Posts tagged with "adventure travel"

Verdad Nicaragua provides family trip for kids getting away from phones for use by 360 Magazine

VERDAD NICARAGUA – BETTER THAN AN IPHONE

BETTER THAN AN iPhone –THE ULTIMATE ADVENTURE VACATION

Verdad Nicaragua serves up a family summer vacation that beats screen time for kids of any age

Every parent knows that getting your kids to untether from their phones long enough to have a conversation, let alone an experience, is nearly impossible these days. This summer Verdad Nicaragua, on the shores of the Southern Pacific coast of Nicaragua, offers parents the ultimate summer adventure that will convince even teenagers that IRL beats virtual scrolling any day of the week.

This laid-back boutique hotel overlooking Playa Escameca Grande coastline offers up just enough remoteness and just enough luxury to entice the entire family. You can hang out on the beach or poolside, while your kids explore whatever they are into, or the whole family can head out to see the real Nicaragua. Verdad Nicaragua’s custom adventure packages can be designed around getting your kids to connect with reality. 

  • Surf vs. Snapchat: With the resort’s surf school and professional coaches, your kid will soon be riding the waves rather than stroking the keys.  
  • PADI vs. Pintrest: You’ll need no more inspiration than the crystal blue waters and the world that lives below to get your kid interested in becoming PADI-certified at Verdad Nicaragua. 
  • Fishing vs. Facebook: Hook your kid on the excitement of reeling in the big one with a fishing adventure in the waters between Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and Cocina Verdad will prepare your catch for dinner. 
  • Trotting vs. Twitter: Saddle up and explore the undeveloped, untouched, mountainous countryside on horseback with experienced local guides.
  • Treetop Thrills vs. Tik Tok: Soar through the forest canopy and get a birds-eye view of wildlife and nature with a not to be missed zip line tour. 
  • Waterfalls vs. Wifi: Hike in the tropical rainforest and plunge into the natural swimming pools as part of an adventure near the Costa Rican border.

Families can choose from one of four ocean view single story casitas, or one duplex casita that feature private decks and outdoor showers, or a fifth ocean and valley view casita that sleeps three, plus two poolside rooms. With five casitas and two rooms with full-size beds, Verdad Nicaragua is also perfect for a buy out for families looking for a multi-generational getaway. Resort amenities include open-air yoga/fitness studio (fully stocked with functional fitness and yoga gear) a relaxing pool with lounge chairs and an honor bar, a massage studio, and a laid-back lounge perfect for enjoying a sunset cocktail or a board game after a day of fun exploring the surrounding area. 

About Verdad Nicaragua:

Verdad Nicaragua is an eco-friendly boutique resort nestled on the shores of Playa Escameca in Southern Nicaragua. The laid-back luxurious property features modern casitas with private decks and poolside rooms that overlook the gardens and sea. The secluded hillside resort invites guests to explore the stunning landscape, or simply relax on the untouched Southern Pacific coast. The resort offers custom designed adventure packages, a surf school and PADI certification programs.

https://www.verdadnicaragua.com/

ADVENTURES IN MIYAGI PREFECTURE

Known as the “Land of Contrasts,” Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture is home to a variety of outdoor activities for travelers to enjoy. From cycling to surfing and even paragliding, Miyagi’s wide range of landscapes has no shortage of opportunities to try something new. Below are a few places travelers can dream of visiting when travel restrictions are lifted.

With a variety of biking trails to choose from, Miyagi is the perfect place to cycle through paths that stop by some of the prefecture’s most famous sights. For coastal views, Oshika Peninsula offers more than 40 miles of rolling hills and coastal panoramas, including a view of Kinkasan Island, a majestic island home to sacred deer that roam about the island freely. In the countryside, Marumori Loop is a popular cycling spot for locals. The low plains offer excellent views of the mountains, charming villages and rice fields. Experienced bikers can cycle through the mountainous wilderness of Mount Zao. These incredibly remote passes are grueling but are totally worth it for the beautiful scenery, secluded hot springs and countryside cafes.

Speaking of Mount Zao, the region is one of Miyagi’s best destinations for outdoor adventures. Skiers and snowboarders can opt to tackle the remote slopes on their own, but a guide is considered essential for anyone not trained in winter mountaineering and acquainted with the terrain of Mount Zao. Luckily, M’s Guide is a winter mountain guide service based at Sumikawa Snow Park and can tailor any outdoor excursion for guests.

For watersports, three-time paragliding national champion Takeshige Yamaya offers tandem paragliding experiences in Matsushima Bay, perfect for travelers to experience one of the Three Most Scenic Spots in Japan. Setravelndai and even Mount Zao can also be seen from the sky. In Sendai, Barefoot Surf offers a variety of SUP (stand-up paddle boarding) and surfing excursions for any skill level.

Travelers looking to spend the night outdoors can stay at the Fukiage Kogen Campground in Northern Miyagi. The grounds are surrounded by scenic views of mountains and quiet forests. The campground even has its own hot spring, walking trails, pub and plenty of cute goats. While travelers can bring their own equipment, guests can be supplied with all the gear they need with advanced reservations.

For more information on Miyagi, please visit http://www.visitmiyagi.com.

hiking, 360 MAGAZINE

Moab Adventure Center Reopens

As the community opened earlier this month, the staff of the Moab Adventure Center- the pulse point for all things adventure-related in Moab, Utah- is prepared with newly instituted pandemic-prevention protocols to serve visitors.

As of May 1, 2020, the Southeast Utah Health Department authorized a phased reopening of businesses. Lodging, commercial campgrounds, restaurants and activities are now available and operating within recommended guidelines. And just announced, Arches and Canyonlands National Parks are scheduled to reopen on May 29.

Moab Adventure Center is offering most of its regularly-scheduled activities along with newly added private tours. These include Hummer Safari outings for up to nine people; private canyoneering adventures, exclusive Arches National Park morning tours and private stand-up paddleboarding (SUP) lessons for up to six people; and private Moab rock climbing outings for up to four people.

These programs, assisted by dedicated staff and guides, adhere to new COVID-19 mitigation, operation, and safety protocols enacted to give travelers confidence and assurance. Protocols include cleaning of equipment and vehicles; daily staff and guest health screenings and regulations around food preparation and service.

Vacation-related accommodations are open with occupancy limitations and mandatory 24-hour rest periods between each room use. Moab restaurants are open for carry-out and will also seat a limited number of diners with appropriate spacing. Details on Moab Adventure Center’s full COVID Mitigation and Operations Plan can be found here.

“We’re offering most of our regular adventures  in addition to new private tour options for families and colleagues who self-designate as small groups for multi-day rafting adventures and full- and half-day programs,” said Cort Wright, General Manager, Moab Adventure Center. He noted that bookings for private tours of all kinds are up considerably over the same time last year.

The six tours that have been re-tweaked for private groups are;

  1.  Private Slickrock Hummer Safari, a two-hour, off-road excursion in the world’s most serious 4×4. The rate for up to nine people is $795.
    https://www.moabadventurecenter.com/private-moab-hummer-tours-hells-revenge
  2. Private Sunset Hummer Tour with hors d’oeuvres and the setting desert sun for three hours. The rate for up to nine people is $895.
  3.  Private Canyoneering Adventure for five hours with two rappels: 90′ into a hidden chasm and 120′ off a giant rock arch. The rate for up to six people is $795.
  4.  Private Moab Rock Climbing Lessons for three hours for gym and beginning climbers and kids. The rate for up to four people is $595.
  5. Private Arches National Park Morning Tour, a four-hour scenic bus excursion for up to six guests, at $695 per group.
  6.  Private Stand Up Paddleboard Lessons on the Colorado River, a three-hour float with transportation, board rental, instruction, guide, snacks and water. The rate for up to six people is $595.

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Surfing x Morro Bay

SURF’S UP TODAY IN MORRO BAY!

First-Ever World Surf League’s SLO Cal Open at Morro Rock Qualifying Series Event Starts Today Though March 1, 2020

Some of the biggest names in surfing are at Morro Rock Beach today through March 1, 2020 to compete in the first ever men’s and women’s qualifying series event SLO Cal Open at Morro Bay. Competitors include Conner Coffin from Santa Barbara, currently rated # 20 on the World Surf League’s Championship, along with the next biggest name in the sport, 24 year old Kevin Shulz from San Clemente. Shulz, pictured here, just won the SLO CAL Open at Pismo Beach last week and placed 2nd the year before. Cory Arrambide is also competing. He won the Pismo Beach title in 2017. Locally there are have two really good central coast boys competing: Austin Neuman and Braden Jones both from Pismo Beach.

On the Women’s side, it is a very young field with 34 confirmed surfers including 14 year old Sawyer Lindblad. She’s from San Clemente and just won the SLO CAL Open at Pismo Beach, her first professional surf contest. She is competing in Morro Bay along with local Sydney Beckett, who is a standout surfer from the MB High School Surf Team. More information about the event can be found here. More info about Morro Bay can be found here, www.morrobay.org.

About Morro Bay
A true #outdoorgoals destination, this active seaside fishing village with bustling waterfront offers a fun and funky getaway for travelers who seek great wine, seafood and outdoor adventures filled with wildlife. Located along coastal Highway 1 in San Luis Obispo County just south of Big Sur, midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, Morro Bay offers year-round activities in an unspoiled slice of California. From ocean-side golf, kayaking, sailing, hiking, fishing, surfing, biking, and bird watching, to kite flying, shopping, dining, wine bars, local craft brews and miles of unspoiled beaches, there is something for everyone. Sitting majestically between the beach and the harbor lays the iconic and historic landmark Morro Rock, welcoming travelers from miles away as they approach Morro Bay. Located just minutes from world-renowned Hearst Castle, historic missions, breathtaking Montana de Oro State Park, and surrounded by vineyards from Paso Robles to Edna Valley, Morro Bay is a destination designed to fit any style and budget for families, couples or groups. Morro Bay also offers a myriad of year-round events including food, wine and music festivals, art fairs and car shows unique to the town. For more travel information visit www.morrobay.org or follow Morro Bay on Facebook, Instagram, twitter and Pinterest.

Morro Bay, Surfing, California, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MagazineSurfing, Morro Bay, California, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

Angama Mara x Tented Camp

Angama Mara the award-winning safari lodge overlooking Kenya’s Maasai Mara, has announced the July 2020 introduction of Angama Safari Camp, a seasonal sole-use tented camp situated in a remote wilderness region of the southwestern Mara Triangle.

The team that created Angama Mara has reunited to launch the new Safari Camp with Jan Allan‘s tent design and interiors by Annemarie Meintjes.

Comprising four tents, sleeping up to eight guests, the camp will offer absolute privacy in the midst of the mega herds of the migration and abundant resident wildlife. “The design, quite unlike any other mobile tented camp, will be fresh, light and uncluttered, making for easy living while echoing many of the most loved elements of its older sister. There will be Fermob and Vogel furniture, there will be red and blue. As with the Angama Mara lodge, Angama Safari Camp will have the very best of everything, but also just the right amount of everything,” adds owner of Angama, Nicky Fitzgerald.

The tents are unprecedented in design with a distinctive look created through a playful and unusual roof shape. Below the roof sits a landscape-oriented inner tent, allowing for the bedroom, dressing room and bathroom to open up onto the view. Designed for maximum cross-ventilation, the tents also have a four-layer roof system to help keep them cool. Inside, the guest tent beds will be extra-length king and can be made up as a double or twins. The ensuite dressing room, double bucket shower room and private toilet offer the same high levels of comfort as Angama Mara.

Tucked away in a forest below the towering western wall of the Great Rift Valley, guests will have access to extraordinary wildlife experiences right on their doorstep and can tailor-make their safari days, leaving the Safari Camp as early as 6am and returning after sundown at 7:30pm. Aside from the migration, the region of the Mara Triangle where Angama Safari Camp is located is home to cheetah, resident prides of lion, large elephant herds, buffalo and abundant plains game.

Angama Safari Camp will welcome its first guests in early July and will operate until the end of September, with October on request. There is a minimum three-night stay and children of all ages are welcome. “Angama’s little camp will delight our guests by capturing the essence of the glorious adventure of the Golden Age of the African safari – romance, privacy, unconstrained freedom, stories shared around the campfire, dinners lit only by starlight, gentle Kenyan service, the nights either wrapped in silence or filled with sounds of hyena and lions calling, surrounded by a million migrating wildebeest,” concludes Fitzgerald.

ABOUT ANGAMA MARA
High above the Maasai Mara where some of the most romantic scenes from Out of Africa were filmed, Angama Mara comprises two separate and intimate camps, each encompassing 15 tented guest suites. Built on the edge of the Great Rift Valley on one of the most sought-after sites on the continent, this lodge offers heart stopping views as far as the eye can see. The lodge, helmed by industry veteran Nicky Fitzgerald (formerly of &Beyond), boasts outstanding game viewing 12 months of the year, with private access to the reserve. Inspired by the Swahili word for ‘suspended in mid-air,’ Angama Mara floats 1,000 feet above the Maasai Mara, where, every morning, hot air balloons sail past the 30-foot-wide floor-to-ceiling glass fronts of each suite.

In addition to consistently excellent game viewing, including Africa’s Big Five, guests enjoy walking safaris, garden-to-table lunches in the shamba, editing their images in the Photographic Studio a fitness center, a 40-foot-long swimming pool, a curated gallery of African art, clothing and jewelry, and a sun-filled studio where local Maasai women work at beading bespoke items. Angama Mara was named #1 Safari Lodge in the World by Condé Nast Traveler’s Readers’ Choice Awards 2018.

Angama Mara, Tented Camp, Safari, 360 MagazineAngama Mara, Tented Camp, Safari, 360 Magazine,

Why Knoxville Rocks

360 Magazine Culture Editor, Tom Wilmer explores Knoxville—the third largest city in Tennessee.

When people think of Tennessee, Nashville and Memphis get the prime spotlight, and they most often make the top of the to-do list for travelers. But Knoxville has an abundance of attractions that are alluringly unique.

Knoxville’s first iteration as a world-class travel destination happened with a bang when the town hosted the 1982 Knoxville World’s Fair. Today the two remaining iconic vestiges are the Sunsphere tower, and a stunningly beautiful riverside performance amphitheater.

Knoxville is graced with historic architecture, both in the urban core, and surrounding residential neighborhoods, but its the friendliness of the people is an essential ingredient that makes the town so attractive.

Most of the businesses are locally owned. There’s been a recent explosion of new upscale eateries (more than 80 in the urban core) and trendy brew pubs that keep the downtown core hopping in to the wee hours of the night. Festivals like the annual Rhythm and Blooms Blues Festival in May is just a sampler of the live events that take place downtown throughout the year.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW KNOXVILLE VIDEO SLIDE SHOW

Outdoor hiking, biking and kayaking are viral endeavors for locals and visitors alike. Knoxville rightfully touts its super popular Urban Wilderness with more than 1,000 unspoiled acres right in the heart of the city.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE NPR One/KCBX PODCAST INTERVIEW with Angie Wilson at Visit Knoxville to hear the backstory on just why this vibrant town bustles with new, locally-owned businesses.

Carol Evans shares insights about the city’s Urban Wilderness adventures for hikers, bikers. and kayakers. Sam Carlton at the four-star The TENNESSEAN Hotel talks about the Knoxville World’s Fair back in 1982, and how the momentum instilled by the fair continues today.

Tom Bugg, general manager at the city’s two historic theaters—the Tennessee and the Bijou Theatre—paints a vivid picture of Knoxville’s past and present, and how the renovation of the theaters served as an economic stimulus for other downtown revitalization projects.

David Butler, executive director at the Knoxville Museum of Art talks about community engagement through showcasing regional art, educational outreach and gratis admission.

The 1982 Knoxville World’s Fair “Sunsphere”still graces the skyline in the heart of town

Ice Breaker ferry ride through Death’s Door

360 Magazine Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from Door County Wisconsin.

If you’re not familiar with Wisconsin, look at a map of the state and you’ll notice a jutting peninsula (locals fondly refer to the peninsula as Wisconsin’s thumb) on the eastern flank. That’s Door County; cradled on the western flank is Sturgeon Bay and legendary Green Bay.

Summertime is crazy-busy tourist time with vacationers from around the midwest who have a multi-generational fondness for the rural county.

It’s a rural paradise where cherry orchards remain king, but today family-owned wineries have also become part of the landscape, alongside the ever popular roadside farm stands.

 

Lautenbach’s Orchard Country Winery & Market in Fish Creek, Wisconsin–symbolizes Door County’s multi-generational family owned businesses. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

     Summertime rocks with legendary lakeside fish boils and  beachside barbecues with live music.

Legendary Fish Boil at Rowleys Bay Resort & Restaurant Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. Photo Credit Tom Wilmer

 

Rowleys Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin

Innkeeper at Rowleys Bay Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin shows off the end result of the fish boil. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

 

Fish Creek, Wisconsin

Sundowner barbecue and live music on the bay at Fish Creek, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

 

Al Johnson's Swedish Restaurant

Around back–at Al Johnsons Swedish Restaurant in Sister Bay, Wisconsin. Actually they are legend for their goats who mow the restaurant’s sod-roof during the summer months–oh and they serve great food too! Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

If you’re based in a southern state or on the West Coast you might presume that come wintertime the locals in the Northern Tier states hunker down by the fireplace until the spring thaw.

 

Outdoor adventuring on Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in the heart of Door County. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Come up for a visit in the midst of winter and you will see the locals just as busy playing and adventuring in the outdoors as they do in July or August.

 

Great fun to ride a vehicle across the bay to go ice fishing. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Cross Country skiing, snow shoeing, hiking, ice skating–and ice fishing are super popular winter activities. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crprEtOV-pI

Videographer Jason Lopez produced a 360 video featuring the Washington Island Ferry Service with Richard Purinton and Jon Jarosh from the Door County Visitor Bureau

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE KCBX/NPR One PODCAST about the Washington Island Ferry

End of the road-- Door County Peninsula

The northern end of the Door County Peninsula exhibits a distinctive, intoxicating beauty. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A cool mid-winter adventure takes place at the northern end of the Door Peninsula–that’s where you board the ice-breaker ferry for a ride across the straits—dubbed long ago by pioneer adventurers Deaths’ Door.

The roots of the name stem from the potentially brutal and sometimes deadly experience when early settles traveled by boat between the peninsula and ports around Lake Michigan.

Washington Island Ferry wintertime

Washington Island Ferry. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Today the Washington Island Ferry transports locals and visitors every day of the year–shuttling passengers between the peninsula and nearby Washington Island.

The Washington Island Ferries are equipped with hardened ice-breaking bows that carve their way across the straits skirting the fringe of Green Bay and Lake Michigan. 

Death's Door Door County, Wisconsin

Crossing the straits of Death’s Door on the fringe of Lake Michigan en route to Washington Island. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Settled long ago by Norwegian and Icelandic pioneers, Washington Island remains populated by descendants of the first homesteaders (the island today claims a large population of Icelandic descendants)–of course along with a new generation of hardy souls, many attracted specifically because of its remoteness and unspoiled natural beauty.

Washington Island Stavkirke

Washington Island’s revered Norwegian Stavkirke (church of Staves) is based on drawings of a church in Borglund, Norway constructed in 1150 AD. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A saving grace for the island’s pristine environment is that it has experienced minimal development and claims around 700 full-time residents, swelling to more than 1,500 during the summertime.

One of the big draws is a visit to one of the island lavender farms, and lunch at one of the local diners.

In addition to the natural beauty of Washington Island, and Door County, a precious attraction is the friendliness and welcoming attitude of the locals.

White Gull Inn Innkeeper with his woodie

Innkeeper at White Gull Inn shows off his classy ride. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A stop at a coffee shop is an integral part of life year round on the Door Peninsula. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Fun with the locals at Rowleys Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Jon Jarosh with the Door County Visitor Bureau. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer