Posts tagged with "Gabrielle Marchan"

Gaming illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

How Graphic Design is Used for Online Gaming

When most individuals are asked what graphic designers do, they are likely to say they create logos, business cards, t-shirts, or other 2D images. Even though we engage with visual designers’ work every time we choose which games to play online, few people will mention their importance in game design. 

However, graphic design has taken on new dimensions in the twenty-first century, and with the growing online digital environment, it now plays a more critical function than ever before. Graphic design may be seen everywhere on the digital screen, from building web interfaces to online marketing, social media to online games.

The gaming industry is perhaps one of the most challenging fields in digital design. Of course, you need motion graphics, but you also need to pay attention to detail for credible elements and gaming instructions. Nevertheless, it’s safe to conclude that the gaming industry has progressed significantly. This article will look at how graphic design is vital in online gaming.

Marketing

Because many graphic designers work in marketing, their ability to create appealing visuals could benefit video games. Design specialists will capture people’s attention and enhance revenue long term by developing gorgeous banners. As users’ attention spans have shrunk dramatically in recent years, a visual approach gradually takes over written content.

User Interface

A graphic designer creates a game’s user interface (UI). The user interface is a collection of visual elements that allow the player to interact with the game and access various tools and settings. Several user interfaces are frequently found in a single game. When you initially start a game, the first UI you see is usually the launch screen, which sends you to the Menu, which is another UI. Each menu item opens to its own UI, which uses components like volume sliders and mouse sensitivity to assist you in navigating through each setting.

A graphic designer is responsible for selecting where all of these visual components and text should be placed so that they do not obstruct the player’s main view. Therefore, an excellent understanding of visual hierarchy is one of the most crucial skills a graphic designer possesses.

Gaming

So far, we’ve looked at how graphics are utilized in online games to attract attention and convey instructions, but what about the game itself? The motion graphics are well-articulated to guarantee that they achieve their full potential in terms of authenticity. Because online games are frequently adaptations of real-life games, such as casino games, getting them as similar to the real thing as possible is critical to ensure the gamer has a good time. Some of the most well-known gaming studios have reaped the benefits of advances in graphic design and computer technology, producing games that are as immersive as they come.

Video games are multi-faceted bodies with a semiotic landscape as one of them. Signs, display panels, visual announcements, and various other features distinguish games. These graphic objects are frequently employed in real life, such as in ads and the in-game world. As a result, it’s critical to pay close attention to them, enlisting a graphic designer’s help.

Graphic designers’ responsibilities do not end with the elements mentioned above. These designers will always be in demand for a variety of projects. In addition, graphic design is an integral part of gaming since it allows you to fully immerse yourself in the experience. We may take the technology employed in the graphical design component of games for granted, still, it has taken a long road of experimentation in line with general advances in computer technology to get to where we are now.

Overall, graphic design has become an essential part of many industries. It has been established via the study of online gaming that graphic design is critical to the success of the digital game. Consider this: without design in marketing, fewer people will be drawn to the game; without design in instructions, people may be confused about how the game works; and without design in the game itself, people may be dissatisfied with the game they have played.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Miami Design District Recap

For the first time since the pandemic, it’s starting to look a lot like Miami Art Week 2021. Art and design-lovers from everywhere have made their way to Miami, where Art Basel Miami and Design Miami has reopened their doors to enthusiasts, collectors, and curators.

Sunday, November 29

TOD’S CELEBRATES ARTIST WILLIE COLE & THE MOSAIC COLLECTION

Tod’s MOSAIC Collection is a limited-edition capsule collection of handbags and accessories made with unused leather from production. In celebration of this sustainability project, Tod’s commissioned American artist, Willie Cole to create unique sculptures made from recycled Tod’s leather and unused materials. ARTCYCLING, the creative project based on the same values as Tod’s MOSAIC Collection, is brought to life by Willie in collaboration with Tod’s artisans. Among notable guests in attendance who joined the brand and Willie Cole in celebrating Tod’s MOSAIC Collection and the brand’s collaboration with the artist were Karolina Kurkova, HRH Princess Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz, Prince Sultan bin Fahad bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz, Sarah Arison, Casey Fremont, Stefano Tonchi, Sai de Silva, Petra Levin, and Coco Bassey, amongst others.

Monday, November 29

JEFFREY DEITCH PRESENTS SHATTERED GLASS OPENING 

Shattered Glass, the acclaimed exhibition of new art by emerging artists of color, which was shown at Jeffrey Deitch Los Angeles last spring, is being presented in an expanded version in the Moore Building in the Miami Design District. The expanded Miami version of Shattered Glass will include fifteen new artists. The painting, sculpture, and photographic works in the exhibition are all figurative. The subject matter is often the artists’ family and friends. Their primary subject is their own life and their community. The participating artists are all strongly socially engaged; many of whom incorporate powerful social messages into their work. The exhibition represents a remarkable new generation that connects with a new art audience. Jeffrey Deitch has been presenting exhibitions and public art projects in the Miami Design District since 2002.

Location: Miami Design District The Moore Building

Tuesday, November 30

DAVID CASTILLO EXHIBITION PREVIEW OF “YOU SHOULD HAVE NEVER CROSSED THE RIO GRANDE,” A SOLO EXHIBITION OF FABRIC PAINTINGS AND ASSEMBLAGES BY PEPE MAR

David Castillo presents You Should Have Never Crossed the Rio Grande, a solo exhibition of fabric paintings and assemblages by Pepe Mar. The artist’s own experience of migration from Mexico to the United States serves as a stage through which he explores the current conditions of his own practice and of the country that he now calls home. He considers how migratory experiences have shaped the nation, and—by extension—how they have come to influence his own work in a city like Miami, where visual culture is inflected by a diversity of diasporas. And through the various pieces on view in the exhibition, Mar asks a compelling question: “How would my life and practice have developed had I stayed in Mexico?”

Location: 3930 NE 2nd Avenue, Suite 201, Miami, FL 33137

Wednesday, December 1

TIFFANY & CO. YELLOW IS THE NEW BLUE

Tiffany & Co. brings its yellow diamond-themed installation, Tiffany Yellow, to the Miami Design District as it transforms its boutique from classic Tiffany Blue to Yellow. In celebration of this event, the iconic Tiffany Diamond will be on display along with other timeless yellow diamonds. Tiffany has a long history with yellow diamonds and unmatched expertise in this area. Tiffany & Co. is the leader in diamond sustainability and transparency. For all diamonds (including yellow) over 1.8 carats, Tiffany shares the complete diamond craft journey from the mining process to the Blue Box.

Location: Tiffany & Co., 114 NE 39th St., Miami, FL 33137

HIGHSNOBIETY X BACCARAT DINNER CELEBRATING HIGHART WITH EIC THOM BETTRIDGE

An intimate and exciting dinner in the Miami Design District surrounded by sparkling Baccarat crystal celebrating HIGHArt with Editor-in-Chief, Thom Bettridge. Highsnobiety launches HIGHArt platform. An exploration of the collision of the style and art worlds from a Highsnobiety point of view, HIGHArt is designed for its loyal audience of next generation tastemakers and collectors. Building on the “content festival” format it launched with its Not In Paris project, Highsnobiety’s HIGHArt is a platform that blends content, commerce, and experience. It comes to life with a blitz of Miami programming including a month-long pop-up HIGHArt Museum Store in the Design District, nightly launch celebrations with partners including Baccarat and David Zwirner Gallery’s PLATFORM, and an eponymous print magazine featuring Bad Bunny on its first cover and conversations with leading creatives including Nigo, Grimes, Dan Graham, and beyond. The pop-up HIGHArt Museum Store, now open in Miami’s Design District through December 31, is “a museum store without the museum,” connecting the best of the best from within the cultural zeitgeist to create over 100 exclusive and unexpected artist-made products and editions curated by Highsnobiety Founder David Fischer alongside cultural mastermind Sarah Andelman of JUST AN IDEA and creative director Jeanne-Salomé Rochat of Novembre Magazine.

Location: Baccarat, Palm Court, 2nd Floor, Miami, FL 33137

RICK OWENS BOOK SIGNING WITH EDWARD BESS & MICHELE LAMY 

Guests joined for a book signing by Edward Bess and Michèle Lamy in the Rick Owens Boutique of their new release “Just An Idea.”

Location: 131 NE 41st St., Miami, FL 33137

PRADA CELEBRATES YOUNGARTS 40TH ANNIVERSARY HOSTED BY SARAH ARISON, SANDY & TONY TAMER, AND MICHI JIGARJIAN

Location: 152 NE 41st St, #112, Miami, FL 33137

BARBARA STURM + ELLE MACPHERSON TALK ON LIVING AN ANTI-INFLAMMATORY LIFESTYLE

Location: Dr. Barbara Sturm Boutique & Spa, 140 NE 39th St., Miami, FL 33137

Thursday, December 2

CRAIG ROBINS COLLECTION VIP TOURS 

The annual rehanging of Craig Robin‘s contemporary art collection highlights the work of American conceptual artist John Baldessari (1931-2020), and features recent acquisitions including work by Kenturah Davis, Sayre Gomez, Yesiyu Zhao, and more. The collection also features art and design by established favorites such as Urs Fisher, Jean Prouvé, Richard Tuttle, and Marlene Dumas. Open to Art Basel and Design VIP Cardholders only.

Location: 3841 NE 2nd Avenue, Suite 400

STONE ISLAND x SCREENING x MANNEQUIN INSTALLATION 

Stone Island combines the worlds of motocross and art with ANNEX, an experience curated by Katja Horvat and a film that celebrates the project by director Thibaut Grevet. ANNEX is a group artwork installation on a motocross track on the outskirts of Miami. The event began with a private dinner where attendees were invited to preview work installed along the dynamic contours of the track. Motocross riders rode the circuit during the preview, adding context to the art concept. The ANNEX film by director Thibaut Grevet is both a celebratory documentation of the event and the director’s own interpretation of the intersection between motocross and art. This short film is premiered during Miami Art Week at the Institute of Contemporary Art, and will be archived for viewing on stoneisland.com

JEFFREY DEITCH: 8-PANELIST TALK WITH ANGELO BAQUE SPONSORED BY GOAT

Location: Moore Elastika, 191 NE 41st Street, #100, Miami, FL 33137

MITCHELL-INNES & NASH GALLERY, GALERIE LELONG & GOODMAN GALLERY BRUNCH IN PARADISE PLAZA

Location: Paradise Plaza, 151 NE 41st St., Miami, FL 33137

VIRGIL TRIBUTE PROJECTION

Location: 191 NE 40th St., Miami, FL 33137

Television illustration via Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

Are Remastered Games Proof That the Industry Has Run Out of Ideas?

In 2021, around 30 remasters, remakes, and enhanced ports of classic video games were released to the market. This included Diablo II, Final Fantasy, The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword, Mass Effect, and the Grand Theft Auto Trilogy, along with many other big names from the last few decades.

These re-released titles allow players to enjoy classic video games on modern hardware with upgraded graphics and tweaked gameplay.

For players that enjoyed them when they were first released, these new versions are a way to reminisce about games they used to spend hours playing without having to deal with the hassle of buying an old console or finding an emulator. They also allow new players who may not have been around when a game was released 20 to 30 years ago to experience it for the first time.

By upgrading the graphics, old games can be made to look almost like a completely new title or at least help to find a balance between respecting the original version while giving it a modern feel.

However, some people are beginning to question whether the sheer volume of remastered titles is proof that the video games industry has become creatively bankrupt. But is this a fair assessment, or is there value in this refreshing of old content?

Preserving Classics

Video games can often have lifespans of just a few years. They get released, see a flurry of sales, and then get replaced by a sequel. Sure, players can return to them whenever they want, but as new generations of consoles get released, fewer and fewer people have access to old titles.

Yet, just because a video game is 10 years old doesn’t mean that it is bad. The things that made it fun then will still be fun today.

Remastering old titles helps to preserve these games and allows players to enjoy them again. And with the improved backwards compatibility and digital libraries of modern consoles, it is more likely that these old games will be available for years to come.

Introducing New Players to Gaming History

Some of the remasters and remakes that were released in 2020 and 2021 were originally created in the 1980s and 1990s. That means there are two whole generations of gamers that didn’t get to enjoy them on their original hardware.

This includes gaming royalty like Final Fantasy, Command & Conquer, Half-Life, Super Mario 64, Tony Hawk’s Pro-Skater, and Doom – all titles that most players would agree are timeless classics.

Remasters and remakes give these games a fresh lick of paint to help them look better compared to newer releases, making them more appealing to newer generations so that they can enjoy them too.

Remakes Can Add New Features

Remastered games are typically the ones that stood out at the time they were originally on the market. This is usually a sign that they were well made and fun to play.

Therefore, most games don’t need to be improved, augmented, or enhanced as they are still great in their original form.

However, remakes still provide an opportunity for developers to get creative, either by editing the original or creating new modes that put a modern spin on the classic mechanics. For example, the new “Definitive Edition” of Grand Theft Auto Vice City has introduced new wayfinding features to the map, a modern aiming system, and a new weapon selection tool.

Yet players can still enjoy the original story, the 80s soundtrack that features artists like Mötley Crüe, and the same Miami-vibe.

Similarly, online casinos often create different variants of classic games like blackjack. These new versions have a slightly different dynamic to the original version and present new challenges to the player. For example, in Live Free Bet Blackjack, the player can split or double down on certain hands for free.

Some players prefer these modern remakes, but for those that don’t, the original versions are usually also available.

Bankrupt?

Overall, remasters and remakes are not necessarily a sign of creative bankruptcy. The proof that fresh ideas and concepts still exist is found through looking at the huge number of new titles that are released each year.

Sure, big publishers are leaning a little more heavily on their older IP than they once were, but this is just a sign of how good that content is. After all, if players didn’t like these games, they wouldn’t be paying to play them again.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Enjoy The Wood

Enjoy The Wood (ETW), a family brand in Ukraine, which produces top quality handcrafted wooden accessories and customizable world maps that adorn people’s homes and offices. Since 2014, they have sent their signature products, Wooden Maps, to over 100,000 customers in 90 countries.

The founder Igor Fostenko has come a remarkable way, from a homeless teenager to a successful business-owner, an inspirational speaker, and a role model for the Ukrainian business world and beyond.

ETW has had five amazing runs on Kickstarter. Their first products were World Maps. In 2019, the ETW successfully funded its third project, the World’s first 3D Wooden World Map, that raised over $500,000. It is still one of its most popular minimalistic wall decoration products. A true bestseller. However, the 2021 launch of the 3D Luminous Colored Wooden World Map, has beat them all, when they walked away with over $800,000 to continue revolutionizing the Map decor market.

Each time, ETW comes up with products that are bigger and better, and there is no sign of slowing down. Inspired by their customers all over the world, they have become truly unstoppable, and unsinkable (unlike the Titanic).

When it comes to map decor, nobody does it better than ETW. A range of fascinating items to choose from in a variety of colors from soft and natural to simply glamorous: 3D Wooden World Map, 3D Colored Wooden World Map, Woden World Map, Colored Wooden World Map, Cork World Map, 3D LED Wooden World Map, 3D Solid Wooden World Map. And last but certainly not the least (a round of applause here, please), the 3D Luminous Colored Wooden World Map that has just gone public. It has four updated features: 18 vibrant new colors, luminescence effect, magnetic feature and new LED backlight (coming soon), that can be controlled right from the smartphone. Stores energy during the day, the darker it gets – the brighter it shines. Glows in the dark for up to two hours. Add a set of newly upgraded pins for a complete WOW experience. The innovative printing technology allows for highest resolution, incredible precision, and detail in each product. Variety of colors: bright and muted, textured and smooth, to fit any taste and interior.

The installation takes a couple of hours and there is a video with instructions. You will need to use double-sided sticky tape. No wires, extra tools, or appliances are required. Only top quality fiberboard to handcraft the 3D Luminous Colored Wooden World Maps. In the box, clients will find: Map pieces including ocean names, wooden planes, boats and compass, double-sided sticky tape, instructions, corner stencils and a lifetime warranty. The Map is available in different sizes.

A decoration like no other, an ETW map, regardless which one you choose, is a treat for the whole family, a surprise for house guests, and an object of pride. A perfect conversation starter and a mood setter.

So, what’s next for Enjoy the Wood? What kind of features would you like to see in the next ETW map on the market? Place your bets ladies and gentlemen. When it comes to what Enjoy the Wood can do, the sky’s the limit.

Kristin Poole image via Krista Detwiler at The Sun Valley Museum of Art

Sun Valley Museum of Art Q×A

By: Emily Bunn

 A keystone of Ketchum’s community, the iconic Sun Valley Museum of Art (SVMoA) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The museum is inviting the public to experience the joy of music and the arts to celebrate the momentous occasion. In past years, SVMoA has hosted 52 Grammy-Award winning artists, featured notable lecturers and visual artists, and awarded over $1 million in arts scholarships to local students and teachers. SVMoA’s Artistic Director, Kris Poole, sat down with 360 Magazine to talk about upcoming summer classes at the museum, the current BIG IDEA exhibition, and future plans for expansion. 

SVMoA is celebrating its 50th anniversary this summer! Are any special performances lined up to commemorate this momentous occasion? 

Clay, Silver, Ink: Sun Valley Center at 50, was on exhibit at The Museum from May through July.

The exhibition is guest-curated by artists Jim Romberg, Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ Director of Ceramics from 1973 to 1986, and Peter de Lory, who began teaching in 1974 and was Director of Photography from 1976 to 1979 and during the summers of 1982 and 1983.

Clay, Silver, Ink features artwork by 60 photographers, ceramic artists and printmakers, as well as several painters, who led classes and workshops at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts during the organization’s first 15 years. Many of the labels will include quotes from the artists that reflect on their experience at The Museum. A slide show of student work and snapshots from the era was also included in the exhibition.

SVMoA’s 50th Celebration & Birthday Concert will take place on August 26 and feature Pink Martini with China Forbes.

Pink Martini is led by the dynamic and hyperenergetic Thomas Lauderdale. The group’s repertoire is inspired by music from around the world and crosses genres of classical, jazz and old-fashioned pop. With 12 musicians onstage and songs performed in 25 languages, Pink Martini has crisscrossed the globe and has played with more than 70 orchestras.

Lauderdale’s co-conspirator in the band is his Harvard classmate, China Forbes. A year after starting the band, Lauderdale invited Forbes to join Pink Martini, and they began penning songs together. Since then, Forbes and Lauderdale have co-written many of Pink Martini’s most beloved songs, including “Sympathique,” “Lilly,” “Clementine,” and “Let’s Never Stop Falling in Love.” Forbes’ original song “Hey Eugene” is the title track of Pink Martini’s third album, and many of her songs can also be heard on television and film.

The concert will be a special one, starting with a look back at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ 50 years and a look ahead to SVMoA’s next 50. SVMoA will share memories and birthday cupcakes and asks everyone to come dressed for a party.

Is SVMoA offering any summer workshops or adult classes?

Yes! We offered 22 adult classes last year, and we plan to expand that programming throughout 2021 and into 2022. Classes range from one-night craft series workshops to creative jump-ins and week-long master class intensives. This summer, we offered the following courses:

Craft Series Workshop:

THREE COLOR REDUCTION PRINTS

Craft Series Workshop

CERAMIC TRANSFORMATION VESSELS

Writing Class

A THOUSAND WORDS: Guided Writing about the Art You See

Creative Jump-In

POCKET SKETCHING

Craft Series Workshop

CAPTURING THE BEST PHOTOS ON YOUR IPHONE

Creative Jump-In

NO-WASTE LEATHER BAG

Creative Jump-In

BEGINNING DRAWING

Creative Jump-In

SUN VALLEY STONES: Oil painting

Creative Jump-In

BUILDING LAYERS WITH OIL AND COLD WAX 

How many students are currently in SVMoA’s art education program and k-12 education program this year?

SVMoA serves nearly 4,000 students through four unique arts education programs over the course of a year, reaching every child in Blaine County. Some programs happen in school classrooms, others in the museum space or performance halls. SVMoA’s student participants come from every public and private school in the Wood River Valley.

SVMoA features “BIG IDEA” projects. What does the BIG IDEA represent?

The BIG IDEA was designed to allow our community to enter into the conversation through a variety of avenues. If you are interested in going to see a film, or listening to a lecture, we hope the program content piques your curiosity enough to get you to visit the exhibition in The Museum or take a class that will allow you to go deeper into the subject. BIG IDEAs run the gamut from serious subjects like Refugees and/or Gender in the 21st century, to lighter fare that explores subjects, like the important role that bees or bicycles play in our world. Artists make art about the world they live in, and more often than not, what is on their minds is a topic we should be paying attention to as well.  We have the opportunity to use the BIG IDEA model to engage people in ideas that matter. The art on exhibition, the music, films, lectures, discussions are all fodder for some pretty interesting conversations.

Why did SVMoA choose to display “Untrammeled: At Wilderness’ Edge” as the museum’s current big idea project?

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebration, we wanted to explore a BIG IDEA that had specific resonance with our local community. Because Sun Valley is a mountain resort town whose very existence owes its debt to the wilderness, we felt reexamining the premise of the 1964 Wilderness Act was an important effort.

At the time that we began talking with artists we had no idea that at this moment the topic would hold particular urgency. Our community, like many others in the mountain west, is experiencing an explosion of tourism and new residents. The exhibition and BIG IDEA grapple with what it means to live on the edge of and with wild places—how do we respect people’s need to be in the wilderness with our need to preserve and protect that very space? How should our idea of “managing” wilderness change/evolve?

We are so pleased to be engaged in the discussion through the work of 4 powerful artists, all of whom have international reputations, and two of whom we commissioned to do new work for this project. Adding talks by journalist Kevin Fedarko and curator Jock Reynolds only enriches the conversation. 

Who is the next speaker in the museum’s lecture series? Why was this speaker chosen? 

As part of the next BIG IDEA project Untrammeled: At Wilderness’ Edge, SVMoA will welcome ​​journalist Kevin Fedarko, award-winning author of “The Emerald Mile” as our first speaker of the 2021/2022 fall/winter season. Fedarko’s book on the The Emerald Mile, with the subtitle The Epic Story of the Fastest Ride in History Through the Heart of the Grand Canyon, chronicles both the complex story of the Canyon’s environmental history, as well as the compelling story of how a couple river and wilderness junkies took the fastest boat ride ever down the Colorado River during the legendary flood of 1983. At this moment in 2021 when we are grappling how best to live on the edge of wilderness, this book and Fedarko’s tale beautifully illustrates the complicated nature of our relationship with wild places.

Jock Reynolds is a nationally respected curator and artist who served as the Director of the Yale University Art Gallery from 1998 to 2018.  He has worked closely with Mark Klett, one of the artists in the Untrammeled exhibition, and is keenly interested in the role that art plays in shaping our national discussions. Jock will be in conversation with Mark Klett and Laura McPhee about their commissioned artworks.

Sandra Cisneros is one of the United States most important poets and writers.  She is best known for her evocation of Mexican American life in Chicago. “The House on Mango Street,” written in 1983, continues to be taught in classrooms throughout the country. Cisneros has been invited to participate in SVMoA’s lecture series to speak to the value and richness of cross-cultural experiences.  As a woman and a writer Cisneros beautifully explores the experience of being connected to both the US and to Mexico.  There are so many members of our community and so many people in our country who share this relationship. We look forward to welcoming Cisneros to this community at this moment of growth and transition.

How do the three SVMoA spaces– The Museum, The Liberty Theatre, and the Hailey House and Classroom – each operate? What is each space’s function?

The Museum

Sun Valley Museum of Art is non-collecting museum that is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (one of only five institutions in Idaho). SVMoA offers free admission and is open to the public throughout the year. Its downtown Ketchum location allows stop-by visitors as well as event and exhibition attendees to explore and experience art firsthand—both through visual art exhibitions and hands-on immersive education opportunities.

The Liberty Theatre

The former home of the Company of Fools, the historic The Liberty Theatre is centrally located on Main Street in Hailey, Idaho.  The theatre is currently closed, awaiting some needed renovations.

The Hailey House and Classroom

The historic Hailey House, birthplace of American poet Ezra Pound, is open to visitors by appointment and during scheduled events. The house is frequently used to house visiting artists, teachers and musicians. The Hailey Classroom is open for adult, teen and youth classes and workshops during scheduled programs.

The museum is in the process of constructing a new building as well. How does SVMoA plan to use their new space?

Sun Valley Museum of Art needs expanded facilities. Currently we are not able to meet the community need for everything from classes to lectures to exhibition tours so we are actively seeking the right opportunity to build or renovate a new space. The community deserves to have a museum that can be a point of pride and meets the needs of today’s families and students as well as our growing and diverse community. As the cornerstone of Wood River Valley’s rich and diverse arts and culture scene, SVMoA is eager to develop a state-of-the-art facility that will engage more people on a deeper level, create more immersive experiences, and ensure accessibility for everyone in our community.

SVMoA operates as an arts education nonprofit. How can interested patrons support the arts? 

SVMoA’s annual programs are supported in large part by its more than 1,200 members. When you join as a SVMoA member, you don’t just support your own arts experience; you support arts access for all. Your membership fee pays it forward so your fellow community members can experience the arts—the joy, the wonder, the inspiration, and the healing.

SVMoA’s annual Wine Auction welcomes friends, families, arts supporters, vintners and chefs to celebrate and support the arts each summer. The 2021 Wine Auction wrapped in mid-July and raised more than $1 million for arts education with the help of more than 350 attendees.

BIG IDEAS and major program support comes from memberships, individual donations, private foundations and public and private grants. 

Regarding COVID-19, does the museum require guests to purchase tickets in advance online, or can visitors purchase tickets upon arrival? 

SVMoA’s museum space is free and open to the public. SVMoA classes and events typically require advance registration and/or ticket purchase (as events can sell-out), but SVMoA will in general welcome walk-up attendees and participants if space allows. 

At The Museum walk-in visitors are always welcome! If you’d like to learn more about the artwork in the exhibition, we invite families and small groups for private tours with The Museum’s curators. To schedule a tour please contact us at 208.726.9491 or at information@svmoa.org. 

*Featured artwork by Laura McPhee

Companion Species - WSU via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Companion Species by Jordan Schnitzer
Mark Klett - Inside ice cavern via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Inside Ice Cavern by Mark Klett
Laura McPhee artwork via Krista Detwiler at the Sun Valley Museum of Art for use by 360 Magazine
Laura McPhee
Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville

By: Emily Bunn × Armon Hayes × Vaughn Lowery x Sydney Mayer

On Wednesday night, 360 Magazine had the pleasure of viewing Teatro Nuovo‘s The Barber of Seville. While we were originally visiting Chicago on assignment, after finding out about this monumental production, we knew it couldn’t be missed. We immediately dropped what we were doing and used our Amtrak monthly pass to dash to Damrosch Park in New York City.

Our experience was impressive from the start as soon as we entered the space. Damrosch Park is part of the Lincoln Center complex nearby Fordham University Lincoln Center. It includes the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim outdoor bandshell in the greenspace’s center. The park encompasses the Metropolitan Opera House, the New York State Theater (now the David H. Koch Theater), and Philharmonic Hall (later Avery Fisher Hall and now David Geffen Hall).

The opera buffa invited in guests with a whimsical atmosphere of musical merrymaking. This classic two-act opera, originally by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini, was developed into a cutting-edge interpretation by Teatro Nuovo–Italian for the new theater. The expansive stage, which included a backdrop with soft, rosy clouds, was decorated with a cast of performers donning black-tie apparel. The rostrum was well-lit and easily viewable from all angles of the venue.

The enchanted lighting cast a sultry wash of deep blue hues over all the guests in attendance. Opera enthusiasts of all ages were present for one of the first shows since lockdown. Joining us were people from all ages, races and walks of life: biracial couples, youthful gay couples, and arts aficionados who appeared to be well into their 90s. This sensual, post-pandemic moment of calm finally brought New York’s community of playwrights, musical lovers, and opera fans together yet again.

This marvelous production of The Barber of Seville has surely been long-awaited by many – a worthy cause for celebration. Still, Teatro Nuovo employed all current CDC guidelines. Similar to the seating at fashion shows, guests were organized into pods of two people. Security guards were also present at the venue to enforce these restrictions.

The orchestra was unbelievably incredible, climaxing to a crashing cadenza that captivated the entire audience. Impressively, the conductor of the show also played violin. The cast was headlined by mezzo-soprano Hannah Ludwig. She was joined by the Figaro of Bass, Hans Tashjian, and the Almaviva of tenor, Nicholas Simpson. The three artists are additionally accompanied by soprano Alina Tamborini as Berta, bass Daniel Fridley as Don Basilio, and baritones Scott Purcell and Kyle Oliver as Bartolo and Fiorello, respectively. All of the singers had impressive skill and exhibited raw, uninhibited talent. Their on-stage vulnerability lent for an impassioned delivery which was impactful to all who were lucky enough to hear it. Bellowing vocals swelled the venue with their prolific pipes.

The opera included an intermission, which kindly allowed for guests to relive themselves and enjoy the provided refreshments.

The classic tale of this passionate love story enraptured the audience of emotional fans. 360 Magazine had goosebumps and became teary-eyed at the sublime, awe-inspiring rendition. The vibrant energy of love made one of our team members wish that their parents were still alive to witness this event. This romantic, operatic show was reminiscent of a foreign film gone wild. Fortunately, sub-captions were included.

Teatro Nuovo’s production of The Barber of Seville was truly the performance of a lifetime. 360 Magazine can now joyously cross seeing this spectacular show off of our bucket list.

A standing ovation for Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville can be viewed HERE.

*Photo credit: Steven Pisano

Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Kyle Olliver (Fiorello), Teatro Nuovo chorus. Photo Credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hans Tashjian (Figaro), Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano.

illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 Magazine

DEBATING THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN THE DRAFT

By: Clara Guthrie

Members of the Senate Armed Services Committee have proposed a revolutionary reconfiguration of the federal military draft that is aimed at including women in the Selective Service System, according to a release from POLITICO. As the law stands now, all American men must register for the service when they turn 18, although the draft has not actually been enacted in more than 40 years since the Vietnam War. Refusing or failing to register can lead to fines, being denied student financial aid or federal jobs, and even prison time.

In the new proposal – authored by Senate Armed Services Committee Chair Jack Reed of Rhode Island – the language regarding who must enlist at 18 would be expanded to include “all Americans,” not just men.

The conversation around including women in the draft has picked up speed and garnered national attention in the past few years. In June, the National Coalition for Men brought a case to the Supreme Court that challenged the male-only draft, calling it unconstitutional. While the Court declined to hear the case, three Justices—Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer and Brett Kavanaugh—did release a public statement on the topic. The statement argued that the exclusions of women from the draft made little sense when considering how much the military has changed in the past four decades since the Supreme Court first held up the original policy. The tone of the statement was unsure about whether the draft meets the standard of “exceedingly persuasive justification” to discriminate on the basis of gender. The Justices also noted the monumental 2015 decision from the Pentagon to open all military combat roles to women as further evidence.

This hot-topic issue most recently entered Capitol Hill in 2016. At the time, the Senate voted to have the decision become part of the annual defense policy bill; the House Armed Services Committee adopted a similar provision, but eventually scrapped it. As a compromise, an independent commission was formed to study the draft and the pressing question of what role gender plays in it. In March of 2020, the commission published its final report, which backed the idea of requiring women to register for Selective Service.

However, another distinctive school of thought advocates for the abolition of the draft altogether, as opposed to requiring all young people to register regardless of gender. As Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby wrote in his recent piece, Women don’t register for the draft, and men shouldn’t either, “Selective Service has outlived its usefulness. It should be consigned to history. […] Congress shouldn’t just end male-only draft registration. It should end draft registration, period.” Jacoby goes on to argue that the draft is an outdated practice and that an all-volunteer army is far more effective: “Compared with draftees, [those who volunteer for service] work harder, serve longer, perform better, and are more likely to regard their service as a calling, not a compulsion. Their commitment and skill are reflected in the consistent No. 1 ranking of the military as the most trusted institution in America.” This final point is supported by a 2019 Gallup Poll that found that Americans trust the U.S. military more than any other public institution. 

But, of course, there are legitimate issues posed by relying on a solely volunteer force. The All-Volunteer Force Forum (AVF Forum) is a network of military personnel and citizens alike who support some sort of draft being reinstated in order to combat the civil-military gap (a disconnect in views between military and non-military individuals). The AVF Forum cites issues including unsustainable recruiting techniques, a lack of socioeconomic and geographic diversity in the armed forces, and an inability to draw from the largest pool of possible candidates as all being exacerbated by a reliance on volunteerism.

In April, The AVF Forum held a conference to discuss potential amendments to the draft which do not include the complete dissolution of the institution. One solution is as follows:

“The conscription of only 5 to 10 percent of the force from the top 10 percent income tax bracket, [presented] by Marine Corps veteran and author Elliot Ackerman. The logic being that those within reach of the levers of power would be more inclined to limit military involvement if their own children faced drafting and deployment.”

No clear solution was reached at The AVF Forum conference, as the complicated debate continues to rage.

While it is unclear where exactly President Biden stands on the matter, he did share a clarifying quote at the Military Officers Association of America candidate forum in September of 2020 before he assumed the presidency. “The United States does not need a larger military, and we don’t need a draft at this time. […] I would, however, ensure that women are also eligible to register for the Selective Service System so that men and women are treated equally in the event of future conflicts,” said Biden.

The original proposition by the Senate Armed Services Committee is expected to be considered during committee markup this week. However, there will be no official floor action on the bill until at least later this year. 

If the legislation eventually passes, the measure would only go into effect one year after approval.

travel illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 Magazine

Greece: Europe’s Next, Best Expat Haven

By: International Living

Greece is positioning itself to be Europe’s next, best expat haven, according to the overseas experts at International Living, who say that as a travel destination or live-abroad base, Greece should be on North Americans’ radar. In addition to offering warm weather year-round and easy low-cost living —Greece’s new digital nomad visa coming soon will make it easier for people working remotely to stay for extended periods and even gain citizenship and a passport. What’s more, Greece’s borders are set to open to international travelers May 14, 2021.

Greece offers an enthralling mixture of sun-drenched islands, towering mountains, buzzing cities, and timeless traditions. Wrapped in the warm embrace of the Aegean Sea, it’s vibrant, welcoming, and offers great-value living for North American expats. A couple could live comfortably there for as little as $2,000 a month, according to International Living.

“We’ve seen a sharp uptick in online traffic to our Greece content in 2021, with the overall traffic to our Greece pages up 41% in the first three months of 2021, when compared to the last period (Oct-Dec) of 2020,” says Jennifer Stevens, Executive Editor, International Living.

“The appetite for on-the-ground Greece intel has increased, and we’re happy to see that because this is a nation that can make good sense for all sorts of expats—younger, older, full-time or part-time. If you like the idea of a travel-rich life in Europe, Greece could make a very good base.”

Exploration in Greece will be a possibility again as soon as May 14, 2021 when, according to the Greece tourism minister, the borders are set to open to international travelers who show proof of vaccination, covid-19 antibodies, or a negative test result taken within 72 hours of departure.

Greece offers expats easy, good-value living in the sun. After 15 years in San Francisco where she worked as a Certified Public Accountant, IL contributor Lynn Roulo moved to Greece—with her dog, her two cats, and one suitcase in tow.

“I moved without a local job or a significant relationship waiting for me in Athens, so it was a big step into the unknown,” says Roulo. “But it didn’t feel scary or anxiety-provoking. The idea of moving and starting a fresh new life energized me. That was in 2012, and I still feel a sense of excitement that I get to live here.

“When I moved from San Francisco to Athens, I was pleasantly shocked to learn I could rent a comfortable 70-meter apartment with a modern bathroom and kitchen, as well as a huge private roof deck with a view of the Parthenon for less money than it would have cost me to rent a studio basement apartment in the worst neighborhood in San Francisco.

“Greece is a great choice for expats because of its amazing weather, hospitable people, its relatively low cost of living and its location, giving visitors easy access to travel to a wide range of other countries. You can go to London or Lebanon for a long weekend.”

“And if you have a dream to move, don’t give up on it. These dreams come from somewhere, and moving abroad may just be the best decision of your entire life. I know it was for me.”

Greece already has in place a “Golden Visa,” (effectively an investment visa) which grants long-term residence—with a path to citizenship and a passport—to people who make an investment in real estate valued at EUR250,000 (roughly $300,000) or higher. That’s about half the investment threshold required for a similar visa in places like Portugal or Italy where the necessary investment is closer to $600,000.

Most exciting, though, is a new visa aimed at attracting digital nomads, set to come online soon, the editors at International Living report. They argue it makes very good sense for a person who has the flexibility to work remotely and likes the idea of a sunny European base.

“Finally—a remote worker incentive plan that actually makes a lot of sense,” says Jeff D. Opdyke, editor of Global Intelligence Letter, a publication of International Living.

The new plan that Greece is now in the process of assembling…it looks to be one of the smartest remote-worker visas I’ve come across. That’s because under the Greek plan as currently envisioned, a ‘digital migrant,’ as the Greeks call us, will be eligible for a 50% exemption on earned income for the first seven years. In essence, you owe local taxes on only half your income.

For someone who’s still in the workforce and looking to maximize their savings opportunities as they approach retirement, sharply reducing your tax burden for seven years represents an intriguing opportunity to squirrel away more money.

“Though Greece hasn’t finalized details of its plan yet, the Greek approach looks to allow for longer living arrangements, given the seven years of tax breaks. And it just so happens that ‘long-term migrants,’ which is what you’d be as a digital worker, are eligible for Greek citizenship after seven years. Which means you could apply for a Greek passport…which is an E.U. passport…which would give you unfettered access to live and work across the rest of the European Union, no different than if you were moving from Tampa to Tucson.”

A person considering a move to Greece will want to carefully research the options for visas and residence permits. International Living’s report details the best of them for expats looking for a full- or part-time retirement in Greece, including a discussion of this new digital nomad visa on the horizon.

But accessible residence is just one of the many reasons to love living in Greece. It’s an easy place to adopt a healthy lifestyle, the entire country is physically breathtaking, and the Greek people have a well-earned reputation for being friendly, helpful, and genuinely caring.

Here are four more reasons why International Living recommends Greece as a potential destination for anybody ready to move out of the U.S.:

1.     Good-Value Cost of Living

Greece is super-affordable, especially when compared to North America and much of the rest of Europe. Prices for daily essentials (food, transport, etc.) are at least 20% cheaper than in the U.S., and costs to rent an apartment can be as much as 70% less.

Throughout Greece, expats will save money by using public transport, avoiding touristy areas, shopping at local markets, and eating out where the Greeks do. A budget-conscious expat can live comfortably in Greece for $1,830 a month or less.

2.     Welcoming and Easy Lifestyle

Greece is a proud nation that emphasizes family, tradition, and a love of the outdoors. Because tourism plays such an important part in the Greek economy, English is widely spoken in many areas and the country’s infrastructure caters well for locals and visitors alike.

Expats enjoy lots of options in terms of lifestyle: from a sturdy lakefront cabin in the mountains, to a rooftop apartment on the outskirts of Thessaloniki, to a low-maintenance beachfront unit on Mykonos, residents are guaranteed plenty of sunshine and four distinct (though mild) seasons—even though the Greeks tend to think in terms of ‘summer and everything else’.

3.     Excellent Healthcare

The quality of medical care in Greece is generally excellent, especially in major centers like Athens and Thessaloniki. Emergency healthcare in Greece is free regardless of nationality. Pharmacies are abundant throughout the country—Greece has more pharmacists per capita than any other nation in Europe.

4.     Safety

Greece is one of the safest countries in Europe, and has an easy-going, relaxed feel.

Roulo, based in Athens, says, “As a single woman, I feel very safe living here. Crime here is significantly lower than in the United States, the police presence is strong, and there is no need for ‘active shooter’ drills in Greece.”

Basic precautions with regard to personal belongings will prevent rare cases of petty theft.

About International Living

Since 1979, InternationalLiving has been the leading authority for anyone looking for global retirement or relocation opportunities. Through its monthly magazine and related e-letters, extensive website, podcasts, online bookstore, and events held around the world, InternationalLiving provides information and services to help its readers live better, travel farther, have more fun, save more money, and find better business opportunities when they expand their world beyond their own shores. Their website has more than 200 contributors traveling the globe, investigating the best opportunities for travel, retirement, real estate, and investment.

travel illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 Magazine

Tourism Trends in 2021

What’s Ahead for Travel and Tourism? 5 Trends to Look For in 2021 and Beyond

By: Stefan Read, SVP Engagement Advisory and Strategy Practice Lead at Jackman

As vaccines continue to roll out and people begin to see a light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, many consumers are starting to think of travel. A recent survey by CivicScience found that as of March 2021, nearly 6 in 10 US adults say they’d be willing to travel in the next five months. This is very promising, but much has changed in the past year and several aspects of consumer behavior have been permanently altered. In order to succeed in the new post-Covid world, travel and hospitality brands must understand the new and emerging trends impacting this industry. Below are the top trends and customer behaviors that we will see in 2021 and beyond as travel begins to ramp up again.

  1. Cleanliness: Unsurprisingly, travelers now say that cleanliness is their top priority when selecting hotels and flights. In November 2020, Booking declared that short-term or holiday rentals have to meet a minimum cleanliness standard by May 2021, or have their properties delisted. Airbnb and VRBO created new cleaning procedures for hosts to follow in the pandemic. Even after the pandemic ends, cleanliness will remain top of mind for travelers as the anxiety around COVID and other illnesses have now become part of our new reality. Travel and hospitality brands can do their part by communicating detailed and specific information with travelers about the cleaning procedures they have in place, and making sure the procedures can be clearly observed by guests. Hotels and property hosts should also adjust their change and refund policies to allow guests to cancel at the last minute in case of a future outbreak. Brands that prioritize the health and well-being of guests over profits will win when it comes to customer loyalty and safety.
  2. Wellness Tourism: Cleanliness goes hand in hand with wellness, and wellness tourism will keep growing over the next couple of years as people continue to seek out travel for the purpose of promoting health and well-being through physical, psychological, or spiritual activities. According to the Global Wellness Institute, wellness tourism will be worth $919 billion by 2022, representing 18 percent of all tourism globally. Brands should start to think about what services or experiences they can create or enhance that will attract these wellness travelers, such as transforming outdoor spaces to become open air yoga studios or hiring meditation or massage experts available for guests to utilize during their stay.
  3. Staying Close to Home: It’s no surprise that during the pandemic traveler preferences shifted toward the familiar. Backpacking through Europe was no longer feasible, so travelers instead opted for domestic destinations and were more thorough in their planning. A recent AirBnB survey revealed that 56 percent of consumers prefer a domestic or local destination and one in five Americans say they want their destination to be within driving distance of home. As a result, road trips will boom – in fact, 59 percent of families say they’re more likely to drive than fly on their next trip. Smaller hotels can compete with the big hotel chains by highlighting the local aspect of their experience and engaging meaningfully with the community they’re in. They might also consider banding together to help people plan fun road trips along specific routes. Travel and hospitality brands can help take some of the anxiety off of travelers by playing a more active role in the planning aspect of the guests’ travel.
  1. Traveling to Connect: The door is open for brands to play a more meaningful role in the travel plans for customers as Airbnb anticipates 2021 being the year of “meaningful travel.” It’s not the act of getting on a plane, standing in long line ups, and visiting crowded tourist attractions that people miss about travel. Rather, it’s the element of social connection – reuniting with old friends, spending time with family, and experiencing something new with loved ones. For a significant percentage of AirBnB survey respondents, their definition of meaningful travel has changed since the pandemic to become even more focused on being with loved ones. These people also say they intend to travel more after the pandemic, with nearly one in two (46%) saying they will travel more for pleasure, such as by going on vacation and to visit family. Brands should consider helping with family reunion planning and continue to be mindful of ways to bring families together while still maintaining a clean and safe environment.
  2. Eco-Tourism: Defined as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people and involves education,” eco-tourism is on the rise. Consumers are taking on the role of “concerned citizens” demanding responsible travel policies, and we’re seeing a shift in behavior and sentiment toward appreciating the earth and what it has to offer. Moving forward, people will be thinking more mindfully about the way they travel, why they travel, and where they go. Rather than trying to fit as many destinations as possible into one trip, many consumers will opt for longer stays, choosing to get to know the local communities, cultures, cuisines, and landscapes.

The world of travel and tourism has been forever altered by the pandemic and lockdowns. With some valuable insights into how customer behaviors and desires have changed, travel and hospitality brands can find new, creative ways to appeal to travelers. The five trends listed above are a great place to start when looking to understand the ways these industries will continue to change moving into 2021 and beyond.

travel illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

Beijing’s Tourism Revenue Drop

Beijing’s Tourism Revenue Dropped by 53% in 2020 – Loss of Over ¥330B 

The tourism industry was badly hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and the city of Beijing saw the momentum of the industry halted in 2020. Beijing had become an increasingly popular tourist destination prior to the pandemic with revenue from inbound tourism recorded at $5.16B in 2019. According to data presented by TradingPlatforms, Beijing’s total revenue from tourism decreased by over 53% in 2020 for a staggering loss of ¥330B, or $50B.

Beijing Revenue From Tourism Dropped By Over $50B After Years Of Growth

China has long moved on from its isolationist policies and has encouraged the mainland as a travel destination for tourists. Revenue from China’s tourism sector grew at a strong 13.8% CAGR from 2010-2019 to ¥5.7T, or almost $880B. In 2019, China was the fourth most visited country by foreign tourists with 65.7M arrivals for the year.

Beijing is one of the leading tourist destinations in China, and the city has been enjoying the growth of the tourism sector until the pandemic of 2020 hit. From 2016-2019, Beijing’s tourism revenue experienced a 5.53% CAGR, rising to a value of ¥622.7B in 2019. However, COVID-19 shut borders around the world, crippling global mobility and disrupting the momentum built up by Beijing’s tourism industry. Beijing’s revenue from tourism dropped over 53% in 2020 to just over ¥291.

Beijing suffered a staggering loss in revenue, specifically in inbound tourism, where revenue dropped from $5.16B in 2019 to just $480M in 2020.

COVID-19 Hit China Early – Caused Massive Disruption in H1 of 2020

China felt the effects of COVID-19 before much of the rest of the world did. A clear example of this is in the drop in weekly Airbnb bookings from the period between January 5th to March 7th. This drop occurred when the coronavirus was just becoming news to the rest of the world of what was happening in various parts of China. Beijing experienced a dizzying 96% drop in weekly Airbnb bookings compared to just 46% in Seoul and 29% in Tokyo in this time period.

The number of domestic tourists is estimated to have dropped by as much as 62% in the first half of 2020 compared to the year prior, with revenues dropping by as much as 77%. By the end of the year, China had experienced a 43% drop in domestic tourists and a 52% drop in revenue from domestic tourism.

Tourism in China Projected To Completely Recover Within 5 Years

In 2019, the absolute economic contribution of tourism in China was estimated at $1.67T. This fell sharply to just $745.5B in 2020-a decrease of more than 55%, but still the largest in Asia and the second-largest overall, after the USA. However, projections have the figure bouncing back up by over 40.5% in 2021 to $1.04T. The figure is projected to surpass pre-pandemic levels for the first time in 2023, when the absolute economic contribution of tourism is projected to be at $1.75T.

Despite the turmoil of 2020, China’s absolute economic contribution from tourism is projected to have an impressive CAGR of 20.75% from 2021-2025, reaching more than $2.67T by the end of the forecast period.

You can read more about the story with more statistics and information on TradingPlatforms’ website.