Posts tagged with "hot springs"

Post Vaccination Adventure Image by Sublime Public Relations courtesy of Adam York for 360 Magazine

Post-Vaccination Adventures

President Joe Biden’s recent announcement that the United States will have enough coronavirus vaccines for all adults by the end of May – two months earlier than previously thought – is promising news for travelers. Precautions will still need to be taken, of course, but domestic travel is likely to be popular again this summer, highlighted by national parks, active trips and travel where physical distancing is possible. Here are six dream vacations to take this summer once you’ve gotten your shots.

 

1. Long-Weekend Cycling: Adventure Cycling Association is offering a new collection of long-weekend tours close metropolitan areas to make it easy to give bike travel a try. Options include taking in the crisp mountain air and stunning vistas while cycling around the stunning Lake Tahoe on the California-Nevada border, or leaving behind the hustle and bustle of New York City to bike up the Hudson River valley and visit peaceful state parks. To learn more, visit this website

 

2. Greater Yellowstone Adventures: A stay at The Wilson Hotel in Big Sky, Montana, offers the opportunity to explore the surrounding mountains, rivers and Yellowstone National Park. Go hiking through shaded forests and wildflower-filled alpine meadows, float or fly fish in a clear, cool river, experience the adrenaline rush of lift-served mountain biking at Big Sky Resort, or tour the natural wonders and wildlife of Yellowstone. To learn more, visit this website.

 

3. Explore National Parks by RV: Blacksford is a new recreational vehicle rental business with an all-inclusive pricing model that includes unlimited miles, no generator fees, bedding, bath and kitchen supplies, free Wi-Fi, free annual national park pass and 24-hour roadside assistance. Blacksford also curates road trip experiences by connecting travelers with vetted campsites, guides and other hand-picked attractions. To learn more, visit this website.  

 

4. Channel Your Inner Cowboy: “Yellowstone,” the wildly popular cable television series starring Kevin Costner, has sparked newfound interest in luxury dude ranch vacations. Red Reflet Ranch, a 28,000-acre guest ranch in Ten Sleep, Wyoming, has experienced a surge of guests booking five-figure vacations because of their love for the series. Guests stay in fully-stocked private cabins and enjoy farm-to-table cuisine while participating in equestrian programs, cattle branding, hiking, mountain biking, ATVing, fly fishing, shooting, family-friendly activities and cooking classes. To learn more, visit this website.

 

5. Idaho Hot Springs, Camping and Cycling: Escape Adventures is excited to offer a multiday cycling tour showcasing Idaho’s magnificent Sawtooth Range and some of the state’s most scenic natural hot springs. The tour includes five days of transfixing road rides – including over the highest paved road in the American Northwest – colorful mining towns, wild rivers and remote natural hot springs. To learn more, visit this website.

 

6. Retreat to a Teton Tiny House: With sustainably built, LEED-certified “tiny house” cabins, Fireside Resort is Jackson Hole, Wyoming’s most innovative take on resort town lodging. The resort embraces modern, yet rustic design and presents a fresh approach to luxury lodging. Nestled in a wooded setting at the foot of the Teton Range, the cabins allow guests to get back to nature while enjoying the intimacy of a boutique hotel and the ambiance of their own cozy residence. To learn more, visit this website.

Post Vaccination Adventure Image by Sublime Public Relations courtesy of Adam York for 360 MagazinePost Vaccination Adventure Image by Sublime Public Relations courtesy of Adam York for 360 Magazine

Post Vaccination Adventure Image by Sublime Public Relations courtesy of Adam York for 360 Magazine

Fireside Resort. Post Vaccination Adventure Image by Sublime Public Relations courtesy of Adam York for 360 Magazine

ADVENTURES IN MIYAGI PREFECTURE

Known as the “Land of Contrasts,” Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture is home to a variety of outdoor activities for travelers to enjoy. From cycling to surfing and even paragliding, Miyagi’s wide range of landscapes has no shortage of opportunities to try something new. Below are a few places travelers can dream of visiting when travel restrictions are lifted.

With a variety of biking trails to choose from, Miyagi is the perfect place to cycle through paths that stop by some of the prefecture’s most famous sights. For coastal views, Oshika Peninsula offers more than 40 miles of rolling hills and coastal panoramas, including a view of Kinkasan Island, a majestic island home to sacred deer that roam about the island freely. In the countryside, Marumori Loop is a popular cycling spot for locals. The low plains offer excellent views of the mountains, charming villages and rice fields. Experienced bikers can cycle through the mountainous wilderness of Mount Zao. These incredibly remote passes are grueling but are totally worth it for the beautiful scenery, secluded hot springs and countryside cafes.

Speaking of Mount Zao, the region is one of Miyagi’s best destinations for outdoor adventures. Skiers and snowboarders can opt to tackle the remote slopes on their own, but a guide is considered essential for anyone not trained in winter mountaineering and acquainted with the terrain of Mount Zao. Luckily, M’s Guide is a winter mountain guide service based at Sumikawa Snow Park and can tailor any outdoor excursion for guests.

For watersports, three-time paragliding national champion Takeshige Yamaya offers tandem paragliding experiences in Matsushima Bay, perfect for travelers to experience one of the Three Most Scenic Spots in Japan. Setravelndai and even Mount Zao can also be seen from the sky. In Sendai, Barefoot Surf offers a variety of SUP (stand-up paddle boarding) and surfing excursions for any skill level.

Travelers looking to spend the night outdoors can stay at the Fukiage Kogen Campground in Northern Miyagi. The grounds are surrounded by scenic views of mountains and quiet forests. The campground even has its own hot spring, walking trails, pub and plenty of cute goats. While travelers can bring their own equipment, guests can be supplied with all the gear they need with advanced reservations.

For more information on Miyagi, please visit http://www.visitmiyagi.com.

Miyagi – Japan’s Most Relaxing Vacation

Geothermal wonders that rejuvenate the body and mind, Japan’s onsens (naturally occuring hot springs) are a must for any traveler, and Miyagi Prefecture has no shortage of them. With many dotted throughout Miyagi’s diverse terrain, each onsen provides a unique experience with different water sources producing baths of different temperatures, mineral content, texture and more. As these onsens are often located in the mountains, by the ocean and in forests, they provide a great place for travelers to practice the tradition of toji, extended stays at onsens to recuperate from illness or overexertion. Below is a sample of Miyagi’s best onsens for travelers to dream of relaxing in once travel restrictions are lifted.

Reflective pond at Tenshukaku Gardens (©Visit Miyagi)

One of the more popular onsen towns due to its proximity to Miyagi Prefecture’s capital Sendai, Akiu Onsen is tucked in the region’s mountains. The town features about a dozen hot spring hotels located along the scenic Natorigawa River with many offering day use of their hot spring baths. Nearby, Tenshukaku Gardens is home to its own onsen, known as Ichitaro no Yu. After strolling through the traditional Edo-style garden, guests can warm up in the hot spring with a view of Mount Osawa. Lucky bathers may even get to catch a glimpse of kamoshika, a rare Japanese goat-antelope often seen roaming on the mountainside. While the onsen’s water will leave skin soft and silky, Akiu Onsen water is also said to improve quality of sleep, circulation and reduce stress levels.

Sakunami Onsen is located deeper into the mountains and the train ride to this town passes through thick pine and maple tree forests with views of the Hirosegawa River below. This onsen town was often visited by weary monks, members of the shogunate and the shogun himself centuries ago as the water was said to treat a variety of illnesses. After cleansing their mind and body at the onsens on the rocky banks of the river, travelers can opt to hike one of the many trails or take a day trip to the Nikka Whiskey Miyagikyo Distillery.

Naruko Onsen’s diverse hot spring water makes for a rich experience (© JNTO)

Known as one of the “Three Most Scenic Spots of Japan,” Matsushima Bay has its own onsens facing towards the bay with views of countless small islands

Several hotels near the bay have their own natural onsen facilities and staying the night is highly recommended. Guests should make their way out to the open-air baths during the night to see thousands of stars light up the bay. For early birds, the baths are also an ideal spot to watch the sunrise. While Naruko Onsen can be a little hard to get to as it’s hidden away in the hills of northwestern Miyagi, the trip is worth it. Naruko Onsen boasts one of the richest onsen experiences anywhere as the town has eight of the ten types of hot spring water found in Japan. Additionally, the town has more than 400 different springs providing an almost endless variety of bathing facilities. Naruko Onsen also has a wide range of ryokans from traditional inns to luxurious private baths.

The Miyagi Onsen Experience: Watch HERE

For more information on Miyagi Prefecture’s onsens, travelers are encouraged to use the website’s Trip Organizer which has plenty of resources and travel tips. Travelers can also watch this short video highlighting experiences at onsen towns in the prefecture.

Japanese Traditional Travel

Japan is a country on many travelers post-lockdown vacation bucket list. There are a variety of fun, interactive ways to recreate some of the country’s ancient wellbeing and mindfulness practices from afar. There are methods and products that highlight how some of Japan’s oldest traditions, from onsens to the art of Kintsugi, will help to inspire travelers to start planning their next restorative journey to Japan.

Beppu Onsen has several hot springs that vary in color and clarity for different ailments in persons. One of Japan’s most iconic wellness attractions, the Onsen (or hot spring), is naturally enriched with vitamins and minerals from subterranean volcanic activity beneath the archipelago. There are a variety of products travelers can buy to enhance their own Japanese-style bath at home; the Japanese brand Kracie has created a variety of bath salts which allows four people to bring the magic of the onsen into their homes. These bath salts mimic the vitamin and mineral composition of some of Japan’s most popular Onsens like Noboribetsu Onsen, Beppu Onsen, and Kusatsu Onsen.

Each packet of salts has a specific purpose, so people can mix and match the salts to create their desired wellness remedy.
Another way to enjoy the Japanese-style bath at home is to introduce the scent of Hinoki or Japanese cypress. This type of wood is used for traditional Japanese bathtubs and bath products in ryokans and local homes, as the scent has a relaxing effect on the body. Adding a few drops of Hinoki essential oil or scented candle can elevate any bath experience. For a moment of mindfulness, the Soto Zen Buddhist Associationalso recommends the practice of zazen meditation, a meditative discipline-specific to the Zen Buddhist tradition. In Japan, only two monasteries practice this form of Buddhism: the Daihonzen Eiheiji in Fukui Prefecture and the Daihonzan Sojiji in Kanagawa Prefecture. The association has a starter video to help anyone get started. Other forms of mindfulness include the practice of Shakyo, or hand-copying Buddhist
sutras. Shakyo originated before printing and was the primary way of diffusing the teachings of Buddha. Now, the practice is done as a form of prayer, and copying sutras can help someone obtain various blessings. Various kits can be found online. that comes complete with a brush pen, transcription paper, and a sutra. Directly translating to “golden journey,” kintsugi is the meditative Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with a special lacquer dusted in gold, silver or platinum and is tied to the philosophy of wabi-sabi, embracing the flawed or imperfect. The technique was originally invented in the 15th century and can now be practiced at home, using safe and hypoallergenic kits such as this one that has everything needed to successfully repair broken ceramics. Today, most gold used to fix ceramics with the kintsugi technique in Japan can be traced back to Kanazawa

For more inspiration, visit about Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO). As the official tourism board of Japan, JNTO is involved in a wide range of promotional activities to encourage international travelers to visit Japan. Through a variety of campaigns and initiatives, JNTO is inspiring more American travelers to visit Tokyo, Kyoto, and beyond.
For more information about travel to Japan, visit JNTO on its Website

VISIT × MENDOCINO COUNTY

Mendocino County Open for Business: Get your Glass up Here

MENDOCINO LAKE COMPLEX WILDFIRE CONTAINED; ALL MAJOR HIGHWAYS & TOURISM 

FACILITIES OPEN; MUSHROOM SEASON SPROUTS UP NOVEMBER 3-12



Just in time for fall fungi season, Mendocino County Tourism Commission reports containment of the Mendocino Lake Complex wildfire which was located east of Highway 101 in Redwood and Potter Valleys. A vibrant wine region, these two of the county’s 10 AVAs are now in recovery following losses suffered as the result of an October 8, 2017 blaze which consumed 37,000+ acres. Given the incident’s remote location, Mendocino’s legendary 90 miles of Pacific coastline, Anderson Valley wine region and key tourism areas of Fort Bragg, Mendocino, Little River and Point Arena Lighthouse remain untouched.

Scenic coastal Highway 1 and Mendocino County’s “Inspiration Highway” 101 are 100 percent fully operational and all tourism hotels and attractions remain unaffected, including 450+ hotel properties and 90+ wine tasting venues. Key visitor sites including the cities of Ukiah and Willits as well as the nearby attractions of the City of 10,000 Buddhas, Ridgewood Ranch (home of Seabiscuit), the Skunk Train, Vichy and Orr Hot Springs and the ancient redwood forests of Montgomery Woods State Reserve remain untouched.   

According to Mendocino County Air Quality Management District, the regional Air Quality Index is rated “Good” – the highest ranking available. In addition, fresh offshore winds and seasonal weather have tamped down ash residue. www.co.mendocino.ca.us/aqmd/advisories.html#advisory.

November marks Mendocino County’s famed mushroom season, with the 19th Annual Mushroom, Wine & Beer Fest running through November 3-12, 2017. The Northern Californian region is a magnet for fungi foragers and enthusiasts who fervently track the annual crop of coveted candy cap, chanterelle and porcini mushrooms. Mendocino is home to some 3,000 mushroom varieties, 500 which are edible. www.visitmendocino.com/event/mushroom-wine-and-beer-festival; 866.466.3636

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