Posts tagged with "African American culture"

Markice Moore image by Starz for use by 360 Magazine

Markice Moore Q&A

By: Emily Bunn

The most sought-after ‘bad guy’: Markice Moore is a rising force to be reckoned with in Hollywood’s entertainment industry. Most notably recognized for his role as Ray Ray on the hit seriesSnowfall,” Moore is continuing to flesh out his acting resume with his upcoming involvement with 50 Cent’s show on Starz, “Black Mafia Family.” “Black Mafia Family” tales place in the late 1980s and is based on the story of two brothers, Demetrius “Big Meech” Flenory and Terry “Southwest T” Flenory, who had been involved in money laundering and drug trafficking schemes. We sat down with the rising star to discuss the relevance of “Black Mafia Family”’s themes in the present, Moore’s method acting experiences, upcoming music releases, and more.

Where were you when you received the call to join the cast of “Black Mafia Family”?

I was in Las Vegas at the craps table and I just lost $200. So when my manager called it was the best news ever!

What are you most excited about regarding your involvement in “Black Mafia Family”?

I’m most excited about working with 50 Cent again after working on “The Oath” with him for Crackle. His name rings bells in Hollywood now, so it’s an honor to be attached to his brand.

How do you feel about being popularly cast into roles as antagonists or villains?

Wow! I’m popularly casted! That’s kind of cool. I fucking love it! I love playing the bad guy, I mean, I think we all kind of relate to the bad guy. Some of us just don’t have the balls to do what he does, you know. To commit to antagonizing is a skill set.

What has been your favorite role you’ve ever played, and why?

Ryan Payne on The Paynes was my favorite character because he was so goofy and a nitwit. Even my mother called and told me, “You’re really acting now, Ryan is a dumb ass.”

Both “Snowfall” and “Black Mafia Family” revolve around crime and drugs in the 1980s. Can you speak on the relevance of these themes within the shows as still existing today?

Well if we may go a little deep, I believe it’s important to touch on these topics because our culture, African American culture, has been systematically targeted so heavily by oppressors using tactics like drugs and violence as conduits to control our narrative. It’s important that we take some of that power back and tell our sides of those stories. They use their mediums to paint a picture of us as only drug dealers, instead of humanizing us like they do their heroes.

How did your experience living in Atlanta compare to the experiences illustrated in your involvement with the film, “ATL”?

It was literally the same. At the time of filming I was hustling, bootlegging liquor, and playing with guns. My Austin character kept me out of trouble.

Following your 2020 release of “Nervous,” are you looking to put out any more music soon?

Yes. Absolutely. I am one half of a rap group called Pool Boys.  We are releasing more new music this summer. Right now, we have “Nervous,” “Cold,” and another record called Clubhouse that’s going crazy!

Are there any other upcoming acting projects you’re working on to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

Yes! I have a production company called, “TABLE READ PRODUCTIONS” and we are working on a movie made by people in the clubhouse called, “Green Bean Me.” So, be on the lookout for that.

Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

Culture Creators

[Los Angeles, CA, June 23] Friday, June 24, Culture Creators gathered black culture’s most impactful and inspiring voices under one roof for the third annual Innovators & Leaders Awards Brunch. This year, the event took over The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills and received the support of sponsors such as Remy Martin, The Mane Choice, Morgan Stanley, and Beats by Dre.

300+ guests witnessed the honorees receive their respective awards and share stories, memories, and gratitude. Bringing the house to its feet in a roar of applause, Sylvia Rhone garnered the Culture Creators Icon Award.

Other recipients included Jemele Hill, who received the Defiance Award, Kenya Barris, Jana Fleishman, Tunji Balogun, Shawn Gee, and more. Celebrity guests included Will.i.am, DJ Khaled, Tank, Andre Harrell, Miles Brown, Essence Atkins, Luke James, Waka Flocka, and more. Once again, Culture Creators magnified the resonance of Black Culture’s Innovators & Leaders and kicked off BET weekend in uplifting fashion.

See More Exclusive Photos HERE
Images Courtesy of Getty Images

LIST OF HONOREES

Honorees: Sylvia Rhone | President, Epic Records // Jemele Hill | Chief Correspondent & Sr. Columnist, The Undefeated ESPN // Lauren Wesley Wilson | President ColorComm, Inc. // Fatima Robinson | Choreographer & Director // Brea Stinson | Owner & Fashion Designer, STINSON HAUS // Jason Bolden | Co-Founder, JSN Studio/ / Charles D. King | Founder & CEO, MACRO // Kenya Barris | Writer & Producer, Creator of “Black-ish” // Rashaun Williams | General Partner, MVP All-Star Fund // Shawn Gee | President, Live Nation Urban // Tunji Balogun | Co-Founder, Keep Cool/EVP, A&R RCA Records // Jana Fleishman | EVP Media & Strategic Development, Roc Nation // Kristi Henderson | Co-Founder, WEEN // Carlos Fleming | Partner & Head of Sports Talent Marketing, WME // Rodney Williams | CEO & Co-Founder, LISNR

ABOUT CULTURE CREATORS

Culture Creators (CC) is an organization made up of the key figures from music, technology, film, television, fashion, and much more. Culture Creators always aims to celebrate the accomplishments of minorities in various industries and how African American culture continues to thrive and impact popular culture. As part of its programming for the 2016 GRAMMY weekend, Culture Creators hosted a soiree that attracted the likes of Diplo, Chris Rock, Skrillex, Lorde, Fatima Robinson, Cory Gamble, SZA, KeKe Palmer, and many more important Hollywood trendsetters and pioneers. Culture Creators also partnered with Howard University to provide executive leadership and recruitment to aid in the diversity and inclusion recruitment of students for mass merchant retailers, advertising agencies and athletic apparel companies.