Posts tagged with "watersports"

ADVENTURES IN MIYAGI PREFECTURE

Known as the “Land of Contrasts,” Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture is home to a variety of outdoor activities for travelers to enjoy. From cycling to surfing and even paragliding, Miyagi’s wide range of landscapes has no shortage of opportunities to try something new. Below are a few places travelers can dream of visiting when travel restrictions are lifted.

With a variety of biking trails to choose from, Miyagi is the perfect place to cycle through paths that stop by some of the prefecture’s most famous sights. For coastal views, Oshika Peninsula offers more than 40 miles of rolling hills and coastal panoramas, including a view of Kinkasan Island, a majestic island home to sacred deer that roam about the island freely. In the countryside, Marumori Loop is a popular cycling spot for locals. The low plains offer excellent views of the mountains, charming villages and rice fields. Experienced bikers can cycle through the mountainous wilderness of Mount Zao. These incredibly remote passes are grueling but are totally worth it for the beautiful scenery, secluded hot springs and countryside cafes.

Speaking of Mount Zao, the region is one of Miyagi’s best destinations for outdoor adventures. Skiers and snowboarders can opt to tackle the remote slopes on their own, but a guide is considered essential for anyone not trained in winter mountaineering and acquainted with the terrain of Mount Zao. Luckily, M’s Guide is a winter mountain guide service based at Sumikawa Snow Park and can tailor any outdoor excursion for guests.

For watersports, three-time paragliding national champion Takeshige Yamaya offers tandem paragliding experiences in Matsushima Bay, perfect for travelers to experience one of the Three Most Scenic Spots in Japan. Setravelndai and even Mount Zao can also be seen from the sky. In Sendai, Barefoot Surf offers a variety of SUP (stand-up paddle boarding) and surfing excursions for any skill level.

Travelers looking to spend the night outdoors can stay at the Fukiage Kogen Campground in Northern Miyagi. The grounds are surrounded by scenic views of mountains and quiet forests. The campground even has its own hot spring, walking trails, pub and plenty of cute goats. While travelers can bring their own equipment, guests can be supplied with all the gear they need with advanced reservations.

For more information on Miyagi, please visit http://www.visitmiyagi.com.

Rita Azar illustration for 360 MAGAZINE travel stories

Free Ways to Have Fun in Montreal This Summer

You don’t have to break the bank to have an amazing time in Montreal. The city is filled to the brim with stunning museums, gorgeous nature parks, and frequent cultural festivals. The best part? Most of the best things to see in Montreal are actually completely free.

Travelling on a budget may be tricky but in a city like Montreal, it’s easy to have an unforgettable trip without spending a fortune. 

#1. Explore the natural beauty of Mount Royal Park

The namesake of Montreal is also one of its main attractions, the beautiful Mount Royal. This peaked hill stands tall in the centre of the city, surrounded by a nature park designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, the renowned architect who made New York’s Central Park a reality.

Mount Royal Park is especially beautiful in the summer for picnics, relaxing by Beaver Lake, or hiking to the top for some spectacular views. You can spend a whole day here and all without spending a bit.

#2. Create your own bike tour of the city and surrounds

A great way to spend a day without breaking the bank is by seeing the city on a bicycle. Montreal is crisscrossed with bike paths that total a length of over 500km and all are open to the public for free.

Cycle along the Lachine Canal into Old Montreal, pass the Olympic Village, and enjoy the sights of Parc La Fontaine along the way. If you’re feeling especially adventurous, you can even make your way off of the island to explore the north and south shores.

#3. Get your culture fix at one of the city’s amazing museums

The Musee des Beaux Arts

For lovers of art and photography, there is no better way to spend an afternoon for free than at The Musee des Beaux-Arts. Along with a permanent exhibition, the museum features artwork from Canadian and European artists like drawings, engravings, silverware, and works of art from ancient Asia, Egypt, Greece, and South America. 

Modern art aficionados can also see Andy Warhol’s advertising on display too! Museum admission is free for all on the first Sunday of the month and every day for those 20 and under while seniors (65+) are admitted free on Thursdays.

The Redpath Museum

The Redpath Museum is named after a 19th-century sugar baron who financially supported the museum on the campus of McGill University. 

History and science geeks will get a kick out of the wide range of fossils (including dinosaurs), skeletons of rare and extinct animals, rocks and minerals, and a fine collection of Egyptian antiquities that the Redpath has to offer. And best of all, admission is free.

#4. Partake in the summer festivals

Montreal is known as a festival town and it’s no wonder with locals that love to eat, drink, and celebrate life every day of the year. 

The city is abuzz with music festivals throughout the year like the International Jazz Festival, Les Francofolies, Les Nuits D’Afrique, and the indie music festival Pop Montreal. Music lovers, rejoice! From shows and live entertainment, the summer is ablaze with music — and all of it is completely free.

#5. Enjoy the spectacle of the International Fireworks Competition

Summer visitors to Montreal will likely be familiar with the International Fireworks Competition there that takes place twice a week throughout June and July. This epic (and free) attraction draws locals and tourists alike to the waterfront of the Old Port, the Jacques Cartier Bridge, or the amusement park, La Ronde, for the best views.

#6. Stay in and relax

Whether you’re a Montreal local or on a summer holiday, some days you may just feel like staying in and snuggling up with a glass of wine and a good movie. 

For a fun and free good time, put on your comfiest outfit and try your luck at one of Canada’s great online casinos with free spins that require no obligation and are easy to activate. Who knows? Your free spins might end up paying off!

MONTREALIVE

The vibrance of the city is undeniable, as is the accessibility for all types of travellers on any budget. There are delicious cheap food choices, it’s easy to walk or cycle around, and there are plentiful free activities to do and things to see – especially in the summer when nearly every week hosts some kind of festival, street fair, parade, or cultural show.

Montreal has been called many things throughout the years. From “The City of Steeples” to “Festival City”, “The City of Saints”, nothing captures the essence of the city as well as its most recent nickname: “Montrealive”.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Elkhart Lake for 360 magazine

Elkhart Lake WI

By Elle Grant x Vaughn Lowery

As summer winds down and fall arrives, many find themselves itching for one last summer getaway, or rather, that first autumn weekend away. 360 Magazine was able to take advantage of such a trip, visiting Wisconsin’s Elkhart Lake this past September. Located in the heart of Moraine State Forest, Elkhart Lake is the ideal natural getaway, being home to lake activities as well as canopied hiking and biking trails.

Elkhart Lake, located on the East side of Wisconsin, is both a stunning sojourn into nature and also a historical destination. With a population just under one thousand, the village maintains a cozy quality, with local shops, restaurants, and activities maintaining a small-town, yet polished feel. Yet during the summertime, the town swells and comes to life. First inhabited by the Potawatomi Indians, the name Elkhart stems from the description Native people had of the area, that the lake resembled the shape of an elk’s heart. Native American culture can easily be explored in the area through local tours and at the Henschel’s Indian Museum. Elkhart is also a significant historical definition in terms of its relationship to racing, reaching its peak in the mid 1950s.

Our stay at the Shore Club was nothing short of superb. The new owners, Tom and Kristin Pagel, have done an incredible job renovating the hotel. Renovations including adding updated technology to enhance guest stays: Netflix, Alexa, a digital concierge through the Whisper app, Peloton bikes will soon be available, and luxury motor sports for those interested. Furthermore, the site also boasts an indoor pool, a game room with ping pong tables and vintage arcade games, and a gym. For those interested in seeing Elkhart on two wheels, free bikes are available for guest use at the front desk. The restaurant on site, the Cottonwood Social, offered consistently well-done meals, including the perfect weekend brunch.

We began our lake escape with a pontoon cruise on the namesake of the area, Elkhart Lake. Before departing, we sipped and snacked on the Osthoff’s signature cocktails and hors oeuvres. On the pontoon boat, we were able to view the lake’s crystal-clear lake waters and receive a tour that included information of the area’s history, legends, and folklore. The evening air aboard the boat made this the perfect way to begin a stay. Following the pontoon ride, dinner at the Osthoff Resort’s newest restaurant, Concourse Restaurant and Lounge, proved to be a unique culinary experience. With specialties such as the honey balsamic trout, seared scallops with sweet pea risotto, and the veal schnitzel with pickled cucumber relish, there was a delicious and refined option forevery set of tastebuds. The restaurant’s décor, a tribute the area and Osthoff’s vintage racing roots, also deserves special note.

Elkhart lake is famed for its historic roots as a racing circuit in the 1950s. During this decade, the village of Elkhart Lake transformed into an open-road race circuit where top sports car drivers traveled from all around the world to take on the unique terrain. Likewise, thousands of fans were drawn to the area, eager to see the athletes and vehicles alike. The racing today is focused at Road America,but the historic circuit is marked with signs denoting Wacker’s Wend, Kimberly’s Korner, and Dicken’s Ditch. This auto focused tour of the area isn’t to be missed. Road America also offers an opportunity to join in on the fun with options such as go-karting and ATVs at this world-acclaimed facility.

Road America and Elkhart Lake are famous as one of the oldest, largest, and most iconic tracks in the world. Currently, its original course is registered on the National Register of Historical Places, emphasizing its significance. Gaining popularity in the 1940s and 1950s, the post-World War II economy spurred on the influx of sporting luxury automobiles. For Elkhart specifically, the notable Sports Car Club of America were the main organizer of their races. Incredibly popular races such as the RoadAmerica 500, SCCA National Sports Car Championship, the United States Road Racing Championship and the IMSAGT Championship. Today, it continues to host luxury races and draw motorsports fans and can even be found in numerous racing video games!

Following a wild time racing, time winding down at the Aspira Spa was well-needed. Inspired by local Native American practices and traditions, but fused with modern technology and science, the spa offers the ideal treatment for any interest party. The inside space of the Aspira is thoughtfully designed and embraces the concept of Feng Shui as well as the natural elements. Personally, we enjoyed the Element Facial; this facial is a mask focused in traditional Chinese medicine representing the five elements. These five elements are wood, fire, earth, metal, and water. Harmony can be restored through the combination of colored light and essential oils inspired by these elements. By exalting the healing practices of indigenous cultures around the world, Aspira is able to provide a holistic, organic, and thorough approach to healing and relaxation.

Traveling back in time once again, visiting the Carriage Museum at Wade House transported us even further back – back to the 1860s stagecoach era located within this Wisconsin Historical Site. To get a full experience of the period, we were able to travel in that manner: horse-drawn carriage! The museum also features Wisconsin’s most diverse collection of transportation of this manner with over 100 horse-and-hand drawn vehicles. For the transportation enthusiasts, this isn’t to be missed.

When one thinks of wine country, Wisconsin might not exactly spring to mine. Yet award-winning sommelier Jaclyn Stuart operates Vintage Elkhart Lake, a charming shop where she hand-selects all wines available. The tasting at her bar came paired with cheese plates, potato chip flights, and other delectable pairing bites. The shop, beyond wine unique to the area, also sells other local delicacies for those interested in bringing home a taste of Wisconsin.

It would hardly be a trip to the lake without time spent on the lake fishing. Elkhart Lake is 119 feet deep and 292 acres wide, providing the perfect home to a variety of fish species: musky, walleye, northern pike, largemouth and smallmouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill and crappie all inhabit the lake. Going with a licensed guide like Jay Brickner will aide in explaining all those numerous species. Below the surface isn’t the only place to find remarkable species – a variety of endangered bird call this estuary home including bald eagles. Whether or not fishing is an interest, time spent on this beautiful, blue lake is worth taking a boat out for. A little closer to shore also boasts the best of the lake’s charms. From the time when Native Americans lived along its banks, Elkhart’s pristine quality has been appreciated. Taking advantage of more advanced activities like a hydrobike or other watersports can be a more adventurous way to embrace lake life. Other options including standup paddleboard, jet skis, and speedboats. Even taking a walk in the sand along the shoreline is another greatway to take advantage of all the lake has to offer.

The natural beauty of Elkhart Lake region is its most obvious draw, but the culinary seen isn’t to be underestimated. Lake Street Café, serving California Bistro style fare, also offers Wisconsin’s third largest wine list ensuring the perfect pairing for any dish. Quit Qui Clubhouse features classic pub and grill fair with a Wisconsin twist, including homemade soups, chili, sandwiches, burgers, and more. Siebkens Resort and 67 Saloon are also phenomenal dinner options reflecting inspiration from the area.

Elkhart Lake proved to be a much-needed September getaway. The natural beauty paired with the historical aspects of the Native American culture in the area as well as the history of luxury racing makes this an incredibly well-rounded destination.

Malia Manuel, G-shock, 360 MAGAZINE

MALIA MANUEL × G-SHOCK

G-SHOCK PARTNERS WITH STAR SUFER MALIA MANUEL FOR SECOND VIDEO IN “24 HOURS OF TOUGHNESS” SERIES

New Campaign Centers Around Powerful Women Pushing the Boundaries of Time

Casio G-SHOCK recently launched the second of three videos in its powerful “24 Hours of Toughness” series, a campaign centered around influential women in the creative space and how they operate outside of the traditional 9 to 5.

Featuring Kauai, Hawaii native and female surf legend Malia Manuel, the campaign offers a behind-the-scenes look at Malia’s life on and off the board. Malia, who is a G-SHOCK ambassador, also became the youngest surfer ever to win the U.S. Open of Surfing at the age of 14.

“I love what I do and being able to inspire young female athletes,” said Malia. “As someone who doesn’t operate within the traditional 9 to 5, the campaign presented an exciting opportunity for me to showcase my everyday life and the place I love most.”

Malia’s video can be viewed in its entirety here: HERE.

“We’re excited to continue sharing inspirational stories through our campaign,” said David Johnson, Vice President of Casio’s Timepiece Division. “There are so many untraditional ways to achieve success and the women in our campaign don’t let the traditional boundaries of time stop them.”

In addition to showcasing Malia’s commitment to her sport, the new video also introduces the latest women’s series – the GMAB800. Designed with the active, modern woman in mind, the new watches feature several fitness-focused functions useful for daily health management and are the first women’s collection offering Bluetooth connectivity to measure the number of steps, the walking or running pace, and calories burned.

The GMAB800 collection retails for $120 each and are available for purchase at select G-SHOCK retailers including Macy’s, G-SHOCK Soho Store, and gshock.com.

morro bay, California, 360 MAGAZINE, Halloween

Witches × Warlock Paddles

Last Saturday, a shadowy group of Witches and Warlocks created a fun and frightful scene when they took over Morro Bay, CA. Local professional photographer Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy witnessed the event and memorialized the scene with these amazing photographs. “We started this event six years ago to celebrate Halloween,” says Annette Ausseresses, one of the original witch paddlers. “Since then, we’ve seen the idea really take off and now there are Witches and Warlock Paddles happening from coast to coast. So, we decided to add a donation component and make it public this year.” Canned goods and/or cash donations were collected for the Food Bank of San Luis Obispo County, a network of community partners dedicated to alleviating hunger in San Luis Obispo County while building a healthier community.  For more information on all the exciting things to do and see in Morro Bay, visit www.morrobay.org.

HOLIDAY RIVER EXPEDITIONS

Soldier, geologist and explorer John Wesley Powell is an American legend. One-hundred-fifty years ago this year, he and a brave band of men set out from Green River, WY, with a mission to map and log the canyons, tributaries and features of the unexplored Green and Colorado rivers. History tells the amazing tale of adventure, hardship and ultimate success.

In 2019, to honor and celebrate the spirit of that epic journey, Holiday River Expeditions will re-create a portion of Powell’s trip on an 18-day, oar-powered rafting adventure from July 5 to 22. The John Wesley Powell 150th Celebration Trip will retrace Powell’s route through Lodore, Desolation, Gray, Labyrinth, Stillwater and Cataract Canyons in Utah. The 308 miles can be done as a whole, spanning the entire state of Utah, or as one or more of four stand-alone segments.

“This kind of epic, multi-week rafting adventure is rarely offered in this day and age of quick escape vacations. For this season only, it’s our honor to offer guests this voyage back in time offering a true slice of American history through stories and expert insights,“ explains Lauren Wood, Trip Director and granddaughter of company founder, the late Dee Holladay. “While this journey is lengthy, modern equipment and services guarantee it’s nowhere near as arduous and challenging as Powell’s expedition was.”

On each leg of the trip, Holiday River Expeditions has invited a renowned river historian along to help recreate what Powell encountered on his journey via captivating stories and readings.

The full July 5-22 18-day adventure is $3,850 per person (plus Land Use Fee). Included in all four legs of the trip are delicious campfire meals, snacks and beverages, all required equipment, expert guides and shuttle transportation.

4-day Gates of Lodore – Guests begin with Lodore Canyon in Dinosaur National Monument, arriving by van from Vernal, UT. The put-in is in Brown’s Park National Wildlife Refuge where almost immediately some of Powell’s more infamous rapids — Disaster Falls and Hell’s Half Mile — challenge rafters (the Powell party named most all of the rapids and features found here and downstream). Tranquil waters prevail up to the confluence of the Yampa River in Echo Park, named for its incredible acoustics and scenery. Then come the swirling, unpredictable currents Powell dubbed Whirlpool Canyon. The last day in Dinosaur National Monument carries guests into what Powell described as a place where the river stretched out shallow and as wide as the Missouri River.The per person rate for Leg 1 is $1,005 (youth, senior and group rate $885). River historian Roy Webb joins this segment. He has spent his life running the rivers of the western United States and has authored four books and many articles and book reviews, virtually all on the history of river running in Utah. He is a charter member of the Colorado Plateau River Guides Association. 5-day Desolation Canyon includes a 30-minute scenic flight from Green River, UT, to the embarkation point for Desolation Canyon at Sand Wash. Much of Desolation Canyon is a National Historic Landmark established in 1969, the centennial of the Powell expedition. It was selected because it is relatively unchanged from the time of Powell and the place where the most authentic experience can still be had today. As the cliffs’ colors shift dramatically, it is easy to see why Powell named Gray Canyon. Even more eccentric rock towers lead to sporty rapids like Wire Fence, Three Fords and Coal Creek. Mystical seeps in the rock layer bring verdant life to the canyon walls.The per person rate for Leg 2 is $1,180 (youth $980, senior, group $1,085). Dennis Willis, a noted river historian, joins this sector. For 30 years Dennis worked for the BLM’s Price Field Office as the caretaker of Desolation Canyon. He supported and nurtured scientific research in fisheries and hydrology, geology, botany and archaeology. With over 120 Desolation trips logged, it is still his magical, special place.

5-day Labyrinth Canyon brings guests through a rarely visited section of the Green River and into the upper stretches of Labyrinth Canyon that slowly rises up and closes in, moving from alien flat lands of the upper section to breathtaking red-canyon walls with exquisite side stops like Trin Alcove, 10-mile Canyon and Bowknot Bend.The per person rate for Leg 3 is $950. Joining this section is John Weisheit, an active member of the Conservation of Living Rivers and Colorado Riverkeeper of the Waterkeeper Alliance. 5-day Cataract Canyon begins with tranquility on the flat water and in the secret tiered grottoes of Stillwater Canyon. Here signs of Ancestral Puebloan peoples abound. The confluence of the Green and Colorado rivers marks the beginning of Cataract Canyon and the heart of Canyonlands National Park. After few short miles of flat water, from downstream comes an ominous thunder of Powell’s Cataracts – 30-plus rapids. With full chapters written about them, these massive wave-trains and churning holes are an epic crescendo for this extended and historic excursion.

The per person rate for Leg 4 is $1,180 (youth, senior, group $1,040).Weisheit will also provide insight and interpretation along this final leg of the journey.

About Holiday River Expeditions

Holiday River Expeditions began in 1966, when Dee Holladay and his wife Sue took the plunge to become river outfitters. Due to its respect for the lands, rivers, guests and employees, the family-owned-and-operated company has grown exponentially. Each of its guides is professionally trained in first aid and river safety, and with 50+ years of experience, the company provides guests the opportunity to explore the nation’s wild lands safely and securely. Holiday River Expeditions has a commitment to protect the environment through education and conservation, and as such, uses oar-powered and paddle rafts exclusively.

Tourism to Turkey

NEW YORK (May 22, 2018) – Tourism to Turkey increased by 50.56 percent in the first quarter of 2018, with a total of 7,263,807 visitors between January and March, according to official figures released by the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

The tourism growth coincides with the start of the Year of Troy 2018, which celebrates the 20thanniversary of the archaeological site’s listing on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List. As part of the Year of Troy, a calendar of cultural and sporting initiatives will be held throughout the year, including the International Trojan Food Festival-Çanakkale in June and the Trojan Horse Short Film Festival in October.

In support of The Year of Troy, Turkish Airlines launched a “Troia”-themed aircraft. The A321-type aircraft is specially designed with a livery of the Trojan Horse, made famous in Homer’s account of the Trojan War in the epic, Iliad.

Other cultural and tourism highlights from Turkey include:

HERITAGE

  • Following an eight-year restoration project, the 1,600-year-old Theodosius Cistern officially opened to the public in April. The Cistern is believed to date to the reign of the Byzantine emperor Theodosius II and formed part of a 250 km-long system which brought fresh water to the ancient city. Located in Istanbul’s Çemberlitaş neighborhood, the fifth century structure will periodically host art exhibitions and other cultural events.
  • Twelve pieces of the world-famous Zeugma mosaics are to be returned to Turkey, following the signing of an agreement between the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of Turkey and Ohio’s Bowling Green State University. The pieces, forming part of the frame for the infamous “Gypsy Girl” panel, have been held by the university since 1965. On their return, they will be exhibited at the Zeugma Mosaic Museum in Gaziantep.

TOURISM

  • The Ministry of Finance announced incentives to boost medical tourism in Turkey, with the aim to bring 1.5 million health tourism visitors to the country by 2023. Incentives include new investment subsidies and value-added tax (VAT) exemptions for non-resident foreigners using medical institutes accredited by the Ministry of Health.

  • Istanbul Modern, Turkey’s leading contemporary art museum, will move to a new location on Istanbul’s historic waterfront. Designed by the celebrated Italian architect Renzo Piano, the three-year construction project is part of the city’s initiative to restore cultural and historic sites in the Galataport district. The Istanbul Modern will temporarily move to the Union Française building until construction is complete.

HOSPITALITY

  • The first Six Senses resort in Turkey opened on May 1 in Kaplankaya. On the banks of the Aegean Sea, Six Senses Kaplankaya includes 141 guestrooms, six suites and 66 private villas. The hotel’s secluded location offers a range of activities, such as watersports, hiking and nature trails, and cultural experiences. State-of-the-art spa facilities incorporate high-tech science with high-touch therapies, providing a range of pioneering health and wellness regimens.
  • The Galata Istanbul Hotel – MGallery by Sofitel recently opened its doors. The new luxury establishment boasts 83 different rooms and suites, as well as a selection of bars, restaurants and spa facilities, including a traditional Turkish Hammam.
  • EDITION Hotels is launching its new hotel in Bodrum. Overlooking the Aegean Sea, the Bodrum EDITION offers 102 rooms, suites and villas. Facilities include an infinity pool, garden lounge, night club, Turkish Hammam and fitness center. Food options will include an all-day casual dining venue, two bars and a gourmet specialty grill.

GASTRONOMY AND NIGHTLIFE

  • Istanbul’s newly renovated Ulus 29 restaurant reopened in April. An eclectic menu, blending traditional Turkish cuisine with international food trends, makes this stylish restaurant and bar popular with both locals and visitors with views over the Bosporus.
  • The recently-opened MSA Restaurant can be found in Istanbul’s Sakip Sabanci Museum. Owned by the Culinary Arts Academy of Istanbul, instructor chefs and students provide an extensive menu, ranging from local Istanbul street food and Turkish cuisine to popular international dishes.

  • The Populist has recently opened a new branch at Bebek Mahallesi, Neşe Sokak, No: 1. Dating back to 1890, the craft brewery and restaurant remains a firm favorite with locals and tourists alike. Spread over three floors, the décor comprises a unique blend of prohibition-era USA with modern day Istanbul.

  • Rana by Topaz is a new restaurant in the up-and-coming Gümüşsuyu area. The causal tavern-style feel offers a comfortable dining experience, while the ambitious menu combines international and Turkish cuisine.
  • Inspired by the Rolling Stones’ song, Angie is an intimate bar located in Istanbul’s trendy Bebek neighborhood. Offering both live music and DJ performances, its classic feel brings a new dimension to Istanbul’s eclectic nightlife.

  • Hypnos Hall is a new addition to Istanbul’s electronic music scene. The venue will host international DJs and producers, as well as featuring artistic and visual shows.

  • The Ruby night club has recently opened its doors, providing a glamorous nighttime experience in Istanbul. The restaurant boasts a unique range of Turkish and Japanese dishes, to be enjoyed on the garden terrace with panoramic views of the Bosporus. The Ruby’s nightclubs stay open until the early hours, offering both live music and DJ performances with selection of award-winning cocktails.

For more information visit: www.hometurkey.com. For media enquiries, contact: Finn Partners, Haldun Dinccetin haldun.dinccetin@finnpartners.com (212) 754-6500

About Turkey

Turkey is a modern country with a captivating blend of antiquity and contemporary and of East and West. The cradle of civilization and center of world history today stands as one of the fastest-growing tourism destinations in the world. Turkey was the site of the first human settlement; the seat of the Byzantine, Roman and Ottoman Empires; the birthplace of Homer and the last home of the Virgin Mary, just to name a few. Today Turkey, with its spectacular coastline, majestic mountains, cosmopolitan cities and quaint villages is one of the world’s most fascinating destinations.