Posts tagged with "camping"

Charlie Bushnell photograph by Photographer Max Wanger from Marissa, Heliotype Creative for use by 360 Magazine

Disney+ Star Charlie Bushnell Q×A

By: Ally Brewster

Charlie Bushnell is an up-and-coming actor that stars as Bobby Cañero-Reed in the Disney+ original series Diary of a Future President. The Disney+ original series produced by Gina Rodriguez’s production company I Can and I Will Productions is told through creator and producer Elena’s narration as written in her diary. The series follows the daily events of Elena’s life and her interactions with friends and family. She lives with her older brother, Bobby (portrayed by Charlie); and mother, Gabi. Elena has a strong desire to become a president of the United States, which is made visible through flash-forwards to her political campaign as an adult. All 10 episodes of the highly-anticipated Second Season is available on Disney+ to watch now.

We had the opportunity to ask Charlie about acting on the show and balancing his acting life with his personal, high school life:

You decided that you wanted to act while binging Stranger Things. What about the tv show inspired you to start acting? What other television and TV shows do you look to for inspiration?

Yeah! Stranger Things created such an extraordinary world, and I just fell in love with everything about it – the characters, the story, etc.… It was so unique, and I’d never seen anything like it before. All the main characters are kids around my age, so I could really relate to them. For some reason, even though I had never thought about it before, it just hit me that I could do that too… and now I’m here! It’s been a pretty wild ride so far, and I appreciate every minute of it. Another one of my all-time favorite shows is The Office.

Has it been difficult to balance high school and acting? How do you deal with the busy schedule and still maintain the activities you’ve previously enjoyed?

It can definitely be a lot, but I make it a priority to always create time for myself and relax, even when life is crazy busy. When we filmed season 2, it was during the school year, and as students, we had to do at least 3 hours of school a day on set, so we basically had no breaks besides lunch, lol. When we weren’t filming, we were doing school, and when we weren’t doing school, we were filming. But I LOVE what I do, and even though it can be quite stressful at times, I wouldn’t have it any other way.

What has been your favorite part of acting in Diary of a Future President?

I literally cannot think of one negative thing or experience I’ve had while working on this show, so every part is my favorite part, haha… but if I had to choose, definitely the people. I have made some life-long friends on this show. We all get along so well and always have an absolute blast together on set. I love my Diary family so much! ❤️

Where do you hope your character Bobby Cañero-Reed goes in this next season? Can you give any teasers for what’s next for him in the new season?

In season 2, Bobby is in high school and has everything all planned out. He’s looking forward to joining the varsity tennis team and getting closer to Liam; however, things don’t exactly go as planned. As expected, after entering high school, Bobby’s world really opens up, and he meets a lot of really cool new people.

Diary of a Future President is one of your biggest roles. Has it taught you anything new about acting and the business? What have you taken away from the experience?

Well, Bobby is really my only role (so far), haha… But yes! I have learned so much while working on this show. As an actor, watching pros like Gina Rodriguez, Selenis Leyva, Michael Weaver, Jessica Marie Garcia, and others just do their thing is like the ultimate master class in acting. Everyone on this show is so incredibly talented; it’s insane. But I’ve also learned so much about the filmmaking process as a whole and just how much goes into it. When you watch the final product of a movie or show, you really only see the actor. Still, something I’ve really opened my eyes to while working on this show is that literally every single person in the cast and on the crew – from the lighting department to the camera operators to HMU to wardrobe, etc.… plays such a crucial part in the making of a TV show or movie. It would not be possible without every single one of them—huge shoutout to our Diary crew. You guys are the best! ❤️

About Charlie Bushnell:

Los Angeles-native Charlie Bushnell was born into an artistic family and was always destined to be in entertainment. The son of a musician, grandson of a jazz singer and nephew to a film and television actor, at just 10 years old he started making movies with his friends.

While binge-watching “Stranger Things”, he made the decision to pursue acting. In the beginning, Bushnell self-trained by memorizing his favorite film monologues. He participated in school plays and eventually started taking professional acting classes at John Rosenfeld Studios, Ruskin Academy, amongst others.

Auditions quickly followed and he soon landed the role of Bobby Cañero-Reed in the Disney+ coming-of-age comedy series Diary of a Future President, executive produced by Gina Rodriguez through her production company, I Can and I Will.

The series follows 13-year old Cuban-American Elena in her journey to become the future president of the United States while navigating the ups-and-downs of middle school. Bobby is Elena’s sweet and mischievous older brother, now a freshman in high school.

Presently, you will see Charlie reprise his role as Bobby in the upcoming season on Disney+. You will see him grow and blossom as he navigates high school.

Off screen, Charlie, currently a junior in high school, loves playing tennis, camping, playing guitar, going to the beach, volunteering at a food shelter and enjoying time with his family and friends.

Road Trip via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

How to Drive a Class A Motorhome

With so many Americans embracing the RV lifestyle, there’s bound to be a learning curve on how to drive and manage a large motorhome.

Holiday Rambler® has partnered with Spencer and Kristi Blu from the Adventurtunity Family to share their experiences as they travel the United States in a 2017 Vacationer® 36H from Holiday Rambler with their four-year-old son Kade and puppy Ruko Blu. The family purchased their 37-foot RV in July 2020 and started living on the road full time that September.

Since then, they’ve chronicled their adventures on Instagram and the Holiday Rambler blog.

Holiday Rambler is an award-winning brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc. The Holiday Rambler 2022 line includes four diesel and three gas motorhomes, including the Vacationer model that the Adventurtunity family owns.

Dad Spencer does the majority of the driving of the family’s Holiday Rambler and recently shared his tips and advice for handling a Class A motorhome in a blog post.

Learning to Drive a Class A Motorhome by Spencer Blu from Adventurtunity Family

There is something about learning to drive a Class A motorhome that gives some people pause when they are trying to decide what type of RV to buy for their family.  It was one of the most frequent questions I got when we brought home our Vacationer.  Friends and family alike would look at it and say, “That’s a beautiful motorhome…no way I could drive that!”  Or something like, “That’s gotta be so scary to drive. How did you learn?”  If I’m honest, Class A’s were not at the top of my list when we started looking for an RV because I had never driven anything nearly that big!  But, the reality is that it’s not all that daunting.  And, like anything else, the more you do it, the better you get!

So, to help put nerves at ease for those considering a motorhome purchase, I’m going to be talking about the aspects of driving a Class A motorhome to give you a better idea of what it’s like, how it differs from driving a passenger vehicle, and ideally give you the confidence to go take that test drive! 

To be clear, I am not an expert or an instructor.  The ideas and thoughts are based on my experience driving our Holiday Rambler Vacationer with a gas engine.  I have not driven a diesel pusher, and, while I understand there are some fundamental mechanical and operational differences, the concepts below should by and large apply to either platform.

The First Drive

“So, you want to take it for a drive?”  Those words hit me in the face like a right hook from Mike Tyson.  My family and I were standing in the living area of a beautiful Holiday Rambler motorhome.  It was the very first RV we went to look at when we started our search. We had been given the tour and were honestly a little giddy with the thought that it could possibly be our new home for an incredible journey to come!  And then the seller asked that question and I was snatched right out of my daydream.  “You mean right now?” I said, as if his question was poorly timed.  I mean I knew it was coming, we were there as potential buyers. I certainly wouldn’t buy a car without driving it, this shouldn’t be any different, right?  So, after about a 15 second internal pep talk, and the realization that, if I was going to drive this thing across the country, I had to start somewhere, I said, “Let’s go!”  And you know what?  It wasn’t nearly as big a deal as I had made it out to be in my head!  So now I can say with confidence that if you’re hesitant about getting a Class A because you lack the experience to drive it, don’t be.  You can do it, and you’ll be glad you did!

The Basics of Driving a Class A Motorhome

Let’s get the obvious out of the way off the bat.  Regardless of what length the coach you decide to get is, it will be bigger and heavier than what you’re used to driving.  By a lot.  I had driven a few rental box trucks before. But none of them even came close to the size of our 37-foot-long Vacationer. Time and space will be your biggest allies as you pilot your coach!  So, as long as you keep these fundamental things in mind every time you turn the key, you’ll be in good shape.

  1. Know your height and weight (fully loaded). Write them down on a sticky note and place it on the dash where you can see it.  Better to know you won’t fit under an overpass before you get to it than to find out while you’re stuck under it.
  2. Take left turns wider than you think you need to, and right turns even wider.  As nicely as these machines can handle being on the road, they will not turn on a dime. 
  3. Allow yourself additional space to get up to speed with traffic.  More importantly, leave plenty of space between yourself and the vehicle in front of you to slow down. Acceleration and braking distances are greatly increased in a vehicle this size.

Road Signage

Another thing that you will realize is that there are a lot of road signs that now apply directly to you as the driver of a large vehicle. You will start to pay attention to all those signs you ignore when driving a passenger vehicle.  Those suggested speed signs for off-ramps and sharp curves you always thought were comically slow will all of a sudden make perfect sense when cruising in your rig.  You’ll also want to be aware of height and weight restriction signs that may now apply to you when approaching bridges and overpasses.  A quick glance at that aforementioned sticky note will be quite helpful! 

When travelling in mountainous or hilly regions you will want to keep an eye out for signs that tell you the grade percentage of an upcoming steep climb or descent.  You’ll definitely want to slow down when approaching a steep descent.  Manage your speed by gearing down and braking intermittently to save your brakes. The “Runaway Truck Ramp” signs you see on steep downhills are there for a reason and you do not want to have to use one of them!

What it boils down to is that you’ll now need to take note of all the signs that are there for truck drivers.  While you may not be driving an 80,000 lb. tractor trailer, you are closer to their level than you are to the Honda Civics buzzing around you on the road.  So being aware of those signs will go a long way in helping you arrive safely to your destination!

Conclusion

And there it is my friends!  I knew nothing and had zero experience the first time I drove our coach.  But I took my time and made sure to be very aware of my surroundings.  It really is enjoyable once you get comfortable and familiar with your coach.  Hopefully this information helps give you some confidence to go find that Class A you and your family have been dreaming about!  You’ll be rolling down the road to adventure in no time!  By the way, we ended up buying that Holiday Rambler Vacationer.  The very first one I drove is the one we own, and I couldn’t be happier!

CELEBRATE LABOR DAY VISITING MANUFACTURING SITES THROUGHOUT THE U.S.

Curated by the Holiday Rambler® Brand

The long Labor Day weekend is an ideal time to sneak in a warm weather road trip before temps begin to cool off. For RVers and travel lovers looking for something different, try visiting a few manufacturing sites suggested by Holiday Rambler.

While many traditional manufacturers haven’t reopened their factory tours, there are still plenty of interesting (and tasty) companies to visit for a behind-the-scenes look. Think potato chips, baseball bats, whisky, cars, hot sauce, and more. The ten sites on the Holiday Rambler travelogue start on the East Coast, dip into the South, wind through the Midwest, head into the Mountain states, and finish on the West Coast. Each stop is paired with a recommendation for a local establishment that’s a bit different from the norm, along with an RV park.

While Holiday Rambler has temporarily suspended its factory tours, the brand has released a series of four videos showcasing how its motorhomes are made at its manufacturing headquarters in Decatur, IN. The exclusive tours deliver a peek into a few of the steps involved in manufacturing a 16,000 to 30,000 lb. Class A motorhome. To watch the factory tour videos, visit Holiday Rambler’s website, select the About tab, click on Factory Tours, and provide an email address.

Holiday Rambler RVs are known for their superior functionality and luxury design amenities that allow travelers to explore far and wide with confidence and in comfort. The 2021 Nautica model from Holiday Rambler earned Best New Model from RV Pro and Top RV Debut from RVBusiness. Nautica is a Class A Diesel motorhome that is less than 40′ and built on a Freightliner Custom Chassis®. While the Nautica is shorter in length, it still boasts a roomy interior with lots of storage. Amenities include an electric fireplace, stainless steel appliances, pantry storage, master bedroom suite with a skylight shower, and an exterior entertainment center with a 50″ LED TV.

Holiday Rambler is a Class A RV brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group®, Inc. For more information, visit HERE.

Please note: each manufacturing stop has been researched but be sure to call ahead to confirm hours of operation, advance ticketing requirements, and other relevant details. Be sure to travel safely by following the CDC guidelines related to COIVD-19.

10 Manufacturing Stops from Holiday Rambler

Cranberry Bog Tour – Harwich, MA

The U.S. is the world’s leading cranberry producer and MA is one of the leading cranberry growing states. Take a scenic drive to the largest organic cranberry bog on Cape Cod. During a 90-minute tour, learn about the 12-month operation of a bog. Before or after the tour, visit the farm stand for all things cranberry – fresh and dried cranberries, cranberry sauces, cranberry bog honey, and cranberry cookbooks.

Daily tours are offered throughout the spring, summer, and fall, reservations are required, and tickets are $15 each.

To experience the local culture, grab a bite to eat at Mooncusser’s Tavern­­ or Brax Landing, which offers waterfront dining on the Saquatucket Harbor. RVers can stay overnight at Adventure Bound Camping Resorts.

UTZ Potato Chips – Hanover, PA

For snack lovers, the Utz Potato Chip Trip is a must. In 1921, William and Salie Utz began making potato chips in their summer kitchen. 100 years later, the company continues to be family managed and has expanded to make a number of other brands, including Bachman, Zapp’s, Dirty, TGI Fridays Snacks, and Good Health.

This free, 30-45-minute self-guided tour lets visitors see (and smell) the process that starts with farm-fresh potatoes and ends with crispy Utz chips. An observation gallery, closed-circuit monitors, and audio program deliver interesting details about the production process. And, of course, the tour ends with a bag of Utz potato chips and a coupon to the factory outlet store – the perfect place to stock up on road-trip snacks.

The tour is open Monday – Thursday but call ahead to confirm the hours since the daily production schedule is subject to change.

Staub’s Landing Restaurant and Pub is nearby and offers lunch and dinner options, including the area’s best burgers and a selection of more than 60 craft beers. RVers can stay overnight at Gettysburg Farm RV Campground.

Maker’s Mark Distillery – Loretto, KY

Visit one of the most picturesque production sites in the country to learn about the history of Maker’s Mark bourbon whisky. Watch the fermentation process, see the charred oak barrels used to age whisky for five to seven years, and don’t miss the bottling area where workers hand-dip the top of each bottle in Maker’s Mark’s signature red wax.

The origin story of Marker’s Mark is relatively new, dating back to 1953. It began when Bill Samuels, Sr. purchased an existing distillery in Loretto, KY, and began making whisky based on his family’s 170-year-old recipe. Maker’s Mark is unusual because it uses red winter wheat in its mash bill instead of rye. And, instead of the American spelling of “whiskey,” Samuels chose “whisky” to pay homage to his Scottish-Irish heritage.

All tours must be booked online in advance and all guests must be 21 years of age or older.

Visit LaGwen Drive In that’s known for its home-made chili sauce, hamburgers, and hand-dipped cones. RVers can stay overnight at Elizabethtown Crossroads Camp.

Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory – Louisville, KY

Louisville Slugger got its start in 1844 when 17-year-old Bud Hillerich played hooky from work to take in a Louisville Eclipse baseball game. When the team’s superstar hitter broke his bat, Hillerich offered to make him a new one. 177 years later and Louisville Slugger remains family owned and proudly produces 1.8 million wood and aluminum bats a year.

The fun begins outside with the world’s largest baseball bat that stands 120 feet tall and is a replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch Louisville Slugger. During the factory tour, walk through the production line to see a few of the 22 steps that turn raw wood into a sleek bat. Each visitor walks off with a better understanding of this iconic brand, along with their very own souvenir mini-bat. After the tour, check out the baseball museum that’s dedicated to the game and some of its legends.

Tickets for the museum and factory tour range from $16 to free and reservations are required.

Afterwards, get a Southern fix of ribs, beef brisket or shrimp and grits at Hammerheads. RVers can stay overnight at Elizabethtown Crossroads Camp.

Ford Rouge Factory Tour – Dearborn, MI

The Ford Rouge Factory dates back to 1917 when Henry Ford first began developing the site. His vision was to achieve “a continuous, nonstop process from raw material to finished product.” At its peak in the 1930s, more than 100,000 people worked at the expansive industrial complex, and one new car rolled off the line every 49 seconds. Today, the Rouge Factory is an example of engineering and modern manufacturing coming together to create one of the country’s most popular trucks – the Ford F-150.

The self-guided tour includes two high-tech theater experiences. The Manufacturing Innovation Theater combines “floating” 3D laser projection mapping and exciting behind-the-wheel footage to take visitors from concept to highway. Top off the tour with a visit to the observation deck to see a remarkable display of industry in motion as Ford F-150s are assembled on the plant floor below.

Tickets to the Henry Ford Museum include the Rouge Factory Tour and are currently limited due to a reduced daily capacity. Tickets should be purchased in advance online.

To continue the “Ford experience,” grab lunch at Ford’s Garage that’s designed to look like a 1920s service station with vintage Ford vehicles, gas pumps, and fixtures. RVers can stay overnight at Haas Lake Park RV Campground.

Wisconsin Foamation Cheesehead Factory – Milwaukee, WI

For a “cheesy” factory tour, look no further than Wisconsin. The tour begins with everyone taking a “Wedge of Allegiance” and continues from there with plenty of groan-inducing jokes. From start to finish, see how cheeseheads are made in a small production facility in Milwaukee. On the deluxe tour, everyone can make their own cheesehead or other style of cheese-inspired hat. FYI – cheesehead was originally coined by Chicagoans as a derogatory term to describe Wisconsinites.

Ralph Bruno started the cheesehead craze in 1987. While reupholstering his mother’s couch, he took an extra piece of foam, cut it into a wedge, added holes, and made it the color of American cheese. He then wore it to a Milwaukee Brewers’ baseball game and, based on the attention and interest from fans around him, began making and selling cheeseheads. Today, cheeseheads are known around the world and can be found in various styles – top hats, visors, sombreros, and more!

The tour that includes a cheesehead hat is 45-60 minutes and starts at $25.

Visit Sobelman’s for a true Milwaukee bar/restaurant experience and be sure to take a look at their Bloody Mary offerings. RVers can stay overnight at Wisconsin State Fair RV Park or River Bend RV Resort.

Budweiser Brewery Tour – St. Louis, MO

Adolphus Busch was a German immigrant and U.S. Civil War veteran who joined his father-in-law, Eberhard Anheuser, in the brewery business after serving in the Union Army. In 1876, thanks to Busch and a friend, the brewery introduced a light-colored beer called Budweiser that Americans loved. Before Budweiser, many were drinking heavy, dark ales so a palatable, crisp lager was appreciated. In 1879, the company’s name was changed to Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association, and in 1880 Busch took over as president after Anheuser’s passing. Busch pioneered the use of refrigerated railcars and pasteurization in the brewing industry as part of his efforts to create the first nationally selling beer in the U.S.

Visitors can choose from a number of different tours. The Beermaster Tour lasts approximately 120 minutes and visits exclusive locations on the Anheuser-Busch campus. The Clydesdale VIP Experience lasts approximately 45 minutes and includes a visit to the stables and time with a Clydesdale handler who will share in-depth information about their lifestyle, training regimens, and mannerisms.

Tour tickets range in price, depending on the experience selected. When booking online, note that some tours are for guests 12 years and older while others are open to all ages.

After the tour, combine Blue’s music with a po boy or red beans and rice at Blue’s City Deli. RVers can stay overnight at Pin Oak Creek RV Park.

Hammond’s Candies – Denver, CO

10 million – that’s how many candy canes Hammond’s Candies in Denver hand makes each year. In addition to that signature cane-shaped candy, the company also produces chocolate bars, rainbow lollipops, and lemon drops. Take a free, 30-minute tour to see how this company that’s one of the oldest candy manufacturers in the U.S. makes its sweet treats.

Hammond’s Candies was founded by Carl T. Hammond, Sr. who quit high school in 1913 and got a job as a candy maker apprentice. After serving in World War I, Hammond returned to Denver and picked up where he left off in a candy factory. With several years of experience under his belt, he ventured out on his own. Early on, Hammond did everything. He developed the recipes, made the candy, sold it, and handled all the tasks required of a fledging business. Today, the company sells its handmade candies worldwide. In the U.S., its treats can be found in Whole Foods, Nordstrom’s, Dean & Deluca, Cracker Barrel and specialty shops.

Tours run every 30 minutes and online reservations are required to ensure availability.

For a self-described “square meal, stiff drink and a fair price,” visit Work & Class. RVers can spend the night at Dakota Ridge RV Park.

TABASCO Factory Tour & Museum – Avery Island, LA

Avery Island, the location where world-famous TABASCO is made, is unique just like the sauce. The island actually rises above the marshes found along coastal Louisiana and sits atop a deposit of solid rock salt that is believed to be deeper than Mount Everest is high.

The TABASCO tour is self-guided and features nine stops including the TABASCO Museum, Pepper Greenhouse, Barrel Warehouse, and TABASCO Country Store (the bottling line stop is currently closed). The Country Store shouldn’t be missed since visitors can taste a variety of TABASCO products, including Tabasco-flavored ice cream and “Original Red” that’s sold in more than 195 countries and territories. The original recipe was created by Edmund McIlhenny in 1868 and has been used by the McIlhenny family for more than 150 years. Most visitors are surprised to learn that only three ingredients are used in the sauce – aged red peppers, salt, and distilled vinegar. Once the three ingredients are combined, the pepper mash is placed into oak barrels, topped with a layer of salt, stored in the Barrel Warehouse, and aged for three years.

Tickets range from $12.50 to free and the tour is open daily.

Check out the Tabasco Restaurant on Avery Island or venture to Landry’s Cajun Seafood & Steakhouse 15 minutes away. RVers can spend the night at Frog City RV Park.

Tillamook Creamery – Tillamook, OR

Tillamook Creamery is the largest tourist attraction on the coast of Oregon and one of the most popular in the state. The creamery offers a free, self-guided tour that shares details about life on a dairy farm, allows visitors to watch milk being made into cheese, and, most importantly, provides complimentary samples. For those who would like to learn the secrets behind Tillamook’s extra creamy ice cream, make a reservation for the small group Exclusive Ice Cream Experience. Get a hands-on look, and taste, of how extra creamy Tillamook Ice Cream goes from milk to market.

Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) was founded in 1909 when several small creameries each contributed $10 to start the cooperative to ensure all cheeses made in the Tillamook Valley would be produced with the same high level of quality. Today, the TCCA is owned by almost 80 farming families, and is proud to make award-winning cheese, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, and butter.

The creamery recommends visiting during the week to see employees working in the facility. Tickets to the Ice Cream Experience range from $15 – 20 for children and adults.

Just a few minutes away, visit Dutch Mill Café, a ’50s diner with checkerboard flooring, old time booths, and the front clip of a 1957 Chevy. RVers can spend the night at Pleasant Valley RV Park.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® companies are leading designers and manufacturers of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. Our companies serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. They provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). REV’s diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principal vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG. Investors-REVG

Lake Mead Mojave Adventures via The Vox Agency for use by 360 Magazine

Lake Mead Mojave Adventures

Lake Mead Mohave Adventures (LMMA) proudly announces the receipt of prestigious certifications for its properties at Lake Mead National Recreation Area:  the Certificate of Conformance with International Standard ISO 14001:2015 from the National Registrar Team and the Clean Marina designation from the Clean Marine Program.

LMMA’s properties include Hoover Dam Rafting Adventures/Willow Beach Marina & Campground, Callville Bay Marina, Cottonwood Cove Resort & Marina, Echo Bay RV Park, Lake Mead RV Park and Temple Bar Resort & Marina.

To be designated a Clean Marina, marina and yacht club owners and operators meet the challenge of maintaining environmentally sensitive facilities with the goal of preventing and reducing pollution in our nation’s waters. It is one of two such programs not governmentally administered in the United States and has earned the endorsement of numerous industry associations and environmental groups. The Clean Marinas Program’s growing list of members includes 128 facilities around the United States. LMMA’s facilities at Callville Bay Marina, Cottonwood Cove Resort & Marina, Temple Bar Resort & Marina and Willow Beach Marina & Campground have maintained this certification for more than 20 continuous years.

“We are passionate about the quality of our staff as well as about caring for the lakes and rivers in which we operate,” explained Chad Taylor, director of sales and marketing, Lake Mead Mohave Adventures. “It’s a pleasure to be able to ensure all our customers have the best in the business attending to their marina needs, as well as the cleanest and most environmentally sound operations anywhere. It’s our part to play in perpetuating the vitality of this industry and the health of our planet.”

For more information on Lake Mead Mohave Adventures, click HERE

About Guest Services

Since 1917, Guest Services, Inc. has earned the reputation as a premier hospitality management company and national and state park concessionaire that has taken great care and pride in delivering best-in-class food, lodging, retail and recreation services. The Fairfax, Virginia-based company and its subsidiaries employ more than 3,500 staff at more than 250 facilities, which welcome approximately 30 million guests annually across the United States. Guest Services, Inc. is proud to welcome visitors at Mount Rainier National Park, North Cascades National Park and Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area in Washington, several parks in the Washington, D.C. area, and state parks such as Bear Mountain in New York, in addition to Missouri’s newest state park in the Ozarks–the much anticipated Echo Bluff State Park. To learn more click HERE.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Alpaca Expeditions Reopens Full Classic Inca Trail

The Full Classic Inca Trail Reopens July 15th, 2021!

Alpaca Expeditions are thrilled to announce that the Inca Trail will restart for 2021.

The government of Peru has announced that the full Inca Trail will reopen July 15 and treks can resume on that date.

Applications for permits will open on June 25th and July 15th is the date when treks will begin. This means all 4, 5, and 7 day Inca Trail treks are now available to book, after a year-long closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2-Day short Inca Trail treks are already open, but now all treks on the Inca trail are open. 

There are changes to the Inca Trail 2021 Treks, required by the Peru Government: 

  • 1.50% Reduction in Allowed Group Sizes: This means open trekking groups are only 7 guests max (unless booked specifically with more), 1 guide, and 14 porters. It means small groups and fewer crowds.  
  • 2. 50% Reduction in Available Inca Trail Permits: This means it’s important to submit your application for a permit so as to get your preferred dates in as soon as possible – there are 50% fewer permit slots available for 2021. 
  • 3. Everyone is invited: means tell your friends and loved ones! This is a great opportunity to hike this beautiful trail with smaller crowds. You do not need to have a previous reservation – you can book now.

For those who want to hike this year, please contact Alpaca Expeditions with your new start date and updated information ASAP to give them the best chance to secure your permits. Permits will go especially fast this year with these new limitations, and Alpaca wants to make sure all your dreams come true.

Come with Alpaca Expeditions and allow them to show you the magical land of the Incas! 

About Alpaca Expeditions

Alpaca Expeditions, a 100 % Peruvian company, is a pioneer adventure operator diligently working to provide the best services available. Although they offer daily departures, it’s important to check with a member of their sales team to plan a trek. Please email them at info@alpacaexpeditions.com. They stand ready to help answer questions and help prepare for this amazing journey.

O'Connell's Lake via Emily Delarm for use by 360 Magazine

June is National Camping Month

Written by Emily DeLarm

June is National Camping Month, and what better way to celebrate than getting out and camping! In the past year, camping has gained popularity with more people trying it now than ever before because it’s a great way to get outside while social distancing. So why not take the whole family camping this year!

Today’s campgrounds cater to every type of camper, with a range of accommodations to make even the most resolute non-camper comfortable. Combine that with an immersion in nature and a surprising array of amenities, and we think you’ll agree it’s time the whole family went camping. Here’s why:

1.) Being in nature is good for your health

Many have long felt a sense of well-being when out in nature, and research has shown that there is a positive physical response to doing so. Several recent studies have shown that having access to nature reduces stress and enhances a feeling of well-being.

Another study found that people who experience a feeling of awe for the natural beauty of their surroundings have lower levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), an inflammatory biomarker which can result in a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, and depression.

2.) Skipping the hotel makes it unique

Today’s camping experience doesn’t have to mean pitching a tent in the middle of nowhere or in a state park where the nearest bathroom is a half-mile hike away. There are campground accommodations to suit every type of camper – from those who enjoy “roughing it” in a tent, to those who bring their RV-home-on-wheels, to those who prefer cabins with electricity, full bathrooms, and all the comforts of home.

For those seeking a true “glamping” experience, try a stay in a tiny house vacation rental that is sure to please the whole family – all the comforts of home in a miniature package that is sure to delight every child (and the little kid in every adult). A few to try:

Leavenworth Tiny House Village is located about two hours south of Seattle in the Bavarian-themed town of Leavenworth, WA. While you’ll feel a world away, you don’t need a passport to be transported to small-town Bavaria in your tiny house while you enjoy access to 300 acres of beautiful forests and meadows. The five tiny houses, each with their own unique Bavarian theme and decor, are “glamping” style vacation rentals, with all kinds of amenities to enjoy at the campground. Get to know Hanna, Belle, Otto, Adeline, and Rudolf starting at $129/night.

Tuxbury Tiny House Village is located about an hour north of Boston just outside the picturesque town of Amesbury, MA. The village offers vacationers a unique respite from the hustle and bustle of everyday life while experiencing a one-of-a-kind vacation. The tiny houses in the village are full of character and personality and range from 180 to 275 square feet. Relax along the tranquil shores of Tuxbury Pond, lounge by the pool, or enjoy a variety of popular local attractions, including apple orchards, farms, and eclectic restaurants. Choose from Emerson, Henry, Clara, Riley, and Murphy, each starting at $135/night.

3.) It’s a great excuse to leave the devices behind

While more campgrounds are modernizing with the installation of amenities such as Wi-Fi, you can still find plenty of destinations where cell service is less reliable. Before you consider that a shortcoming, think about the number of times a cell phone has interrupted a conversation between members of your family, and how nice it would be to hit the pause button on such intrusions.

In fact, studies have shown that just having a cell phone out during a conversation has a negative impact on your sense of connection to the other person, feelings of closeness between you, and the quality of the conversation you experience.

Try vacationing out of reach of a cell tower, and you just might find a real connection and improved reception, with no phone at all.

4.) Be a kid again

In today’s world, adults are burdened and distracted with the responsibilities of being an adult. But even worse, kids seem to be busy trying to be adults. A camp vacation encourages the whole family to set “the real world” aside for a time and focus on having fun with each other. With an assortment of planned events and activities for the whole family, you can let go of the scheduling and planning that are the hallmark of a typical vacation and enjoy what’s happening right on site.

One fantastic destination is O’Connell’s Yogi Bear Jellystone Park in Amboy, Illinois. A dizzying array of activity opportunities include three heated swimming pools, spas, kiddie pools, a beach for swimming, double-flume waterslide, paddle boat rentals, mini-golf, four playgrounds, hiking trails, fishing, hayrides, and a fully stocked indoor activity center with daily planned activities.

5.) Enjoy an immersive destination (without costumed characters)

The best part about summer camp as a kid was all the fantastic fun things to do. Everywhere you turned there was an activity being led or a game being played. Campgrounds offer the same appeal. Many offer your standard fares such as lake access, swimming pool, basketball court, sand volleyball, and activities like the ever-favorite tie-dye. Some of our favorites take it a step farther and transport you to another realm:

Rancho Oso in Santa Barbara, CA offers guests the opportunity to camp on a historic working ranch, complete with horseback riding, lasso lessons, and over 300 acres of scenic mountainside hiking trails to explore. Get as authentic as you wish, with a stay in a cabin, covered wagon, or even a teepee. At Gettysburg Farm in Dover, PA, guests can camp on a working farm, enjoy hayrides, farm animal feedings, vegetable picking, and visits to the farm animals, including horses, llamas, pigs, cows, and adorable pygmy goats.

6.) It’s easy to plan

For an easy, convenient way to plan your trip, visit CampUSA.com or download the CampUSA app. There you can quickly search more than 1,200 of the top campgrounds nationwide, including Kampgrounds of America, Encore RV Resorts, Thousand Trails locations and so many more.

The site and app offer the ability to search by map, by state or search for campsites nearby. Then filter your search to find the perfect spot for you when you sort by camping type (cabins and other rentals, RV or tent) and the amenities you’re looking for, like pet-friendly, waterfront sites, swimming pool, Wi-Fi, and more (even mini-golf!) Once you have your prospects narrowed, the site provides detailed information about each campground and a super easy booking interface, including the option to enter your credit card information by scanning with your camera phone (on the app). It doesn’t get easier than that!

7.) Nature can grease the wheels of bonding

Some vacations can leave us more stressed and less rested than before we left. To truly rejuvenate the whole family, try immersing yourselves in nature. Several studies have reported the positive effects that viewing beautiful imagery of nature has on people’s emotions and behavior.

In one example, when participants in this study were asked to interact with nature every day for a month reported feeling healthier and happier after the study. In another study, after spending just a minute looking up into a scenic expanse of eucalyptus trees, participants reported feeling less entitled and self-important than those who spent the time looking up at a tall building.

Imagine how much easier it would be to bond and connect with your family when each of you is experiencing a boost in gratitude and a dip in self-importance. If simply watching nature can have such a positive impact on our feelings, think of the impact that experiencing nature can have on the whole family.

Need yet another reason? How’s this: Camping just might be one of the least expensive – and most rewarding – vacations you’ll ever take.

See you by the campfire!

Artwork by Kaelen of 360 Magazine

4th of July Travel Destinations

4TH OF JULY SIGHTS, SOUNDS, AND STOPS, Curated by the American Coach® Brand

Each year, Americans mark the country’s birth with Fourth of July celebrations. The national holiday recognizes the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted during the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, PA. 

For RVers and those who love to travel, Independence Day delivers some of the best sights, sounds, and stops of the year. And, while the East Coast is rich with “independence” sites, there are also a plethora of significant museums, attractions, activities, and fireworks displays throughout the country that represent the United States and its independent, bold spirit.

The American Coach recommended road stops begin with some lesser-known sites and end with more traditional ones. All the destinations have been selected based on their historic, patriotic, or All-American flair.

Made in the USA, American Coach is an ultra-luxury brand of recreational vehicles that’s celebrating its 30th anniversary. American Coach motorhomes are known for their exquisite design, lavish touches, and innovative engineering that make a road trip a relaxing and indulgent experience. New models feature such amenities as high-end kitchens with black stainless steel appliances, quartz countertops with waterfall edges and hand-crafted kitchen cabinets; spacious and luxurious master bedrooms and baths with articulating king beds, spa showers and his and her sinks; and superior technology components such as 50” exterior TVs. American Coach is part of the REV Recreation Group (RRG), a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc.

American Coach models have earned numerous industry awards, including “Top RV Debut” and Must See RV. For more information, visit their website.

Please note: each Fourth of July stop has been researched but be sure to call ahead to confirm hours of operation, advance ticketing requirements, and other relevant attendance details.

Lesser Known Fourth of July Stops

Kaboom Town!, Addison, TX

Everything is bigger in Texas, so it is not surprising that on July 3 there’s a “best of” fireworks show that lasts for a solid 30 minutes just outside of Dallas. It is not only locals who brag about the patriotic display, but it’s also received accolades from the American Pyrotechnics Association, too! Spectacular views can be found throughout Addison but one of the best ways to take in the show is to book a watch party at a local restaurant or hotel. The parties typically include live music and special Fourth of July morsels and libations, served with a side of festivities.  

RVers can stay overnight at Sandy Lake MH & RV Resort near Dallas. The resort’s amenities include a dog park, fitness center and swimming pool.

National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, Near Dayton, OH 

For more than a century, the U.S. Air Force has defended the United States in the air, space, and cyberspace through the skill and bravery of American Airmen and Airwomen. Located on the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the free National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is the world’s largest military aviation museum. The museum features more than 350 aerospace vehicles and missiles and thousands of artifacts. 

One of the historic events showcased at the museum is the moon landing. On July 20, 1969, the United States’ Apollo 11 became the first crewed mission to land and walk on the moon. Touch actual rocks from the lunar surface of the moon and the planet Mars as part of SPACE: A Journey to Our Future, a highly interactive special exhibit that showcases the country’s space exploration program.  

RVers can spend the night at Thousand Trails – Wilmington RV Resort. The resort has 170 acres of premiere camping along with an on-site lake that provides opportunities to fish and canoe.

Let Freedom Sing!, Nashville, TN

Known as America’s home to country music, downtown Nashville is hosting a free Let Freedom Sing! event that includes a concert by three-time, Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Brad Paisley. The city is also putting on its largest fireworks show ever, synchronized to live music from the Nashville Symphony.  

Located on a peninsula with views of Percy Priest Lake, RVers can spend the night at Elm Hill RV Resort, which offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities. Guests can also rent boats, kayaks and paddleboards to explore Percy Priest Lake.

Cody Stampede Celebration & Parade, Cody, WY

To truly experience the spirit of America’s Wild West, plan to attend the four-day Independence Day celebration in Cody that runs July 1-4. Since 1919, Cody has been showcasing the toughest and most talented cowboys and cowgirls, legitimately earning its title as Rodeo Capital of the World.

During the holiday, Cody is hosting the PRCA Rodeo where contestants compete for $400,000 in prize money. The weekend also includes three parades where the red, white, and blue will be on full display – a Kiddies’ Parade on July 2 and a Stampede Parade on July 3 and 4. At dusk on July 4, fireworks will explode above the Wyoming River. Cody is also home to the Buffalo Bill Center of the West with five museums under one roof. Explore Plains Indian cultures, trailblazing cowboys and cowgirls, classic and modern western artworks, and more.

Cody is 55 miles from the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park, which became the country’s first national park on March 1, 1872. In addition to its exploding geysers, bubbling paint pots, mesmerizing hot springs, and travertine terraces, Yellowstone is also home to the United States’ national symbol, the bald eagle.

RVers can stay overnight at Ponderosa Camp Ground

Independence Rock Historic Site, Alcova, WY

Travelers who happen to be in southern WY traveling on State Route 220 should keep an eye out for the Independence Rock Rest Area. The granite rock is approximately 130 feet high and was a well-known landmark on the Oregon, Mormon, and California emigrant trails. More than 5,000 names are carved on the rock by 19th century pioneers who traveled treacherous trails and braved tough conditions in search of their American dream in the Western states. One of the earliest names carved into the rock is M.K. Hugh and is dated 1824. Hiking is allowed on and around the rock.

Overnight accommodations aren’t plentiful near Independence Rock Historic Site so it’s best visited along the way to another destination.

Freedom Park, Omaha, NE 

Located along the banks of the Missouri River in the heartland of the country, Freedom Park honors the United States Navy. The free outdoor park and museum showcase two impressive pieces of military hardware – the minesweeper USS Hazard, which received three battle stars for its service during World War II, and the Cold War-era training submarine USS Marlin. 

RVers can spend the night at West Omaha / NE Lincoln KOA Holiday, which offers 85-plus RV sites that are satellite friendly.

AmericaFest, Pasadena, CA

AmericaFest, held at the Rose Bowl Stadium, promises to deliver the largest Fourth of July fireworks display west of the Mississippi. The day-long event is a celebration of all things red, white, and blue and includes tailgating, live entertainment, motorcycle stunt show, and a world-renowned fireworks show.

RVers can stay overnight at Orangeland RV Park conveniently located nearby a number of Anaheim attractions. 

Columbia State Historic Park, CA

While the Gold Rush produced great wealth for some, it also transformed the United States. As miners rushed in, the population of California swelled, helping to accelerate its admission to the Union as the 31st state.

Two years after gold was found in 1848 at Sutter’s Mill, the town of Columbia was established. Today, visiting Columbia State Historic Park is like traveling back in time. Visitors are surrounded by the largest collection of gold-rush-era structures in the state of California. Merchants are dressed in 1850s attire, there is the smell of coal smoke from the blacksmith shop, and the rumble of a stagecoach as it arrives in town. Stroll down Main Street, stop in the vintage shops and eateries or try to strike it rich by panning for gold.

Columbia is one of three gold-rush towns clustered together on the outskirts of Yosemite National Park, which is famous for its giant sequoias, dramatic waterfalls, and granite cliffs.

RVers can stay overnight at Black Oak Casino and Resort – a perfect home base for visiting Yosemite and touring the Gold Country. 

Traditional Fourth of July Stops

Freedom Trail, Black Heritage Trail, and USS Constitution, Boston, MA

Since Boston is considered the birthplace of the American Revolution, a stop in this seminal city is a must. Boston-based events that led up to the Revolutionary War include the Boston Tea Party and Siege of Boston. Naturally, many of the leading American Patriots, James Otis, Samuel Adams, John Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere, hailed from Boston.

A 2.5-mile walk along the Freedom Trail includes 16 locations that are significant to the United States’ fight for independence. The trail, most of which is marked by a red brick path, includes the Old South Meeting House, Old State House, and Paul Revere’s House, each of which charge an admission fee. The Boston Common, Granary Burying Ground (the final resting place of John Hancock, Paul Revere, and several other historic figures), Bunker Hill Monument and ground markers that denote a historic site or event round out the stops along the Freedom Trail. Visitors can take their own self-guided tour or book a private tour, many of which feature knowledgeable guides in 18th century garb.

The National Park Service offers free guided tours and brochures for self-guided exploration of the Black Heritage Trail. The trail is a 1.6-mile walking tour of 14 historic sites that explores the history of Boston’s 19th century African American community who primarily lived on the north slope of Beacon Hill. The tour, which is the largest collection of historic sites relating to life within a free Black community prior to the Civil War, includes the Museum of African American History, 54th Regiment Memorial, and the African Meeting House. The trail also features several stations on the Underground Railroad, which escaped slaves used to flee from the South to freedom in the North and Canada. In 1783, Massachusetts was the first state to abolish slavery.

While the USS Constitution (also known as Old Ironsides) was not part of the American Revolution, she is a testament to the honor, courage, and commitment of U.S. sailors to protecting our country. Launched in 1797 from Boston, she fought in the War of 1812 and survived a barrage of cannonballs fired from by British. She remains a commissioned vessel with a crew of officers and enlisted personnel.

RVers can spend the night at Boston Minuteman Campground and take advantage of the nearby hiking and biking trails.

Independence Hall and Museum of the American Revolution, Philadelphia, PA

The Declaration of Independence (a list of grievances against the King of England to justify separation from British rule) and The Constitution (a charter of the United States government ratified by the states) are foundational documents of the United States. Take a guided tour of Independence Hall to see the Assembly Room where both were signed in 1776 and 1787, respectively. Independence Hall, originally known as the Pennsylvania State House, also features an original draft of The Constitution.

Just steps from Independence Hall is the Museum of the American Revolution. Opened in 2017, the museum shares the compelling stories of the diverse people and complex events that sparked America’s path toward liberty, equality, and self-government. Amazing artifacts include an extensive collection of Revolutionary War weapons, diaries, and personal letters. See a replica of the Boston Liberty Tree (where the revolution was first discussed), General George Washington’s tent, and a 13-star flag. Don’t miss the special exhibit, “Flags and Founding Documents, 1776-Today,” that showcases dozens of rare American flags, a copy of the first newspaper printing of the Declaration of Independence, and historic early state constitutions.

RVers can stay overnight at Philadelphia South / Clarksboro KOA Holiday, a peaceful country campground just 20 minutes from Philadelphia.

Statue of Liberty, New York, NY

At a graceful 305’ tall, the Statue of Liberty is a towering symbol of American freedom. The statue was sculpted by French artist Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and gifted to the United States by France in 1875 to commemorate the countries’ alliance during the American Revolution. In her right hand, Lady Liberty holds a torch above her head. In her left hand, she carries a tablet inscribed with JULY IV MDCCLXXVI (July 4, 1776 in Roman numerals), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. 

The statue can be viewed from various vantage points along the Hudson River. For an up-close- and-personal look, take the ferry that departs from Battery Park to Liberty Island where the Statue of Liberty stands.

RVers can stay overnight at Liberty Harbor RV, which also delivers views of the Statue of Liberty and is next to Liberty Harbor Marina.

The National Mall, Washington, D.C.

The nation’s capital is packed with patriotic things to do and see – many of which are free. 

To meet all the presidents of our great country, visit the National Portrait Gallery, which showcases the stories and people who shaped America. The America’s Presidents exhibit features the largest, most complete collection of presidential portraits outside of the White House. The gallery also includes paintings of Martha Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Michelle Obama, and several others.

The free Smithsonian museums located on the National Mall include the National Museum of American History (see the flag that inspired the Star-Spangled Banner), National Museum of the American Indian (shares the diversity of culture, language, history, tradition, and futures of indigenous peoples of North and South America), and the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened in 2017. It’s the only national museum devoted to the documentation of African American life, art, history, and culture. Significant artifacts include garments worn by slaves, a Bible owned by rebellion leader Nat Turner, Emmett Till’s glass-topped casket, training aircraft used by the Tuskegee Institute, and an invitation to President Obama’s 2009 inauguration. 

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C. area

Just outside of D.C., it’s worth a visit to Arlington National Cemetery. Rich with American history on acres of well-manicured grounds, everyone can deepen their knowledge of our great country.

Visit the gravesites of Presidents Taft and John F. Kennedy at Arlington National Cemetery. Taft, the 27th president, was the first president to be buried in Arlington after his death in 1930. Kennedy, the 35th president, was laid to rest in 1963 after his assassination. Most presidents choose to be buried in their home states.

According to the cemetery website: First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy wanted her husband’s gravesite to be accessible to the American public. In selecting a location, she consulted with the president’s brother, Robert F. Kennedy, and Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara—both of whom are also buried at Arlington.

In addition to the presidential graves, the cemetery is the final resting place for many notable Americans, including veterans of the American Revolutionary War, military leaders, astronauts, Supreme Court Chief Justices, and many others.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon, VA

Just a short drive from Washington, D.C., is Mount Vernon – an American landmark and the historic home of America’s first president, George Washington, and his wife, Martha. The Washingtons lived in a two-story Georgian mansion overlooking the Potomac River on an estate that was originally 8,000 acres.

Step back into history and tour the Washingtons’ plantation home, a blacksmith shop, stable, smokehouse, slave quarters, and other outbuildings that supported daily life. An extensive museum shares background on Washington’s life prior to becoming president and the legacy he left behind. The site also includes a memorial to the hundreds of enslaved men, women, and children who worked the plantation.

A unique way to visit Mount Vernon is by boat. Families can travel down the Potomac River and see the Washington Monument, United States Capitol, and other historic sites from a completely different vantage point. The boat trip is narrated and takes approximately three hours round trip. Families disembark at Mount Vernon and have four hours to explore the estate. Mount Vernon can also be reached by bike via the scenic Mount Vernon Trail. The ride takes approximately one hour, and bikes can be rented in Alexandria.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park that offers full hook-up sites and a number of other amenities.

Colonial Williamsburg, VA

Founded in 1699, Williamsburg was established by England as the capital of the Virginia Colony. Today, Colonial Williamsburg is dedicated to preserving and sharing 18th century colonial life during the time when the United States was being formed. 

Recognized as the world’s largest living history museum, a visit to Colonial Williamsburg is an immersive experience. Costumed and wigged interpreters stroll the streets talking in the language and diction of the 1700s. The city’s colonial shops, taverns, homes, kitchens, and gardens are tended to by weavers, wigmakers, and residents of the time. Watch as blacksmiths recreate weapons and hardware that supplied the armies during the Revolutionary War. Tour the Capitol and Courthouse to learn about the founding principles of Virginia government and justice in the 18th century. Book a carriage or wagon ride and dine at a historic tavern serving Colonial-inspired fare, including Welsh Rarebit, Savory Pasty, and Salet of Snipped Greens. 

Learn about the role American Indians played in creating a new country and the impact of the Declaration of Independence on African Americans in Williamsburg. When the Declaration was written, more than 52 percent of Williamsburg’s population was enslaved. Take in a museum theatre exploration of African American perspectives on the Declaration, the revolutions it inspired, and the ongoing struggle for equality and freedom in America.

To commemorate the Fourth of July, the city is hosting a celebration on historic Duke of Gloucester Street with patriotic festivities, public readings of the Declaration of Independence, musical performances, and a fireworks display. 

RVers can spend the night at American Heritage RV Park with its lush meadows and wooded sites. The park also offers premium sites with patio furniture, an outdoor fireplace and extra space.

Colonial Parkway, VA

An entire Fourth of July can be spent in Virginia’s Historic Triangle of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. The 23-mile Colonial Parkway connects the three towns and has numerous scenic pull-offs with historical markers that provide descriptions of the view. A day-long Liberty Celebration at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown features outdoor living-history experiences that allow visitors to explore life in Washington’s Continental Army, see artillery demonstrations, and watch performances by the Fifes and Drums of York Town. In the city of Yorktown, evening activities include a bell-ringing ceremony, patriotic concert, and an amazing fireworks display booming over the York River. 

RVers can spend the night at American Heritage RV Park.

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was an African American Baptist minister and one of America’s foremost Civil Rights activists from 1955 until 1968, when he was assassinated. At the age of 35, he was the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and donated the $54,123 cash prize to advancing the Civil Rights movement. See Dr. King’s boyhood home, the original Ebenezer Baptist Church, and The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (“The King Center”). The National Park Service has restored many of the neighboring buildings to reflect the 1930s and 1940s, the time when Dr. King grew up. Today, visitors can step into that era and imagine themselves walking down the street, hearing the noise of the lively neighborhood, and experiencing what life was like in those tumultuous times.

Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Keystone, SD

This colossal stone edifice in the Black Hills of South Dakota took 14 years to complete from 1927 to 1941 and cost approximately $1 million. The heads of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln are 60 feet tall and were carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore. The four presidents were chosen to represent the nation’s birth, growth, development, and preservation.

On July 3, presidential reenactors George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt will be strolling the grounds, giving talks about their presidency, posing for photographs, and providing autographs. 

And, while Mount Rushmore isn’t hosting its typical Fourth of July fireworks display, many of the surrounding small towns are. Throughout the Badlands and Black Hills, American pride will be on full display with parades, re-enactors, Old West shootouts, cook-offs, car show ‘n shines, live music, ice cream socials, farmers markets, and more.

RVers visiting Mount Rushmore can stay overnight at American Buffalo Resorts or Mount Rushmore KOA Resort at Palmer Gulch in the heart of the Black Hills.

About REV Recreation Group

REV Recreation Group, Inc. (RRG) is a REV Group® company and a leading manufacturer of Class A Gas and Diesel recreational vehicle brands. This company has one of the best and longest standing distribution networks in the industry and boasts some of the industry’s most recognized and iconic brand names such as American Coach, Fleetwood RV, and Holiday Rambler. REV Recreation Group is headquartered in Decatur, IN, which is also its principal manufacturing location. In addition, RRG operates two state-of-the-art service and repair centers and a genuine parts online warehouse.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® (REVG) is a leading designer and manufacturer of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. We serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. We provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). Our diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principle vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG.

Kayaking illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

What’s Trending in Tennessee

What’s New, Trending and Blooming this Spring in Tennessee

  • Memphis – Memphis Zoo’s all-new Kangazoo Experience lets you get face-to-face with kangaroos roaming free in the walk-through exhibit. Visitor favorites also include giraffe-feeding, the panda exhibit and Sting Ray Cove.
  • Jackson – Discover what makes Jackson a unique place for music lovers of all backgrounds whether you’re looking for new eclectic sounds, blues and gospel, country music or more with live performances of Jackson’s Hidden Tracks.
  • Nashville – Enjoy premiere shopping, world-class dining, live music and views of downtown at Fifth + Broadway. This 300,000 square foot multi-level mecca is a must-see and home to the National Museum of African American Musicand Assembly Food Hall featuring two dozen restaurants on multiple levels.
  • Columbia – The Mulehouse is a 55,000 square feet new music and event venue located a few blocks from the downtown square, established by country radio personality and broadcaster, Blair Garner.
  • Manchester – A brand new concert series features live, in-person performances in a socially-distanced setting at the Bonnaroo Farm. Concerts on the Farm includes performances by Billy Strings, Jon Pardy, Jameson Rodgers, The Avett Brothers and more.
  • Chattanooga – Grab your thinking caps, maps and don’t forget your mask. Take adventure to the next level. Learn more about Chattanooga’s top attractions and neighborhoods during the Spring Break Safari Scavenger Hunt.
  • Knoxville – Three levels of magical crystal barrooms wait to be discovered in downtown Knoxville. Bernadette’sbarrooms include the Knox County Quartz House, the Amethyst Lounge, and a stunning rooftop of Crystal Gardens.
  • Gatlinburg – Anakeesta will be in full bloom with the launch of Blooms and Tunes featuring colorful nature-themed art installations, live music and a new spring-themed menu at four restaurants in the park.
  • Townsend – The Smoky Mountain Bigfoot Festival Noon-10 p.m. May 22 includes live music, vendors, food trucks, bigfoot competitions, oral histories, 1-mile fun run and more at the Townsend Visitor’s Center.
  • Johnson City – Grab a scavenger hunt clue card online or from a downtown business to search for 15 bronze animal sculptures as part of Wildabout Walkabout Scavenger Hunt from the public library and King Commons Park to Main and Market Streets.

New Restaurants, Breweries and Distilleries

  • Memphis – Renowned chefs Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman are at it again, this time with their Little Bettie pizza joint inside Wiseacre’s newly opened downtown taproom.
  • Clarksville – The Thirsty Goat is a newer gathering place outside of the city that features a beer garden, artisan coffee shop and oven-fired pizzas.
  • Murfreesboro – Biscuit-based meals made baked fresh daily are at the forefront of Maple Street Biscuit Co. Jams and jellies are also made in-store. Featured on Food Network, The Squawking Goat dish is an all-natural fried chicken breast, fried goat cheese medallion and house-made pepper jelly atop a flaky biscuit.
  • Columbia – Wolf and Scout Coffee Car is located in the Columbia Arts Building serving varieties of coffees and their signature drink, the Wolfhunter.
  • Carthage – Cajun wings, honey BBQ wings, onion rings, fries and delicious sides are on tap at Something 2 Wing About.
  • Farragut – 35 North, located in the heart of Farragut, features the area’s best food trucks, local brews, wine and spirits and features two patios, an outdoor fireplace and a place for gathering.
  • LaFollette – Twin Flame features amazing hot dogs, burgers, wings, catfish, specialty drinks and much more with carry-out and dining room seating available.
  • Wartburg – The MoCo Brewing Project is Morgan County’s latest brewery and coffee shop with signature beers named and influenced by local landmarks. The owners brew beer, coffee and offer flavored coffee and hot chocolate.
  • Sevierville – Tennessee Shine Co.uses family recipes and small-batch distilling, features a tasting bar and Moonshine Tour.
  • Johnson City – Watauga Brewing Company is a three story brewery, restaurant and rooftop bar. Restaurant On 2 combines upscale New American cuisine with Appalachian and southern roots. The chef uses local, seasonal foods in her menu. 

New Attractions and Exhibits

  • Memphis –Visitors can enjoy movie nights and world-renowned musicians in an all-new outdoor setting at The Grove at GPAC.
  • Memphis – Graceland celebrates the 50 anniversary King of Rock ‘n’ Roll meeting then President Richard Nixon with a special pop-up exhibit and artifacts with Dear Mr. President: Elvis and Mr. Nixon.
  • Nashville – Once Upon a Spring at Gaylord Opryland includes a live story time show, art activities, cookie decorating, scavenger hunt, boat rides and other fun programming.
  • Knoxville – Zoo Knoxville’s The ARC (Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Campus), open spring 2021, will showcase the zoo’s pioneering conservation work with these species and feature revolutionary STEM education resources.
  • Johnson City – Paradise Acresis a family farm park with an 18-hole mini-golf course, outdoor laser tag, barn-side drive-in theater and U-Pick produce.

New Hotels & Places to Stay

  • Memphis – Walk the line between southern hospitality, offbeat and elevated cuisine to get a genuine taste of Midtown’s unconventional personality, storied art district and Overton Square at The Memphian, set to open April 2021.
  • Memphis – Hyatt Centric Beale Street Memphis is within walking distance of the city’s famed entertainment district, nestled in a vibrant neighborhood known for lauded music venues, historic landmarks, southern comfort and Memphis-style barbecue.
  • Nashville – W Hotel Nashville is set to take the stage in the heart of the Gulch. Opening spring 2021 with 346 rooms, the new hotel will welcome visitors with curated local tunes, garden-to-glass cocktails and welcoming communal spaces.
  • Pigeon Forge – Pigeon Forge RV Resort along the Little Pigeon River includes 149 RV sites, camping, riverside fishing, illuminated river walk. On-property offerings include on-site concierge services, a pool, and hot tub, playground, picnic pavilion, a dog park, golf cart rentals, a retail store, conference room, gym, and laundry facilities.

New Stores

  • Columbia – Columbia features several new stores including Cope (in the Columbia Arts Building with a variety of trendy plants), family-owned jewelry store Tillis Jewelry on the downtown square and Southern Clutter Boutique with a variety of clothing, accessories, home goods and crafts.
  • Farragut – Euphoric Cheese features cut-to-order cheeses from all around the world, a wide variety of charcuterie items, specialty groceries and a selection of local brews. Items such as chocolate-covered figs, blue cheese stuffed olives, creamed honey and rosemary crackers will make your grazing board memorable.
  • Kingston – That Local Cheeseboard Co.features handcrafted charcuterie boards & boxes, grazing tables, customizable boxes, corporate catering, and gifts and items for special occasions.

Hot/Trending Places for Spring

  • Hornbeak – Vacation while you dine at Blue Bank Fishhouse & Grill at Blue Bank Resort with delicious weekend specials, local craft beer, live music, fire pits, butterfly garden & front row seating to a beautiful sunset on Reelfoot Lake.
  • Alamo – Drive through the 5.5 miles of safari roads in your own car, interact and feed animals at Tennessee Safari Park. After the journey, experience the walk-through zoo, enjoy refreshments at the concessions, the playground area, and the petting zoo.
  • Clarksville – Downtown at Sundown Concerts at Downtown Commons includes free live music the first and third Friday nights May through October. The large urban outdoor park allows space to socially distance with your chairs or blanket.
  • Linden – Experience serenity on the water. Commodore River Adventures offers an uncrowded, individual or small-group, artisan kayaking experience.
  • Nashville – Celebrate spring, warmer weather and longer days with more than 150,000 blooming bulbs and fun seasonal activities during Cheekwood in Bloom.
  • Nashville – Board the General Jackson Showboat, one of Gaylord Opryland’s most popular attractions, for cruises featuring first-class live entertainment, delicious meals and gorgeous views of Nashville.
  • LaFollette – Chapman Hill Winery is a quaint winery with an elegant tasting room nestled in the hills of East Tennessee on the edge of Norris Lake. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for the Vineyard Vibrations live music series.
  • Farragut – Enjoy a stroll through town, a heritage trail, cemetery and educational sites to learn history of the area, pioneer settlements and more through artifacts, photos and stories during the Farragut History Walk.
  • Harriman – Lakeshore Park offers recreation fun for the family and is home to the Gupton Wetlands area, where at least 114 species of birds can be found. Bring bikes, kayaks, fishing poles and enjoy scenery and trails.
  • Lancing – Lilly Hopyard Brewery is tucked away in the woods near the Obed Wild and Scenic River. Warm up around the campfire, watch the game, play corn hole, listen to live music and enjoy the Sauced Frog eatery.
  • Winchester – Stroll with family and friends during Food Truck Fridays at the downtown Farmers Market Pavilion on the Boulevard. Downtown merchants will stay open late on the first Friday of every month.
  • Johnson City – At the 40-acre Tannery Knobs Mountain Bike Park, riders can experience the thrill of off-road riding from the gnarly, rocky downhill of the Black Diamond to smooth dirt paths on the green trails.
  • Pigeon Forge – Explore larger-than-life plant sculptures adorned in half-a-million colorful flower blooms, dance under an Umbrella Sky and indulge in garden-fresh flavors from chefs during Dollywood’s Flower & Food Festival.

Spring Festivals & Events

  • Gatlinburg (March 18-20) – Explore the new Gatlinburg St. Patrick’s Day Celebration complete with traditional Irish music, food, fireworks, and more. The city will be decorated with Shamrock green and feature fireworks show at 10 p.m. Friday at the Space Needle.
  • Bell Buckle (March 20) – The historic town adapts Daffodil Days to include a tree seedling give away, spring bulbs vendors on the square, spring items in stores, and a book signing by beloved former Tennessee Poet Laureate Maggi Vaugn.
  • Chattanooga (March 20-21) – Come see the High Falls flow green during Shamrock City at Rock City featuring Irish food, specialty beer from Chattanooga Brewing Co., bagpipers, pop-up Irish dance performers, and virtual scavenger hunt.
  • Linden (March 26-27) – The Blooming Arts Festival mixes fine arts, local craftsmanship, performances and fantastic local eats. Masks and social distancing recommended. Sanitization stations will be up on Main Street.
  • Pigeon Forge (March 26-28) – Cowboy cooks circle the wagons for the one-of-a-kind outdoor Pigeon Forge Chuck Wagon Cookoff that features chuck wagons–the original food trucks. Attendees can sample the offerings at lunch.
  • Murfreesboro (March 29-April 2) – Looking for a fun and safe way to kick off spring? Stop by the Discovery Center for Mess Fest. Get creative and messy with free outdoor activities such as making oobleck, elephant toothpaste and more.
  • Spring Hill (April 2) – Grammy Award Winner Casting Crowns performs a socially distancing family-friendly drive-in concert 7 p.m. at RippavillaTickets benefit the Well Outreach Food Pantry.
  • Crossville (April 2-June 24) – Cumberland County Playhouse kicks off its 2021 spring season with productions like Clue on Stage, The Savannah Sipping Society, Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now and Duck Hunter Shoots Angel.
  • Savannah (April 3) – The 9th Annual Generals Breakfast kicks off at 9 a.m. at Cherry Mansion with an outdoor breakfast, storytelling program and a Q&A by the homeowners. Tickets are $15. Masks and social distancing are encouraged.
  • Murfreesboro (April 23) – Travis Tritt with special guest Frank Foster takes the stage at 7 p.m. at Hop Springs Beer Park. There’s live music every weekend at the family & dog-friendly park with food and a huge selection of craft beers on tap.
  • Harriman (May 1) – The May Day Craft and Antique Fair will have vendors that display handmade crafts, vintage items and antiques, food vendors, live entertainment and classic car show.
  • Granville (May 1) – The Cornbread & Moonshine Festival features whiskey tastings, cornbread tasting, food, music, and craftsmen. Admission is $5. The new Whiskey Decanter Museum also opens with over 3,000 whiskey decanters.
  • Cookeville (May 1) – Cookeville Storyfest 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the big tent in Dogwood Park includes headliners Andy Offutt Irwin and Minton Sparks, and an amateur storytelling competition.
  • Tellico Plains (May 1) – The Tellico Trout Festival 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. downtown gathers fishermen, river sports enthusiasts and families for fun, education, food, entertainment and outfitter services.
  • Gatlinburg (May 1-3) – Guests can begin a creative journey in crafts, woodworking, basket weaving, jewelry making and more during Hands on Gatlinburg in the Great Smoky Arts and Crafts Community. Register in advance before workshops sell out.
  • Pigeon Forge (May 5-8) – Textile art and techniques to stitch quilts are on display at Pigeon Forge’s A Mountain Quiltfest. Guests can register for instructional classes. The free quilt exhibit and vendor hall are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the LeConte Center.
  • Sweetwater (May 7-8) – Head to Historic Downtown Sweetwater for the Blooms, Bluegrass and BBQ Festival with live music, barbecue competition, vendors, picker’s corner, kids’ zone and fun activities.
  • Smithville (May 8) – Center Hill Lake Fest 4-10 p.m. at The Burlap Room Beer Garden and Dispensary features plenty of space to socially-distance while enjoying food from local food trucks, craft beer and local vendors. Please wear a mask in vendor and restroom lines. Tickets for the kid and pet-friendly event start at $20.
  • Rugby (May 8) – Raise a cup to Queen Victoria during the Queen’s Tea at Historic Rugby. The festive tea will include sandwiches, scones and dessert. Tickets are $22.
  • Wartburg (May 15) – The Tennessee Mountain Laurel Festival is filled with music, food, exhibits, creative arts, crafts, a car show and 24 designated scenic trails 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. around courthouse square.
  • Harriman (May 22-23, May 29-31) – Join a weekend of fun with costume contests, pirate Olympics, treasure hunts, get a picture with a mermaid or scallywag or shop the merchant village for unique treasures at the 5th Annual Tennessee Pirate Fest.
  • Bell Buckle (May 29) – Load up the car and go on an adventure in Historic Bell Buckle geocaching for prizes 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. during the Bell Buckle Car Cache and Pig Bash. Registration information can be found here.
  • Donelson (May-October) – Stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables, shop from local vendors, listen to live music and stroll through the historic grounds of Two Rivers Mansion Fridays 4-7 p.m. during the outdoor Hip Donelson Farmers Market.

For a complete list of what’s happening in Tennessee, visit the calendar on the website.  

AMERICAN-DREAM®-39RK illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

AMERICAN DREAM 39RK

AMERICAN COACH DEBUTS AMERICAN DREAM 39RK

FLOORPLAN INCLUDES EXCLUSIVE KITCHEN ISLAND LAYOUT

REV Recreation Group (RRG), a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc., introduces the all-new 2021 American Dream 39RK model with an innovative floorplan at the FMCA’s 102nd International Convention in Perry, GA (March 10-13, 2021). The 39RK is a Class A Diesel motor coach by the ultra-luxury American Coach brand.

At 40’ 2”, the American Dream 39RK layout provides easy livability and ultimate comfort. Signature elements include a stylish, industry-leading kitchen island, an Adap-table Dinette, a full master suite, and a split lavatory with an enclosed watering room. In the kitchen, the new 39RK floorplan features one of the first stationary islands in a Class A. The fixed island provides more countertop workspace and additional storage, accommodates an induction cooktop, and includes a wine chiller.

“Whenever you’re entertaining, guests naturally gravitate to the kitchen and congregate around the island,” says Doug Miller, Product Manager for REV Recreation Group. “The 39RK floorplan delivers that ‘at-home’ experience with the kitchen island and a number of other residential amenities.”

The island is made possible by an exclusive Adap-table Dinette that can serve as a convenient workstation or breakfast bar for two. By swinging the table out vertically, it easily hosts a dinner party for four. Additional high-end appointments in the kitchen include quartz countertops, two wireless charging stations, an optional Fisher Paykel dishwasher, and hand-made cabinetry with full-extension drawers. The bathroom suite features quartz countertops with a tile backsplash and a beautifully tiled shower with a glass enclosure, skylight, and teak bench. The master suite appointments include a king-sized articulating bed that’s flanked by quartz-topped nightstands, two wireless charging stations, a chest of deep drawers that can accommodate a full wardrobe of clothes, a stackable washer and dryer, and a 43” LED TV.

The American Dream 39RK is built on American Coach’s exclusive and robust Liberty Bridge chassis, boasts a Cummins L9 450 horsepower engine, and has a steerable tag axle for sharp turning and extra carrying capacity.

American Dream offers owners a plethora of choices to customize their motor coach – four exterior paint designs (Falling Ash, Nighthawk, South Beach, and Stone Washed), three stylish and refined décor packages (Club Navy, Luxe Truffle, and Rockport Greige), and four hardwood options that range from classic and rich to contemporary and bright (Cognac, Majestic Chestnut, Sandbar Grey, and Edgecomb).

Celebrating its 30th anniversary, American Coach is the most luxurious brand from RRG. The American Coach line includes three richly appointed models – American Dream, American Tradition, and American Eagle.

For more information on the new American Dream 39RK model, visit their website.

ADVENTURES IN MIYAGI PREFECTURE

Known as the “Land of Contrasts,” Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture is home to a variety of outdoor activities for travelers to enjoy. From cycling to surfing and even paragliding, Miyagi’s wide range of landscapes has no shortage of opportunities to try something new. Below are a few places travelers can dream of visiting when travel restrictions are lifted.

With a variety of biking trails to choose from, Miyagi is the perfect place to cycle through paths that stop by some of the prefecture’s most famous sights. For coastal views, Oshika Peninsula offers more than 40 miles of rolling hills and coastal panoramas, including a view of Kinkasan Island, a majestic island home to sacred deer that roam about the island freely. In the countryside, Marumori Loop is a popular cycling spot for locals. The low plains offer excellent views of the mountains, charming villages and rice fields. Experienced bikers can cycle through the mountainous wilderness of Mount Zao. These incredibly remote passes are grueling but are totally worth it for the beautiful scenery, secluded hot springs and countryside cafes.

Speaking of Mount Zao, the region is one of Miyagi’s best destinations for outdoor adventures. Skiers and snowboarders can opt to tackle the remote slopes on their own, but a guide is considered essential for anyone not trained in winter mountaineering and acquainted with the terrain of Mount Zao. Luckily, M’s Guide is a winter mountain guide service based at Sumikawa Snow Park and can tailor any outdoor excursion for guests.

For watersports, three-time paragliding national champion Takeshige Yamaya offers tandem paragliding experiences in Matsushima Bay, perfect for travelers to experience one of the Three Most Scenic Spots in Japan. Setravelndai and even Mount Zao can also be seen from the sky. In Sendai, Barefoot Surf offers a variety of SUP (stand-up paddle boarding) and surfing excursions for any skill level.

Travelers looking to spend the night outdoors can stay at the Fukiage Kogen Campground in Northern Miyagi. The grounds are surrounded by scenic views of mountains and quiet forests. The campground even has its own hot spring, walking trails, pub and plenty of cute goats. While travelers can bring their own equipment, guests can be supplied with all the gear they need with advanced reservations.

For more information on Miyagi, please visit http://www.visitmiyagi.com.

Rita Azar illustrates homeschooling article for 360 MAGAZINE

Homeschool Experts Recommend

Camping as a Virtual Learning Tool

With virtual schooling and family camping both skyrocketing as the result of COVID-19, Hip Homeschool Moms, a Parents magazine 2020 “Best Homeschooling Resource,” and Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park have teamed up to help struggling parents create fun, educational learning opportunities.

According to Jellystone Park, reservations are spiking as many schools open virtually and parents work from home, allowing families more flexibility to travel.

“Whether parents are using online curriculums provided by schools or are homeschooling, it’s important that they find ways to make learning fun,” said Trish Corlew, co-founder of the website HipHomeschoolMoms. “Most kids need to do more than sit in front of a screen to learn, which is why we are such big fans of camping. It provides so many great, hands-on educational opportunities.”

Hip Homeschool Moms has these tips for parents on how to include a late summer or fall camping trip in their virtual or homeschool plans:

  1. Look for family friendly campgrounds, such as Jellystone Park.They offer activities that entertain and educate kids, such as Bingo and arts and crafts, which supplement planned learning. They also provide socialization opportunities that are needed with classrooms closed and homeschool field trips and other activities on hold.
  2. Involve the kids in planning and managing the trip.Part of the learning experience is allowing kids to help with researching campgrounds, setting the budget for the trip and buying necessary supplies. And once you’re at the campground, let the kids help take care of the RV or cabin. They love responsibilities like these because it makes them feel grown up. These are life skills they will soon need.
  3. Check the campground’s Wi-Fi in advance.
    Call the campground to make sure it offers sufficient Internet access. If not, rent or buy a mobile hotspot to make sure you have enough bandwidth for online lessons, movie streaming and staying in touch with friends, family and work.
  4. Use online lessons and apps.Online lessons perfect for camping are widely available to help children study leaves, trees, rocks, flowers and wildlife. There also are apps designed for outdoor learning, as well as printable activities and games to take with you.
  5. Read and walk together.Camping provides the ideal environment to spend time as a family. Read aloud together, taking turns on different pages to help reluctant readers improve their skills. Or have the kids read independently and share what they learned. Scavenger hunts with printed or app-based guides encourage togetherness and learning.
  6. Visit local attractions.Many campgrounds are located near natural and historic sites. Consider stopping at some on the way to or from your campground. Museums and science centers can make for great day trips, especially on rainy days.
  7. Encourage your children to share what they learn.Kids love to tell stories, take pictures and produce videos. Have them record the weather, plants and animals they observe, and their activities. Journaling and scrapbooking also are great ways to get the most educational value from a trip and to preserve memories.

“Even before the pandemic, fall camping had become extremely popular with families, especially with most Jellystone Park locations offering special fall events, such as Halloween weekends,” said Trent Hershenson, Jellystone Park vice president of Marketing. He encourages parents to book trips now and to consider weekday visits, as weekends book up quickly. Weekday rates also may be lower.

For more advice on educational camping and links to free lessons and guides, visit here.

For tips on planning a family camping trip and to book a reservation at one of more than 75 Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resorts, visit here.

Links to video of kids learning while camping here and here.