Posts tagged with "Native Americans"

Art in the Garden illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Calling All Art-Fanatics!

Calling All Art-Fanatics: 18 Exciting Art Happenings Across the Country

Destinations News:

California

  • Presidio “My Park Moment” Photo Contest: The Presidio in San Francisco has launched “My Park Moment” photo contest, where the public can submit a photo of their favorite park memory through May 28—a family picnic, a camping trip, their last hike in the Presidio or anything else they love to do in their favorite park. This fall, approximately 400 photos will be selected for a free and family-friendly outdoor photo show at the future home of the Presidio Tunnel Tops. Debuting in spring 2022, the Presidio Tunnel Tops project, comprising 14 acres of new national park land—will be an iconic “must see” San Francisco destination. 
  • LACMA Partners with Snapchat: Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and Snapchat recently debuted the “Monumental Perspectives” experience, which brings together artists and technologists to create virtual monuments that explore some of the histories of local communities in an effort to highlight perspectives from across the region. Visitors can experience the augmented reality monuments online or at site-specific locations across Los Angeles including LACMA’s Wilshire Boulevard campus, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and more. 
  • Napa Wrap Art and Art Walk: Napa Wrap Art is a new outdoor public art project debuting this spring, featuring transformed utility boxes into works of art around Downtown Napa. Thirteen regional artists were selected to create diverse designs that provide an opportunity to turn ordinary objects into something special that both locals and visitors can enjoy. Later this summer, Downtown Napa will welcome a new rotation of the Napa Art Walk sculptures – a true outdoor treasure hunt for art that is a perfect activity for kids of all ages. 
  • Desert X: The third installment of the internationally acclaimed biennial desert art exhibition returned in 2021 through May 16. The 2021 Desert X artist lineup includes a diverse group of 13 artists ranging from locals like Kim Stringfellow to international representatives like Zahrah Alghamdi. Visitors can explore new outdoor art installations across the desert region for an exciting socially distant experience.

Texas

  • San Antonio’s McNay Art Museum just opened Limitless! Five Women Reshape Contemporary Art, which includes an ever-popular infinity mirror room installation. San Antonio Museum of Art opened No Ocean Between Us, featuring art from Latin American artists of Asian descent, while the Briscoe Western Art Museum will open Still in the Saddle: A New History of the Hollywood Western in time for Memorial Day Weekend.
  • Designed by Steven Holl Architects, the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts completes a decade-long campus redevelopment project. Opened to the public in late 2020, the building finishes a trio of spaces that make up one of the largest art museums in the country. On the first floor is a black-box gallery dedicated to immersive installations. Second-floor galleries highlight photography, decorative arts, prints and drawings, and the top floor features thematic exhibitions on art from the 1960s onward. Additionally, the space features a 215-seat theater and a fine dining restaurant. 
  • The Dallas Museum of Art recently unveiled Cubism in Color: The Still Lifes of Juan Gris, the first US exhibition in over 35 years dedicated to the Spanish artist Juan Gris, this exhibition reconsiders the legacy of this important yet underappreciated modernist master. Co-organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and the Baltimore Museum of Art, Cubism in Color: The Still Lifes of Juan Gris highlights the artist’s pioneering and revolutionary contributions to the Cubist movement by focusing on his fascination with subjects drawn from everyday life.

Rapid City, South Dakota

  • “Legends in Light” Laser Show at Crazy Horse Memorial – Beginning Memorial Day weekend and occurring nightly through Labor Day, the “Legends in Light” laser show at Crazy Horse Memorial turns the carved mountainside into a 500-foot remarkable display. Each night at 9:30 p.m., viewers can take in the story and rich heritage of Native Americans.The show presents colorful animations and features music with choreographed lasers and sound effects.  
  • Gift From Mother Earth Art Show – Every June, Crazy Horse Memorial hosts The Gift From Mother Earth Art Show – an exhibition that celebrates a blend of arts and crafts that represent Native American cultures and the New West. From Friday June 18th – Sunday June 20th, artists of custom-made clothing, jewelry and other similar items will showcase their pieces starting at 8 a.m. each day. 
  • Native POP: People of the Plains – Featuring original Native work by established and emerging Native American Artists, Native POP is a one-day fine art show located in Main Street Square in downtown Rapid City. This cultural celebration will take place on Tuesday, July 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 8 pm. and will feature Native culture bearers sharing their Native knowledge and artistry. Visitors to Rapid City can also experience Native American art, culture and history at Prairie Edge or Journey Museum and open-air murals painted by local artists at Art Alley throughout the summer. 

St. Pete/Clearwater, Florida

From museums devoted to big-name artists to incredible street murals adorning the buildings around St. Pete’s Central Avenue, art—and the cultures it celebrates—is all around in St. Pete/Clearwater. Spring/Summer 2021 is an exciting season for St. Pete art, with new exhibitions, venues, and events to explore. 

  • From Margins to Mainstays at Museum of Fine Arts St. Pete – This exhibition, on display April 24 – September 26, features masterworks from MFA’s photography collection that were made by artists whose careers and personal lives were sidelined, ignored, or impacted by their gender, race, sexuality, or nationality. From Margins to Mainstays illustrates how the canon of photography has changed since the medium first began being shown in museums in the 1940s, with particular emphasis on rectifying the small percentage of women and artists of color historically acquired by and displayed in public collections. The exhibition includes works by Berenice Abbott, Lotte Jacobi, Carrie Mae Weems, Lee Miller, Cornelius Marion Battey, James Van Der Zee, and Manuel Álvarez Bravo.
  • Fairgrounds St. Pete at The Factory – Art enthusiasts will fall in love with The Factory, an 8-warehouse St. Pete arts center spread over 6.5 acres in the heart of the Warehouse Arts District. Fairgrounds St. Pete, opening Spring 2021 at The Factory, is a 15,000 square foot artist-made environment. Fairgrounds functions as an immersive, choose-your-own-adventure experience where visitors are invited to explore a world of playful art and technology exhibits that highlight weird, wacky, and wonderful Florida. The inaugural installation gives 60+ local and nationally recognized artists a platform to showcase their work and experiment with the unexpected. Fairgrounds aims to compensate artists fairly for their contributions by paying not only for their work, but also a portion of the profits from ticket sales while their work is on view. Through exhibits, events, workshops, and creative education programs, Fairgrounds will be a leader for arts innovation and an economic engine for local artists and craftspeople.

Hotel/Attraction News:

Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa

Kicking off in May, Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa has partnered with local artists and galleries to create the “Art in the Garden” exhibit. The gallery spread out across the property’s 10 acres of gardens will be open to both guests and the local community, free of charge, and Estancia will be providing a guided art brochure that showcases the various pieces and maps them out across the property. Art pieces including murals, statues and galleries have been created and provided by locals including Channin Fulton, Stefanie Bales, Billy Pease, Thomas J. Galleries and more.

New Orleans – The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum’s newest special exhibit “SOLDIER | ARTIST: Trench Art in World War II” explores the unique military pastime of creating art, souvenirs and tools out of the discarded materials and waste of war. Featuring more than 150 artifacts, many of which have never been exhibited, the collection also includes a background on the creators, providing a rare glimpse into the circumstances of war and the ingenuity and resourcefulness of servicemembers in the field. Such items range from souvenirs, such as ashtrays and jewelry made by servicemembers for their loved ones at home, to forbidden items like radios and musical instruments made by prisoners of war. The exhibition will be open to the public through January 2, 2022.

Daxton Hotel – Birmingham, Michigan

Daxton Hotel has opened its doors in the affluent community of Birmingham, a city 30 minutes north of Detroit. The hotel features a minimalist-luxe design with more than 400 original pieces of cutting-edge art curated from around the world by renowned  Saatchi Art. The incredible collection of mixed media brings whimsical and energetic flair throughout as vibrant colors flood spaces throughout the hotel, featuring a chartreuse lobby, deep-burgundy guest rooms and lavender parlors, an ideal composition juxtaposed with the art collection, avant-garde architectural lighting and furniture in bold shapes. Daxton Hotel brings a blend of provocative yet sophisticated style, offering artistic freedom of expression throughout the use of light rays, shadows and reflections creating an ethereal mood. The hotel offers a Beauty + Bubbles event, where visitors get an intimate tour of the public art collection curated by Saatchi Art on the first Friday of every month. The tour features work from 160 artists representing nearly 40 countries. The artwork crosses multiple mediums including painting, photography, collage, drawing and sculpture of some of the best international, national and regional artists.

The MC Hotel – Montclair, NJ

Located just 45 minutes outside of NYC, the 159 room MC Hotel is at the intersection of culture and community in the heart of Montclair’s thriving artistic community. With art curated from established and up-and-coming artists in every room, the hotel is part art gallery, part meeting place. Currently on display are pieces from painters Ryan Chin and Siona Benjamin-Kruge as well as mixed-media artist Basia Goszczynska to name a few. At guest check-in travelers will be met by a sculpture of a flower from Karen Kimmel that stretches across two walls. The sculpture features textiles that were meticulously hand-punched then painted onsite. On the lobby wall of the bar guests will see a sculpture from Goszczynska which is made from salvaged oyster farming bags, marine rope and steel wire. He also continues this unique interpretation of upcycling to shelves of the bar which displays Rainbow Collections, a piece featuring crowdsourced microplastics and salvaged baby food jars.

Crossroads Hotel – Kansas City, MO

With 2,000 square foot dedicated to public art, local artists and artists with historic ties to Kansas City, Crossroads is not just community-driven but art-driven. The gallery program is a thoughtful effort to reflect and contribute to the surrounding art district. Exhibitions, artist commissions, performances and unexpected artist-driven experiences intimately connect visitors to the creative scene thriving in the area. Along with the public gallery and local creative contributions to the interiors, amenities and delicacies, Crossroads is thrilled to support an artist in residence program. Curated by Hesse McGraw (director at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston) and Kansas City’s el dorado inc., the hotel’s architecture firm, the program provides another meaningful way for Crossroads to contribute to and support the artistic, social and cultural flourishing happening in the city. Current artist in residence Nick Miller is showcasing Wild Stallion, is a sculptural installation representing unseen and unstoppable algorithmic forces of technological innovation done with duct tape. Previous exhibits have come from Peggy Noland whose car makeovers are nothing short legendary and Glyneisha Johnson whose Watering Place paidhomage to the plants as a source of refuge for Black, Brown and Indigenous people.

Hewing HotelMinneapolis, MN

Since opening its doors in 2016 the 124-room luxury lifestyle Hewing Hotel has provided an unmistakable all-Minnesotan experience in the bustling North Loop neighborhood of Minneapolis. The former farm implements showroom and warehouse built in 1897 has been reborn as a cultural center for the community retaining its original brick and timber rustic charm. Immersing guests in Minneapolis, the hotel offers unique experiences with Minnesotan flair such as a monthly music series, Alley KAT! Perkins Pop Up Concert in the adjacent alley with season 6 The Voice semi-finalist Kat Perkins. The visual art of the area is on display through regularly rotating installations of local artists. The current collection includes works from Minneapolis-based artists Roko and Toni Gallo reflecting the beauty and talent within the area.

Melvin Sampson illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Remembering Melvin Sampson

By Hannah DiPilato

Melvin Sampson was a leader throughout his life and was dedicated to fighting for the rights of indigenous people. Before his passing, he was a tribal councilman that pushed for Native American’s rights. 

Some of his most monumental efforts include helping to establish the Indian National Finals Rodeo, assisting in the improvement of health care for Native Americans across the nation, advocating for the construction of the Yakama Nation Indian Health Services clinic west of Toppenish and pushing to improve fish restoration in the Yakima and Columbia basins.

Sampson passed in his home on December 11 at 82-years-old and left behind his wife, Betty Jean and his four daughters. He will be remembered by his big family of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 

Sampson’s full obituary can be found on Heggies Colonial Funeral Home’s website and anyone is able to leave thoughts, prayers and condolences for Sampson’s loved ones. People can also send flowers or a virtual gift and share photos and videos, a beautiful way to share remembrance amidst the pandemic. 

“He’s bigger than the Yakama Nation,” said Yakama General Council Chairman Roger Fiander, who grew up beside Sampson. “Besides that, he was my roping partner.”

Sampson’s legacy of helping to gain rights for Native Americans will live on for generations. Hopefully, many more people will follow in his footsteps to preserve tribal culture. 

Sampson was an advocate of better healthcare for Native Americans for 17 years while he served on the National Indian Health Board. He also helped form the Portland Area Indian Health Board, which monitors the federal administration of Indian health services in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. 

In Washington D.C., Sampson was at the head of an effort to gain funding for a new Indian Health Clinic. Eventually, his efforts led to an expansion of the clinic which expanded it into a facility of over 80,000 square feet. 

Sampson also wanted to improve fish rearing practices in the Yakama and Columbia basins in order to help the fish that lived there. With Sampson in charge, the Yakama Nation gained control of the Klickitat Hatchery which is found on the Klickitat river outside of Glendale. This hatchery was designed to rebuild the population of salmon by mimicking the natural habitat system that fish thrive in. 

Everyone that knew Sampson believed he was a born leader. He had a diverse understanding of tribal culture and government which allowed him to make many changes in his lifetime. George Waters, a lobbyist for the tribe in Washington, D.C., said that Sampson was just a person able to operate in different worlds. 

He was able to create many amazing things such as doing leatherwork and beginning a shop in his basement. Sampson can also be remembered for his forward-thinking ways that were ahead of his time. 

Irving Pinkham, another childhood friend of Sampson, said that Sampson cared for everyone and always wanted to help indigenous people. “In our way, nobody is better than anyone else and that’s what he believed too,” Pinkham said. “He never was a person who said ‘I, I did this, I did that.’ He was always a person who said ‘We, we did this, we did that.’ “

Sampson’s perseverance and ability to understand people helped him become a success in many aspects of his life. He was able to improve healthcare and the way of life for those around him and his legacy will be seen in all of the work he accomplished over his lifetime.

Rita Azar Illustrates an Entertainment Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Nielsen’s 2020 TV Inclusion Report

We’re excited to share with you Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV.  In the current day and age, visibility on screen is more powerful than ever. Through Nielsen’s latest report, the clear facts about representation on television are laid out in a clear and coherent way for interested parties.

This is Nielsen’s first ever report that measures the television media landscape’s progress and gaps in on-screen inclusion. The report reviews a variety of underrepresented groups in TV, including women, people of color and LGBTQ+ folks.

Some major takeaways from the report:

  • Hispanic/Latinx women are consistently and significantly less represented across all platforms
  • Across all TV, Native Americans’ share of screen is less that one quarter of their presence in population estimates
  • Of the top 300 programs across broadcast, cable and SVOD, only 2.3% have non-binary representation

From these takeaways, it is clear that although television has moved in a direction of representation, there is still plenty of progress to be made. If Nielsen continues to report this information yearly, it will be interesting to track these developments over time.

You can download the full report and learn more here: nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics

Kaelen Felix illustrates Elkhart Lake for 360 magazine

Elkhart Lake WI

By Elle Grant x Vaughn Lowery

As summer winds down and fall arrives, many find themselves itching for one last summer getaway, or rather, that first autumn weekend away. 360 Magazine was able to take advantage of such a trip, visiting Wisconsin’s Elkhart Lake this past September. Located in the heart of Moraine State Forest, Elkhart Lake is the ideal natural getaway, being home to lake activities as well as canopied hiking and biking trails.

Elkhart Lake, located on the East side of Wisconsin, is both a stunning sojourn into nature and also a historical destination. With a population just under one thousand, the village maintains a cozy quality, with local shops, restaurants, and activities maintaining a small-town, yet polished feel. Yet during the summertime, the town swells and comes to life. First inhabited by the Potawatomi Indians, the name Elkhart stems from the description Native people had of the area, that the lake resembled the shape of an elk’s heart. Native American culture can easily be explored in the area through local tours and at the Henschel’s Indian Museum. Elkhart is also a significant historical definition in terms of its relationship to racing, reaching its peak in the mid 1950s.

Our stay at the Shore Club was nothing short of superb. The new owners, Tom and Kristin Pagel, have done an incredible job renovating the hotel. Renovations including adding updated technology to enhance guest stays: Netflix, Alexa, a digital concierge through the Whisper app, Peloton bikes will soon be available, and luxury motor sports for those interested. Furthermore, the site also boasts an indoor pool, a game room with ping pong tables and vintage arcade games, and a gym. For those interested in seeing Elkhart on two wheels, free bikes are available for guest use at the front desk. The restaurant on site, the Cottonwood Social, offered consistently well-done meals, including the perfect weekend brunch.

We began our lake escape with a pontoon cruise on the namesake of the area, Elkhart Lake. Before departing, we sipped and snacked on the Osthoff’s signature cocktails and hors oeuvres. On the pontoon boat, we were able to view the lake’s crystal-clear lake waters and receive a tour that included information of the area’s history, legends, and folklore. The evening air aboard the boat made this the perfect way to begin a stay. Following the pontoon ride, dinner at the Osthoff Resort’s newest restaurant, Concourse Restaurant and Lounge, proved to be a unique culinary experience. With specialties such as the honey balsamic trout, seared scallops with sweet pea risotto, and the veal schnitzel with pickled cucumber relish, there was a delicious and refined option forevery set of tastebuds. The restaurant’s décor, a tribute the area and Osthoff’s vintage racing roots, also deserves special note.

Elkhart lake is famed for its historic roots as a racing circuit in the 1950s. During this decade, the village of Elkhart Lake transformed into an open-road race circuit where top sports car drivers traveled from all around the world to take on the unique terrain. Likewise, thousands of fans were drawn to the area, eager to see the athletes and vehicles alike. The racing today is focused at Road America,but the historic circuit is marked with signs denoting Wacker’s Wend, Kimberly’s Korner, and Dicken’s Ditch. This auto focused tour of the area isn’t to be missed. Road America also offers an opportunity to join in on the fun with options such as go-karting and ATVs at this world-acclaimed facility.

Road America and Elkhart Lake are famous as one of the oldest, largest, and most iconic tracks in the world. Currently, its original course is registered on the National Register of Historical Places, emphasizing its significance. Gaining popularity in the 1940s and 1950s, the post-World War II economy spurred on the influx of sporting luxury automobiles. For Elkhart specifically, the notable Sports Car Club of America were the main organizer of their races. Incredibly popular races such as the RoadAmerica 500, SCCA National Sports Car Championship, the United States Road Racing Championship and the IMSAGT Championship. Today, it continues to host luxury races and draw motorsports fans and can even be found in numerous racing video games!

Following a wild time racing, time winding down at the Aspira Spa was well-needed. Inspired by local Native American practices and traditions, but fused with modern technology and science, the spa offers the ideal treatment for any interest party. The inside space of the Aspira is thoughtfully designed and embraces the concept of Feng Shui as well as the natural elements. Personally, we enjoyed the Element Facial; this facial is a mask focused in traditional Chinese medicine representing the five elements. These five elements are wood, fire, earth, metal, and water. Harmony can be restored through the combination of colored light and essential oils inspired by these elements. By exalting the healing practices of indigenous cultures around the world, Aspira is able to provide a holistic, organic, and thorough approach to healing and relaxation.

Traveling back in time once again, visiting the Carriage Museum at Wade House transported us even further back – back to the 1860s stagecoach era located within this Wisconsin Historical Site. To get a full experience of the period, we were able to travel in that manner: horse-drawn carriage! The museum also features Wisconsin’s most diverse collection of transportation of this manner with over 100 horse-and-hand drawn vehicles. For the transportation enthusiasts, this isn’t to be missed.

When one thinks of wine country, Wisconsin might not exactly spring to mine. Yet award-winning sommelier Jaclyn Stuart operates Vintage Elkhart Lake, a charming shop where she hand-selects all wines available. The tasting at her bar came paired with cheese plates, potato chip flights, and other delectable pairing bites. The shop, beyond wine unique to the area, also sells other local delicacies for those interested in bringing home a taste of Wisconsin.

It would hardly be a trip to the lake without time spent on the lake fishing. Elkhart Lake is 119 feet deep and 292 acres wide, providing the perfect home to a variety of fish species: musky, walleye, northern pike, largemouth and smallmouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill and crappie all inhabit the lake. Going with a licensed guide like Jay Brickner will aide in explaining all those numerous species. Below the surface isn’t the only place to find remarkable species – a variety of endangered bird call this estuary home including bald eagles. Whether or not fishing is an interest, time spent on this beautiful, blue lake is worth taking a boat out for. A little closer to shore also boasts the best of the lake’s charms. From the time when Native Americans lived along its banks, Elkhart’s pristine quality has been appreciated. Taking advantage of more advanced activities like a hydrobike or other watersports can be a more adventurous way to embrace lake life. Other options including standup paddleboard, jet skis, and speedboats. Even taking a walk in the sand along the shoreline is another greatway to take advantage of all the lake has to offer.

The natural beauty of Elkhart Lake region is its most obvious draw, but the culinary seen isn’t to be underestimated. Lake Street Café, serving California Bistro style fare, also offers Wisconsin’s third largest wine list ensuring the perfect pairing for any dish. Quit Qui Clubhouse features classic pub and grill fair with a Wisconsin twist, including homemade soups, chili, sandwiches, burgers, and more. Siebkens Resort and 67 Saloon are also phenomenal dinner options reflecting inspiration from the area.

Elkhart Lake proved to be a much-needed September getaway. The natural beauty paired with the historical aspects of the Native American culture in the area as well as the history of luxury racing makes this an incredibly well-rounded destination.

Football illustration by Rita Azar

Washington NFL Team Changes Name

By Gabriella Scerbo

Following hundreds of protests condemning racism, the Washington Redskins football team combat discrimination by changing their name. 

Much of the Native American experience has been one filled with hatred, violence, and disadvantage throughout U.S. history. The term “redskin” was a way to identify Native Americans from white colonizers in the 19th century. Today, with the derogatory term cheered in crowds, adorned on merchandise, and profited from by the NFL, the discrimination of Native Americans continues to be normalized. 

Corporations including Target and Nike have agreed to stop selling Washington Redskin merchandise if the name is not changed; Amazon has already taken to removing the team’s merchandise. Now, the team plans to change the mascot as well as any Native American imagery connected to the sports team.

Although the Washington Redskin name is more than eighty years old, it is better late than never to better the NFL. While the Washington football team may be first team at any national level in sports to change their racist name, they are hopefully not the last. Hopefully more companies will follow suit as the world continues to question the racist implications and origins of symbols in our society.