Posts tagged with "Martin Luther King Jr"

Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato
February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement. George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion. Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology. Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people. Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation. Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time. Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology. Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer. Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention. Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists. Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress. John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation. Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous. Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items. Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing. LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio. Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence. Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak for 360 MAGAZINE.

360 Magazine Marches on Washington

By Cassandra Yany × Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery

Recently, our team journeyed to Washington, D.C. for the National Action Network’s Commitment March. The August 28 march marked 57 years since the March on Washington where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his historic “I Have A Dream” speech. According to the National Action Network’s website, the goal of the march was to advocate for comprehensive police accountability reform, promote participation in the Census and motivate voters to cast their ballots in the upcoming Presidential election.

The National Action Network was founded by Rev. Al Sharpton in 1991. With nearly 100 chapters nationwide, the civil rights organization works in the tradition of Martin Luther King, Jr. to achieve “one standard of justice, decency, and equal opportunities for all people regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, criminal record, economic status, gender, gender expression or sexuality.”

The trip from New York to Washington, D.C. was made easy by taking Amtrak’s Acela service. Despite the higher price point, the Acela is newer and less crowded than regional trains. The express train eliminated the burden of tolls and stopped in only a few cities, arriving in D.C. after about three and a half hours. It can be stressful to travel right now, so it was a relief to see how clean the train was. The quiet car, basic free wifi and outlets on board provided the perfect environment to research and write articles on our tablets. We utilized our extra time to discuss with one another and prepare for our coverage of the march and our days in D.C.

The café offered coffee and various snack options, and the sliding glass doors made it easy for us to walk through the cars. The reclining seats were comfortable and allowed us to rest before our trip. There were also sections of four seats for those traveling in a larger group. Each passenger could bring two personal items weighing up to 25 pounds, and two carry-on bags weighing up to 50 pounds at no additional cost. Amtrak is currently offering reduced fares for two to six tickets purchased together where riders can save eight to 45 percent.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

Luckily, we were able to call Amtrak in advance to ensure we could carry on our folding bicycles. With limited parking available in the city, electric bikes served as a great mode of transportation for many protesters. E-bikes such as the DYU Smart Bike and a custom scooter from Good Vibe Gliders were an affordable alternative to renting a car, and made covering and participating in the march much easier.

The Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks started early Friday morning. Participants marched through the National Mall, many carrying signs remembering those whose lives have been lost in acts of police violence. Others displayed “Black Lives Matter” on flags, shirts and masks.

Some participants created street art during the event, voicing their support through their work. At one point, a number of demonstrators stood together in the Reflecting Pool in front of the Washington Monument. Marchers reached the section of 16 Street NW that has become known as “Black Lives Matter Plaza” around 3:30 PM before dispersing for the day.

Organizers of the march upheld COVID-19 guidelines and regulations. The National Action Network placed multiple signs throughout the National Mall encouraging social distancing, and took marchers’ temperatures as they entered the area. Face masks were distributed to people who did not have one, and visitors from high-risk areas were urged to join virtually from their homes. There was also a testing booth on site, as reported by WUSA 9.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

The march was co-convened by Sharpton and Martin Luther King III. Among the thousands of attendees who gathered on the National Mall were the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Jacob Blake. Many members of these families gave speeches at the Lincoln Memorial, along with lawmakers from across the country. These congressmen and women pushed for legislation that would address cases of racial injustice.

Though she was not present, Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris shared her message to marchers via Twitter. In her speech, which was played at the event, she said, “…if we work together, to challenge every instinct our nation has to return to the status quo, and combine the wisdom of long time warriors for justice, with the creative energy of the young leaders today, we have an opportunity to make history, right here and right now.”

Yolanda Renee King took the stage to address the crowd, standing where her grandfather had led March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In a video posted by CNN she said, “We stand and march for love and we will fulfill my grandfather’s dream.” She then led a chant of “Show me what democracy looks like; This is what democracy looks like!”

Friday was also the 65th anniversary of Emmett Till’s murder. The 14-year-old was lynched and thrown off a bridge while visiting family in Mississippi. He was abducted after “allegedly whistling at a white woman,” according to ABC 7 Chicago, and his body was found mutilated in the Tallahatchie River. Till’s family never received justice, as the two men responsible for his death were both acquitted. Till’s murder helped to spark the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s. Civil rights leader and former congressman John Lewis wrote that “Emmett Till was [his] George Floyd” in a New York Times essay that was published on the day of Lewis’ funeral.

The trip provided a meaningful experience to stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as time to see local relatives. 360 President Vaughn Lowery visited his uncle Leroy Lowery, the former executive director of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, who raised over $120 million for the Stone of Hope.

Leroy Lowery is the son of the late Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a civil rights leader who helped Martin Luther King, Jr. establish the Southern Christina Leadership Conference, and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Leroy Lowery attended the march with his father in 1963 and stated on Friday, “to see that we have to march [again] 57 years later is deflating.”

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

Coach K teaches a Masterclass

Catch Quality Control Record’s Coach K as he heads to Morehouse College Wednesday night to teach a masterclass with students in Atlanta, 7pm EST, followed by a Q&A at 8pm. The event will be livestreamed Wednesday night on Morehouse TV

 

How does Coach K maintain balance and keep it real while working as   Label Coo, Artist Manager, studio owner, deal broker and – more often than not – Father Figure to Migos, Lil Yachty, Trippie Redd, Lil Baby, Stefflon Don and more?

 

How did he stick to his vision and create his own blueprint for success in the midst of the chaos of dealing with artists and making their visions a reality? 

 

Join the livestream this Wednesday, 7pm at Morehouse College, an historic African American college and the alma mater of many rhodes scholars and civil leaders, including Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

National Civil Rights Museum

Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee

Faith Morris External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Faith Morris External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 serves today as the powerful anchor of the National Civil Rights Museum in MemphisTennessee.

Cick here to listen to the KCBX/NPR podcast with Culture Editor, Tom Wilmer and Faith Morris, External Affairs Officer at the National Civil Rights Museum.

Lorraine Motel-Room 306 where Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Martin Luther King delivered his last speech at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee on March 3rd 1968. The next day King was assassinated while standing on the balcony of his room at the Lorraine Motel.

Twenty-three years later, the National Civil Rights Museum was unveiled on the site of the old Lorraine Motel.

Through powerful exhibits and interpretive displays the history and legacy of civil rights is showcased–from the arrival of the first slaves on the shores of America to lynchings, sit-ins, the Freedom Riders, Rosa Parks in Birmingham, Brown Vs. Board of Education, and the perpetuation of Jim Crow today.

 

Freedom Riders Greyhound bus firebombed by white supremacists in Alabama in 1961

Freedom Riders Greyhound bus firebombed by white supremacists in Alabama in 1961

Charred hulk of the firebombed Greyhound bus on display at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Charred hulk of the firebombed Greyhound bus on display at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The façade of the iconic Lorraine Motel was preserved chillingly intact complete with vintage autos parked out front, but on the inside of the motel rooms, past the curtains, is the massive museum.

Poignant displays include an intact burnt out Greyhound bus that was firebombed by white supremacists during Freedom Summer in 1961, and the original lunch counter from a powerful student sit-in that was captured on film in 1960.

 

School field trip to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

School field trip to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

The museum is located on Mulberry Street in the heart of the South Main Arts District in downtown Memphis, six blocks from the Mississippi River.

If you go plan on spending a minimum of two or three hours to experience the highlights, but with dozens of historic films playing continuously, you could easily spend an entire day at the museum.

http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/

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Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer winner of the Lowell Thomas Award 2017, 2016, 2015, 2013

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer winner of the Lowell Thomas Award 2017, 2016, 2015, 2013

 

TV ONE SPONSORS NAACP IMAGE AWARDS

TV One is joining forces with a distinguished team of sponsors supporting the 49th NAACP Image Awards: Red Carpet Live! pre-show on Monday, Jan. 15 at 8.00 p.m. ET/7:00 p.m. CT. and the subsequent live telecast of the 49th NAACP Image Awards onTV One at 9 p.m. ET8 p.m. CT. Sponsors include Ford Motor Company, AT&T, American Family Insurance, Black Radiance, Curls, Disney Pictures, McDonald’s, Walmart and Toyota.

 

“As we recognize black achievement on a day as auspicious as the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, TV One is proud to partner with a dynamic group of companies which understand the importance of representing the dream within their communities and across the nation,” says Rahsan-Rahsan Lindsay, TV One EVP of Ad Sales and Marketing.

For the fifth consecutive year, TV One is the television home for the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization’s award show, the 49th NAACP Image Awards hosted by Golden Globe-nominated actor Anthony Anderson.

Additionally, actor and TV personality Terrence J (Think Like A Man) will return to host and serve as one of the producers for the 1-hour live TV One Red Carpet Special with correspondent Tanika Ray (Extra) and chat with the stars as they grace the carpet at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium.  The telecast will feature the latest, fully loaded Toyota Camry on the carpet. Toyota will also present the digital red carpet promotional category on HelloBeautiful.com. Following the arrivals, special guests will indulge on festive fair in the Walmart VIP Gold Room, complete with food, drinks and photographs to capture the occasion.

Ford Motor Company returns as the lead telecast sponsor to present the Backstage Pass, hosted by celebrity influencer Tai Beauchamp and comedian/actor/producer Chris Spencer. The in-show segments offer exclusive interviews with award presenters and winners throughout the night. Ford will also sponsor the Entertainer of the Year Award category, which boasts a tight field of nominees including Chadwick Boseman, Ava DuVernay, Bruno Mars, Issa Rae, Chance The Rapper and Jay-Z.

McDonald’s has signed on as sponsor of the newly created “Music Makes A Difference Honor,” which recognizes exceptional individuals whose work and foundations strive to create a force of development, change and inspiration in the lives of our communities.   The recipient is to be announced. Also, McDonald’s will sponsor the digital music recording promotional category as featured on HelloBeautiful.com.

AT&T’s sponsorship of the Countdown Clock during the red carpet special will help build anticipation leading up to the live broadcast of the Awards show, while their support of the TV One after party with show participants, winners and other special guests will help continue the celebration after the last trophy is awarded.

American Family Insurance and Black Radiance Curls will sponsor the first-ever NAACP Image Awards Red Carpet Fan Zone, where 100 lucky fans can watch their favorite stars walk the red carpet as well as experience all the glitz and glamour of the celebrity arrivals. Disney Pictures will build excitement for their new films A Wrinkle In Time and Black Panther with exclusive content from the upcoming releases during the telecast.  Beauty brand Black Radiance Curls will also sponsor activations on-site during the Red Carpet Live! pre-show.

The NAACP Image Awards honors individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative endeavors and celebrates the accomplishments of people of color in the fields of television, music, literature and film.  For the first time in its award show history, the public was invited to vote for their favorite nominees in 36 categories, which is certain to make for an even more meaningful win for this year’s honorees.

“For the first time in our history, voting for the 49th NAACP Image Awards was open to the public,” said Derrick Johnson, NAACP President and CEO. “Through our Hollywood Bureau, the NAACP fights for diversity and inclusivity in front of and behind the lens. Engaging the public in the selection of the Image Awards winners is a natural extension of that mission. I am thrilled but not surprised that more than a million individual votes were cast for nominees in 36 categories. We look forward to celebrating the winners they selected on January 15th.”

TV One will drive conversation around MLK Jr. Day and the 49th NAACP Image Awards by encouraging its social audience to share how they ‘REPRESENT’ Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream today. Nominees, celebrities, influencers, notable dignitaries and the social community will use the hash tag #RepresentTheDream to create an emotional and powerful campaign that will remind viewers of the power of “The Dream.” Viewers can find each thought-provoking #RepresentTheDream testimonial on www.TVOne.tv/ImageAwards or on Instagram during the Red Carpet Live! pre-show.

For all information and latest news, please visit the official 49th NAACP Image Awards website at http://www.naacpimageawards.net. Viewers can also join the conversation on TV One’supcoming live telecast of the 49th NAACP Image Awards by visiting www.tvone.tv/imageawards and connecting via social media on TwitterInstagram and Facebook (@tvonetv) using the hash tags #ImageAwards and #RepresentTheDream.

Legendary Music Producer Rick Hall Dies at 85

Legendary music producer and FAME Studios founder Rick Hall has died at the age of 85. Hall died this morning at his home in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, not far from his world famous recording studio.

The family has issued the following statement:

It is with the deepest sorrow that we announce the passing of our father, husband and beloved grandfather, Rick Hall. His spirit will live on forever through the massive amount of legendary music that he so tirelessly produced. Music was his life and because of him, Fame Studios and Muscle Shoals will always be “shooting for the stars!” We hope the band in Heaven is ready. If not, there’s going to be a problem.

Rick Hall made music history when he founded FAME Recording Studios in Muscle Shoals. Hall went on to earn international fame and eventually a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement. In the days when Martin Luther King Jr. was marching for freedom, Hall proved to be a civil rights pioneer through his music. His open collaboration among black and white artists was a revolutionary cultural standard not only to “deep south” Alabama, but to the nation at large. FAME’s color blind atmosphere, and the raw music it produced, would help shape American culture during its most troubled and tumultuous time.

Considered the “Father of the Muscle Shoals Sound,” Hall helped define a generation by pioneering a new sound that would inspire artists, give birth to new kinds of music and launch the careers of hundreds of superstars, songwriters, musicians and music executives. Record executives literally flocked to Muscle Shoals for Hall to produce and engineer a mind-boggling array of major artists, including Aretha Franklin, Clarence Carter, Mac Davis, Wilson Pickett, Etta James, Alabama, Tom Jones, Allman Brothers, The Osmonds, Shenandoah, Wayne Newton, TG Sheppard, Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers, Little Richard, Lou Rawls and so many more. With more than 300 hit singles to his credit, and more than 40 Gold and Platinum records, Hall was one of the top producers of Pop, Rock, R&B and Country records in the world.