Posts tagged with "TED Talk"

Heavenly Reyna photograph by Jeanne Dee from James Steers, Press Here Publicity for use by 360 Magazine

Heavenly Reyna Releases Acoustic Version of Upcoming Single “EXIT”

Pop prodigy Heavenly Reyna has released the stripped-down, piano-driven version of her anticipated upcoming single “EXIT.” Press here to listen to the acoustic track, a quirky, pop-infused ballad which compares the pain of heartbreak to the agony of LA traffic. The accompanying video finds Heavenly with nothing but a piano as she reflects on the anguish left behind in the wake of a breakup. Press here to watch the “EXIT” acoustic video.

“As a trilingual artist, I love global stories that we can all relate to,” says Heavenly. “I’ve grown really fast on Twitch and ‘EXIT’ has always been one of my most popular songs there because everyone can relate to heartbreak and agonizing traffic. I like the juxtaposition of comparing a breakup to traffic as it adds a twist to the song.”

Heavenly celebrated the release of the acoustic version of “EXIT” with a special Twitch livestreamed release party which Twitch promoted on their front page. In addition to performances during the livestream, Heavenly partnered with Røde Microphone to host a giveaway for viewers that tuned in. Press here to view their Twitch channel.

Readying to step into her own, and previously releasing music under the moniker Mozart, “EXIT” marks Heavenly’s first release under her birth name. A prolific singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist, Heavenly has brought together her love of music and her diverse experiences into her songs including her previous single “Push You Harder,” an inspiring, female empowerment anthem about succeeding in the face of adversity which received acclaim from LA Weekly, Celeb Secrets, and Pasadena WeeklyPress here to watch the music video for the track which was written shortly after Heavenly’s 17th birthday and draws inspiration from strong women throughout history.

Raised in 48 countries as her family travelled the globe and documented their adventures as travel bloggers, Heavenly shared her experiences of how these ventures played an influential role in her life in a 2016 TED Talk. Using her music as a cultural bridge to bring people together through relatable storytelling that transcends individual cultures, Heavenly is fluent and crafts songs in English, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish. She has gone viral on TikTok for performing covers of popular songs in a multitude of different languages, recently catapulted to over two million channel views on Twitch after becoming a partner, and headlined shows on her European solo tour.

Since kicking off her musical career as a teenager, Heavenly featured next to Ariana Grande in her “God is a Woman” music video, appeared on MTV songwriting with Bebe Rexha, was a featured singer in both Halsey’s and Lindsey Stirling’s documentaries, starred in in the Brat series The Talent Show, and was crowned the winner of the International Songwriting and Unsigned Artist competitions. Taking her talents into the world of acting, Heavenly also won a Best Actress Award for her dramatic lead in the film Rose, and recently starred in two new thrillers, Fame at a Deadly Cost and Glass Darkly.

Follow Heavenly Reyna

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Children Diagnosing Their Own Disorders

A Cultural Revolution That Has Gone Too Far

By Laura Wellington

My son came home from school yesterday. A normal afternoon, I heated up a hamburger and fries and placed it in front of him. It launched us into our regular discussion regarding his day. You know the one, “How was it? What’d you do? What’d you learn?” and so on.

This afternoon, however my son took our pleasant exchange one step further. He coupled it with expressing a worry of his, denoting that “something may be seriously wrong with him because he has a hard time sitting still in school at times and occasionally feels the need to fidget.” He then went on to grasp the name of the disorder he must have and shared it with me. I stopped him in his tracks.

My son is ten. He is an intelligent kid as well as a talented athlete. He’s met all of his pediatric markers since birth easily. He has friends of whom he socializes daily. There is nothing wrong with him. I reassured him of this, emphasizing my point by telling him that, “He is a kid, and by definition, he should be feeling these things at his age.”

This incident made me question where we’ve arrived in society, wondering how many other children worry about the same thing? What percentage today suffer with the notion that something might be truly wrong with them simply because they don’t understand what normal behavior is for kids their ages and are growing up in a culture laden with labels and diagnoses eagerly offered to explain the imperfect beings that they are? I bet you that percentage is relatively high.

Don’t get me wrong. I am far from being flippant about mental health. As we all know, there are very real disorders that plague children. Diagnosing and treating them are imperative. But when children become clinicians, themselves, because they are so tapped into the undertone of an era that gives off the vibe that “something is wrong” before it is even right or normal, that’s a little scary. What it tells me is that WE need to back off in this regard so that our kids can too.

I’m not alone in my thinking. Allan Schwartz, LCSW, PH.D. concurs in his article “Children: Are We Too Quick To Suspect Mental Illness?” In it he states “Given the new diagnostic criteria and additional behaviors listed as indicative of mental illness in the DSM V, there is the danger that too many children could be viewed as having mental disorders when it is not necessary.”

Children need to be children. It is tough enough to be a child when you are naive to what you are supposed to do simply because you are one. Helping them to understand this is key. If you can follow up with a brief conversation about the current tone of society specific to mental health, including where you agree and disagree, this can’t hurt either.

The fact that today’s kids have placed the action of “self-diagnosing” their own disorders in their repertoires is a serious warning call for the rest of us. We need to change this and let them go back to being imperfectly-perfect children — the ones who don’t want to sit still, argue with their siblings incessantly, and whine each night to stay up past their bedtimes.

There is time enough to grow up and worry about everything else.

And speaking about worrying, in my new book “Be Careful What You Wish For”, what did Joan help Evie stop worrying about when together at the table? (Question #5, BCWYWF book contest)

Follow Laura J. Wellington

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Madame Gandhi, 360 Magazine

Madame Gandhi Releases New Video

Acclaimed artist and activist Madame Gandhi debuts her new music video for “Waiting For Me” and announces other exciting upcoming events

Today, multi-talented artist, percussionist, producer and activist Madame Gandhi releases her newest video for “Waiting For Me.” Directed by Misha Ghose, “Waiting For Me” was conceptualized and produced by an all-female team and features queer, trans, female and gender non-conforming cast members. With its contrasting industrial imagery and color palettes, the visual brings the song’s empowering message to life: an eco-feminist call to action that eschews institutionalized power structures in favor of forging new narratives of self-expression. This feminist anthem perfectly aligns with Madame Gandhi’s persistent fight for equality and justice and you can check out Vogue Magazine’s article about Madame Gandhi and the video here.

When asked about the video, Madame Gandhi explains, “We as artists have the power to use our art to vividly reimagine the world we wished we lived in. ‘Waiting For Me’ is a song about questioning societal norms as they exist. The video opens with the quote, ‘We always assume our own powerlessness, but never our own power.’ With the interconnected social justice movements happening around the world, we are seeing a larger belief in the power of the collective for change. This music video is a call to action for each of us to examine how hierarchy, capitalism and systemic oppression serve to keep us obedient, with little space for dialogue or critical thinking. My hope is that this video inspires folks to ask, ‘Are my behaviors contributing to the oppression of somebody else? And what contributes to my own oppression? What does my version of freedom look and feel like?’”

The video for “Waiting For Me” launches the next chapter in Madame Gandhi’s already critically-acclaimed career, as she announces her signing with Sony Music Masterworks. Having already released her first two EPs, Gandhi begins her new partnership with Sony Music Masterworks ahead of the third and final installment in the series.

Madame Gandhi has had even more excitement recently, one of which being her performance for NPR Tiny Desk (Home) Concert. In addition, Gandhi was elected as 2020 TED Fellow for her commitment to creating meaningful and positive change and will also participate in TED2020 this summer. Here, she will be joining multidisciplinary individuals across the globe for an online gathering of conversations, sessions and performances. But, this is not Madame Gandhi’s first experience on the TED Stage; she returns after her 2018 TED Talk about the importance of making music accessible to those hard of hearing.

Madame Gandhi also recently provided a song to the documentary series And She Could Be Next. For this project, Gandhi works in collaboration with Gingger Shankar on a track entitled “Freedom Cries” which will be found on the show’s soundtrack. The documentary series chronicles the defiant movement of women of color who are transforming American politics. And She Could Be Next is currently airing on local PBS stations, streaming online at AndSheCouldBeNext.com and on the PBS app on your smart TV.

About Madame Gandhi:

Kiran Gandhi, who performs as Madame Gandhi, is an artist and activist whose mission is to elevate and celebrate gender liberation. With an imitable pairing of complex percussive rhythms and empowering messages of liberation, Madame Gandhi is known for her passionately uplifting music that continues to elevate the female voice and redefine notions of gender, identity and politics.

She has toured as the drummer for M.I.A, Thievery Corporation and most recently Oprah on her 2020 Vision Stadium Tour. Gandhi holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Mathematics and Gender Studies from Georgetown and an MBA from Harvard. In 2015, she ran the London Marathon bleeding freely to combat period stigma around the world, sparking a global viral conversation about how we treat menstruation in various cultures. She has been listed as a Forbes 30 Under 30 member and is a 2020 TED Fellow. Her uplifting music and inspiring talks have been critically acclaimed by The New York Times, Billboard, NPR and more. Her song “The Future is Female” reached #8 on the Spotify Viral US Charts following the 2017 Women’s March. She has released two short-form albums, Voices and Visions, accompanied by a series of music videos produced by women and gender non-conforming creatives. Gandhi is currently working on her third short-form album Vibrations.

Follow Madame Gandhi: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

Madame Gandhi, 360 Magazine
Madame Gandhi, 360 Magazine
Madame Gandhi, 360 Magazine