Posts tagged with "heritage"

Art in the Garden illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Calling All Art-Fanatics!

Calling All Art-Fanatics: 18 Exciting Art Happenings Across the Country

Destinations News:

California

  • Presidio “My Park Moment” Photo Contest: The Presidio in San Francisco has launched “My Park Moment” photo contest, where the public can submit a photo of their favorite park memory through May 28—a family picnic, a camping trip, their last hike in the Presidio or anything else they love to do in their favorite park. This fall, approximately 400 photos will be selected for a free and family-friendly outdoor photo show at the future home of the Presidio Tunnel Tops. Debuting in spring 2022, the Presidio Tunnel Tops project, comprising 14 acres of new national park land—will be an iconic “must see” San Francisco destination. 
  • LACMA Partners with Snapchat: Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and Snapchat recently debuted the “Monumental Perspectives” experience, which brings together artists and technologists to create virtual monuments that explore some of the histories of local communities in an effort to highlight perspectives from across the region. Visitors can experience the augmented reality monuments online or at site-specific locations across Los Angeles including LACMA’s Wilshire Boulevard campus, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and more. 
  • Napa Wrap Art and Art Walk: Napa Wrap Art is a new outdoor public art project debuting this spring, featuring transformed utility boxes into works of art around Downtown Napa. Thirteen regional artists were selected to create diverse designs that provide an opportunity to turn ordinary objects into something special that both locals and visitors can enjoy. Later this summer, Downtown Napa will welcome a new rotation of the Napa Art Walk sculptures – a true outdoor treasure hunt for art that is a perfect activity for kids of all ages. 
  • Desert X: The third installment of the internationally acclaimed biennial desert art exhibition returned in 2021 through May 16. The 2021 Desert X artist lineup includes a diverse group of 13 artists ranging from locals like Kim Stringfellow to international representatives like Zahrah Alghamdi. Visitors can explore new outdoor art installations across the desert region for an exciting socially distant experience.

Texas

  • San Antonio’s McNay Art Museum just opened Limitless! Five Women Reshape Contemporary Art, which includes an ever-popular infinity mirror room installation. San Antonio Museum of Art opened No Ocean Between Us, featuring art from Latin American artists of Asian descent, while the Briscoe Western Art Museum will open Still in the Saddle: A New History of the Hollywood Western in time for Memorial Day Weekend.
  • Designed by Steven Holl Architects, the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts completes a decade-long campus redevelopment project. Opened to the public in late 2020, the building finishes a trio of spaces that make up one of the largest art museums in the country. On the first floor is a black-box gallery dedicated to immersive installations. Second-floor galleries highlight photography, decorative arts, prints and drawings, and the top floor features thematic exhibitions on art from the 1960s onward. Additionally, the space features a 215-seat theater and a fine dining restaurant. 
  • The Dallas Museum of Art recently unveiled Cubism in Color: The Still Lifes of Juan Gris, the first US exhibition in over 35 years dedicated to the Spanish artist Juan Gris, this exhibition reconsiders the legacy of this important yet underappreciated modernist master. Co-organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and the Baltimore Museum of Art, Cubism in Color: The Still Lifes of Juan Gris highlights the artist’s pioneering and revolutionary contributions to the Cubist movement by focusing on his fascination with subjects drawn from everyday life.

Rapid City, South Dakota

  • “Legends in Light” Laser Show at Crazy Horse Memorial – Beginning Memorial Day weekend and occurring nightly through Labor Day, the “Legends in Light” laser show at Crazy Horse Memorial turns the carved mountainside into a 500-foot remarkable display. Each night at 9:30 p.m., viewers can take in the story and rich heritage of Native Americans.The show presents colorful animations and features music with choreographed lasers and sound effects.  
  • Gift From Mother Earth Art Show – Every June, Crazy Horse Memorial hosts The Gift From Mother Earth Art Show – an exhibition that celebrates a blend of arts and crafts that represent Native American cultures and the New West. From Friday June 18th – Sunday June 20th, artists of custom-made clothing, jewelry and other similar items will showcase their pieces starting at 8 a.m. each day. 
  • Native POP: People of the Plains – Featuring original Native work by established and emerging Native American Artists, Native POP is a one-day fine art show located in Main Street Square in downtown Rapid City. This cultural celebration will take place on Tuesday, July 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 8 pm. and will feature Native culture bearers sharing their Native knowledge and artistry. Visitors to Rapid City can also experience Native American art, culture and history at Prairie Edge or Journey Museum and open-air murals painted by local artists at Art Alley throughout the summer. 

St. Pete/Clearwater, Florida

From museums devoted to big-name artists to incredible street murals adorning the buildings around St. Pete’s Central Avenue, art—and the cultures it celebrates—is all around in St. Pete/Clearwater. Spring/Summer 2021 is an exciting season for St. Pete art, with new exhibitions, venues, and events to explore. 

  • From Margins to Mainstays at Museum of Fine Arts St. Pete – This exhibition, on display April 24 – September 26, features masterworks from MFA’s photography collection that were made by artists whose careers and personal lives were sidelined, ignored, or impacted by their gender, race, sexuality, or nationality. From Margins to Mainstays illustrates how the canon of photography has changed since the medium first began being shown in museums in the 1940s, with particular emphasis on rectifying the small percentage of women and artists of color historically acquired by and displayed in public collections. The exhibition includes works by Berenice Abbott, Lotte Jacobi, Carrie Mae Weems, Lee Miller, Cornelius Marion Battey, James Van Der Zee, and Manuel Álvarez Bravo.
  • Fairgrounds St. Pete at The Factory – Art enthusiasts will fall in love with The Factory, an 8-warehouse St. Pete arts center spread over 6.5 acres in the heart of the Warehouse Arts District. Fairgrounds St. Pete, opening Spring 2021 at The Factory, is a 15,000 square foot artist-made environment. Fairgrounds functions as an immersive, choose-your-own-adventure experience where visitors are invited to explore a world of playful art and technology exhibits that highlight weird, wacky, and wonderful Florida. The inaugural installation gives 60+ local and nationally recognized artists a platform to showcase their work and experiment with the unexpected. Fairgrounds aims to compensate artists fairly for their contributions by paying not only for their work, but also a portion of the profits from ticket sales while their work is on view. Through exhibits, events, workshops, and creative education programs, Fairgrounds will be a leader for arts innovation and an economic engine for local artists and craftspeople.

Hotel/Attraction News:

Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa

Kicking off in May, Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa has partnered with local artists and galleries to create the “Art in the Garden” exhibit. The gallery spread out across the property’s 10 acres of gardens will be open to both guests and the local community, free of charge, and Estancia will be providing a guided art brochure that showcases the various pieces and maps them out across the property. Art pieces including murals, statues and galleries have been created and provided by locals including Channin Fulton, Stefanie Bales, Billy Pease, Thomas J. Galleries and more.

New Orleans – The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum’s newest special exhibit “SOLDIER | ARTIST: Trench Art in World War II” explores the unique military pastime of creating art, souvenirs and tools out of the discarded materials and waste of war. Featuring more than 150 artifacts, many of which have never been exhibited, the collection also includes a background on the creators, providing a rare glimpse into the circumstances of war and the ingenuity and resourcefulness of servicemembers in the field. Such items range from souvenirs, such as ashtrays and jewelry made by servicemembers for their loved ones at home, to forbidden items like radios and musical instruments made by prisoners of war. The exhibition will be open to the public through January 2, 2022.

Daxton Hotel – Birmingham, Michigan

Daxton Hotel has opened its doors in the affluent community of Birmingham, a city 30 minutes north of Detroit. The hotel features a minimalist-luxe design with more than 400 original pieces of cutting-edge art curated from around the world by renowned  Saatchi Art. The incredible collection of mixed media brings whimsical and energetic flair throughout as vibrant colors flood spaces throughout the hotel, featuring a chartreuse lobby, deep-burgundy guest rooms and lavender parlors, an ideal composition juxtaposed with the art collection, avant-garde architectural lighting and furniture in bold shapes. Daxton Hotel brings a blend of provocative yet sophisticated style, offering artistic freedom of expression throughout the use of light rays, shadows and reflections creating an ethereal mood. The hotel offers a Beauty + Bubbles event, where visitors get an intimate tour of the public art collection curated by Saatchi Art on the first Friday of every month. The tour features work from 160 artists representing nearly 40 countries. The artwork crosses multiple mediums including painting, photography, collage, drawing and sculpture of some of the best international, national and regional artists.

The MC Hotel – Montclair, NJ

Located just 45 minutes outside of NYC, the 159 room MC Hotel is at the intersection of culture and community in the heart of Montclair’s thriving artistic community. With art curated from established and up-and-coming artists in every room, the hotel is part art gallery, part meeting place. Currently on display are pieces from painters Ryan Chin and Siona Benjamin-Kruge as well as mixed-media artist Basia Goszczynska to name a few. At guest check-in travelers will be met by a sculpture of a flower from Karen Kimmel that stretches across two walls. The sculpture features textiles that were meticulously hand-punched then painted onsite. On the lobby wall of the bar guests will see a sculpture from Goszczynska which is made from salvaged oyster farming bags, marine rope and steel wire. He also continues this unique interpretation of upcycling to shelves of the bar which displays Rainbow Collections, a piece featuring crowdsourced microplastics and salvaged baby food jars.

Crossroads Hotel – Kansas City, MO

With 2,000 square foot dedicated to public art, local artists and artists with historic ties to Kansas City, Crossroads is not just community-driven but art-driven. The gallery program is a thoughtful effort to reflect and contribute to the surrounding art district. Exhibitions, artist commissions, performances and unexpected artist-driven experiences intimately connect visitors to the creative scene thriving in the area. Along with the public gallery and local creative contributions to the interiors, amenities and delicacies, Crossroads is thrilled to support an artist in residence program. Curated by Hesse McGraw (director at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston) and Kansas City’s el dorado inc., the hotel’s architecture firm, the program provides another meaningful way for Crossroads to contribute to and support the artistic, social and cultural flourishing happening in the city. Current artist in residence Nick Miller is showcasing Wild Stallion, is a sculptural installation representing unseen and unstoppable algorithmic forces of technological innovation done with duct tape. Previous exhibits have come from Peggy Noland whose car makeovers are nothing short legendary and Glyneisha Johnson whose Watering Place paidhomage to the plants as a source of refuge for Black, Brown and Indigenous people.

Hewing HotelMinneapolis, MN

Since opening its doors in 2016 the 124-room luxury lifestyle Hewing Hotel has provided an unmistakable all-Minnesotan experience in the bustling North Loop neighborhood of Minneapolis. The former farm implements showroom and warehouse built in 1897 has been reborn as a cultural center for the community retaining its original brick and timber rustic charm. Immersing guests in Minneapolis, the hotel offers unique experiences with Minnesotan flair such as a monthly music series, Alley KAT! Perkins Pop Up Concert in the adjacent alley with season 6 The Voice semi-finalist Kat Perkins. The visual art of the area is on display through regularly rotating installations of local artists. The current collection includes works from Minneapolis-based artists Roko and Toni Gallo reflecting the beauty and talent within the area.

Denise Solenghi (Lara Facco P&C) Denise Solenghi (Lara Facco P&C) for 360 Magazine

Cut A Rug A Round Square

Curated by: Jessica Stockholder

The American artist curates an exhibition of works from the collection of “la Caixa” Foundation and CRT Foundation for Modern and Contemporary Art and turns them into a large environmental installation.

Many times has the “end” of painting been declared and just as many times its “rebirth” has been attested: with the desire to investigate the limits and contemporary potentialities of painting, from February 11 OGR–Officine Grandi Riparazioni–presents Cut a rug a round square, a new site-specific commission developed for the former industrial spaces of OGR Turin by the American artist Jessica Stockholder.

Chosen for her peculiar perspective, Jessica Stockholder has played over the last twenty years a crucial role in the ongoing debate on painting and its limits, expanding the concept in a relentless dialogue amid various media, between form and space, by forcing the limits of painting towards the sculptural and installation dimension.

In her work, the artist combines apparently disparate and ordinary objects to create complex installations that hoard and stratify materials and colors: plastic bags and containers, extension cords, lumber, carpets, and furniture: in her hands, these often-neglected objects recover aesthetic and formal qualities in a practice reminiscent of abstract expressionism, color field painting, and minimalism.

For the project set up inside Binario 1 of OGR Cult, the area of OGR dedicated to art and culture, the artist Jessica Stockholder converted into an exceptional curator and created a unique installation with works from two important collections: the Collection of Contemporary Art “la Caixa” of Barcelona, and that of the CRT Foundation for Modern and Contemporary Art, whose works are on permanent loan to the Turin museums Gam – Gallery of Modern Art and Castello di Rivoli, Museum of Contemporary Art.

To plan her route across the rich heritage at her disposal, the artist developed a concept that is both rigorous and poetic: “I am exploring how the generally rectilinear geometry inherent in the contour, or edge, of paintings, generates meaning both inside and outside the paintings. – states Jessica Stockholder – In relation to both their exposure and internal mechanisms, paintings make use of geometry and its resonance with the scale and form of the human body. (…) Casting a glance through the collections, I was struck by the many works in which the circle and square intersect. Often these works literally feature circles and squares themselves. I began to think of the representation of the human body as a kind of circle within the square, as in Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man. The paintings are themselves usually characterized by rectilinear geometries. What happens inside pushes against the edges. The edges are both literal and abstract and are defined by the end of the material support, but the rectangle, identified as a mapping, is understood by virtue of abstraction.

Combining works of disparate production and origin, the artist investigates the ways of painting and its categorical definitions across genre boundaries, studying its literal and metaphorical edges.

Works range from Directions by Vito Acconci, a photograph documenting the exhausting performance of a man with his arms and legs spread to evoke the Vitruvian Man, to Combustion by Aurelio Amendola, whose shots portray Alberto Burri in the act of melting plastic with a flashlight to create a circle in a square. From Bonded EternmaleMonica Bonvicini‘s installation of two chairs covered in studded black leather exhibited on a circular red carpet, to A REMOVAL OF THE CORNER OF A RUG IN USE by Lawrence Weiner where written words protrude from the surface of the wall like paint does on his canvas. From 9 to 5 by Edward Ruscha, who painted the time cycle of a working day trapped inside a claustrophobic rectangle to Undercurrent (Red) by Mona Hatoum where the floor surface acts as a pictorial plane for a large carpet of electric cables. And again, among others, the works of Marlene Dumas, Richard Tuttle, Tracey Emin, Diego Perrone, and Jessica Stockholder herself, are exhibited in a display specially designed by the artist who succeeded in transforming the entire exhibition into a work of art in itself, a large environmental installation that evokes, in an experiential form, the clash between the circle and the square as an image of the productive clash between rationality and imagination, order and superabundance, body and idea.

Cut a rug a round square is an opportunity for the public to admire, in complete safety and free of charge, in the spaces of OGR, a treasure preserved by the city’s museums and enriched over the years by the CRT Foundation, with a newfangled interpretation from the point of view of an artist across the works of yet another international collection. The exhibition focuses on the theme of painting, dear to both collections, which have a rich heritage of pictorial works, by taking the cue from one of the most discussed and loved media – even by the more general audience. Cut a rug a round square reshapes the boundaries of this discipline and weaves a discourse that takes from the forms and phantasmagorias of painting, keys to reading the contemporary world,  and invites visitors to lose themselves in a world of shapes and colors.

Jessica Stockholder (1959, Seattle, WA. Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois) has exhibited widely in museums and galleries internationally. Her work is in the permanent collections of numerous museums including the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; MoCA Los Angeles; MoMA San Francisco; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The British Museum, London; and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Recent solo exhibitions include Stuff Matters at the Central Museum, Utrecht and Relational Aesthetics at The Contemporary Austin, Austin in 2019.

From February 11
Free admission
Thursday and Friday, 3PM – 8PM, last admission 7.30PM
OGR Cult, OGR – Officine Grandi Riparazioni

Rams illustrated by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

1800 Tequila x Los Angeles Rams

1800 Tequila, the world’s most awarded tequila line, today announces 1800 Tequila is the Official Tequila of the Los Angeles Rams, marking the brand’s first professional football team partnership. As two heritage brands with award-winning credentials and historical roots in Mexico and Southern California respectively, 1800 Tequila and the Los Angeles Rams unite to bring the best taste in tequila to game days.

1800 Tequila and the Los Angeles Rams are rolling out a playbook to help Rams fans celebrate game day at home with programs including:

1800 Play For Sweeps – A sweepstakes that challenges fans to showcase how they celebrate gameday on Instagram and Twitter, with the hashtag #1800PlayForSweeps. Prizes include $1,800 in merchandise credit to the official LA Rams Fan Shop during the month of October. For more information on how to participate, please visit here.

1800 Taco Tailgate – For the ultimate at-home tailgate experience, 1800 Tequila is teaming up with LA-based creator and actor Travis ‘Taco’ Bennett and popular Mexican food truck Mariscos Jalisco to launch 1800 Taco Tailgate. The contest allows lucky Los Angeles residents to win a visit from the 1800 Taco Tailgate for a doorstep delivery of 1800 Tequila cocktails and Mariscos Jalisco tacos on game day. Fans can enter ahead of the Rams Week Seven game when they host Chicago on October 26th by posting on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #1800TacoChallenge. For more information on how to participate, please visit here.

1800 LA Rita – Rams fans watching the game at home can create a version of the 1800 LA Rita, 1800 Tequila’s signature LA Rams’ cocktail, by ordering 1800 Silver on Saucey, ReserveBar or Drizly and combining 1800 Silver, lime juice, agave syrup and fresh squeezed orange juice in a shaker, and shaking and straining into a salted rocks glass garnished with a lime wedge (full recipe available here).

St. Helena Celebrates Napoleonic Heritage

ST. HELENA LAUNCHES ‘NAPOLEON 200’ CAMPAIGN TO COMMEMORATE NAPOLEONIC HERITAGE

Starting this fall, the remote South Atlantic island of St. Helena is hosting a series of events and special projects surrounding its Napoleonic heritage. The campaign, under the auspices of The British Napoleonic Bicentenary Trust, marks 200 years since Napoleon died on the island to which he was exiled after the French defeat at the 1815 Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon allegedlydied of stomach cancer on May 5, 1821 at Longwood House, one of the most visited historic sites on St. Helena. In 1840, his coffin was disinterred and transported to Paris where it was reburied beneath the dome of the des Invalides.

Located 1,200 miles from Africa and 1,800 miles from South America, St. Helena (pronounced St. Hel-EE-na) is one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands. As Napoleon’s place of exile, the island is home to numerous heritage sites; and valleys dotted with forts and flag stations built to ensure Napoleon could not escape.

The Trust has two main objectives: to preserve the island’s at-risk heritage sites, and to promote new perspectives on the story of Napoleon on St. Helena.

To preserve the island’s heritage, two projects have been announced. The first is the restoration of Toby’s Cottage, a building that housed the aristocratic Balcombe family’s slaves – including a man named Toby. The cottage is one of a few surviving dwellings of enslaved Africans on the island. There are also plans for a new Heritage Trail, encompassing several historical sites.

The campaign will feature a series of online events. These aim to commemorate the death of Napoleon in a respectful manner, acknowledging the complicated legacy of his rule, defeat and death.

In May 2021, there will be several intimate memorialization events at the graveside of several notable individuals of the Napoleonic period. Virtual experiences will include 3D ‘visits’ to the island’s main Napoleonic sites. More information on the British Napoleonic Bicentenary Trust and Napoleon 200 can be found at:www.napoleon200.org

ABOUT ST. HELENA: St. Helena is one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands, located in the middle of the South Atlantic, 1,200 miles from Africa. St. Helena Tourism is dedicated to the conservation of its diverse and unique animal, plant, and marine life, and eager to welcome visitors to come to the island. Starting in 2020, St. Helena became accessible by regular flights from Johannesburg, as well as season services from Cape Town.

The Leather City

By Armon Hayes

Superheroes are as custom as their outfits. Living in a world where versatility and luxury are never compromised, The Leather City is the destination where craftsmanship meets your leather desires.

Amazingly stitched pieces of premium quality are seamless when it comes to design. Rooted in heritage, The Leather City proudly represents over 22 years of leather goods at their most polished.

The pop culture partnership with the Canada-based company comes at a time when we all could tap into our inner “superhero”. From Black Panther to Deadpool, Superman to Batman and Captain Marvel to Nightwing, The Leather City’s superhero jackets let us embrace the spirit of our heroes at a time in which our world could use a few high-powered individuals battling for justice.

Building bridges in Africa and Dubai, the high fashion brand diversifies its efforts to further its commitment to heritage. The Leather City doesn’t just make jackets. These pieces are leather artwork lined and designed to cater to extraordinary lives, and the zipper closure jacket is premium to its smell and tailored fit.

The Leather City is following these superheroes with a goal to protect, though not against aliens, supervillains and evil gods. They are providing workers with items like gloves, masks, hand sanitizer and soap to counter the spread of COVID-19 and keep their customers safe.

Shades by Saint Owen

Dominican Republic Flag illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Dominican Day Parade

This Sunday, thousands of New Yorkers and visitors would usually be flooding Sixth Avenue to celebrate the culture and heritage of the Dominican Republic at the Dominican Day Parade. 

While the event is going to be celebrated a bit differently this year, Presidente beer and Presidente Chairman, Alex Rodriguez, are giving fans nationwide a way of observing this day with those who share their passion for the DR’s rich culture with a virtual celebration where all are welcome!

Tune in on Sunday, August 9th at 3 PM EST as Presidente hosts an online celebration in partnership with Que Lo Que, a traditional Latin dance party created by the legendary APT.78, whose intention is to celebrate Latino culture through its gatherings. Participants will find themselves in attendance with former-New York Yankees legend and Chairman of Presidente, Alex Rodriguez! Activities will include:

  • A live, digital set from LA MEGA’s 97.9FM DJ Aneudy that will air on Presidente’s Instagram channel
  • Chances for fans to win Presidente swag for their attendance throughout the program
  • Including an exclusive line of NY-inspired Presidente T-shirts, hats, bandanas, and Drizly codes

 

The Martini & Rossi Riserva Speciale Range

AN UNRESERVED STORY OF BITTER & BOTANICALS

The year was 1863 when Alessandro Martini and Luigi Rossi created their first Martini vermouth and began a lifelong quest to place their stamp on Italian culture. Their infamous partnership created the iconic brand that is MARTINI & ROSSI — a household name synonymous with bold heritage, impeccable craftsmanship and unreserved style. Its latest triumph, the Riserva Speciale Range, represents the height of Italian Aperitivi and the art of balance.

Today, the 8th generation MARTINI & ROSSI Master Artisans Giuseppe “Beppe” Musso and Ivano Tonuttiare following in the foot steps of the brand’s founders as dedicated and passionate craftsmen who guard and preserve its quality and integrity. They are two of only four people worldwide to know Luigi Rossi’s original recipes.

Over a century in the making, the Riserva Speciale Rangeis the first permanent line of expressions within MARTINI & ROSSI to be launched in 25 years. Comprised of two iconic Vermouths di Torino—Rubino and Ambrato— along with an incomparable Bitter Liqueur,the entire process of creating one bottle in the MARTINI & ROSSI Riserva Speciale Range takes over one year. The collection is a homage to the brand’s origins, a celebration of the region’s bounty and the ultimate distillation of the MARTINI & ROSSI legacy of innovation and boldness.,representing a new generation of signature aperitifs that will become the tradition of tomorrow.

A protected name of origin, Vermouth di Torino can only be assigned to expertly crafted vermouths that use 100% Italian wines and Artemisia herbs sourced from the Piedmonte region. The MARTINI & ROSSI Ambrato and Rubino Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino acknowledge and pay tributeto this guarded name of origin by employing the same time-honored craft that has been passed down from generation to generation. Born and madein Pessione, these acclaimed products are the most authentic expression of the ingredients and style of the region, honoring over a century of winemaking prowess.

Setting the standard for what a Vermouth di Torino represents, MARTINI &ROSSI Master Artisans Beppe Musso and Ivano Tonutti use the same established production practices developed by the first Master Artisans centuries ago, paying homage to their rich roots and heritage. By law, at least one Artemesia herb must be included in a Vermouth di Torino, but to give them true Italian heart and to create a more complex, complete, and rounded sensation, the Masters chose to use three types of local Artemisia.

All grown in nearby fields in Piedmonte, Artemisia Absinthium, commonly known as Wormwood, brings a strongly bitter-herbal character, Artemisia Pontica adds a touch of anise, and Artemisia Vulgaris provides a floral note.

The terroir of the fragrant pastures is essential to the exceptional quality ofthe botanicals used in both the Ambrato Vermouth di Torino and Rubino Vermouth di Torino. The inclusion of all three types brings a new dimensionto the classic taste of Vermouth.

Ambrato Vermouth di Torino

For the Ambrato Vermouth di Torino, Artemisia is blended with other carefully sourced exotic and local herbs and spices including RomanChamomile, Yellow Cinchona bark and Chinese Rhubarb. The ItalianRoman Chamomile emphasizes the fresh floral notes of the artemisia, while the yellow Cinchona bark brings a fresh, mouthwateringly bitter character. The botanicals are added to a neutral grain spirit, steeped, then placed in rotary drums turning at a slow speed for a period of many weeks to create the extracts – liquid elixirs that will be added tothe final blend.

The botanical extracts for the Ambrato are rested for over two months in Piedmontese Tino casks, reminiscent of the process used in the very early days of the company. This complex practice softens the blend of botanicals, creating the desired balance needed in each.

After the botanical extracts are rested, they are then blended with100% Italian wines selected by Master Blender Beppe Musso. LocalMoscato d’Asti DOCG wines, along with crispy and fresh Italian wines, are used to create the distinctive amber Ambrato Vermouth di Torino, adding their soft honeyed and aromatic sweetness. Along with the local Artemesia, Roman Chamomile, Yellow Cinchona Bark andChinese Rhubarb, the end result is a lightly bitter profile that is her baland floral with just a touch of honey to finish.

Rubino Vermouth di Torino

Italian Holy Thistle and Red Sandalwood were specifically selected to imbue the Rubino Vermouth di Torino with their aromatic character and perfectly compliment the three types of ItalianArtemisia. Scarce and highly prized, the sustainably sourced RedSandalwood imparts a delicate spice and woody, bitter note. TheItalian Holy Thistle brings a cooling, energetic, and bitter taste to the mixture. Using the same production process as with Ambrato, each of the carefully selected botanicals are transformed into precious extracts then rested for over two months in order to create a perfectly balanced, harmonious blend of flavors.

Master Blender Beppe Musso carefully blends the botanic extracts with 100% Italian wines once their resting period has ended. The exquisite Riserva Speciale Rubino is brought to life with small amounts of the full-bodied Lang he DOC Nebbiolo wines. These parcels are known to be dark and fruity, characteristics which shine through in the final product. The wines are blended with the extracts of Artemesia, Italian Holy Thistle and Red Sandalwood resulting in a bright ruby red Vermouth di Torino. The delicate balance of botanicals and wine create a full-bodied, herbal and complex style ofVermouth di Torino with a lingering profile and just a touch of spice.

Bitter Liqueur

The crown jewel in the Riserva Speciale Range is undoubtedly the Bitter Liqueur. Inspired by founder Luigi Rossi’s original recipe from 1872, and usingonly 100% natural ingredients, the MARTINI & ROSSI Bitter has been remastered for today’s modern palate.

To compliment the prized Piedmontese Artemisia, Master Herbalist Ivano Tonutti carefully selected three exotic botanicals: Saffron, Angostura andColumba. The Angostura is a pleasing aromatic bitter that imparts a deep flavor which, along with the Artemisia, provides a solid foundation to theBitter Liqueur. Columba is a harmonious bitter that gives a substantial mouth-filling bitter taste while balancing the other botanicals. Finally, Saffron,the “golden spice,” gives the liquid a wonderful end note, intensifying the aromatic bitter qualities, bringing perfume and a lingering finish to the final product.

In total, over twenty different botanicals are used to encompass the complete range of bitter, each delivering an irreplaceable richness and complexity tothe taste profile through different dimensions of bitterness.

To better harmonize all the aromatic ingredients and add roundness to the bitter notes, the botanical extracts are mixed with sugar and a neutral grain spirit then rested in the same traditional Tino casks used for the MARTINI &ROSSI Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino. This resting period creates exceptional harmony and balance, integrating the layers of flavor together to create a complete sensation of bitterness. The final product is a one-of-a-kind, versatile liqueur that adds depth, complexity and balance to any cocktail

Master Herbalist Ivano Tonutti

Hailing from Piedmonte, Ivano Tonutti is the 8th Master Herbalist to follow in the foot steps of the legendary Luigi Rossi. The most complex and precious secret atMARTINI & ROSSI is how the taste, aroma and texture of the hand selected botanicals are captured, and for the last 25 years, Tonutti has been embracing this legacy.

Prior to joining the MARTINI & ROSSI family, Tonutti studied in nearby Turin as apharmacist before taking up his role as a Technical Director within the company.He served a lengthy apprenticeship learning the skills and artistry needed before his appointment of Master Herbalist, the most trusted and celebrated role atMARTINI & ROSSI.

A true expert in botanicals and extraction techniques, Tonutti has an intimate knowledge of and rapport with the over forty natural ingredients that are used inMARTINI & ROSSI recipes. Under his guidance, his team of virtuosos ensure every individual botanical meets each rigorous standard set down by the company even before the fundamental taste components are extracted. Hundreds of samples are tasted and rejected until each requirement is met ensuring complete consistency and balance across the Riserva Speciale Range.

MASTER BLENDER GIUSEPPE “BEPPE” MUSSO

Originally from a village just outside the MARTINI & ROSSI home of Pessione, Italy, Giuseppe Musso is the Master Blender for the iconic brand and best known as “Beppe.” He is one of the very few responsible for the century-old recipes atCasa Martini, working to preserve the taste, quality and style of the Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino and Bitter Liqueur.

A student of the world-renowned Scuola Enologica di Alba, once Musso completed his training he worked for 10 years as a winemaker producing celebrated wines such as Barolos, Barbarescos, Moscatos and Asti Spumantes. He was always, however, drawn to his native Piedmonte, and returned home to join the MARTINI & ROSSI team where he began working with the quality assurance group getting to know each expression intimately.

In 1993, he was then honored with the opportunity to join Luciano Boero, theMARTINI & ROSSI Master Blender of over thirty years and become part of his team of winemakers. After 18 years of training under his tutelage, Musso succeeded Boero’s tenure once he retired from the company. Now, Musso, with the assistance of his curated team of artisans, sources each wine and leads the delicate blending process of marrying them with the bespoke botanical extracts within the MARTINI & ROSSI portfolio of vermouths and bitter.

NORTH AMERICAN BRAND AMBASSADOR FABIO RAFFAELLI

For almost two decades, Fabio Raffaelli has developed and contributed to bar programs at some of the world’s finest dining institutions, and today, he holds the title of the first-ever MARTINI &ROSSI North American Brand Ambassador. In this role, Raffaelli champions the iconic brand’s acclaimed heritage-rich expressions, and most recently the newly debuted Riserva Speciale Range.

Raffaelli has cultivated a respected reputation thanks to a keen attention to detail, expert palate and high standard for exceptional service. Born in Italy, Raffaelli has bartended in some of the most prestigious bars and restaurants across Europe. He has collaborated with internationally respected chefs including Alain Ducasse, Ferran Adrià, and Gordon Ramsay, as well as the celebrated legendary bartender Salvatore Calabrese. Raffaelli gained a reputation for his service-driven style and impeccable elegance before moving to the U.S.

In 2009 Raffaelli crossed the Atlantic to New York City to bring his expertise in Italian cocktails, spirits and wine to the Michelin Starred Italian restaurant Del Posto. With an expertise and focus on highlighting the diversity and complexity of Italian spirits, Raffaelli completely redesigned the bar program once he arrived, which earned well-deserved praise and critical acclaim. Continuing his career in fine dining, Raffaelli worked with renowned chef Daniel Boulud at DANIEL on the UpperEast Side. During his tenure there, he engineered the restaurant’s show-stopping table-side cocktail service and curated a rotating seasonal menu of cocktails, each highlighting a different spirit, preparation and presentation.

Today, in his role as North American Brand Ambassador and as the face of the brand in NorthAmerica, Raffaelli utilizes his Italian spirits prowess and innate style to raise awareness and build loyalty for the MARTINI & ROSSI Riserva Speciale Range.

Art Of The Wild

Maison Perrier-Jouët presents EDEN by Perrier-Jouët: an ephemeral, immersive experience, taking place at Faena Hotel, in parallel with Design Miami/, the contemporary art fair that the House has collaborated with for the past seven years. On 5th December, the biggest names in Miami came together to discover Art of the Wild, the extravagant universe as seen by the House to re-enchant the everyday through the presence of unbridled nature. It continues to enchant Miami with a packed programme of events.

Maison Perrier-Jouët is taking over Miami, where it unleashed EDEN by Perrier-Jouët: an invitation to delve into the House’s relationship with art and nature that spans back to its foundation. It was the ideal setting for spreading Art of the Wild, the House’s vision of an unexpected and joyful world, where nature reveals itself in all its liberty and exuberance. Reflecting this vibrant spirit, Winnie Harlow hosted a party on 5th December where people from all horizons were brought together for a unique champagne experience.

The House spread Art of the Wild by setting up this space on the beach. It was fitted with graphics created by Luftwerk, a creative duo commissioned by the House last year to interpret its cultural heritage, in particular the anemone motif designed in 1902 by Emile Gallé – one of the masters of Art Nouveau – that adorns bottles from the Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque collection. The immersion continued with a virtual reality journey that began in the heart of the magnetic nature of Art of the Wild and took guests on an exploration of the House’s cellars in Epernay, Champagne. Rounding things off, a photobooth in the same style was set up to capture highlights of the festivities.

Created for the House by British designer Bethan Laura Wood, HyperNature takes the form of a tree with an extravagant, intense presence. It proposes a new, whimsical champagne experience where flutes can be “plucked” directly from the branches, as a grape might be plucked from a vine. It is also on display in the Collectors Lounge of Design Miami/ throughout the fair.

EDEN by Perrier-Jouët presents two packed days and nights of Art of the Wild events, during which guests can taste a selection of Maison Perrier-Jouët’s cuvées. On the 5th, the House hosted a talk with Bethan Laura Wood, organised by Dazed Arts. On the 6th, Maison Perrier-Jouët is welcoming a creative brunch with food designer Laila Gohar and sunset cocktails to accompany a private trunk show presenting the new jewellery collection by Jade Jagger. Rounding off the residency will be the launch of the CR Fashion Book Calendar with Estee Lauder. A complete schedule covering lifestyle, fashion, food and design, reflecting the House’s openness to all forms of creativity.

At the EDEN by Perrier-Jouët, just as at Design Miami/, the House shares its approach to champagne that stands apart from customary codes, stemming from its creative freedom and unconventional observations of nature, supported by a community of free spirits who share its values. These “Artisans of the Wild” come from a variety of creative fields, including design, fashion and gastronomy – represented by Bethan Laura Wood, Winnie Harlow and Laila Gohar, respectively – as well as art and hospitality. Along with its Artisans of the Wild, the House is writing a new chapter in a story that has been unfolding for over 200 years.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”