Posts tagged with "homelessness"

Camino Press Photo by Def Jam Recordings for use by 360 Magazine

Camino QxA

Camino, an Atlanta-based singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, is an inspirational, soulful pop and R&B powerhouse with his debut EP, Burning Fire, to be released on April 23. Burning Fire regales the tale of Camino’s past­– both painful and joyous­­­–as he struggled with homelessness after his move from Mississippi to Atlanta, followed his tenacious passion for music, and eventually landed an impressive record deal with Def Jam Recordings. Camino’s music is authentic, invigorating, and raw­. Here at 360 Magazine, we sat down with Camino to discuss how he found inspiration to pursue music in his darkest moments, dream music collaborations, and the upcoming release of his full-length album.

1. What response are you anticipating when your EP, Burning Fire, drops? 

Honestly, I don’t know. I obviously hope the response is amazing, but I honestly don’t know. I just hope people like it and find a way to connect to it.

2. How would you describe the sound of Burning Fire in three words? 

Cinematic, anthemic and vulnerable   

3. Who was your biggest musical inspiration in writing Burning Fire?

My aunt and uncle inspired the song, and it is about them and their story. But musically, Imagine Dragons and Adele, most definitely.  

4. What kept you going to pursue music when it may have felt like the odds were stacked against you? 

God and faith. I know I’m meant to do music. It’s the only thing I’m good at and it’s the only thing that makes me truly happy­­­­–like truly to my core happy.   

 

5. Who would be your dream artist to collaborate with? 

Billie Eilish, Adele, Sam Smith and Lewis Capaldi are all incredible. I’d love to collaborate with any of them. 

6. Did your move from Mississippi to Atlanta influence the music you were listening to and drawing inspiration from? 

Yes, absolutely. Coming from a small city like Jackson, Mississippi compared to Atlanta, Georgia was such a huge leap for me. It gave me more confidence to write the songs I wrote and instilled the passion in me to create the songs I did.  


7. How are you feeling about already being signed such a notable label as Def Jam Recordings? Incredible. God is the greatest. Def Jam is home. They are incredible and provide every resource I need. Shoutout to my team I LOVE Y’ALL!   

8. Looking ahead, do you have more plans for releasing any other music in 2021?  

Yes, full-length album coming. That is my true masterpiece. Just stay tuned–I’m so excited to share with the world.

Keith Washing and KEM illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Keith Washington × KEM

TV ONE’S CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED DOCU-SERIES, UNSUNG AND UNCENSORED CONTINUES WITH R&B GREATS KEITH WASHINGTON AND KEM THIS SUNDAY, APRIL 11 AT 9 P.M. ET/8C

New Episodes of UNSUNG Features Mystikal, Syleena Johnson, Bobby V, Lyfe Jennings and The Jones Girls

New Episodes of UNCENSORED Features Remy Ma, Marsha Ambrosius, Lisa Leslie and Jaleel White

All-new episodes of TV One’s original docu-series UNSUNG and UNCENSORED continue this Sunday, April 11. UNSUNG leads the night with Keith Washington at 9 p.m ET/8C immediately followed by UNCENSORED with KEM at 10 p.m. ET/9C This season, fans are treated to a sneak-peek look at episodes with the new digital series Unwind with Syleena Johnson. Each episode will be published on TVOne.TV and TV One’s social media platforms. Syleena will react to clips, share anecdotes, and provide cocktail recipes for viewers to unwind to as they watch both UNSUNG and UNCENSORED. She’ll end each episode reminding viewers of their chance to win a $250 Amazon gift card.

UNSUNG: Keith Washington

Singer Keith Washington burst onto the 90s R&B scene with a sensual, smooth style that was undeniable. Keith reveals the trials he overcame to become a star and the struggle to regain his passion and purpose after reaching the lowest depths.

The six-time NAACP Image Award-winning series UNSUNG continues the season with equally unforgettable stories from a wide array of artists including Mystikal, Syleena Johnson, Bobby V, Lyfe Jennings, and The Jones Girls. UNSUNG, one of the network’s longest-running series, highlights the careers and explores the personal lives of some of the most talented, versatile, and influential black vocal artists.

UNSUNG is narrated by actor Gary Anthony Williams and is Executive Produced by Arthur Smith and Frank Sinton of A. Smith & Co. Productions. Mark Rowland also serves as Executive Producer. For TV One, Jason Ryan is Executive in Charge of Production; Donyell Kennedy-McCullough is Senior Director of Talent & Casting; and Robyn Arrington Greene is Head of Original Programming and Production.

UNCENSORED: KEM

The hit autobiographical series UNCENSORED explores the lives of your favorite personalities as they provide first-hand accounts of their success and the obstacles they faced throughout their careers. This week’s episode hits a high note with R&B trailblazer KEM. The “Love Calls” singer is a three-time Grammy-nominated artist. However, his journey to success wasn’t easy. He struggled with addiction and homelessness before using music to help him find his way through.

This season of UNCENSORED profiles Remy Ma, Marsha Ambrosius, Lisa Leslie and Jaleel White.

UNCENSORED is produced for TV One by Eric Tomosunas, Keith Neal, James Seppelfrick and Paul Hall (Executive Producers), Jay Allen (Co-Executive Producer), and Nikki Byles (Producer) of Swirl Films. For TV One, Jason Ryan is Executive in Charge of Production; Donyell Kennedy-McCullough is Senior Director of Talent & Casting; and Robyn Greene Arrington is Vice President of Original Programming and Production.

For more information on UNCENSORED and UNSUNG, visit TV One’s YouTube Channel and check out exclusive, behind-the-scenes content on the website. Viewers can also join the conversation by connecting via social media on TV One’s Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Be sure to follow UNCENSORED and UNSUNG on Facebook and Instagram.

#TheFloatingChallenge by GARMENT DISTRICT FOR GOWNS for use by 360 Magazine

The Floating Challenge

NEW YORK FASHION TEAMS UP WITH GARMENT DISTRICT FOR GOWNS TO RAISE FUNDS FOR NYC FAMILIES IN NEED

#THEFLOATINGCHALLENGE CAMPAIGN TO BENEFIT THE FLOATING HOSPITAL, WHO PROVIDE EMERGENCY RELIEF & FREE HEALTHCARE IN NYC

#THEFLOATINGCHALLENGE RUNS FROM MARCH 3RD – MARCH 31ST ON INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, REDDIT & TIKTOK

Premier NYC designers Marc Jacobs, Oscar De La Renta, Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler, Monse, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Prabal Gurung and others have teamed up with Garment District For Gowns (GDFG) to help raise funds for NYC families in need.  The designers have donated select pieces from their collection to be raffled as prizes in conjunction with GDFG’s #TheFloatingChallenge campaign.

Launching March 3rd and running through March 31st, #TheFloatingChallenge is a social media campaign to raise awareness and secure donations for The Floating Hospital (TFH). #TheFloatingChallenge asks participants to share a photo of themselves “floating”, tag @TheFloatingChallenge and three friends who “keep them afloat” to pass on the message. Participants are invited to make donations through the Garment District For Gowns website, which will automatically enter them into the raffle for the chance to win the donated designer items. The prizes will be drawn on March 31st with additional prizes awarded to creative submissions to #TheFloatingChallenge social media campaign. Other designers and lifestyle brands taking part include Coach, Loeffler Randall, La Perla, Danielle Frankel, Augustinus Bader, Discount Universe, Standards Manual, Cinnamon Projects, Olivia Wendel, Maison Cruz, Piecework Puzzles and more to be announced.

All proceeds benefit The Floating Hospital, a 155 year old charitable organization that provides free healthcare services to medically underserved communities in New York City, primarily made up of families living in shelters and temporary housing. GDFG will be providing The Floating Hospital with critical PPE supplies and an extensive list of essential items urgently needed by the families they serve, including infant diapers, socks & underwear, childrens clothing, adult professional clothing to be worn during job interviews and more.  Corporate sponsorship has been secured to bolster the donation effort.

More than 15,000 families are temporarily housed in municipal shelters, and even more families and children live “doubled-up” in spaces rented or owned by others, such as friends or family members. Millions of New Yorkers live on the razor’s edge, one personal crisis away from homelessness. 1 in 7 New Yorkers have lost their job in the past 12 months in the wake of the Covid-19 epidemic.

ABOUT GARMENT DISTRICT FOR GOWNS

GDFG is a female-founded, NYC-based non-profit organization that provides healthwear and crisis relief to medical facilities and community organizations.  Founded in the wake of the Covid-19 epidemic, they have manufactured and distributed medical isolation gowns for over 46 Hospitals and Healthcare facilities, donating more than 11,000 gowns to date–all proudly made in the USA.  Comprising members of the fashion community­­–with experience at designer labels including Oscar De La Renta, The Row, Ralph Lauren and Coach–GDFG is an advocate for domestic manufacturing, having mobilized over 1200 U.S. jobs within sourcing and production. GDFG was in the first round of awardees of the Empire State Development grant.

ABOUT THE FLOATING HOSPITAL

The Floating Hospital is a charitable institution that combines healthcare, social support, and the delivery of necessities to New York City’s neediest families, with a particular focus on women and children. TFH’s unique integrated-care model includes medical, dental, and behavioral health programs and free health-education programming all under one roof. It also offers a free shelter-to-clinic shuttle service from nearly 300 locations throughout the five boroughs. True to its historic “more than healthcare” model, TFH also provides essentials such as food, seasonal clothing, diapers, and hygiene products to families living with homelessness. The Floating Hospital has a deep commitment to meeting the needs of diverse populations; both our staff and the populations we serve is nearly 98% BIPOC.

Founded in 1866, TFH is one of the last family-practice-based charity hospitals in the city, extending high-quality, compassionate care to families regardless of race or ethnicity, immigration or insurance status, or ability to pay. Today, the Hospital maintains a 23% charity rate, which is 10 times higher than other not-for-profit hospitals, which average charity rates of 1-1.5%. Since its founding, the Hospital has served more than 5 million New Yorkers. For more info, visit their website.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Marsha's House in the Bronx for 360 MAGAZINE.

Marsha’s House: Shelter for LGBTQ+

In Greenwich Village near where Stonewall Inn resides, a monument will be built to honor the legacy of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, trailblazers and history-makers for the LGBTQ+ community. Marsha P. Johnson was a black transgender woman and drag queen, whose outspoken activism and radical vision during the Gay Liberation Movement continues to inspire people today.

A monument isn’t the only place bearing her memory. Marsha’s House- operated by the nonprofit Project Renewal- opened on February 15, 2017 to continue to serve the community as Marsha did, by taking in homeless LGBTQ+ young adults. With the added risks and discrimination that they face, Marsha’s House seeks to provide valuable resources and shelter to these LGBTQ+ youth.

According to a report done by the National Institutes of Health, around 62% of homeless LGBTQ+ youth have faced discrimination from their families. Jazmine Pérez, Program Director of Marsha’s House, stressed the importance of having a “safe space dedicated to [LGBTQ+ homeless youth]” as “New York City had never had housing tailored to their needs.”

These youth face particular adversities that are further complicated when alternative housing options do not have the facilities to aid them, or are outright discriminatory towards them. A study done by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln shows that 41% of homeless and runaway LGBTQ+ adolescents they interviewed have major depression, in comparison to 28% of homeless heterosexual adolescents interviewed.

 Marsha’s House boasts a variety of programs catered towards some of the issues that LGBTQ+ individuals face. Pérez outlines services which include “referrals to legal supportive services, education, healthcare, and employment programs.”

Additionally, clients that come to Marsha’s House are assured personalized living arrangements that assist each individual in finding employment and housing. “Our Case Managers and Peer Counselors meet with clients to ensure compliance with their individual living plan. They work closely with our Job Developer, Vocational Counselor, and Housing Coordinator to secure employment and housing.”

Concerns over Covid-19 pandemic are ever prevalent in the context of shared living facilities, like homeless shelters. However, Marsha’s House eases some of this concern by screening potential clients for the virus, enforcing social distancing, and cutting down accommodation from 81 beds to 60 in its 5-floor-walk-up facility. The facility maintains 20 rooms of various sizes, from single rooms to larger rooms that accommodate up to 6 people.

But Covid-19 hasn’t been the only adversity Marsha’s House has faced in recent years. The Trump administration has continued to be a source of disparaging policies and remarks against the LGBTQ+ community. On July 23, 2020, the Department of Housing and Urban Development formally announced a proposal that would reverse the 2012 Equal Access Rule, which warrants protection for homeless transgender people against discrimination by homeless shelters and other federally funded alternative housing. 

This comes as a setback and large blow to the transgender community. A 2015 survey done by The National Center for Transgender Equality shows that “70% of respondents who stayed in a shelter in the past year reported some form of mistreatment, including being harassed, sexually or physically assaulted, or kicked out because of being transgender.” The HUD’s rollback on the Equal Access Rule would only serve to undo the progress that has been made to make homeless shelters more safe to the marginalized people that need them.

    “The rhetoric and policies of the Trump administration have disregarded the very identities of our clients and staff, especially when it comes to the intersectionality of our existence,” said Pérez. “Speaking personally, as a woman of color with trans experience, I feel like I have three strikes against me in the eyes of this administration.”

Despite these incredible challenges they face, Marsha’s House continues to receive equally incredible help- from the support coming from their progressive state of New York, to the generous donors that help fund Project Renewal, to the operations staff that help run things every single day. “Our Marsha’s House Heroes are our operations staff. As essential workers, they have not skipped a beat with reporting to work and providing the support our clients needed. Being that we are a shelter, we operate 24/7/365, and our operations staff members are always here for their full 8-hour shifts.”

COLLEGE STUDENTS × HOMELESSNESS

For the fifth year in row, the #RealCollege survey has documented a crisis affecting American higher education. Researchers conclude that more than 6 million students are affected by food and/or housing insecurity.

The #RealCollege survey is led by the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University.  In 2019, the survey was completed by more than 167,000 students at 227 community colleges and four-year colleges and universities located in 44 states and the District of Columbia.

A remarkable 17% of students who answered the survey were homeless at some point in the last year, almost 40% were food insecure, and almost half faced housing insecurity.  The results are consistent with the prior #RealCollege surveys and those led by other researchers around the nation.

“It is clear that college is now about serious financial struggles, not partying.  Money weighs heavily on students’ minds, and without a safe place to sleep and enough to eat they cannot concentrate on learning,” said Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab, founding director of the Hope Center and the leading expert on basic needs insecurity among college students. “This is a waste of talent and it undermines our economy. To become student-ready, colleges need to move beyond food pantries and take preventative measures, and policymakers must support them. There are six pieces of federal legislation to address these issues pending in Congress now—it is time to act!”

Among the 167,000 respondents in this year’s survey:

·      39% were food insecure in the last 30 days;

·      46% were housing insecure in the previous year;

·      17% were homeless in the previous year; and

·      Some groups of students were more at risk than others: community college students, racial/ethnic minorities, and LGBTQ students were all more likely than others to face one or more of these challenges

This year’s response rate of 167,000 students represents about 8% of the total number of students contacted for the survey, according to the Hope Center.  “We think these are conservative estimates of the true extent of the problem, since students without funds rarely have time to do surveys or access to the necessary technology for e-surveys like this one,” said Christine Baker-Smith, Managing Director of the Hope Center. “We don’t advertise the survey as focused on food or housing, and do not offer any help.”  The Hope Center’s research team estimates that that the figures extrapolate to at least 6 million affected students.

There are many interconnected reasons college students are facing basic needs insecurity today, according to the report. Some of these are:

· Tuition is up, but more importantly, financial aid to students has not kept up with the cost of living although college loans are still available;

·      Students are being asked to pay for books and tuition but lack the financial support the system demands—many students today are themselves parents or are supporting other family members;

·      Employers are less likely to want to hire students since they may have complicated schedules, and for the students who can find flexible work, the minimum wage has not kept up with cost of living increases;

·      Th social safety net is not what it used to be—today, many college students are excluded from programs such as SNAP, for example; and

·      College themselves are struggling with insufficient money to help students in need. For example, in public higher education, budgets have been cut 25% on a per-student basis over the last 30 years.

Because the problem stems from many different avenues, the solutions are multi-pronged as well. The first step, according to the report, is for colleges and universities to admit there is a problem. The Hope Center is offering to support any institution that wants to address these problems; they can sign up here.  Among the programs the report describes that have helped at campuses across the U.S.:

·      Meal vouchers or swipes;

·      Access to public benefits, such as SNAP, or transportation/housing assistance;

·      Emergency aid that students can access quickly, for unforeseen expenses like car repairs or groceries;

·      Case management, so the students have a contact on campus who can help them navigate the help available to them.

In 2020, the Hope Center plans to release the following reports that focus on different college student populations and aspects of student life:

·      March 24: Student Athletes 

·      April TBA: Staff and Faculty

·      April 8: Parenting Students

·      April 13Philadelphia

·      May 13: Transportation

·      May TBA: Mental Health

The full #RealCollege National Survey 2020 can be found online at this link: http://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2019_RealCollege_Survey_Report.pdf  

The colleges and universities that took part in this year’s #RealCollege Survey are:

Two-Year Colleges

Aims Community College (CO)

Alexandria Technical & Community College (MN)

Amarillo College (TX)

Anoka Technical College (MN)

Anoka-Ramsey Community College (MN)

Arapahoe Community College (CO)

Atlantic Cape Community College (NJ)

Austin Community College District (TX)

Bay de Noc Community College (MI)

Bellevue College (WA)

Bergen Community College (NJ)

Blackhawk Technical College (WI)

Blue Mountain Community College (OR)

Bristol Community College (MA)

Brookdale Community College (NJ)

Brookhaven College (TX)

Bucks County Community College (PA)

Bunker Hill Community College (MA)

Camden County College (NJ)

Cayuga Community College (NY)

Cedar Valley College (TX)

Central Lakes College Brainerd (MN)

Central Lakes College Staples (MN)

Central Oregon Community College (OR)

Centralia College (WA)Cerritos College (CA)

Chaffey College (CA)

Clackamas Community College (OR)

Clark College (WA)

Clatsop Community College (OR)

Clover Park Technical College (WA)

Columbia Basin College (WA)

Columbia Gorge Community College (OR)

Community College of Allegheny County (PA)

Community College of Baltimore County (MD)

Community College of Philadelphia (PA)

Community College of Rhode Island (RI)

Compton College (CA)

County College of Morris (NJ)

Cuyamaca College (CA)

Dabney S. Lancaster Community College (VA)

Delaware County Community College (PA)

Durham Technical Community College (NC)

Dutchess Community College (NY)

Eastfield College (TX)

Edmonds Community College (WA)

El Centro College (TX)

Essex County College (NJ)

Everett Community College (WA)

Finger Lakes Community College (NY)

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (MN)

Galveston College (TX)

Glendale Community College (CA)

Grayson College (TX)

Green River College (WA)

Greenville Technical College (SC)

Grossmont College (CA)

Hibbing Community College (MN)

Highline College (WA)

Holyoke Community College (MA)

Hudson County Community College (NJ)

Hudson Valley Community College (NY)

Itasca Community College (MN)

Ivy Tech Community College (IN)

Jamestown Community College (NY)

Jefferson State Community College (AL)

Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College (WI)

Lake Washington Institute of Technology (WA)

Leeward Community College (HI)

Linn-Benton Community College (OR)

Lone Star College (TX)

Lower Columbia College (WA)

Massasoit Community College (MA)

Mesabi Range College (MN)

Middlesex Community College (MA)

Middlesex County College (NJ)

Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MN)

Minnesota State College Southeast (MN)

Minnesota State Community and Technical College (MN)

Mohawk Valley Community College (NY)

Monroe Community College (NY)

Montgomery College (MD)

Mountain View College (TX)

Mt. Hood Community College (OR)

Napa Valley College (CA)

Nassau Community College (NY)

North Central Texas College (TX)

North Lake College (TX)

North Seattle College (WA)

Northern Essex Community College (MA)

Northern Virginia Community College (VA)

Northland Community and Technical College (MN)

Northwest Technical College (MN)

Ocean County College (NJ)

Olympic College (WA)

Onondaga Community College (NY)

Oregon Coast Community College (OR)

Orleans Technical College (PA)

Ozarks Technical Community College (MO)

Passaic County Community College (NJ)

Patrick Henry Community College (VA)

Pellissippi State Community College (TN)

Pierce College-Fort Steilacoom (WA)

Pierce College-Puyallup (WA)

Portland Community College (OR)

Rainy River Community College (MN)

Raritan Valley Community College (NJ)

Red Rocks Community College (CO)

Reedley College (CA)

Renton Technical College (WA)

Richland College (TX)

Ridgewater College (MN)

Riverland Community College (MN)

Riverside City College (CA)

Rochester Community and Technical College (MN)

Rogue Community College (OR)

Rowan College at Burlington County (NJ)

Rowan College of South Jersey (NJ)

SUNY Adirondack (NY)

SUNY Corning Community College (NY)

SUNY Erie Community College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)

SUNY Orange (NY)

Saint Paul College (MN)

Salish Kootenai College (MT)

San Diego City College (CA)

San Diego Continuing Education (CA)

San Diego Mesa College (CA)

San Diego Miramar College (CA)

San Jose City College (CA)

Santa Rosa Junior College (CA)

Santiago Canyon College (CA)

Seattle Central College (WA)

Shoreline Community College (WA)

Skagit Valley College (WA)

South Puget Sound Community College (WA)

South Seattle College (WA)

Southwestern Oregon Community College (OR)

Spokane Community College (WA)

Spokane Falls Community College (WA)

St. Cloud Technical and Community College (MN)

St. Philip’s College (TX)

Sussex County Community College (NJ)

Tacoma Community College (WA)

Tallahassee Community College (FL)

Texas Southmost College (TX)

Tillamook Bay Community College (OR)

Treasure Valley Community College (OR)

Trinity Valley Community College (TX)

Umpqua Community College (OR)

Union County College (NJ)

Wake Technical Community College (NC)

Walla Walla Community College (WA)

Wallace State Community College Hanceville (AL)

Warren County Community College (NJ)

Wenatchee Valley College (WA)

Westchester Community College (NY)

Western Technical College (WI)

Whatcom Community College (WA)

White Earth Tribal and Community College (MN)

Yakima Valley College (WA)

Four-Year Colleges and Universities

Alfred State College (NY)*

Bridgewater State University (MA)

Cedar Crest College (PA)

Colorado School of Mines (CO)

Colorado State University—Fort Collins (CO)

Colorado State University— Global (CO)

Daytona State College (FL)*

Diné College (AZ)*

Drexel University (PA)

Emporia State University (KS)

Fashion Institute of Technology (NY)*

Fitchburg State University (MA)

Florida State College at Jacksonville (FL)*

Fort Lewis College (CO)

Framingham State University (MA)

George Fox University (OR)

Grand Valley State University (MI)

La Salle University (PA)

Lehigh University (PA)

Maryville College (TN)

Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MA)

Mercy College of Ohio (OH)*

Metropolitan State University (MN)

Metropolitan State University of Denver (CO)

Miami Dade College (FL)*

Minnesota State University Moorhead (MN)

Muhlenberg College (PA)

Northern Vermont University Johnson (VT)

Oglala Lakota College (SD)

Rhode Island College (RI)

SUNY Cobleskill (NY)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (NY)

SUNY College Old Westbury (NY)

SUNY Cortland (NY)

SUNY Delhi (NY)*

SUNY Empire State College (NY)

SUNY Fredonia (NY)

SUNY Maritime College (NY)

SUNY Morrisville (NY)*

SUNY New Paltz (NY)

SUNY Oneonta (NY)

SUNY Oswego (NY)

SUNY Polytechnic institute (NY)

SUNY Potsdam (NY)

SUNY Upstate Medical University (NY)

Salem Community College (NJ)

Southwest Minnesota State University (MN)

St. John’s University (NY)

St. Norbert College (WI)

Stony Brook University (NY)

Temple University (PA)

The College at Brockport (NY)

The University of Montana (MT)

United Tribes Technical College (ND)*

University of Alaska Fairbanks (AK)

University of Central Missouri (MO)

University of Colorado Denver (CO)

University of Kansas (KS)

University of Massachusetts Boston (MA)

University of Massachusetts Lowell (MA)

University of Memphis (TN)

University of Missouri St. Louis (MO)

University of Northern Colorado (CO)

West Virginia University (WV)

Western Washington University (WA)

Westfield State University (MA)

York College of Pennsylvania (PA)

* Institution primarily offer credentials other than a Bachelor’s degree and was included in two-year rates.