harmony, typical of the European tradition, a spontaneity of gesture, the offspring of Rosenberg’s arena, and Action painting: raw canvases were cut with a razor blade, the strips glued together, unglued, rearranged, superimposed, layered on the support and, finally, repainted in order to harmonize the duality of “positive” and “negative” spaces. It is this primitive encounter of two opposing forces that brings to life Marca-Relli’s canvases, palimpsest collages created by an equally reasoned and “neurasthenic” gesture, a definition given by Afro Basaldella to the artist in a letter sent to his friend and colleague Toti Scialoja.

Always departing from the classical proportions of the wooden mannequin, inseparable companion of his painting, Marca-Relli created a macrocosm of seemingly abstract signs, main elements of his major artistic achievements, on display at Galleria Mattia De Luca. From plain Cityscapes with a metaphysical flavor of the early 1950s, to the enigmatic seated figures of his early collages, and up to the homage to his friend and neighbor Jackson Pollock, the exhibition traces the strong impact of Marca-Relli as a person and as an artist on the American and international scene.

You will be able to appreciate the works of the calibre of Cityscape from 1953, an oil on canvas, which was inspired by the artist’s Mexican sojourns and is a turning point for his adoption of the collage technique. There are also Seated Figures of the mid-1950s, a cornerstone of his oeuvre owing to its compositional harmony reminiscent of Cubism. Also unmissable are the 1955 masterpieces The Strategist and The Struggle, as well as his epic tribute Death of Jackson Pollock, a testament to what was a mutual influence more than a friendship. This relationship was replete with frequent confrontations (after all, how to reconcile the irascible Conrad with the despotic and childish soul of the boy from Cody), dialogues, encounters and mutual respect. You will continue your journey through the Italian-American master’s production with the harmonious turmoil of the forms in M-11-56, a work that paved the way for the artist’s New York masterpieces The Battle and The Warrior, respectively part of the permanent collections of the MET and the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The canvases of the late 1950s and the early 1960s are exhibited as a logical follow-on of Marca-Relli’s artistic career, in which any anthropomorphic reference disappears to leave room for architectural compositions with a classical flavour, as in The Wall No. 2. There is no lack of alternative media with which the artist experimented throughout his entire life, as in the case of Cunard L-8-62, which reveals Marca-Relli’s great ability to absorb the stimuli deriving from Minimalism and Arte Povera. He tried out compositions which, while never losing sight of the harmony of forms, opened up to the concepts of rhythm and matter typical of the works of Donald Judd and those of the great artists of Arte Povera.

Marca-Relli, an abstract expressionist with a European approach, is not only a “bridge” between Rome and New York, but above all a master at the cusp of two worlds, Europe, and the United States.

Conrad Marca-Relli
His works are included in the following collections: Bilbao, Guggenheim Museum; Buffalo, Albright-Knox Art Gallery; Chicago, Art Institute; New York, MET, MoMA, Whitney Museum of American Art; San Francisco, Museum of Modern Art; Venice, Peggy Guggenheim Collection; Washington, National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum.

 

The Fisher House illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Fisher Dollhouse × MAD

MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN INVITES VISITORS INTO MINIATURE WORLD CREATED BY NEW YORK COLLECTOR JOANNA FISHER

The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature

May 8 — September 26, 2021

Purchase Tickets Here

Inspired by Venice’s glamorous Gritti Palace, The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature will make its public debut at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) on May 8. With a fifteenth-century classical exterior and ten rooms filled with an eclectic range of historical and contemporary craft, art, and design rendered in miniature, The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature displays an impressive collection of contemporary art created by more than ten international artists, many of whom are working in miniature for the first time. New York collector, maker, and arts patron Joanna Fisher conceived of the dollhouse in response to the lockdown required by the COVID-19 pandemic. Like so many, she was housebound and felt her world shrink…and embraced it, literally. The dollhouse project offered Fisher a form of therapy: it provided a safe haven and, with ever-inward retreat during quarantine, an escape.

“’The House Within’ is how I think about this project. A place people can go to in their minds,” said Fisher. “This was born in the pandemic. An emotional home I found within myself. A safe place created in my imagination. That is how this came to be.”

Fisher was familiar with the Museum of the City of New York’s Stettheimer Dollhouse. This, plus Rachel Lee Hovnanian’s suggestion that the project could be like a miniature version of Peggy Guggenheim’s Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, lead her to commission micro-artworks from artist friends and collaborators. All working in isolation, many found an unexpected sense of community in the creation of the dollhouse and the works within. Peter Gerakaris’s neo-Byzantine icon presented an introspective challenge of recreating an exacting process—painting with a brush of no more than three hairs. There are also sculptural works by prominent artists, including an abstracted figure by Michele Oka Doner and one trapped in glass by Dustin Yellin. An “ancestor portrait,” a reimagined image of Fisher by Antonio Pio Saracino, is mounted in a gilt frame. Artists Tatyana Murray and Rachel Lee Hovnanian both shrunk preexisting works: Aquatic Dream and Body Armor, respectively. Exquisite paintings were contributed by Darren Waterston, Federico de Francesco, and Ryan McGinness, whose family joined Fisher at a recent Thanksgiving celebration where their daughters played with dollhouses together. Waterston contributed an ethereal landscape in the same spirit as a series begun during the pandemic while Hunt Slonem gamely adapted his popular bunny imagery with smaller strokes. There’s also photography by Veronica Gaido. Many of these are set in elegantly crafted, ebonized, or gilded carved wood frames.

Another inspiration for Fisher was Queen Mary’s Dollhouse (long on display at Windsor Castle) that was presented to the Royal Family in 1924 in gratitude for bravery and leadership during the First World War. Designed by Edward Lutyens, it was the work of 1500 of the finest makers of its day. Some of the objects commissioned for it were replicated for The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature, which is also filled with scaled miniatures by contemporary makers as well as antiques and vintage pieces. Its Baroque-style fireplace is by a British maker Sue Doviso, who specializes in detailed architectural elements. Others, like the porcelain sink attributed to Sonia Messer, are testament to twentieth-century pioneers of dollhouse furniture manufacture. “Venetian” touches in the painted bombe chest and bust of Julius Caesar are by David Castillo, a miniaturist in Barcelona. The stunning Murano-style glass chandelier came from glass artists Mario Ramos and Mariana Grande in Madrid. Fred Cobbs, a revered miniature metalworker in Georgia, made a range of tools and other items, from a watering can to a wine vat to an espresso machine.

Close looking is rewarded: a display cabinet teems with ammonites, which first appeared 240 million years ago; a ruby glass wine set fit for (and believed to be made for) Queen Anne; “bamboo” furniture, mouse-sized preserves, a powder horn, and a masquerade mask. Specialties are evident in miniature foods, elaborately bound books, clay olive jars, and wigs. While no dolls dwell here, animals do, in the form of a pheasant, a monkey riding a camel, and ceramic dogs, one housed in its own magnificent dog bed by jeweler Laura Lobdell. The needlepoint rugs Fisher designed and made herself. Many of the makers, like one who refashioned WWI bullet casings into the legs of a brass table, remain unknown.

The dollhouse was made to order by British set designer Holly Jo Beck, who has worked at the Folger Theatre in Washington, D.C. and now works primarily as an animator. In both form and details, the dollhouse draws on specific places such as the Palazzos da Mula Morosini and Bernardo a San Polo. For Fisher, it evokes memories of a favorite hotel, the Gritti Palace, built as a noble residence in the fifteenth century on Venice’s Grand Canal. The pink facade also suggests to Fisher a local landmark, Julian Schnabel’s Palazzo Chupi in Greenwich Village. Such associations offer flights of fancy during a time of curtailed travel and cancelled plans.

A “house within a house,” as poet and critic Susan Stewart wrote nearly thirty years ago in On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection, the dollhouse exposes tensions between the inside and outside worlds. Sanctuary and prison, this “most consummate of miniatures” also confronts “the inaccessibility of what cannot be lived.” A condition intensified by the pandemic that Fisher has felt intensely. “While this dollhouse was a solitary exercise,” she noted, “it somehow brought me closer to people all over the world, creating its own social network, balancing out the isolation of this pandemic.”

The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature is a work in progress, one Fisher plans to return to. For now, this dollhouse’s secret rooms, where one could imagine curling up or entertaining at a moment’s notice, have been fixed in time and opened up so that visitors can inhabit and enjoy.

EXHIBITION CREDITS

The Fisher Dollhouse: A Venetian Palazzo in Miniature was curated by Caroline Hannah.

This exhibition is made possible through Joanna Fisher’s support and efforts.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) champions contemporary makers across creative fields and presents the work of artists, designers, and artisans who apply the highest level of ingenuity and skill. Since the Museum’s founding in 1956 by philanthropist and visionary Aileen Osborn Webb, MAD has celebrated all facets of making and the creative processes by which materials are transformed, from traditional techniques to cutting-edge technologies. Today, the Museum’s curatorial program builds upon a rich history of exhibitions that emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach to art and design, and reveals the workmanship behind the objects and environments that shape our everyday lives. MAD provides an international platform for practitioners who are influencing the direction of cultural production and driving twenty-first-century innovation, and fosters a participatory setting for visitors to have direct encounters with skilled making and compelling works of art and design. For more information, visit Museum of Arts and Design.

Glastress illustration done by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

2021 U.S. Premiere of Glasstress

Some of the world’s leading contemporary artists are invited to breathe new life into centuries-old glassmaking in Venice ― maestros of glassblowing from the legendary Berengo Studio residency help artists manifest their visions.

Among the 34 artists: Ai Weiwei, Fred Wilson, Joyce J. Scott, Jimmie Durham, Ugo Rondinone, Fiona Banner, Vik Muniz, Monica Bonvicini, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Laure Prouvost, Renate Bertlmann, Thomas Schütte, Loris Gréaud, and Erwin Wurm.

  • There is every reason this year to have a world view,” says Irvin Lippman, the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s Executive Director, as South Florida boldly ushers in the new year with the national premiere of Glasstress 2021 Boca Raton.
  • Three years in the making, with 2020 being such a challenging year to coordinate an international exhibition of this size and scope, the effort serves as an important reassurance that art is an essential and enduring part of humanity.”
  • “This is also a tribute to the resilience of Venice’s surviving the floods and continuing to make art through the pandemic,” adds Irvin Lippman.

The new exhibition runs January 27 through September 5, 2021 and the Museum will feature online initiatives for virtual viewing. Watch the video here featuring interviews with some of the artists in the new exhibition. The 34 artists in this new, never before seen edition of Glasstress were all invited by Adriano Berengo to work alongside his master glass artisans at the Berengo Studio on the island of Murano in the Venetian lagoon. Most of these works in glass have never been seen elsewhere, and were handpicked by Kathleen Goncharov, the Museum’s Senior Curator who traveled to Italy in 2019.

With incredible energy, the Studio has brought a new vision on how to stimulate today’s leading artists into thinking how the medium of glass can be made into dramatic and provocative works of contemporary art. Most of these artists have, during their careers, been invited to participate in the Venice Biennale. Some of the works were created during the pandemic lockdowns, with artists collaborating remotely via Zoom with their glass artisan partners after initial on-site work at the studio in Venice.

“Unlike the past and the present, what comes next for our world presents itself as constant possibility, always transforming as we move forward in time,” says Adriano Berengo. This concept of transformation has always held an affinity with glass, a medium which – as the name Glasstress suggests – exists in a state of constant tension. Life needs tension, it needs energy, and a vibrant exchange of ideas.”

The exhibition presents 34 new works that explore some of today’s pressing subjects, including human rights, climate change, racial justice, gender issues and politics. The Boca Raton Museum of Art has dedicated more than 6,500 square feet of exhibition space to this collection. A fully illustrated catalogue is also available.

The mission of Glasstress is to restore the visibility and reputation of Murano glass, after decades of closures of ancient, centuries-old glass furnaces. Instead of creating decorative objects with glass, these artists are invited to create original works, often on a massive scale. They collaborate with glass masters whose expertise has been developed over generations in Venice. Most of these artists have never worked with glass, so they unite their artistic ideas with the technical expertise of their skilled collaborators.

The results are breathtaking. The first installation visitors to the Museum will encounter is Sala Longhi by Fred Wilson. He created this series at Berengo Studio after the Biennale exhibited his work about Black residents of Venice from the Renaissance to the present. This installation features an ornate white chandelier with 29 glass panels that mirror 18th-century Venetian artist Pietro Longhi’s paintings. Instead of canvases, Wilson shows the viewer only the whites of the eyes of his Black subjects through cutouts in black reflective glass.

“We have brought Glasstress to countries around the world for ten years, seeking to expand and enliven international awareness of the variety and richness of contemporary artists using glass in their creative practices,” adds Adriano Berengo. “In the past, its place in the art world might have seemed uncertain. But now in this latest edition of Glasstress, the first after a global pandemic, one thing we know for certain: glass endures. Life is fragile, just as glass is fragile, yet in this fragility there is also strength.”

“It is in this spirit of experimentation that Glasstress Boca Raton 2021 explores the limitless potential of glassblowing. “We realize how far we have come as we approach the 60th anniversary of the American studio glass movement that launched in 1962 through the efforts of Harvey Littleton and Dominick Labino,” adds Irvin Lippman. “This presentation of Glasstress is also a tribute to them.”

This show also unveils the Museum’s new acquisition for its collection, created in the Berengo Studio – Glass Big Brother, a sculpture by Song Dong, one of contemporary Chinese art’s leading figures. The large-scale ceiling installation is 11 feet long and reaches all the way to the floor. Thirty surveillance cameras are ensconced from top to bottom, looking out at all directions around the chandelier.

The installation Rosemarie’s Divorce, by Renate Bertlmann, unites aspects from Rosemarie’s Baby (1983), her multi-part installation about the ambivalent relationship between mother and child, and Discordo Ergo Sum, a field of knife-roses she exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 2019. The monstrously enlarged glass pacifier is an image she has used since the mid-1970s referencing sexuality and motherhood. It is flanked by two knife-roses made of deep black glass.

The Italian artist Monica Bonvicini’s deeply psychological work addresses themes of sexuality, power, and relationships in male-oriented domains. Her visits to sadomasochist nightclubs with Gay male friends are the inspiration for Bonded. She won the prestigious Golden Lion award at the 1999 Venice Biennale. DNA HAS NO COLOR is a new statement from Nancy Burson that is a powerful work about the illegitimacy of racism. This is a continuation of the project that Zaha Hadid commissioned Burson to develop for the London Millennium Dome. Burson is known for biology-related work, including her use of cutting edge facial morphing technology for art that shows what individuals would look like as a different race.

The Pandemic Oculus, (2020), by Tim Tate, whose work explores the worlds of loss, memory, recovery, and hope. As an HIV-positive man, he lived through the worst of the AIDS epidemic during the 1980s and 1990s, and now through the current pandemic. In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, the artist states that Pandemic Oculus also honors the many unsung heroes around the world: nurses, teachers, essential employees, grandparents caring for children so that parents can work, and so many more. Tate is the co-founder of the Washington Glass Studio in Washington, DC. He is also the co-moderator, along with William Warmus, of the 21st Century Glass group on Facebook, which has shared and discussed over 10,000 images of sculptural glass from around the world.

Erwin Wurm’s wry sense of humor permeates his most famous works and has served him well in creating a poignant cultural commentary throughout his career. Wurm produced this triad in cold hard glass at the Berengo Studio. They are smaller versions of the massive bronze sculpture of a hot water bottle with legs, Big Mutter, that he created for the Venice Biennale in 2020. In the exhibition catalogue, the show’s curator Kathleen Goncharov describes these “mothers” as neither warm nor comforting . . . their stubby little legs imply flight when called upon to be caregivers.

At the Berengo Studio, Jimmie Durham created a series of eight giant cougar heads suspended on metal armatures. Caught in suspension as they gaze at one another, their collective roar remains frozen between them. The cougar is one of the most sacred animals in Cherokee mythology, and the influence of Native-American culture vs. Western rationalism is evident in his work. The artist’s long trajectory includes his work during the civil rights movement and as a political organizer for the American Indian Movement. In 2019, Durham was the recipient of the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement award at the 58th Venice Biennale.

In the Museum’s exhibition catalogue, curator Kathleen Goncharov describes Prune Nourry as no stranger to illness . . . her work always dealing with science and bioethics from a feminist perspective, a focus that has intensified since her breast cancer diagnosis in 2018. At the Berengo Studio, she created River Woman, a transparent skeletal sculpture based on an anatomical drawing of the human vascular system. While its form may be human, the arteries resemble rivers, streams and trees that suffer in their own way too, from human abuse rather than disease.

Ugo Rondinone represented his home country in the Swiss Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007). In this work, the twelve glass horses cast in beautiful shades of blue all face different directions, creating delicate light games with their reflections and shadows in continuous motion. In the context of this installation, the reappearing motif of a horse (which has a long tradition in the history of art), evokes alienation and a subversive twist emblematic of Rondinone’s works.

Ai Weiwei's

DNA HAS NO COLOR, Nancy Burson (2019) for 360 Magazine

Purchase our Glasstress issue HERE.

The Concord Hotel, 360 MAGAZINE, New Hampshire, four diamond, aaa

Venice’s Hotel Ca’ di Dio May 2021

Venice’s newest 5-star hotel, Ca’ di Dio, will be born in May 2021. The hotel sits within a transformed ecclesiastical compound dating from 1272 that has hosted Crusaders, pilgrims and tourists for more than eight centuries.

“We are honored to have been asked to represent the Ca’ di dio,” says Geoffrey Weill, “particularly at this moment in history when revolutionary vaccines are combatting a pandemic that has crippled the travel business in Venice and throughout the world.”

Located on the Riva Ca’ di Dio, the hotel overlooks Venice’s legendary lagoon, and is located adjacent to the Arsenale and the gardens that house the city’s Biennale, one of the world’s most iconic art festivals and exhibitions. The Ca’ di Dio is an easy stroll along the waterfront from bustling St. Mark’s Square.

The 66-key Ca’ di Dio (pronounced Ka-di-dio) is one of a new class of properties managed by Italy’s VOI Hotels, to be known as V-Retreats. The Ca ‘di Dio, like all V-Retreats, is set to be an oasis of peace, a palace of timeless beauty imbued with the finesse and warmth of Italian hospitality. The hotel’s general manager, Christophe Mercier, has a rich history of managing some of Venice’s finest properties.

The creation of the Hotel Ca’ di Dio was entrusted to the studio of the internationally renowned Spanish architect Patricia Urquiola. “My goal was to create an original and distinctive concept,” says Urquiola, “a Venetian ‘mansion,’ deeply linked to the history of the city with fine woods, rich textiles, colors, finishes and Murano glass; each decorative, architectural and lighting element is the result of the skillful hands of skilled craftsmen who combine the passion for their work with the secrets and techniques of Venetian tradition.”

The Ca’ di Dio’s accommodations comprise 57 suites and nine Deluxe rooms, spread over three floors. Ten suites have a unique view of the lagoon and San Giorgio Maggiore Island; two of the suites have a large roof terrace overlooking the San Marco Basin.

Two internal courtyards are home to the hotel’s Alchemia Bar and the Essentia Restaurant, whose design combines Venetian tradition with Urquiola’s contemporary signature. The hotel’s indoor-outdoor VE-RO Restaurant overlooks the breathtaking Venetian lagoon. Named for its Venetian roots, its cuisine is inspired by traditional dishes of the Veneto, reset in contemporary tones, respecting the seasonality of fish and produce. Many of the ingredients will come from the Ca’ di Dio’s vegetable garden secreted within yet another internal courtyard.

The Ca’ di Dio will offer a state-of-the-art wellness program in its Spa Pura, and will welcome small meetings and events. The colors and comfort of the reading room provide the ideal location for contemplation. The hotel’s elegant boutique will offer a selection of Murano glass produced exclusively for the Ca ‘di Dio. The hotel’s side canal entrance provides direct docking for water taxis and the hotel’s water-transfer cruisers.

The opening of the Ca’ di Dio coincides with a new reclaimed future for the city of Venice. “I was in the city in October when the Acqua Alta threatened the customary flooding of the city,” says Weill, “and for the first time, the lagoon’s new high-tech water barriers were set in motion, saving the city’s treasures from the customary flooding.”

The Venice Biennale 2021 has been postponed to 2022 because of Covid-19. The Venice Architecture Biennale, is now slated for May 22, 2021 to November 22, 2021.
Full details of the new Hotel Ca’ di Dio are at https://www.lifestyle-voihotels.com/en/ca-di-dio/and will be expanded in coming weeks.

Goldkimono – To Tomorrow

VENICE BEACH MEETS AMSTERDAM – NEW ARTIST GOLDKIMONO LAUNCHES DEBUT SINGLE ‘TO TOMORROW’

STREAM ‘TO TOMORROW’ AND WATCH THE OFFICIAL VIDEO NOW
The story of Goldkimono begins in Venice, California in a short-term lease just steps from the beach. With a rental guitar and his laptop in tow, Dutch songwriter and producer, Tienus Konijnenburg developed his eclectic sound inspired by the California coastline. His debut single, “To Tomorrow” encompasses a laid-back story filled with punchy beat textures and wavy acoustics to keep you hopeful for days to come.

Available today on all streaming platforms, the introductory single is accompanied by a vibrant official music video that transports listeners to a carefree sunny day on the West Coast, soaking up the sunshine. “To Tomorrow” is a testament to time and how it just keeps flowing. It’s this ever-evolving thing that changes us, but time makes us who we are and gives us opportunities to grow.

Tienus’ animated lyric composition offers hints of 90s hip-hop blended with an island pop style, with a crunch of a Dutch stroopwafel. Known for writing the iconic Kygo single, “Firestone”, Goldkimono describes his sound a lot like his clothing style, “Take a handful of sunshine and throw it into a boardwalk thrift shop, walk out with some comfy colorful pants and a LEVI’s Sherpa jacket and don’t turn back.”

“To Tomorrow” describes the feeling of carrying on the careless feeling you had when you were young on to the next day and into the future. It’s about being present when you feel the sunlight shine down on your life, and bringing that feeling into tomorrow.

With warmer weather and brighter days on the horizon, there’s no better time to stream Goldkimono’s “To Tomorrow” on your favorite streaming platform.

Camille Hannah, Olsen Gruin, art, design, 360 MAGAZINE, Australia

Camille Hannah

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present The Sixteen Pleasures, a solo exhibition by Australian artist Camille HannahThe Sixteen Pleasures will be on view at Olsen Gruin from October 9 – November 9, 2019. The exhibition design leads viewers with subtle intensity through a dynamic installation of variously scaled paintings and mirrors. During this journey, reflected glimpses of the self coalesce with Hannah’s paintings, creating spillage between the territories that define body and artwork. Enveloped and embraced within these abstract landscapes, viewers experience a bodily extension: a potent sensation which exceeds rational grasp.

By traversing this alluring amalgamation of imagery, the viewer becomes both witness and participant in the creation of these compelling ‘virtual’ paintings. These seductive, enigmatic images of desire echo the artist’s ongoing explorations around the expansive, unbounded nature of female desire and of the carnal disruption inherent to perceptual experience in the digital realm.

The Sixteen Pleasures also evokes the sensory experience of film, video and the mesmerizing back-lit screens that saturate our modern world. It is richly infused with the artist’s extensive enquiries into art history, philosophy, poetry, sexuality and contemporary culture, filtered through the personal narrative of each individual viewer. With this exhibition Hannah aims to create a boundless, all-encompassing landscape in which the viewer is captivated by an exhilarating and thought-provoking, physiological experience.

Camille Hannah attained a Masters of Fine Art by Research in 2013 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in 2010, at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, Australia where she was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship Award. In 2018 she won the Wyndham Art Prize, and in 2017 was selected as a finalist for the Arte Laguna Prize, Nappa Arsenale, Venice, Italy and as winner of the Special Exhibition Prize of a solo exhibition at Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister, Regensburg, Germany in 2018. In 2015 she was selected by an international jury to win the T.I.N.A. Art Prize, Maurizio Caldirola Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy, and was a finalist & winner of the People’s Choice Award in the Gold Coast Art Prize, Qld, Australia. Hannah was shortlisted in 2014 for Contemporary Visions V, Beers Contemporary Gallery, London, and in 2012 she won the Kozica-O’Callaghan Award for Painting. Other awards include the Premio Ora Art Prize, Italy 2013 International Catalogue and being shortlisted for the Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice Arsenale, Italy and the Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2012.

SAN CLEMENTE PALACE KEMPINSKI × ART

SAN CLEMENTE PALACE KEMPINSKI UNVEILS ART EXHIBITS AROUND VENICE BIENNALE

Betty Boop by Joana Vasconcelos

San Clemente Palace Kempinski Venice, the luxury resort located on its own private island in the Venetian lagoon, just eight minutes away from St. Mark’s Square, has launched two new exhibits in honor of the 58th Venice Biennale. Sculptures by English artist Tony Cragg and Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos are both currently on display around the resort’s historic gardens.

Tony Cragg’s four sculptures are currently on display at San Clemente Palace: his works Caught Dreaming, Runner and We are exhibited in the main garden, while his work Pair is on display in the hotel’s lobby. These artworks will be on display until November 17, 2019. Cragg currently lives in Wuppertal, Germany, and is known for creating sculptures that reference nature.

Meanwhile, San Clemente Palace is also exhibiting works by renowned Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos in a new exhibit curated by Nina Moaddel titled, What are you hiding? May you find what you are looking for. To create this exhibit, Vasconcelos was inspired by the 58th Venice Biennale’s theme, May you live in interesting times, with artworks referencing Portuguese pop culture, while reinterpreting contemporary art. Vasconcelos’ works play with the viewers’ perception through a sharp sense of humor that shuns dogmatism and at the same time explores issues of identity, migration and the exploitation of women.

On display in San Clemente Palace’s 12th-century church is Vasconcelos’ large-scale sculpture, called Madragoa (2015-2019), inspired by Lisbon’s façades, and exploring the intersections of art and architecture. In the gardens of San Clemente Palace is a piece titled, I’ll be Your Mirror #1 (2019), a giant Venetian carnival mask made of mirrors, which has previously been exhibited in the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. Viewers can look through the mask from any angle without ever losing sight of their own reflection. Also featured in the gardens is Betty Boop PA (2019), Vasconcelos’ most iconic work and part of the artist’s famous shoes series. The high-heeled shoe is crafted out of saucepans and questions the meaning of the word “feminine” in today’s world. Vasconcelos first became known internationally after her participation in the 51st Venice Biennale in 2005; and in 2012, she became the first woman (and the youngest artist) to exhibit at the Palace of Versailles.

For more information about San Clemente Palace Kempinski Venice, please visit: http://www.kempinski.com/en/venice/san-clemente-palace-kempinski

ABOUT SAN CLEMENTE PALACE KEMPINSKI VENICE:

The resort hotel has an impressive heritage and is uniquely situated on San Clemente Island in the Lagoon of Venice. Set among a centuries-old park, antique courtyards and a 12th-century church, the hotel provides the perfect setting for total relaxation, just minutes from St. Mark’s Square. All 190 rooms and suites provide a stunning view of Venice, the lagoon, the gardens or the inner courtyards. The hotel also offers six convention rooms for up to 450 people, and together with the whole complex and its surrounding grounds, it is the ideal place for weddings and other events, with the historic scenery providing an unforgettable setting.

VENICE’S SAN CLEMENTE PALACE KEMPINSKI REOPENS FOR ITS 2019 SEASON

San Clemente Palace Kempinski, the Venetian luxury resort uniquely located on its own private island eight minutes away from St. Mark’s Square, will open for its fourth season on March 20, 2019.

Just minutes from the bustle of Venice and set among a centuries-old park, antique courtyards and monastery buildings, the 190-room resort has its own pitch & putt golf course, a tennis court, spa, heated outdoor pool and outdoor jogging trails, as well as a kids’ club for younger guests. Last year, the resort unveiled Al Bacaro, an outdoor lounge serving cichetti (Venetian tapas) and cocktails, overlooking the Venetian lagoon and skyline.

Throughout the 2019 season, San Clemente Palace will offer a number of unique offerings for Easter, Spring Break, the Venice Biennale and beyond. During Easter weekend, the resort will offer a special “Kids Stay for Free” package, along with celebratory chocolate egg-decorating workshops and Easter Brunch for the whole family. To commemorate the 58th Venice Biennale, from May 11 through November 4, 2019, San Clemente Palace will also offer a special dedicated package, including exclusive tickets to the Biennale.

San Clemente Palace is also poised to become a true foodie destination this year, as the resort will welcome four top Michelin-starred guest chefs to cook alongside Executive Chef Giorgio Schifferegger for a special event called “Cena a Quattro Mani” (“Four-Hands Dinner”). San Clemente Palace will also be home to a number of other special F&B events, including a Wine & Beer pairing menu with local craft beer and wine, and a pizza-tasting event welcoming Pizza World Champion Gianni Calaon.

In honor of the resort’s opening, San Clemente Palace is offering a discount of up to 40% on all suites for stays between March 20 and April 30, 2019.

For more information about the San Clemente Palace Kempinski, please visit

http://www.kempinski.com/en/venice/san-clemente-palace-kempinski/special-offers/.

Q&A With Todd Schireson, Abell Auction Co.

Vice President of Abell Auction Company, Todd Schireson, gives a one-on-one personal interview regarding his business as well as his family’s legacy.

Q: How does one become a curator for an auction?

A: Although I have a BA Degree in Business/Economics, I grew up surrounded by antiques and fine art through the family business. I started taking an interest in design, and knew that I wanted to work in the art world.

Q: When did you realize that you wanted to continue your family’s legacy?

A: I was working in high-end residential management and was fortunate enough to work closely with some of the most important interior designers of the day. I became increasingly passionate about art and design, and started taking more of an interest in the auction business. My grandfather and father were both co-owners of the family auction house and it was a natural step to take in my mid-twenties.

Q: What type of research have you conducted in order to keep your pulse on the millennial consumer?

A: My research comes from years of experience as an auctioneer watching what different age groups are buying. We have changed our business format to encompass more millennial buyers. We hold specialty auctions, especially featuring more mid-century and luxury goods to accommodate that market.

Q: Do you consider yourself a philanthropist? Does any of your proceeds at your auction go towards any humanitarian efforts?

A: All of the auctioneers at Abell including myself donate our time to doing charitable auction events. I recently served as an auctioneer for the Jane Goodall foundation charity auction, and have done cancer foundation auctions as well.

Q: Describe your most eclectic find for this youthful market segment?

A: Every so often we come across really fun estates in Southern California. One estate that a youthful market responded well to was a single-owner men’s sneaker collection. We sold more than 200 pairs of collectible, new, in-box sneakers.

Q: How do you select a location for your pop-up engagements?

A: We selected a location based off of a diverse, younger, affluent market. We typically use the Venice area for its walkable neighborhood and the educated art community present.

Q: What advice would you give to someone aspiring to be an auctioneer?

A: The main facets of being an auctioneer are obtaining merchandise and selling merchandise. For both you have to know your customer base, know what look is selling, and be educated about any piece that could come across an auction house.

Q: Is there anything you wish us to know about your next endeavors?

A: We are taking a 102-year-old business and bring it into the 21st century by becoming more accessible online, to reach an audience that can’t necessarily be here in person.

Q: Are you tackling other markets besides LA? National? International?

A: We have a solid base in Southern California, but have expanded into Palm Springs, Northern California and Las Vegas. We are an internationally and nationally recognized auction house; our expansion into the international markets has been a result of expanding online.