Posts tagged with "African American History"

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month Gift Guide

As Black History Month (BHM) commences, we aim to honor the history and celebrate the successes of Black/African American people. This February, 360 has assembled a list of impeccable products that strive to honor the rich past, present and future of BHM.

Fabletics t-shirt collection

In partnership with Melissa Koby and Rob Lewis, Fabletics announced the launch of their limited edition ‘BHM Tees’ series. Both artists, Koby and Lewis, are devoted to cultivating discussion surrounding Black representation, which is the exact goal for the BHM collaboration.

Including a series of four tees, Fabletics releases the ‘Kindred,’ ‘Harmony,’ ‘Africobra’ and ‘Festac 77,’ that have individual, unique artworks that continue conversation of harmony amongst insufficiently represented groups. Fabletics has promised to donate $50k in support of Community Spring and Imagine Black Futures, organizations that are committed to uplifting and providing power to the Black community.

This unrepeated ‘BHM’ tee collection showcases the timeless Fabletics ‘Go-To’ design showcasing a comfortable, gender-neutral fit available in sizing XS-XXL. The tees can be purchased for $39.95 (VIP price) on fabletics.com and in retail stores, beginning February 1.

BHM Fabletics tees via Carli Bendetti for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lids historically Black institution partnership collection

In collaboration with The Negro Leagues Museum, Black Fives and Harlem Globetrotters, Lids has produced a new apparel and accessories series that will pay tribute to the three historic Black sports establishments, They Gave Us Game.

The compilation will be sold year-round, showcasing goods that reference vintage pieces worn by iconic African American players throughout the years. Constructed with an innovative, modern touch, the collection still has reminiscent underlines from each property. A piece of all earnings from the collection will be donated to Lids Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to giving back to these groups to further influence youth sports. Pricing ranges from $80 – $100, with headwear varying between $31.99 – $39.99, and They Gave Us Game will be available on Monday February 28

Lids globetrotters collection piece via Lids for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Crunch

The Crunch allows for the convenience of 7 kitchen electrics in one unit. It replaces a traditional air fryer, grill, rotisserie, dehydrator, toaster oven, roaster, and convection oven to bring you one multifunctional powerhouse. It’s 12.7 Qt. capacity provides more room for more food and better results. It has eight main cooking functions, including fries, meat, seafood, pizza, chicken, vegetables, bake, and dehydrate. You can use it to make both French fries and beef jerky! There’s also a rotisserie function and an e-recipe book with over 20 recipes. 

TIDAL

This Black History Month, TIDAL will be releasing content weekly to celebrate the history and contributions of the Black community across key themes. Week one focused on Health and Wellness (the official theme of Black History Month 2022), and for this second week TIDAL has unveiled 11 playlists honoring the legacy and campus life of HBCUs. Subscribers can enjoy a variety of playlists such as: 

The remainder of February will see Social Justice and Behind The Mic content (spotlighting Black writers, engineers and producers behind the music we love) as well as the popular What’s Going On: Artists Speak Their Truth playlist, where artists discuss the message behind their songs that have become social justice anthems. 

As an added bonus, activist and renowned jazz trumpeter, Keyon Harrold, will be tapping into TIDAL to create an exclusive playlist that will feature a brand-new track. All playlists and exclusive content can be found on TIDAL’s Black History Month hub HERE.

Women is Losers x Latino International Film Festival for use by 360 Magazine
Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

First Jewish American Heritage National Park Made Law

Yesterday marks a significant win in the decades-long effort to recognize and celebrate the philanthropic legacy of Julius Rosenwald and his impact on American democratic equality.  With the president’s signing of the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020, a process begins that would lead to the establishment of the first National Park Service site to honor a Jewish American and celebrate the contribution of a Jewish American to our society, while preserving a selection of iconic Rosenwald Schools.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation first highlighted the threatened natureof the Rosenwald legacy by placing Rosenwald Schools on its 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List in 2002. The National Trust supported the preservation of Rosenwald Schools for many years, providing workshops, conferences, and technical assistance – including a publication: the Grassroots Guide to Preserving Rosenwald Schools.

The heightened awareness created by the endangered list designation and Rosenwald Schools initiative  ultimately led to a partnership between the National Trust, the Campaign to Create the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools National Historical Park, and the National Parks Conservation Association, which together collaborated to achieve the successful enactment of the Julius Rosenwald and the Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020 (H.R.3250).  Within this effort the Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund established a grant fund that has provided over $2.5 million in matching grants to advance Rosenwald School preservation, including planning, engineering studies, architectural plans, archaeology, research, and rehabilitation.

“Rosenwald Schools unearth a fascinating and true history of African American activism, achievement, and resilience in the United States,” said Brent Leggs, executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.  “Their permanent preservation and interpretation broadens our understanding of the civil rights fight for equality in twentieth century America and the enduring power of interracial cooperation.”

BACKGROUND
Born in 1862 in Springfield, Illinois not far from the residence of then President Abraham Lincoln, Julius Rosenwald made his fortune as co-owner of Sears, Roebuck and Company. His own parents, however, had fled persecution in Germany in the late 1900s, and he began to channel his experience of hatred and bigotry into the creation of the Rosenwald School Fund, which had a lasting impact on education in America.  A prominent philanthropist, Rosenwald joined the board of esteemed black educator Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute in 1912.  Together, these two champions of social justice, one a former slave and the other a first-generation American refugee from persecution, used architecture and innovation to address the crisis in education facing Black families across the South.

Between 1917 and 1932, the Rosenwald School Fund, working in partnership with local Black communities, helped to finance the construction of more than 5300 state-of-the-art school buildings for community and academic use.  The schools served as a lifeline for students and educators whose progress was held back by the separate and unequal school system that ruled the Jim Crow South.  By 1928, one-third of the South’s rural African American school children and teachers were educated in Rosenwald Schools.  Notable former students include poet and activist Maya Angelou and the late Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), among many notable others.

“History shows us,” Leggs continued, “that countless ordinary citizens were the vanguards of collective action and human innovation.  These stories and landmarks serve as a testament to our progress, and they remind us that our work is not complete.”

Passage of the bill was a multi-year effort, but yesterday it was signed into law.  The legislation,  sponsored by Representative Danny Davis (D-IL) and Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), directs the Department of the Interior to conduct a special resources study of sites associated with the life and legacy of Julius Rosenwald, with a special focus on Rosenwald Schools and determine how they might be designated as a new unit within the National Park System.  Once established, the Rosenwald park unit would become the first of over 420 National Park Service sites to honor the life and contributions of a Jewish American.

About the National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.  http://savingplaces.org | @savingplaces

About the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund
The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a multi-year initiative of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in partnership with the Ford Foundation, the JPB Foundation, the Open Society Foundations and other partners, working to make an important and lasting contribution to our cultural landscape by elevating the stories and places of African American achievement and activism. Visit http://www.savingplaces.org/actionfund

Madam Walker House illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund

The call to action by American citizens during this year has made us all rethink how we view American history. Protestors have demanded the nation target injustice and fix the systems that promote the unequal treatment of African Americans. The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund was founded at a similar time of crisis, after the 2017 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that led to the creation of a national preservation campaign meant to uplift and honor the Black American experience.

 “The AACHAF was created out of the recognition that we in the field of preservation needed to do more,” said Brent Leggs, executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund. “We realized that the American story we often tell repeatedly negates the transformative contributions of African Americans, whose capability, intellect, and creativity were and still are invaluable to the building of this nation. The Trust decided then and there to create the Action Fund as a way to help fill in those gaps. We realized that preservation of historic sites, where African Americans changed the American landscape, could be one way our nation comes to understand the need to create a more fair and just society. We saw a more inclusive approach to historic preservation as one step on the long road to heal the divisions between us.”

Through its African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, the Trust is investing more than $1.6 million in grants to 27 sites and organizations across 22 states and the District of Columbia. Thanks to our partnership and a generous grant provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, we are funding communities to protect, restore, and interpret African American historic sites and uncover hidden narratives of the African American contribution to the American story. 

“The Action Fund plays a crucial role in elevating Black voices and stories in our national dialogue about arts and culture, and in expanding our collective knowledge and understanding of African-American history,” remarked Mellon Foundation President Elizabeth Alexander. “We are thrilled that the 2020 Action Fund grants will continue to provide transformative support to Black cultural organizations and heritage sites throughout the country.

Leggs underscored the importance of this work, noting, “The recipients of this funding exemplify centuries of African American resilience, activism, and achievement, some known and some yet untold, which tell the complex story of American history in the United States.  Over the past two years, the Action Fund has funded 65 historic African American places and invested more than $4.3 million to help preserve landscapes and buildings imbued with Black cultural heritage. With urgency and intention, the nation must value the link between architecture and racial justice and should fund these and other cultural assets to ensure their protection and preservation.”  

Grants are given across four categories: capacity building, project planning, capital, and programming and interpretation. The list of all 27 grantees and a short blurb about each is attached.  A link to a fuller web version of the list can be accessed HERE.

The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a multi-year initiative led by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to make an important and lasting contribution to our cultural landscape by elevating the stories and places of African American resilience, activism, and achievement. 

For 70 years, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has led the movement to save America’s historic places. A privately funded nonprofit organization, we work to save America’s historic sites, tell the full American story, build stronger communities, and invest in preserving the future.

Follow The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Qatar Airways and Brooklyn Nets x Black History Month

Qatar Airways and Brooklyn Nets Celebrate Black History Month

To tip off the month, Qatar Airways hosted students and former Tuskegee
Airman for a series of events

On Monday, Qatar Airways, official airline partner of the Brooklyn Nets, celebrated Black History Month
by honoring the historical achievements of African Americans during the Nets game at Barclays Center.
The luxury airline invited Tuskegee Airman Willie Jackson, local community organization, United Youth
Aviators, and students and alumni from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to enjoy a
series of activities throughout the evening.

To tip off the night, Qatar Airways presented former Tuskegee Airman and President of the 369th
Regiment Sergeant (ret.) Willie Jackson, with a special game ball delivery. The evening also included an
on-court, around the world competition with an HBCU alumni, for the opportunity to win roundtrip tickets
to incredible Qatar Airways destinations. Additionally, the airline highlighted stories of seven Black
aviation pioneers throughout the arena during the night and distributed Black History Month themed rally
towels to the first 5,000 fans in attendance.

“Black History Month is a time of reflection and an important reminder of the work we have left to do,”
says Senior Vice President of the Americas Eric Odone. “At Qatar Airways, we are fortunate to have
opportunities to engage with the community, and we’re grateful that our partnership with the Brooklyn
Nets and Barclays Center allows us to take these educational commitments further.”
Leading up to Black History Month, in partnership with Qatar Airways, Nets player Nic Claxton visited the
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum along with 20 children from United Youth Aviators. United Youth
Aviators is a specially-curated program that offers students from New York City the opportunity to learn
about aviation from an early age and ultimately how to fly a plane. Representatives from Qatar Airways
accompanied the group on their private tour around the museum, where they experienced the rich
aviation history and cultural significance.

The Doha-based airline also hosted the group from United Youth Aviators in a private suite at the Nets
game on February 3 where they participated in a Q&A session with Willie Jackson on his experience with
the Tuskegee Airmen. The children were also invited to stand on-court with Nets players during the
national anthem.

The month-long celebration of African American history is part of Qatar Airways’ corporate social
responsibility efforts aimed at building stronger communities and providing youth with meaningful
educational opportunities.

A multiple award-winning airline, Qatar Airways was named ‘World’s Best Airline’ by the 2019 World
Airline Awards, managed by Skytrax. It was also named ‘Best Airline in the Middle East’, ‘World’s Best
Business Class’, and ‘Best Business Class Seat’, in recognition of its ground-breaking Business Class
experience, Qsuite. It is the only airline to have been awarded the coveted ‘Skytrax Airline of the Year’
title, which is recognized as the pinnacle of excellence in the airline industry, a record five times.
Qatar Airways operates a modern fleet of more than 250 aircraft via its hub, Hamad International Airport
(HIA), to more than 160 destinations worldwide. The world’s fastest-growing airline added several new
destinations to its network last year, including Rabat, Morocco; Izmir, Turkey; Malta; Davao, Philippines;
Lisbon, Portugal; Mogadishu, Somalia; Langkawi, Malaysia; and Gaborone, Botswana. The airline will
add Santorini, Greece; Dubrovnik, Croatia; Osaka, Japan; Nur-Sultan and Almaty, Kazakhstan; Cebu,
Philippines; Accra, Ghana; Trabzon, Turkey; Lyon, France; Luanda, Angola; and Siem Reap, Cambodia,
to its extensive route network in 2020.