Posts tagged with "MOMA"

champion Jalaiah Harmon image for use by 360 magazine

CHAMPION REVERSE WEAVE WEEK

Champion will celebrate its first-ever Reverse Weave Week from October 13 – October 19 to acknowledge the anniversary of the iconic franchise’s patent that was finalized on October 14, 1952.

TikTok Activation

To commemorate the celebration in a big way, Champion is teaming up with TikTok superstar, Jalaiah Harmon, the creator of the famous Renegade TikTok dance, to create a “reverse” version of the viral sensation. Even better, Champion is “reversing time” by ensuring that with this version, Jalaiah gets the credit she deserves from the start – as opposed to what happened when the original version was released last year and took off without her.

Consumer Giveaway

Jalaiah will post the Reverse Renegade dance on her TikTok on October 13, where viewers can check out and learn the dance and try it themselves! Anyone who posts a video doing the Reverse Renegade on TikTok and/or Instagram Reels from 6am PST on October 13 to 11:59pm PST on October 19 and use hashtag #ReverseRenegadeChallenge will have a chance to win just 1 of 52 exclusive, must-have “Reverse Reverse Weave” hoodies. Winners will be chosen at random on October 19 at 11:59pm PST and notified via direct message.

Rules to Enter Consumer Giveaway

  • Follow Champion on TikTok & Instagram
  • Use hashtag #ReverseRenegade
  • Tag @Champion and mention a friend

History of Reverse Weave

  • The history of Reverse Weave begins on the field in the 1930’s. Champion supplied many football teams with Reverse Weave uniforms. The brand listened to the concerns from coaches about shrinkage when washing big batches of athletic wear and decided to stitch athletic gear horizontally instead of vertically to help the uniforms last longer.
  • Initially patented in 1938, the patent for Reverse Weave as we know and love it today was finally finalized on October 14, 1952. In 2017, the Reverse Weave hoodie was included in the MoMA “Is Fashion Modern” exhibit as one of the 111 items that have shaped the history of fashion. And today, you see Reverse Weave on just about every celebrity and consumer over the past couple generations.
  • This is one of the first examples of what Champion’s “Be Your Own Champion” campaign is all about – encouraging consumers (and leading by example) to do things the right way, on and off the court – never cutting corners. Champion Reverse Weave is cut on the cross-grain to reduce shrinkage. Built with rib side panels for ease of movement, this heavyweight icon won’t slow you down.
  • It’s not just a sweatshirt. It’s an heirloom. The Champion Reverse Weave is cut on the cross grain to reduce shrinkage and stand the test of time.
  • Another reason the franchise is so beloved is because of its versatility. Originally, the Reverse Weave sweatshirt was made in solid colors and with a unisex fit. Over the years, it has expanded to include hoodies.
Conrad Marca-Relli nel suo studio a Long Island for use by 360 Magazine

MATTIA DE LUCA

MATTIA DE LUCA presents CONRAD MARCA-RELLI Il Maestro Irascibile in collaboration with Archivio Marca-Relli from October 9th, 2021

Galleria Mattia De Luca is proud to present Conrad Marca-Relli – Il Maestro Irascibile (The Irascible Master), an exhibition entirely dedicated to the Italian-American artist, a key figure of American Abstract Expressionism. After the historic exhibition at the Galleria La Tartaruga in 1957, this first Roman retrospective, organized in collaboration with the Marca-Relli Archive, will be inaugurated on Saturday, 9 October 2021, on the premises of the Palazzo Albertoni Spinola at 2 Piazza di Campitelli, Rome.

Conrad Marca-Relli, aka Corrado Marcarelli, was born in Boston on 5 June 1913 to Italian parents from the Campania region. An indomitable spirit and a tireless traveler, Marca-Relli grew up traveling continuously to Italy, making him perfectly bilingual, literally and artistically speaking. A lover of the monumentality of Rome, where he worked for several years, and of great Italian Renaissance painting, the Italian-American artist was the true classicist soul of the New York School. The birth of the Eighth Street Club and the organization of the famous 1951 Ninth Street Show is attributable to his fervent temperament. Marca-Relli, imbued not only with classical culture, but also with a certain pragmatism of American origin, undertook from the 1950s a successful and endless path of research into the collage technique. The compositional results of this research would be brought to the ultimate outcome of speaking of his art as “painting-collage”. This modus operandi emerged as a balanced combination of compositional harmony, typical of the European tradition, a spontaneity of gesture, the offspring of Rosenberg’s arena, and Action painting: raw canvases were cut with a razor blade, the strips glued together, unglued, rearranged, superimposed, layered on the support and, finally, repainted in order to harmonize the duality of “positive” and “negative” spaces. It is this primitive encounter of two opposing forces that brings to life Marca-Relli’s canvases, palimpsest collages created by an equally reasoned and “neurasthenic” gesture, a definition given by Afro Basaldella to the artist in a letter sent to his friend and colleague Toti Scialoja.

Always departing from the classical proportions of the wooden mannequin, inseparable companion of his painting, Marca-Relli created a macrocosm of seemingly abstract signs, main elements of his major artistic achievements, on display at Galleria Mattia De Luca. From plain Cityscapes with a metaphysical flavor of the early 1950s, to the enigmatic seated figures of his early collages, and up to the homage to his friend and neighbor Jackson Pollock, the exhibition traces the strong impact of Marca-Relli as a person and as an artist on the American and international scene.

You will be able to appreciate the works of the calibre of Cityscape from 1953, an oil on canvas, which was inspired by the artist’s Mexican sojourns and is a turning point for his adoption of the collage technique. There are also Seated Figures of the mid-1950s, a cornerstone of his oeuvre owing to its compositional harmony reminiscent of Cubism. Also unmissable are the 1955 masterpieces The Strategist and The Struggle, as well as his epic tribute Death of Jackson Pollock, a testament to what was a mutual influence more than a friendship. This relationship was replete with frequent confrontations (after all, how to reconcile the irascible Conrad with the despotic and childish soul of the boy from Cody), dialogues, encounters and mutual respect. You will continue your journey through the Italian-American master’s production with the harmonious turmoil of the forms in M-11-56, a work that paved the way for the artist’s New York masterpieces The Battle and The Warrior, respectively part of the permanent collections of the MET and the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The canvases of the late 1950s and the early 1960s are exhibited as a logical follow-on of Marca-Relli’s artistic career, in which any anthropomorphic reference disappears to leave room for architectural compositions with a classical flavour, as in The Wall No. 2. There is no lack of alternative media with which the artist experimented throughout his entire life, as in the case of Cunard L-8-62, which reveals Marca-Relli’s great ability to absorb the stimuli deriving from Minimalism and Arte Povera. He tried out compositions which, while never losing sight of the harmony of forms, opened up to the concepts of rhythm and matter typical of the works of Donald Judd and those of the great artists of Arte Povera.

Marca-Relli, an abstract expressionist with a European approach, is not only a “bridge” between Rome and New York, but above all a master at the cusp of two worlds, Europe, and the United States.

Conrad Marca-Relli
His works are included in the following collections: Bilbao, Guggenheim Museum; Buffalo, Albright-Knox Art Gallery; Chicago, Art Institute; New York, MET, MoMA, Whitney Museum of American Art; San Francisco, Museum of Modern Art; Venice, Peggy Guggenheim Collection; Washington, National Gallery of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum.

 

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville

By: Emily Bunn × Armon Hayes × Vaughn Lowery x Sydney Mayer

On Wednesday night, 360 Magazine had the pleasure of viewing Teatro Nuovo‘s The Barber of Seville. While we were originally visiting Chicago on assignment, after finding out about this monumental production, we knew it couldn’t be missed. We immediately dropped what we were doing and used our Amtrak monthly pass to dash to Damrosch Park in New York City.

Our experience was impressive from the start as soon as we entered the space. Damrosch Park is part of the Lincoln Center complex nearby Fordham University Lincoln Center. It includes the Daniel and Florence Guggenheim outdoor bandshell in the greenspace’s center. The park encompasses the Metropolitan Opera House, the New York State Theater (now the David H. Koch Theater), and Philharmonic Hall (later Avery Fisher Hall and now David Geffen Hall).

The opera buffa invited in guests with a whimsical atmosphere of musical merrymaking. This classic two-act opera, originally by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini, was developed into a cutting-edge interpretation by Teatro Nuovo–Italian for the new theater. The expansive stage, which included a backdrop with soft, rosy clouds, was decorated with a cast of performers donning black-tie apparel. The rostrum was well-lit and easily viewable from all angles of the venue.

The enchanted lighting cast a sultry wash of deep blue hues over all the guests in attendance. Opera enthusiasts of all ages were present for one of the first shows since lockdown. Joining us were people from all ages, races and walks of life: biracial couples, youthful gay couples, and arts aficionados who appeared to be well into their 90s. This sensual, post-pandemic moment of calm finally brought New York’s community of playwrights, musical lovers, and opera fans together yet again.

This marvelous production of The Barber of Seville has surely been long-awaited by many – a worthy cause for celebration. Still, Teatro Nuovo employed all current CDC guidelines. Similar to the seating at fashion shows, guests were organized into pods of two people. Security guards were also present at the venue to enforce these restrictions.

The orchestra was unbelievably incredible, climaxing to a crashing cadenza that captivated the entire audience. Impressively, the conductor of the show also played violin. The cast was headlined by mezzo-soprano Hannah Ludwig. She was joined by the Figaro of Bass, Hans Tashjian, and the Almaviva of tenor, Nicholas Simpson. The three artists are additionally accompanied by soprano Alina Tamborini as Berta, bass Daniel Fridley as Don Basilio, and baritones Scott Purcell and Kyle Oliver as Bartolo and Fiorello, respectively. All of the singers had impressive skill and exhibited raw, uninhibited talent. Their on-stage vulnerability lent for an impassioned delivery which was impactful to all who were lucky enough to hear it. Bellowing vocals swelled the venue with their prolific pipes.

The opera included an intermission, which kindly allowed for guests to relive themselves and enjoy the provided refreshments.

The classic tale of this passionate love story enraptured the audience of emotional fans. 360 Magazine had goosebumps and became teary-eyed at the sublime, awe-inspiring rendition. The vibrant energy of love made one of our team members wish that their parents were still alive to witness this event. This romantic, operatic show was reminiscent of a foreign film gone wild. Fortunately, sub-captions were included.

Teatro Nuovo’s production of The Barber of Seville was truly the performance of a lifetime. 360 Magazine can now joyously cross seeing this spectacular show off of our bucket list.

A standing ovation for Teatro Nuovo’s The Barber of Seville can be viewed HERE.

*Photo credit: Steven Pisano

Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Kyle Olliver (Fiorello), Teatro Nuovo chorus. Photo Credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hans Tashjian (Figaro), Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano. Teatro Nuovo Barber of Seville Photos via Christina Bianco, credit Steven Pisano for use by 360 Magazine

Hannah Ludwig (Rosina), Nicholas Simpson (Almaviva). Photo credit: Steven Pisano.

IZIPIZI x MoMA

MoMA gave the public a first look on some of their new Izipizi eyewear. The event was a celebration filled with vibrant colors and striking personalities. A spring kickback tone set by DJ Valissa Yoe(photographed below) and a environment filled with many welcoming faces. The colors and decor of the room only amplified the numerous options given by Izipizi’s designer shades. The sunglasses were in many different colors and innovative frames including a pop two-colored style. The collection will be available on May 29th exclusively at the Moma Design StoresFashion PR Pauline Perina in Izipizi.Models; Inuer Pichardo, Dante Dupree , Mayce Vassago in Izipizi.

By: Frank Pena

Photos by: Milton Pichardo

Melodics for V-drums 

Roland and Melodics Announce “Melodics for V-Drums”


Free downloadable, interactive drum lesson app dedicated for V-Drums


Roland Corporation (LVCC Central Hall, Booth# 17544) and Melodics™ announce the release of “Melodics for V-Drums,” a dedicated desktop drum learning app for Roland V-Drums, compatible with Mac or PC.

Since the first Roland V-Drums release in 1997, over one million units have been sold all over the world. From top pros to entry-level hobbyists, V-Drums instruments are highly acclaimed for their authentic performance and the various digital advantages that help players enjoy drumming.

Since 2015, Melodics has offered its unique desktop music lesson app to build up the finger-drumming skills of DJs or EDM musicians using pad controllers and drum machines. The app’s lesson programs have a highly visual design that integrates interactive game styles to keep users motivated. Lessons are created by a variety of contemporary musicians to cover a wide range of music genres and playing styles, and new lessons are introduced every week to encourage regular practice.

Roland and Melodics collaborated on the release of the new Melodics for V-Drums app to help Roland V-Drums users create and build up efficient drumming techniques. The app supports V-Drums equipped with a USB computer connector such as the TD-50, TD-30, TD-25, TD-15, TD-11, and TD-1 series, and features 40 free lessons onboard. V-Drums users can start taking lessons immediately after installing the app on their computer and connecting to the V-Drums via a USB cable.

Melodics for V-Drums is being offered currently as a free download. Paid subscribers can enjoy additional 60 lessons, with new lessons being added every week.

Melodics Limited CEO Sam Gribben noted, “We are excited to be working with Roland, the world leaders in electronic drums, to help musicians build and refine their skills. As all great drummers know, practice is the key to mastery. Melodics is designed to help drummers get more from every minute they spend practicing. Not only will you learn faster, you’ll reduce the bad habits that can build up with unstructured practice. With music you’ll love to play to, and tools designed to help you stay motivated, Melodics will feel more like fun than work. Together, Roland and Melodics will help drummers around the world to get better, faster.”

Roland Corporation CEO and Representative Director Jun-ichi Miki added, “Since the first V-Drums release in 1997, V-Drums have been acclaimed by drummers all over the world. We decided to collaborate with Melodics to support effective drum practicing using our V-Drums. Generally, drum practicing tends to be boring and time consuming. The drum lessons available on Melodics cover various musical styles and help make learning to drum fun and efficient. The combination of using V-Drums and Melodics together is an ideal solution for both beginner and experienced drummers.”

To learn more about the Melodics for V-Drums app, visit www.melodics.com/vdrums/.

Rilke Guillén

Rilke Guillén 

Artist Plásticomexicanocatalán, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, of thinking and feeling. He has exhibited his work in Spain and Mexico for many decades.

Artist statement

I believe to express my vision of this splendor-decadent world that witnesses our existence, to try to move in the emotion of the viewer, to make him see inside yes; by the right and the reverse of the same glove of what is and exists and of what is not and also exists. Like the dream inside the eye and the outside eye. Like the truth and vertigo of the depth of the fractal-cosmic spiral. As a picture, as truth, as the line that springs from my pen. Creating images and sculptures gives meaning to my existence and being me from the inside-out, so I can communicate with others. I am an insatiable explorer of the plastic techniques that I am encountering in my path, such as painting, watercolor, engraving, sculpture, design, etc. My search in these different lands has the same objective: to find the voice that is capable of taking out this animal-human being, who is thronging in my heart. The fine perfume of the flower of my spirit.

Biography

I remember as a child drawing horses and birds obsessively. The representation of images has always seemed to me as a matter that holds great power, as if in representing an object or being, somehow one was made with his skill, with his unique quality. I have always been surrounded by art. My father, in his poetic dimension, attracted artists from all disciplines to the house to share his presence and talent, some of them had a great impact on me. There was a very special one that made me the honor of taking me as a disciple for a short but unforgettable time: The great teacher Rodolfo Zanabria (who in peace rides in infinity with his maidens with long hair and beautiful faces). From him, I learned that the road is long and if you know how to walk you will reach the Magical Domain. Destiny had the willingness to be a Mexican-Catalan artist, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, thinking and feeling. This has allowed me to exhibit and share my work on both sides of the Atlantic since my debut on the plastic scene, until today.

For more artworks, visit here.

MOMA × FONDATION LOUIS VUITTON 

MoMA Collection Comes to Paris in Major Exhibition Presented by Fondation Louis Vuitton

Fondation Louis Vuitton presents an exceptional exhibition devoted to the unrivalled collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Featuring more than 200 renowned masterpieces and less familiar, but highly significant works, the exhibition highlights the pivotal role that MoMA, its curators and its exhibition program have played in the history of art in the 20th and 21st Centuries.

Now engaged in a significant expansion and renovation of its building, MoMA has chosen Fondation Louis Vuitton as its partner to bring its legendary artistic heritage to Paris, showcasing its mission to be perpetually modern.

The exhibition draws together a superb and far-reaching representation of the highly important artworks that MoMA has acquired since its founding in 1929 ranging from the birth of modern art through trends and styles such as American abstraction, Pop art and Minimalism to the most contemporary art.

Among the 200 works presented at Fondation Louis Vuitton are masterpieces by Paul Cézanne, Gustav Klimt, Paul Signac, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Giorgio de Chirico, Edward Hopper, Max Beckmann, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, Alexander Calder, René Magritte, Walker Evans, Yayoi Kusama, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns, Yvonne Rainer and Frank Stella. 

Some of the works will be shown in France for the first time: Constantin Brancusi’s bronze Bird in Space (1928); Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962); Philip Guston’s Tomb (1978); (Untitled) “USA Today” by Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1990) and more.