Posts tagged with "chick Webb orchestra"

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville

By: Emily Bunn × Armon Hayes × Vaughn Lowery x Sydney Mayer

On Wednesday night, 360 Magazine had the pleasure of viewing Teatro Nuovo‘s The Barber of Seville. While we were originally visiting Chicago on assignment, after finding out about this monumental production, we knew it couldn’t be missed. We immediately dropped what we were doing and used our Amtrak monthly pass to dash to Damrosch Park in New York City.

Our experience was impressive from the start as soon as we entered the space. Damrosch Park is part of the Lincoln Center complex nearby Fordham University Lincoln Center. It includes the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim outdoor bandshell in the greenspace’s center. The park encompasses the Metropolitan Opera House, the New York State Theater (now the David H. Koch Theater), and Philharmonic Hall (later Avery Fisher Hall and now David Geffen Hall).

The opera buffa invited in guests with a whimsical atmosphere of musical merrymaking. This classic two-act opera, originally by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini, was developed into a cutting-edge interpretation by Teatro Nuovo–Italian for the new theater. The expansive stage, which included a backdrop with soft, rosy clouds, was decorated with a cast of performers donning black-tie apparel. The rostrum was well-lit and easily viewable from all angles of the venue.

The enchanted lighting cast a sultry wash of deep blue hues over all the guests in attendance. Opera enthusiasts of all ages were present for one of the first shows since lockdown. Joining us were people from all ages, races and walks of life: biracial couples, youthful gay couples, and arts aficionados who appeared to be well into their 90s. This sensual, post-pandemic moment of calm finally brought New York’s community of playwrights, musical lovers, and opera fans together yet again.

This marvelous production of The Barber of Seville has surely been long-awaited by many – a worthy cause for celebration. Still, Teatro Nuovo employed all current CDC guidelines. Similar to the seating at fashion shows, guests were organized into pods of two people. Security guards were also present at the venue to enforce these restrictions.

The orchestra was unbelievably incredible, climaxing to a crashing cadenza that captivated the entire audience. Impressively, the conductor of the show also played violin. The cast was headlined by mezzo-soprano Hannah Ludwig. She was joined by the Figaro of Bass, Hans Tashjian, and the Almaviva of tenor, Nicholas Simpson. The three artists are additionally accompanied by soprano Alina Tamborini as Berta, bass Daniel Fridley as Don Basilio, and baritones Scott Purcell and Kyle Oliver as Bartolo and Fiorello, respectively. All of the singers had impressive skill and exhibited raw, uninhibited talent. Their on-stage vulnerability lent for an impassioned delivery which was impactful to all who were lucky enough to hear it. Bellowing vocals swelled the venue with their prolific pipes.

The opera included an intermission, which kindly allowed for guests to relive themselves and enjoy the provided refreshments.

The classic tale of this passionate love story enraptured the audience of emotional fans. 360 Magazine had goosebumps and became teary-eyed at the sublime, awe-inspiring rendition. The vibrant energy of love made one of our team members wish that their parents were still alive to witness this event. This romantic, operatic show was reminiscent of a foreign film gone wild. Fortunately, sub-captions were included.

Teatro Nuovo’s production of The Barber of Seville was truly the performance of a lifetime. 360 Magazine can now joyously cross seeing this spectacular show off of our bucket list.

A standing ovation for Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville can be viewed HERE.

*Photo credit: Steven Pisano

Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Kyle Olliver (Fiorello), Teatro Nuovo chorus. Photo Credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hans Tashjian (Figaro), Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano.

Ella Fitzgerald × Louis Armstrong 

ELLA FITZGERALD AND LOUIS ARMSTRONG’S BELOVED MUSICAL PARTNERSHIP CELEBRATED IN NEW 4CD SET, CHEEK TO CHEEK: THE COMPLETE DUET RECORDINGS, OUT NOVEMBER 10 ON VERVE/UMe FOR ELLA 100

 
INCLUDES THEIR TIMELESS THREE VERVE ALBUMS, DECCA SINGLES, LIVE TRACKS, B-SIDES, RARE RECORDINGS AND UNRELEASED MATERIAL

 

 
By the time Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong collaborated on their first duet together, they were each already jazz giants. Fitzgerald was an acclaimed solo artist for Decca with many hits and more than 200 songs under her young belt, first with the Chick Webb Orchestra and then as leader of her own big band. Armstrong, known affectionately as Pops, was one of the leading singers, trumpet players and entertainers of the day; a star of both sound and screen. Together their talent knew no bounds and propelled them further to stardom, and today are some of the biggest highlights of both of their extraordinary careers.

 
For the first time, all of Fitzgerald and Armstrong’s classic duets are in one place: Cheek To Cheek: The Complete Duet Recordings, a new 4CD and digital set will be available November 10. Part of Ella 100, Verve Records/UMe’s yearlong celebration of Fitzgerald’s centennial, the 75-track collection gathers their three timeless Verve albums – newly remastered versions of Ella and Louis, Ella and Louis Again and Porgy and Bess – along with all of their Decca singles, live recordings from Jazz at the Hollywood Bowl, recorded as a warmup for Ella and Louis, plus several alternates and false starts from the Decca and Verve eras, illuminating their craft and good humor. Cheek To Cheek also includes unreleased material: “The Memphis Blues,” with Bing Crosby, from his radio show; several takes of Armstrong’s solo showcase, “Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess;” and an instrumental mix of “Red-Headed Woman.” The comprehensive collection is rounded out with extensive essay by Ricky Riccardi, the world’s leading authority on Armstrong, plus detailed annotations and rare images from the archives. Preorder Cheek To Cheek here: http://UMe.lnk.to/CheekToCheek4CD

 
Armstrong and Fitzgerald were first paired together by Decca label head Milt Gabler when they were both recording for the label. For the inaugural session in January 1946, Gabler had them cut the new song “You Won’t Be Satisfied (Until You Break My Heart)” and a recent Nat King Cole hit, “The Frim Fram Sauce.” The former became a jukebox hit and hinted at the magic they could create together. Over the next few years they would reunite for a string of singles – all eight are presented here in order of release – before recording their first album together. Fitzgerald’s manager Norman Granz, on the heels of founding Verve Records with his highly successful first release, Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Cole Porter Song Book, put Fitzgerald and Armstrong in the studio on August 16, 1956 to record the entire eleven-song Ella and Louis album in a day. The record was a critical and commercial success when released in the fall of 1956. Down Beat gave it five stars and, in November, the album hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Jazz charts. The night before recording the album, Fitzgerald and Armstrong performed together at the Hollywood Bowl, and these rare, impromptu performances of “You Won’t Be Satisfied,” along with “Undecided,” marking their earliest collaborative recordings for Granz, are included on the fourth disc.

 
Knowing he needed to get them back in the studio as soon as possible, Granz recorded them in several ambitious sessions from July 23 to August 19, resulting in the follow up album Ella and Louis Again as well as Porgy and Bess, the folk opera with music and lyrics by George & Ira Gershwin. Ella and Louis Again once again captured their chemistry and resulted in the irresistible “Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off,” the joyful “Stompin’ At The Savoy,” and “Autumn In New York,” one of their finest ballad performances. They also each turned in separate solo features, notably extended interpretations of “These Foolish Things” by Fitzgerald and “Let’s Do It” by Armstrong. The sessions for Porgy and Bess included their final four duets. The recordings capture their teamwork at the peak of its powers, exemplified in the way they seamlessly traded roles of singing and scatting on “Summertime” and “Bess, You Is My Woman Now.” Granz held the album until 1959, when the big-budget film version was in theaters, and it was another success.

 
In addition to gathering all of Fitzgerald and Armstrong’s duets, Cheek To Cheek also gives a unique opportunity to hear what it was like to be in the studio with these two titans. The closing disc is rife with a bevy of alternate takes and false starts, displaying their camaraderie, with many previously unreleased, until now. 

 
The Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation

The Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation was created and funded in 1993 by Ella Fitzgerald in order to fulfill her desires to use the fruits of her success to help people of all races, cultures and beliefs. Fitzgerald hoped to make their lives more rewarding, and she wanted to foster a love of reading, as well as a love of music. In addition, she hoped to provide assistance to the at-risk and disadvantaged members of our communities – assistance that would enable them to achieve a better quality of life. The Board of Directors of the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation seeks to continue Ella Fitzgerald’s goals by making charitable grants serving four major areas of interest:

 

  1. creating educational and other opportunities for children
  2. fostering a love and knowledge of music, including assistance to students of music
  3. the provision of health care, food, shelter and counseling to those in need
  4. specific areas of medical care and research with an emphasis on Diabetes, vision problems and heart disease

Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong

Cheek To Cheek: The Complete Duet Recordings

 
Disc 1
The Decca Singles

1. You Won’t Be Satisfied (Until You Break My Heart)

2. The Frim Fram Sauce

3. Dream A Little Dream Of Me

4. Can Anyone Explain? (No, No, No!)

5. Necessary Evil

6. Oops!

7. Who Walks in When I Walk Out

8. Would You Like to Take a Walk (Sump’n Good’ll Come From That)

 
Ella and Louis

9. Can’t We Be Friends

10. Isn’t This A Lovely Day

11. Moonlight In Vermont

12. They Can’t Take That Away From Me

13. Under A Blanket Of Blue

14. Tenderly

15. A Foggy Day

16. Stars Fell On Alabama

17. Cheek to Cheek

18. The Nearness of You

19. April In Paris

 
Disc 2
Ella and Louis Again

1. Don’t Be That Way 

2. Makin’ Whoopee 

3. They All Laughed 

4. Comes Love

5. Autumn In New York 

6. Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall In Love) 

7. Stompin’ At The Savoy 

8. I Won’t Dance 

9. Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You

10. Let’s Call The Whole Thing Off 

11. These Foolish Things (Remind Me Of You)

12. I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm 

13. Willow Weep For Me 

14. I’m Putting All My Eggs In One Basket 

15. A Fine Romance 

16. Ill Wind

17. Love Is Here To Stay

 
Disc 3
Ella and Louis Again (cont’d.)

1. I Get A Kick Out Of You

2. Learnin’ The Blues

 
Porgy And Bess

3. Overture

4. Summertime 

5. I Wants To Stay Here

6. My Man’s Gone Now

7. I Got Plenty O’ Nuttin’ 

8. The Buzzard Song

9. Bess, You Is My Woman Now 

10. It Ain’t Necessarily So 

11. What You Want Wid Bess?

12. A Woman Is A Sometime Thing

13. Oh, Doctor Jesus 

14. Medley: Here Come Da Honey Man/Crab Man/Oh, Dey’s So Fresh And Fine 

15. There’s A Boat Dat’s Leavin’ Soon For New York 

16. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess?

17. Oh Lawd, I’m On My Way

 
Disc 4: Bonus Tracks
Ella and Louis Live

1. The Memphis Blues (Live from The Chesterfield Show) with Bing Crosby *

2. You Won’t Be Satisfied (Until You Break My Heart) (Live at the Hollywood Bowl)

3. Undecided (Live at the Hollywood Bowl)

 
Decca Extras 

4. You Won’t Be Satisfied (Until You Break My Heart) false start and breakdown

5. The Frim Fram Sauce false starts/takes 1 and 2 *

6. The Frim Fram Sauce alternate take

 
Ella and Louis Again Extras

7. Makin’ Whoopee take 1

8. Makin’ Whoopee take 2

9. I Get A Kick Out Of You take 2 (run-through) and take 3 (breakdown)

10. I Get A Kick Out Of You take 4

11. I Get A Kick Out Of You take 13

12. Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall In Love) take 3

13. Willow Weep For Me take 4

 
Porgy And Bess Extras

14. I Got Plenty O’ Nuttin’ (mono master)

15. A Woman Is A Sometime Thing (mono master)

16. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? takes 5 and 6

17. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? take 7

18. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? take 8 *

19. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? take 9 *

20. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? insert for take 9 *

21. Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess? take 10 *

22. Red-Headed Woman instrumental *

* Previously unreleased

 
ellafitzgeraldfoundation.org | facebook.com/ellafitzgerald