Posts tagged with "Judaism"

Karen Underhill and Bruno Schulz Self-Portrait given by The Polish Cultural Institute of NY for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

Bruno Schulz’s Lasting Impact

Bruno Schulz (1892-1942) created a rich symbolic world in his small body of literary work and in his graphic art that left a huge legacy in Polish literature and in Jewish literature outside Poland. His stories contained mainly in two collections, Cinnamon Shops (1934) and The Hourglass Sanatorium (1938), along with a few other stories published separately, critical works, and letters, are a testament to the fecund cultural environment of the East European region of Galicia between the wars. Schulz is a secular Jewish writer whose stories, which we know from the recent discovery of an early work entitled, Undula (1922) seem to come out of the themes in his artwork, but were forged into their mature form as letters to the Yiddish modernist poet Debora Vogel. He wrote them in Polish, was celebrated in Polish avantgarde circles, and the most extensive body of Schulz scholarship is in Polish. His work reflects the influence of German writer Thomas Mann, as well as Franz Kafka and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (author of Venus in Furs), who were German-language writers of non-German cities of the Austro-Hungarian empire like Schulz Prague and Lemberg (Lviv) respectively. Postwar Jewish writers in a variety of languages such as Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, Danilo Ki¡, David Grossman, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Nicole Krauss, have created characters on the model of Schulz’s biography. In the confluence of cultures brought about by modernization and aggressive industrial forces in the Drohobycz-BorysŽaw oil producing region, Schulz’s idea of the writer sifting through the trash tandeta to find and reassemble mutilated fragments of cast-off mythologies or systems of meaning would become a model for generations of writers following the upheaval of the Second World War, post-Communism, and even post-Colonialism.

In this episode of “Encounters with Polish Literature,” we are focusing on Karen Underhill’s research into Schulz in the Jewish modernist context of his own day, rather than his post-Holocaust legacy among the international community of Jewish writers, or strictly in the Polish-language modernist context of writers like StanisŽaw Ignacy Witkiewicz (“Witkacy”) and Witold Gombrowicz or Polish writers influenced by or responding to Schulz in their work like Tadeusz Kantor, Agata Tuszyska, Stefan Chwin, and Olga Tokarczuk.

Finally, Prof. Underhill says a few words about the extensive interdisciplinary offerings in Polish studies at The University of Illinos Chicago.

Learn more about this episode, and see the biography of the guest on the Polish Cultural Institute New York’s website. The linked page includes a bibliography of works in English by and about Schulz: Episode 5.

Bartek Remisko, Executive Producer

David A. Goldfarb, Host & Producer

Natalia Iyudin, Producer

Upcoming Episodes

  • Episode 6 (July 1, 2021): Tadeusz Racewicz with Joanna Trzeciak (Kent State University).
  • Episode 7 (August 1, 2021): Zofia NaŽkowska with Ursula Phillips (translator)
  • Episode 8 (September 1, 2021): StanisŽaw Lem with Bozena Shallcross (University of Chicago)

This project is a part of the anniversary celebration of the Polish Cultural Institute New York.

The Museum of Art and History of Judaism via Beth Levin at WEILL for use by 360 Magazine

The MAHJ Reopening

THE MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY OF JUDAISM IN PARIS REOPENS AND UNVEILS NEW EXHIBITIONS

As Paris begins to reopen, the Museum of Art and History of Judaism (known as “The mahJ”), located in the exquisite 17th-century Hôtel de Saint-Aignan in the historic Marais neighborhood, reopened its doors yesterday, presenting a lineup of new exhibitions following its closure due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Postponed from its previously planned April 2020 opening, Chagall, Modigliani, Soutine… Paris pour École, 1905-1940, will now be on display from June 17 to October 31, 2021. The exhibition will showcase 130 works by Jewish artists who came to Paris in the early 20th century, as part of “the School of Paris.” The artists, including Chagall, Soutine and Modigliani, came to Paris from across the world to create their art in a free and modern context, without the constraints present in their home countries.

Echoing the School of Paris exhibition, the mahJ will unveil a new exhibition dedicated to Hersh Fenster, author of Undzere farpaynikte kinstler (Our Martyred Artists), published in Paris in 1951. Written in Yiddish, the book retraces the lives and works of 84 Jewish artists living in France who died between 1940 and 1945. The exhibition, Hersh Fenster and the Lost Shtetl of Montparnasse, will be on display from May 19 through October 10, 2021.

Also upon its opening, the mahJ will present From Workshop to Museum: ORT and the Transmission of Jewish Culturerunning until January 22, 2022. Founded in Russia in 1880 to help Jews through an apprenticeship of manual trades, ORT (Organisation Reconstruction Travail) is today an international educational network established in more than forty countries. In 2021, the organization celebrates the centenary of its presence in France, where every year it now trains some 5,000 students and trainees. Thanks to new findings in its archives, the mahJ traced back the role of this organization in the creation of the Museum of Jewish Art (1948-1998) in the rue des Saules, Paris, which became part of the mahJ.

In the contemporary gallery, the exhibition Maya Zack, La Mémoire en Actionrunning through September 12, 2021, presents three films presented for the first time in France by Israeli artist Maya Zack, haunted by questions of memory.

For more information about the Museum of Art and History of Judaism, visit this website.

ABOUT THE MAHJ:

Located in the magnificent 17th-century Hôtel de Saint-Aignan in the Marais neighborhood of Paris, the Museum of Art and History of Judaism (Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaïsme – known as “mahJ”) is one of the leading history and art museums in Paris. Since its opening in 1998, the mahJ has been devoted to showcasing major artworks from influential Jewish artists and sharing the history of Judaism in France, as well as throughout Europe and the Mediterranean. The mahJ collection comprises more than 12,000 works from antiquity to the present day and a wealth of archival materials. The museum also provides a number of educational programs to younger generations on Jewish art and culture, and hosts a variety of events and activities for all ages throughout the year.

Art by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

YouTube’s Most Popular Rabbi

World-Renowned Author Manis Friedman Turns to Technology to Help People Rediscover Balance, Becomes YouTube’s Favorite Rabbi

Way before anyone has even thought about the concept of social media, Rabbi Manis Friedman was already helping people rediscover balance, purpose and spirituality. A well-loved author, philosopher, counselor and lecturer, he is best known for his ability to clearly explain and combine age-old Torah wisdom with modern wit to captivate audiences around the world.

For those unfamiliar with him, Rabbi Friedman received his rabbinical ordination from Rabbinical College of Canada in 1969, he also a Biblical scholar and the author behind the acclaimed books “Doesn’t Anyone Blush Anymore?” and “The Joy of Intimacy”.  He founded Bais Chana Institute of Jewish Studies in Minnesota, the world’s first yeshiva exclusively for women back in 1971, and continues to serve the institution as its dean.

As times changed, he recognized that he also needed to change the way he reaches people. His first foray into the world wide web happened in 2005 when he created his website, It’s Good to Know,  which provides sound solutions to everyday problems stemming from relationships, marriage, intimacy, and grief among many others. As social media gained popularity and became more central in people’s lives, he saw the potential that YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Linkedin and podcasts hold in helping him bring everyone the wealth of wisdom that he has acquired from years of studying the scriptures.

Today, Rabbi Manis Friedman is known as “YouTube’s Most Popular Rabbi.” His channel, which has already surpassed 100,000 subscribers, allows him to bring the wisdom of Kabbalah closer to people and counsel them regardless of their religious affiliation.

“Ultimately, the goal is to reach the billions of people on the web and bring them closer to God; to bring healing and help people rediscover morality and balance,” he shares. “With everything that is happening in the world right now, it’s easy to find yourself feeling loss and losing balance, and along with it, losing your cherished relationships. You have the power to fix that, but you need to be open to learning.

Rabbi Friedman has made it his mission to help people improve their relationships and deepen their connection with God. He thanks technology for allowing him to do this despite the pandemic and even giving him a bigger platform to reach a wider audience.

To know more about Rabbi Friedman, you may visit the It’s Good to Know website or follow him on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin.

Zachary Balber: Tamim

Miami Revs Up for Art Basel!

Nov. 20th through March of 2020

The Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, in South Beach, at 301 Washington Avenue. 

Zachary Balber uses portrait photography to uncover the camouflaged identity of some of Judaism’s most unconventional Jews, in his series Tamim.

The photographer, a rising star in Miami’s art scene who is fast gaining national acclaim, is Jewish himself and connected strongly with the men he photographed. Through this series, he re-connected with his own heritage.

This is the first time these photographs have been exhibited in full color, some are new and have never been shown.

Some of the monumental images were printed as large as possible, to show the subjects at two or three times their human scale.

Since many of these men have serious tattoos, this creates the effect of transforming a portrait into a landscape experience for the viewer ‒ the markings across their flesh forge an explicit landscape. 

MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST ZACHARY BALBER:

Zachary Balber was born in Pittsburgh in 1983 and moved to Miami at the age of thirteen, where he received his first camera. Years later, while attending New World School of the Arts, he was hired to assist the fashion photographer Bruce Webber, assisting Webber in his campaigns for Abercrombie and Fitch, Vera Wang, and Vanity Fair Magazine.

He attended New World School of the Arts, graduating Summa Cum Laude, majoring in creative photography. His work has been exhibited at: Art Basel, The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art; The American Jewish University (LA); The Frost Art Museum FIU; MOCA NOMI; FAU Museum OCCA; (CIFO) Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation; Locust Projects; Spinello Gallery; Fredric Snitzer Gallery; The Armory; Art Hong Kong; Primary Projects, and Center for Fine Art Photography (CO); Hinge Gallery (Chicago); among many others. www.gingerphotoinc.com.