Posts tagged with "Barack Obama"

Kaelen Felix illustrates Twin Towers for 360 Magazine

How Has 9/11 Changed America?

September 11, 2001 will forever remain etched in the memories of Americans. Almost 3,000 innocent lives were lost during the deadly 9/11 terror attack. No one saw it coming until two planes hijacked by terrorists crashed into New York’s World Trade Center.

Terrorists aboard a third plane hovered around the Pentagon while the fourth crashed in Pennsylvania. And this was the beginning of significant changes in America’s history. Nearly everything changed in a bid to make America safe. Below are several things that changed after the terrorist attack.

Start Of War On Terror

The 9/11 terrorist attack on U.S. soil marked the beginning of America’s war on terror. Before then, American troops were home. But a month after the attack, American troops were deployed to Afghanistan. Their main objective was reining in al-Qaeda militia – an outlawed terror group – behind the terrorist attack in the U.S.

In an address to Congress nine days after the attack, declared a global war on terror.

“Our war on terror begins with al Qaeda, but it does not end there. It will not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped, and defeated,” Bush’s resolute stand read.

The U.S. troops sustained a long war in dismantling the Taliban government supporting al-Qaeda. It is the most protracted military campaign in the annals of U.S. history. And it didn’t end here. Military troops from the U.S. in 2003 invaded Iraq intending to dethrone Saddam Hussein. Hussein was the leader at the time and was producing weapons for the Taliban forces.

Twenty years later, about 8,000 US troops are still in Afghanistan, taming the Taliban insurgency.

Health Complications

Residents of lower Manhattan in New York reported increasing cases of Ground Zero respiratory diseases five months after the terror attack. Some of the 9/11 related illnesses came as a result of pulverization. When the World Trade Center collapsed, all materials in the building became fine dust spreading all over Manhattan.

The World Trade Center Health Program certifies that there are more cases of respiratory diseases since the attack in the area. Further, other ailments certified by the program include asthma, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, cancer, depression, rhinosinusitis, and sleep apnea.

Onset Of Deportations

The Department of Homeland Security didn’t exist before September 11, 2001. President Bush formed it in 2002, working closely with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Deportations rose exponentially during Barack Obama’s administration, having the highest numbers. Between 2009 and 2010, nearly 400,000 people were deported.

Between 1999 and 2001, there were at least 200,000 annual deportations. But they doubled after the 9/11 terror attack.

Airport Security More Elaborate

In 2001, you would wander around the airport in the U.S. without much fuss. Today, you need a ticket to do this. And proper scrutiny of your passenger I.D. is undertaken before boarding a flight. A thorough body check happens today, and you must remove your shoes and your belt. Back then, none of this happened. Security is now elaborate – nothing is ignored. Not even the vaguest intelligence report.

Anti-Muslim Bias

Between 2015 and 2016, FBI data indicates 91 cases of assault stemming from anti-Muslim bias. In contrast to 2001, after the 9/11 attack, this number grew. Americans perceive Islam as a religion advocating for war. Religious discrimination is still a thing in America. The profiling of Muslims continues amid efforts to change the narrative that they are peace-loving.

The aftermath of the 9/11 terror attack in the U.S. in 2001 has a good and an ugly side. In terms of safety, it is a plus for the people. More elaborate security systems are in place today. But America is still in the war two decades later; this is a sad reminder of the aftereffect of the most significant terror attack in the land.

Jesse McCartney single cover via Charlie Roina for use by 360 Magazine

Jesse McCartney – Kiss The World Goodbye

Jesse McCartney reveals new single and video, Kiss the World Goodbye, as well as announces fall tour dates.

Today, multi-platinum recording artist, singer, songwriter, and actor Jesse McCartney released his new anthemic single and video for Kiss The World Goodbye off his upcoming sixth studio album New Stage, due out Fall 2021. Representing a new chapter in his life, New Stage is set to mark his first full-length album in seven years. The video for Kiss The World Goodbye premiered on McCartney’s YouTube page at midnight last night. Later this year, McCartney will embark on a 2021 tour, in support of the forthcoming album, with pre-sale tickets available for purchase starting later today. 

Inspired by his future wife, actress Katie Peterson, the single reflects their bond where they are ready to take on anything and everything. McCartney shares, “If this last year has taught us anything, it’s to hold our loved ones close. I hope my fans can overcome the fear and anxiety that has come with this pandemic, and if it helps, they can jump in the car with a friend or significant other, roll the windows down, blast this song, and just drive! This song is intended to inspire, even when you have the weight of the world on your shoulders. And when you have that special someone you can rely on, someone who can share in the good times and bad, it really gives you the sense that the two of you can take on anything.”

Kiss The World Goodbye is written by Jesse McCartney, Carah Faye (of Shiny Toy Guns and co-writer of Stay the Night performed by Zedd & Hayley Williams), and Morgan Taylor Reid (Grammy-nominated producer who has previously worked with Marshmello, Chromeo, Backstreet Boys, American Authors, MAX, etc.). The song follows last year’s singles Yours, an introspective look at the different roles he’s played throughout his life, and Friends, an homage to the people in one’s life who become chosen family.

Directed by brother & sister duo, Maxx & Madison, the music video is themed “us against the world,” and inspired by Bonnie & Clyde meets 1996’s Romeo & Juliet, co-starring McCartney’s fiancé Katie Peterson.

This November, McCartney is set to launch his tour in Austin, TX hitting over 20 cities before ending in Los Angeles. Pre-sale tickets go on sale today, July 21. General tickets go on sale starting July 23rd. There will also be VIP packages available for purchase. Additional details to come.

TOUR DATES

11/4: Austin, TX – Emo’s

11/5: Houston, TX – White Oak Music Hall

11/6: Dallas, TX – South Side Ballroom

11/9: Minneapolis, MN – The Fillmore

11/11: Dekalb, IL – Egyptian Theatre

11/12: Chicago, IL – Park West

11/13: Columbus, OH – Express Live!

11/15: New York, NY – Irving Plaza

11/16: Huntington, NY – Paramount Theatre

11/19: Boston, MA – Big Night Live

11/20: Silver Springs, MD – The Fillmore Silver Springs

11/22: Raleigh, NC – The Ritz Raleigh

11/23: Charlotte, NC – The Fillmore Charlotte

11/24: Atlanta, GA – Buckhead Theatre

11/26 Huntsville, AL – Mars Music Hall

11/27: Cincinnati, OH – Bogarts

11/30: St. Louis, MO – The Pageant

12/1: Kansas City, MO – The Truman

12/2: Oklahoma City, OK – Diamond Ballroom

12/4: Denver, CO – Ogden Theatre

12/7: San Francisco, CA – The Masonic

12/8: Los Angeles, CA – The Wiltern

About Jesse McCartney

Since the start of his career, New York-born and Los Angeles-based singer, songwriter, artist, and actor Jesse McCartney has built a catalog of instantly recognizable anthems and captivated audiences on the road and on-screen. His first three albums—the platinum-certified Beautiful Soul (2004), Right Where You Want Me (2006), and Departure (2008)—consecutively bowed in the Top 15 of the Billboard Top 200 with the singles Beautiful Soul minted Gold and Leavin’ certified Platinum. Plus, he collaborated with T-Pain on the cross-genre banger Body Language. Meanwhile, SPIN touted In Technicolor as among its “Top 20 Pop Albums of 2014.” Along the way, he performed in arenas alongside the likes of New Kids on the Block and Backstreet Boys in addition to packing global headline tours and hosting shows for both George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

A sought-after songwriter, he notably wrote the 4x Platinum GRAMMY® Award-nominated Bleeding Love for Leona Lewis. In 2018, the one-off single Better With You racked up over 30 million cumulative streams and paved the way for his fifth offering. Simultaneously, his acting credits grew to include everything from Chernobyl Diaries and Fear The Walking Dead to Alvin and the Chipmunks, and even voicing the character Roxas/Ventus in gamer favorite Kingdom Hearts. Now, he opens up more than ever on his sixth full-length album, due out later this year.

photo by Elektra for use by 360 Magazine

PRATEEK KUHAD – SHEHRON KE RAAZ

Critically acclaimed singer-songwriter Prateek Kuhad has debuted new EP Shehron Ke Raaz. The four-track collection includes an acoustic version of Kuhad’s 2020 breakout hit “Kasoor,” and was heralded by singles “Tere Hi Hum” and the EP’s title trackShehron Ke Raaz is available now on all streaming platforms via Elektra Records.

The artist returns his Indian roots on the project, recording in Bombay and singing in Hindi as he explores the intimate, often hidden worlds that lovers create for themselves. There’s a sweetness to his delivery that transcends language and culture, resulting in a dreamy and profoundly moving body of work that speaks to the kind of fundamentally human desires that bind us all.

Big cities have countless stories of lovers lost in their own little worlds, and while their particular corner of the city may be small in the grand scheme of things, their emotional universe is large and all-encompassing,” Kuhad explains. “This EP explores love in a very gentle and personal manner. The stories are hidden, and they belong to those who wish to participate in them. The music attempts to represent hope, mystery, and wonder in the most beautiful way possible.”

In October, Prateek announced his signing to Elektra Records, making history as the first solo Indian act to join the storied label. The news was heralded by the re-release of his 2018 breakthrough EP cold / mess, lauded by Atwood Magazine an “an utterly breathtaking, expansive piece of indie folk mastery.” The collection has racked up critical praise from NPR, Vulture, Billboard, Uproxx, and former President Barack Obama, who featured “cold / mess” on his 2019 Songs of the Year playlist. In February, Kuhad shared “cold / mess (on piano),” a stripped-back take of the delicate ballad.

Hailed by Rolling Stone India as “one of the country’s leading singer-songwriters,” Prateek Kuhad has taken the rest of the world by storm in recent years, writing and performing in both Hindi and English and garnering a slew of accolades and honors around the globe with his mesmerizing, cinematic songwriting.

Growing up in the small city of Jaipur, India, Kuhad’s childhood listening diet consisted primarily of the Indian pop and Bollywood soundtracks that filled the local radio dial, as well as his parents’ CD collection, which contained only limited Western music. A move to New York City for college opened Prateek’s eyes to a new world of music, discovering Elliott Smith and inspiring him to seriously pursue his musical ambitions. While Kuhad has long been a household name in his native country (he became one of Spotify India’s most-streamed artists when the service launched there and the cold/mess EP debuted at #1), 2019 proved to be his breakout year in North America, with a star-making turn at SXSW and a cross-country headline run that culminated with three sold out shows in New York City.

Prateek’s debut album In Tokens and Charms was an instant hit ߝ earning the artist an MTV Europe Music Award, Indie Album of the Year honors from iTunes, and the title of Best Pop Artist at the Radio City Freedom Awards. The album’s opening track, “Oh Love,” captured first place in the prestigious International Songwriting Competition, which previously helped launch artists like Gotye and Passenger to global audiences. Kuhad has sold out auditorium and amphitheater dates across India, landed arena support slots with the likes of Alt-J and Mike Posner, and traveled the world for headline and festival performances in the US, UK, Australia, Singapore, Canada, and France.

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE IMPORTANCE OF BLACK MUSIC MONTH

By: Andrew Shibuya

For many, June is a month of celebration. Between Pride Month and the official start of summer, June’s thirty days are chock-full of various festivities and commemorations. And still, one of June’s national designations in the United States is almost wholly overlooked annually: African American Music Appreciation Month.

Though this coining of June as African American Music Appreciation Month was first introduced by President Jimmy Carter in 1979, originally dubbed Black Music Month, its current name was given by President Barack Obama in 2009. From its initiation, this commemoration was intended to serve as most generally as a celebration of all African American music in the United States.

And in a recent official White House press release, President Joe Biden voiced his own sentiments behind the importance of Black Music Appreciation month: “During Black Music Appreciation Month, we honor the innovative artists whose musical expressions move us, brighten our daily lives, and bring us together. Across the generations, Black music has pioneered the way we listen to music while preserving Black cultural traditions and sharing the unique experiences of the Black community.”

It would be premature, though, to celebrate Black Music Appreciation Month by solely celebrating a handful of the most prominent Black artists. Because what is Black music exactly? While many companies and streaming platforms have taken to commemorating various iconic artists or works, the goal of this commemoration ought to be to acknowledge and celebrate the vast influence and impact of African American music in the United States as a whole.

Of course, to even begin to fathom how to track this influence, one must attempt to define Black music itself. And inherently, the phrase, and the genre, if it can be put under a singular one, evade definition. Is Black music music simply made by Black artists? Yes. But is music inspired by or influenced by Black artists Black music? This answer is not so clear.

One of the many issues with the distinction and defining of Black music in the music industry is that oftentimes Black artists are often pushed into genres such as R&B or hip hop, which is both reductive and limiting to the artists and their work. Singer-songwriter FKA twigs spoke about this phenomenon in an interview with the Guardian in 2014: “When I first released music and no one knew what I looked like, I would read comments like: ‘I’ve never heard anything like this before, it’s not in a genre.’ And then my picture came out six months later, now she’s an R&B singer.”

For years, high profile award shows such as the Grammys have only helped to perpetuate this boxing in of Black artists. Take, for instance, the confusingly and formerly titled “Best Urban Contemporary Album” category. It was only last year that the category was renamed to “Best Progressive R&B Album”. The change was born out of the award show’s desire for more inclusivity and to better reflect the fluidity and scope of the category. In the past several years, many in the industry and in the media have called for an end to the use of “urban” in describing music, arguing that the term is a vague and limiting generalization for Black music as a whole.

And even in genres that are considered to be most influenced or dominated by Black artists, there has historically been underrepresentation in the industry. For example, just last year, producer Kaytranada became the first Black artist to win the Grammy for “Best Dance/Electronic Album”, though the genre has been unarguably most influenced by traditionally Black dominated genres such as disco and hip hop.

With these inequalities and failures of the music industry in mind, the necessity for Black Music Appreciation Month is most evident. To celebrate Black music is to acknowledge its importance in the history of American music, with respect to both Black artists and otherwise. It is likewise clear that a rigid distinction between what is Black music and what is not is not necessary–for in reality, so much of contemporary American music has been in some way touched or influenced by so-called Black music. It is an undercurrent that has served as the foundation for all of contemporary American music, and has been, in fact, so integral to all of American music.

Because for centuries now, Black music has been a keystone of the American music identity. Antonin Dvořák, a Czech composer, once cited the late nineteenth century African American spirituals he encountered in America as a great inspiration for his “New World Symphony”.  Even more than simply citing these spiritual hymns as inspiration, Dvořák similarly recognized their power, importance, and place in the future and legacy of American music: “These beautiful and varied themes are the product of the soil. They are the folk songs of America, and your composers must turn to them.”

And just as Black music cannot simply be a subgenre of music, it can likewise never be defined as any one thing. Thus, Black Music Appreciation Month ought to celebrate the protean nature of Black music as well as to acknowledge the historical injustices to Black artists and musicians. From folk to the blues, from jazz to hip hop, the influence of Black music on American music as a whole is both undeniable and wholly remarkable. And just as Dvořák was prescient to recognize, Black music has become the indelible foundation and promising future of American music.

 

Hope Tala — MAD for use by 360 Magazine

HOPE TALA — MAD

HOPE TALA REVEALS NEW SINGLE “MAD” PRODUCED BY PAUL EPWORTH AND ACCOMPANIED BY OFFICIAL VIDEO

Today, West London-based genre hybrid Hope Tala reveals her stunning new single, “MAD.” Her first new music since the release of her hotly-received recent EP, Girl Eats Sun, “MAD” sees Hope Tala build on the bossa nova-inspired R&B that has seen her cement herself as one of 2021’s artists to watch. Premiered by Annie Mac on BBC Radio 1, produced by the multi-Grammy award winning Paul Epworth (Adele, Florence + the Machine) and accompanied by a stunning video directed by Millicent Hailes, the song serves as a stellar entry point for what promises to be a breakthrough year for Hope Tala. You can listen to “MAD” HERE. You can watch the official video for “MAD” HERE.

Speaking on the release, Hope states, “I wrote ‘MAD’ about having feelings of frustration and hysteria in a long-distance relationship. It’s about being unable to communicate properly and feeling lost in loneliness—so it’s ironic that I wrote most of the song a week or two before the first lockdown started in the UK. Foreshadowing, almost.”

At this point in her career, Hope has already earned the endorsement of Barack Obama, fronted the Apple x Gay Times Elevate campaign, been spotlighted as a 2021 Vevo DSCVR Artist and has had her music streamed over 30 million times, all while garnering acclaim from Billboard, Clash, Dork, GQ, MTV, Notion, Refinery29, The Line Of Best Fit, Vogue, Wonderland and plenty more.

Music has surrounded Hope for as long as she can remember. Every Saturday growing up, she attended music school, learning the clarinet and performing in orchestras and wind bands. As part of an audio class, she learned Logic, and at 14-years-old, she taught herself guitar. Upon gaining proficiency with recording, she uploaded “Peace Freestyle” to Soundcloud in 2016. Following a post by Instagram creative platform Art Hoe Collective, Illegal Civilization founder Mikey Alfred discovered the track and spun it on Pharrell’s Apple Music Beats 1 radio show. This recognition made Hope realize she “could pursue music as more than just a hobby.” 2018 saw the release of her Starry Ache EP, and she released her Sensitive Soul EP a year later. “Jealous,” “Anywhere” and “D.T.M.” each gained traction on DSPs, as “Lovestained” eclipsed 18.2 million streams. Rolling Stone placed the latter at #8 on its “50 Best Songs of 2019.” Everything paved the way for Girl Eats Sun, released in 2020.

Arriving in 2021 as one of the UK’s brightest lights, Hope Tala looks set to establish herself as a vital new global artist with her upcoming body of work. Look out for more very soon.

ABOUT REPUBLIC RECORDS:

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Black Thought, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Stevie Wonder, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd and more. Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains a long-standing strategic alliance with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (J Balvin and Karol G).  In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production was the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video.

Madame Trusseau's Wax Museum NYC image shot by Vaughn Lowery and Armon Hayes for use by 360 Magazine

Madame Tussauds New York Wax Museum

By: Emily Bunn × Vaughn Lowery × Armon Hayes

Have you ever dreamed of taking seat in the Oval Office, starring on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, or joining the Ghostbusters crew? With Madame Tussauds, what may have seemed impossible is now in fingertips reach. The wax museum hosts five floors of interactive, celebrity wax figures. Positioning the heart of New York City in Times Square, guests of Madame Tussauds wax museum are surrounded by star-struck fun. 360 Magazine visited the wax museum and had a VIP experience with by our favorite figures.

There are several different zones for interactive experiences at Madame Tussauds. In “Walk the Catwalk” guests will be coached by model Alessandra Ambrosio to embrace their best catwalk. Guests can even get their catwalk video recorded to share their strut online. Practices your poses with Heidi Klum and perfect your smize with Tyra Banks. What better place to practice your model moves than In the Fashion Capital of the World?

New York is also known, of course, for the city’s spectacular Broadway productions. Guests can become a part of the interactive, behind-the-scenes journey of exploring the most iconic Broadway shows. Whether you want to follow in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s footsteps and compose Broadway music scores, style the cast’s wardrobe, or act and sing your heart out, you can play your part at Madame Tussauds’ New York Broadway experience. Don’t miss your curtain call on this exciting opportunity.

If you’re looking for a more action-packed experience, be sure to visit Madam Tussaud’s Marvel exhibit! Save the world and rescue humanity alongside your favorite superheroes including The Hulk, The Hulk Buster, Captain America, Thor, Nick Fury, Iron Man, and Spiderman. This interactive Marvel experience lets guests develop their Spidey-senses and get closer to their favorite heroes than ever before.

After you’re done assuming your role as Captain America in the Marvel zone, get ready to use your powers in the Faceoff with King Kong zone. Featuring the largest animatronic in New York City, Madame Tussauds­-in collaboration with Legendary Pictures and Warner Brothers-invites guests to battle King Kong. Guests will begin their daring adventure on the infamous Skull Island, in which they must evade jungle creatures and unearth iconic artifacts from the film. Along their voyage, guests will be accompanied by a new, wax figure of Captain James Conrad before battling the beast. The eighteen-foot tall, multi-sensory animatronic head of King Kong is sure to leave guests in awe and terror. Hear King Kong’s roar and unearth the secrets of skull island with this ferocious exhibition.

If you’re looking for more thrilling spooks, check out Madame Tussaud’s Ghostbusters zone. In honor of the return of the loved franchise, the museum has built a specialty experience inspired by the 2016 film. Escapade along the eerie, underground NY subway tracks and explore the dark basement of a haunted mansion while keeping your eyes peeled for ghosts and goblins galore. Beware of several spooks along the way as you bust ghosts and meet stars such as Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones, Melisa McCarthy, and Kristen Wiig. Fans of the franchise can even take a spin on the Ecto-2.

Another star-studded zone Madame Tussauds offers is MTNY Studios exhibit. Whether you’ve dreamed of being a celebrity on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, forecasting breaking news alongside Michael Strahan, or reporting on the weather with Al Roker, you can be the TV star you’ve always wanted to be.

Finally, the last zone Madame Tussaud offers is the Oval Office experience. Get up close and personal with influential leaders of the past and present, like Barack Obama and George Washington. Instead of reading about history in a textbook, experience making history in-person alongside your favorite politicos.

Besides the museum’s seven interactive zones, there are also two riveting experiences: the Marvel 4D Film, and the Coney Island Carnival Carnage 7D Game.

With Marvel’s 4D experience, guests can feel a part of the movie with 3D film technologies including experiential sensory effects. Viewers are put in the middle of the action when viewing this incredible 4D film. Feel the wind and water, and even smells the same scents at the same time as your favorite heroes in the movie.

Guests are invited to face their greatest nightmares in the Coney Island Carnival Carnage Game. This 7D, multi-sensory experience invites guests to shoot lasers at enemies, ride carnival attractions, and spin the Wheel of Misfortune–all while running from killer clowns. This adrenaline-packed nightmare promises a rich gaming experience that may keep you awake at night–that is, if you can escape.

All of Madame Tussauds’ zones and experiences allow guests to get up more close and personal with their favorite Hollywood celebrities and figures than ever before. Madame Tussauds is available for group visits, school visits, corporate events, and even birthday parties. We went on a Friday afternoon, and had a blast exploring the five stories of experiential fun. The figures we found most lifelike were Taylor Swift and Miley Cyrus. All three figures of Michael Jackson impressed us, and we loved seeing his evolution through time. Our favorite zone was Ghostbusters– the subway set mirrored NYC’s own actual subways, which felt both surreal and cinematic. Those interested in visiting Madame Tussauds can visit this website for ticket purchase and further details. The wax museum is currently operating at reduced capacity and is following all COVID-19 protocols.

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Wendy Williams at Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum NYC via Eliza Rose for use by 360 Magazine
Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

Illustration of Melania Trump and Jill Biden by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Dear Melania Trump, Our 2nd Immigrant First Lady

By Javier Pedroza

Dear Melania: Why didn’t you invite the new FLOTUS, Dr. Jill Biden, for a private tour of the White House living quarter?

“Under all circumstances, we must never desert ourselves”. – Louisa Catherine Adams, the first FLOTUS born outside of the United States of America (1825 to 1829). Historically, First Ladies are mostly respected and admired. The coveted position has been uncontroversial until 2021. 

Melania Trump, formerly known as Melanija Knavs, was born on April 26, 1970 in Slovenia. At age 16, she began what would soon become a successful modeling career, appearing in many high profile ad campaigns and working with some of the best photographers in the fashion industry. In 1996, Mrs. Trump moved to New York and 10 years later she proudly became a United States Citizen. Former First Lady Melania Trump is the wife of the 45th President, Donald J. Trump and the mother to their son, Barron Trump. She is the second First Lady born outside of the United States, and she is the only First Lady to become a naturalized United States citizen. 

Mrs. Trump is the first modern former First Lady to break one of the transfer-of-power rituals; welcoming the incoming president and family into the White House. This American tradition commenced in the 1920s and was respected all the way to 2017, when outgoing FLOTUS Mrs. Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama hosted Mrs. Melania Trump for tea while discussing the private residence. 

“Mrs. Trump should have invited Dr. Biden in for the traditional coffee. Typically, the first lady would come prepared with questions, she’ll meet and talk to the chef, the full time residence staff and have an opportunity for them to break the ice. It’s a courtesy, but logistically it’s incredibly helpful. That didn’t happen,”Capricia Marshall told The New York Times. Capricia Marshall was the former White House social secretary in the Clinton administration. 

In 2016 when former President Barack Obama welcomed Donald and Melania Trump to the White House, Former First Lady Michelle Obama held her head up high despite Donald’s reckless lies about her husband. Michelle Obama went on instagram and described how she felt during that time, sharing that while she was “hurt and disappointed,” she accepted that “the American people had spoken.” She went on to write, “My husband and I instructed our staff to do what George and Laura Bush had done for us: run a respectful, seamless transition of power — one of the hallmarks of American democracy.” 

On January 19th, 2021 CNN reported, “Melania Trump left the White House with the worst popularity rating for any first lady at the end of her term in polling history. The latest CNN/SSRS poll had Trump’s favorable rating at 42% to a 47% unfavorable rating. The 47% is the highest unfavorable rating we ever recorded for Trump. It’s also amazingly high from a historical perspective.” 

On January 20th, another protocol was broken when neither the former President nor any member of his family attended the inauguration. The Trumps also bypassed the laying of a wreath atop the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Ceremony, where the Biden’s were joined by former Presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and their spouses. 

As trending headlines like “Trumps’ snub of Bidens historic in its magnitude” by CNN circulated in the media early this week, we watched Melania Trump address the nation for the last time as First Lady of the United States. This was her first on camera appearance since the January 6th insurrection on the Capitol and she had not been seen in public since New Year’s Eve. During her farewell speech she spent much of her time expressing the importance of kindness. “In all circumstances, I ask every American to be an ambassador of Be Best. To focus on what unites us, to raise above what divides us. To always choose love over hatred, peace over violence and others before yourself.” 

Was this Melania’s opportunity to demonstrate to the world that she is her own person? A proud immigrant from Slovenia who later became an American citizen who respects all aspects of what it means to be an American or perhaps Melanija Knavs has always been a Trump. 

“Develop enough courage so that you can stand up for yourself and then stand up for somebody else.” – Maya Angelou

Rhianna Illustration for 360 Magazine

RIHANNA x ESSENCE

ESSENCE, the leading media, technology and commerce company serving Black women, kicks off 2021 with a stunning January + February cover art exclusive. Legendary artist Lorna Simpson collaborates with global fashion and beauty founder Robyn Rihanna Fenty, who recently launched Fenty Skin globally in stores in the U.S. and the U.K.

Their goal was to reinterpret the narrative of modern-day beauty in the gorgeous photographic cover collage, Of Earth & Sky, and in images comprising a 12-page portfolio feature inside the January + February issue. Over the past 15 years of her acclaimed three-decade career, Simpson has created collages that recontextualize images of Black women from vintage pages ofEbony and Jet magazines. Like all of Simpson’s celebrated works, these original pieces are more than what meets the eye.

Simpson channels Rihanna as her muse throughout the spectacular artistic rendering—reimagining the artist in a way that has neverbeenseen before. Rihanna looks ethereal in designer pieces including from her signature Savage X Fenty line as well as Prada, Givenchy, Hood by Air, Thelma West, Rick Owens and more.

“…I needed to create images of Rihanna to place within the environments of source materials from my archive,” said Simpson. “For the project to have the same kind of dramatic visual intensity as my collage work to date, I had to consider the atmosphere and lighting of specific source materials before arriving to set. Knowing Rihanna’s charisma and commanding presence, my effort was then to be as present and prepared as possible to capture her exquisite performance for the camera…”

The package also features the piece, Anthems of Possibility, written by Simpson’s daughter, writer and actor Zora Simpson Casebere. She weighs in on how Rihanna helped shape her womanhood at an early age and how serving as a stand-in model on set for her mother was a full-circle moment. 

“…At 13, I was deeply grateful that at a formative time in my life, it was Rihanna’s voice and art that became my portals to so many questions about sexuality, sexual exploration and sexual autonomy,” expressed Casebere. “Now, on set, I assisted my mother as a model as she explored how she might later place Rihanna within the visual contexts she’d selected from vintage Ebony magazines, old Associated Press photographs and 19th-century lithographs of mineral specimens.”

“When Rihanna arrived at the set—my first time seeing her in real life—I was mesmerized. She was the very definition of grace, charisma and influence,” continued Casebere. “Wearing a magnificent Maximilian black headdress, she requested the song ‘Thick’ by DJ Chose, then met the camera with power and possibility—power in how she moved her body through space, and possibility in how she dismantled and moved beyond institutional boundaries…”

The gorgeous issue will also pay homage to Vice-President Elect Kamala Harris’ historic win with reflections by five influential Black women: Donna Brazile, Leah Daughtry, Karen Finney, Star Jones and Minyon Moore. In addition, the issue features an interview with Barack Obama talking about his new book and journey as the nation’s first Black president. Plus, iconic actress Cicely Tysonshares an eye-opening excerpt from her new memoir.

For more on this issue, visit ESSENCE.com or pick up the January + February 2021 issue on newsstands next week. (Photographic Collages, Lorna Simpson)

ABOUT ESSENCE COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

Essence Communications is the number one media, technology and commerce company dedicated to Black women and inspires a global audience of more than 31 million through diverse storytelling and immersive original content. With a multi-platform presence in publishing, experiential and online, ESSENCE encompasses its signature magazine; digital, video and social platforms; television specials; books; as well as live events, including Black Women in Music, Black Women in Hollywood, Street Style and the ESSENCE Festival. Essence Communications is owned by Essence Ventures, an independent Black-owned, consumer technology company merging content, community and commerce to meet the evolving cultural and lifestyle needs of people of color.

Rhianna for Essence 1
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JOSEPH LOWERY COVERS 360 MAGAZINE

360 Magazine officially launched their most recent issue today. It will be available online, in print, and for tablets. Its cover features an illustration of Rev. Joseph Lowery, and inside there are stories featuring Lubbock, Isabella Fries, Nikki Taylor, LC Convertible, Rolls-Royce, Door County, Elkhart Lake, Toyota Corolla Apex, and Marsha’s House.

A print copy of the magazine can be purchased on blurb.com and is available to everyone around the world. It is also available online to view on their site.

The featured story revolves around Lowery, who passed away on March 27, 2020 at the age of 98. His death did not garner much attention from the public, despite him being a notable American minister and Civil Rights activist. Lowery’s death came right as the coronavirus pandemic descended on the United States. Perhaps this is why his passing did not receive considerable attention.

“His legacy has gone under appreciated,” the article reads. “Swallowed by momentum of the current movement.”

Lowery worked in tandem with his friend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., with whom he founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, marched on Selma, and organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott after Rosa Parks was arrested in 1955. As one of the longest surviving members of the Civil Rights Movement, Lowery carried with him King’s legacy. 

With it, he eulogized King’s wife, Coretta Scott King, in 2006. With it, he delivered the benediction of the first Black President of the United States, Barack Obama, at his inauguration in 2009. And, carrying with him the legacy of King and his other compatriots in the Civil Right’s Movement, he was awarded by the same Black President the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“Born and raised in Jim Crow Alabama, preaching in his blood, the Rev. Joseph Lowery is a giant of the Moses generation of civil rights leaders,” Obama said at the inauguration. “It was just King, Lowery, and a few others, huddled in Montgomery, who laid the groundwork for the bus boycott and the movement that was to follow.”

His death came two months before the Black Lives Movement resurged after the killing of George Floyd, transforming the conversation regarding Black American lives in the nation. Two months later, Lowery’s friend John Lewis, another civil rights leader, also passed at the age of 80. 

In his hometown of Huntsville, Georgia, there is a boulevard memorializing the civil rights icon. His legacy lives on in his notable work as well as his children and grandchildren, including 360 Magazine’s founder and president, Vaughn Lowery.

“Heading into an election season steeped with strife and antagonism, Joseph E. Lowery’s legacy serves as a poignant reminder,” the article reads. “His efforts to strive for a better world, his constant service and activism, and his dedication to both God and uplifting Black Americans all solidify him as a true icon of Civil Rights and American history.”

On top of its focus on Lowery, 360 Magazine profiles creatives like the singer-songwriter Nikki Taylor Vibe (aka Nikki Taylor) (7), singer Isabelle Fries (11), and model, influencer, and musician Don Benjamin (35). The newest models of hot cars debut on its pages, including the Lexus LC 500 Convertible (25), Toyota Corolla Apex (43), and the entirely reimagined Rolls-Royce Ghost (76).

And, lavish lifestyle pieces feature heavily throughout the issue. Elkhart Lake (31), which is a getaway on the east side of Wisconsin, is reviewed by 360 Magazine’s Elle Grant and Vaughn Lowery. The small city of Lubbock, TX (13) and the 212 Photography Istanbul festival (55) are also spotlit, and the articles on all three destinations are paired with stunning images.

Lastly, Marsha’s House is given its due attention. Marsha’s House houses homeless LGBTQ+ young adults, as Marsha P. Johnson did when she was alive. You can read more on page 51 of the issue.

About 360 Magazine

360 is an edgy fashion, lifestyle and culture magazine. It introduces cutting-edge brands, entities and trends to tastemakers within their respective communities. Its founding members have over 30 years of collective experience both as notable talent and uber professionals within the realm of fashion, music, art, design and entertainment. 360 Magazine is more than just a magazine comprised of journalists, representing a movement of social awareness and change.

It is an LGBTQIA friendly publication. The magazine is contemporary in look and appeal. Quality art content is the constant goal. The magazine will be entertaining, newsworthy and thought-provoking. It will appeal to a broad entertainment readership. No magazine like it is available today, constantly celebrating racial and sexual ambiguous talent and artists.