Posts tagged with "Shade"

Emotional Support House Plants illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

How to Start an Indoor Garden

You might think you need acreage to have a garden plot. Nonsense — if you have sunshine in your apartment, you can start an indoor version.

Container growing offers unparalleled convenience. You don’t have to slog through the weather to tend your crops — you can do so from the comfort of your climate-controlled abode. Here are five tips on starting an indoor garden that will have you making fresh tomato sauce and passing out blooms to all your friends in no time.

1.    Get Your Water Tested

Plants have a lot in common with animals. Both require a place to live, grow and reproduce safely from the worst of the elements. They also need food and water. This final necessity might do more to influence the health of your indoor plants than any other. However, it’s a factor many novice gardeners overlook until they find themselves wondering why their spider plant fails to thrive.

The first thing to determine is whether your water comes from a well or a municipal water supply. One advantage of the former is that your liquid remains free of sanitizing agents as it comes up from an underground source. Elements like chlorine, chloramine and fluoride can slow the growth of your plants and impact the flowering cycle.

However, that doesn’t mean you’re out of the woods if you have a well. Such groundwater sources often have high levels of arsenic, lead and sulfur contamination. Additionally, the water might be rather hard, containing magnesium and calcium. These minerals are responsible for accumulating on plumbing surfaces, causing clogs.

The first water quality you must determine is your pH level. This scale measures how basic or acidic your water is. An overly alkaline pH can lead to mineral loss in your soil and poor harvests from your indoor garden crops.

Your water also contains beneficial bacteria, unless it comes from an overly clean municipal source. This riddance inhibits the processing of organic compounds for plant availability. You might have better luck harvesting rainwater to use for your plants — doing so also cuts down on waste. Before doing so, ensure you’re legally allowed to use a barrel in your jurisdiction. Some places restrict collection out of fear of providing breeding grounds for mosquitos.

Understanding your water quality starts by reading your bill. Your municipality should publish a quality report you can access. You can also purchase PPM meters, although they won’t tell you the precise mineral content of your water. For the best results, you should refer a sample to a lab for testing.

2.    Choose the Right Location

You might end up with more than one indoor garden — and that’s perfectly OK. Different species have varying needs for sunlight. Your golden pothos may adore hanging by a sunny window, but your primroses have another preference. Honor it if you want the best results.

Discovering your various plants’ penchant for light or shade is as simple as reading the instructions that come with most varieties. The internet is also a glorious resource for all things horticulture. You can even find plant identifier apps that will diagnose possible diseases and recommend the best course of treatment.

Your kitchen windowsill is the ideal place for a herb garden. You might not need to travel beyond your grocery store for supplies. Many fresh soft herbs will sprout in water, allowing you to keep them going that way or plant them in soil for improved longevity.

Don’t overlook your bedroom as a location for shade-loving plants. In the 1980s, NASA studied houseplants to see if they could provide sufficient oxygen for supporting life in space. They discovered that these herbal wonders also scrub toxins like formaldehyde from indoor air — meaning you might breathe more comfortably at night, especially if you’re sensitive to allergens.

3.    Select the Perfect Pots

Your plants are beautiful, and much like the right outfit can accentuate your natural beauty, the correct pot can showcase your collection in style. Will you mix and match or go for a monochrome look? You have several options.

You’ll find that plastic planters are the most affordable and lightweight option. You can carry a stack of them home from the store without ever breaking a sweat. However, this material may fade in sunlight and attract and store heat, leading to premature wilting of your plants. You may also need to replace them after a couple of seasons, particularly if you use them in sunny locations.

Clay pots and planters offer superior longevity and can also help you if you’re a novice gardener. This substance controls moisture levels, keeping your plant roots from suffering rot if you accidentally go a bit too heavy with the watering can.

Disadvantages of clay pots include the cost, weight and size. They may also break if you drop them. However, they’re your best long-lasting and eco-friendly bet for an indoor garden that grows season after season.

4.    Invest in Beginner-Friendly Plants

Your plant choices partially determine your indoor garden’s success. For example, you probably don’t want to start with orchids if you’re new to horticulture. These plants look elegant but have a longstanding reputation for being finicky about their treatment.

Golden pothos is an ideal starter plant for sunny locations. Succulents also make easy-to-care-for choices for lining the brightest windowsills of your home. Bamboo and peace lily plants work well in darker bedroom areas, as they prefer the shade.

5.    Keep Your Hobby Going on the Cheap

Once you establish your indoor garden, it’s relatively simple and inexpensive to add to it using materials you already have. One way to do so is by propagating live herbs from cuttings. Soft-stemmed herbs such as basil and oregano require little more than water, although you can buy liquids to encourage root growth. Woody-stemmed herbs take a little more prompting, although you can still use this technique by cutting stems from newer growth that hasn’t hardened yet.

You can also amass a bumper crop of the vegetables you use most often in the kitchen. It’s simple to save the seeds from plants like peppers and tomatoes, dry them and use them to start new seedlings. You won’t even have to drive to the farmers market once you establish your indoor garden on your balcony.

Start an Indoor Garden

You don’t need acreage to enjoy growing things. Use the five tips above to start an indoor garden that fills your home with joy.

- Bluestrokes - artwork by Atanda Quadri Adebayo, Mamus Esiebo | Daniel Tetteh Nartey Moustapha Baidi Oumarou via GR gallery for use by 360 Magazine

– BLUE STROKES –

Atanda Quadri Adebayo | Mamus Esiebo | Daniel Tetteh Nartey Moustapha Baidi Oumarou 

Sept 9 – Oct 9

GR Gallery is pleased to announce – BLUE STROKES – a groundbreaking group exhibition showcasing multi-talented artists from different states of Africa: Mamus Esiebo, Daniel Tetteh Nartey, Atanda Quadri Adebayo, Moustapha Baidi Oumarou. This exciting show will reveal, for the first time in a public exhibition in the U.S. , the latest series of artworks that the artists have been working on for the past months. Appositely conceived for this occasion, this bold body of new works will independently invade the gallery space, contrasting and counterbalancing each other. The show will put together in total twenty original artworks, including paintings on canvas, works on paper and a print.

When: Opening: Thursday September 09 , 5:00pm – 8:00pm (Exhibition Dates: September 09 – October 9  2021). Members of the press can contact GR gallery in advance to schedule a private viewing and/or an interview with the artists before the exhibition is officially open. Reception will be held with no restrictions and drinks will be served. Visitors who want to attend the opening can RSVP by contacting the gallery.

Where: GR gallery,  255 Bowery (between Houston & Stanton) New York, NY 10002

Who: Atanda Quadri Adebayo (b. 1999, Nigeria) | Mamus Esiebo (Lagos Nigeria, 1985) | Daniel Tetteh Nartey (Ghana, 1991) | Moustapha Baidi Oumarou (Cameroon, 1997).

– BLUE STROKES – includes artists from Ghana, Nigeria and Cameroon – all of whom have experienced and contributed to a rich history in local culture and personal heritage. Besides the shared extensive use of the blue tint and the technique used to apply it, the title refers to the color the sky and the sea, associated with freedom, elegance, inspiration, wisdom and the saturnine behavior that defines artists and keeps under control the powerful striking act of wrath. From the vivid imagery, immense balance of rich contrast, to a super concentrated explosion of color, every unique shade, texture and identity of the artists have been interwoven to create this unique exhibition. The artists hail from a variety of communities and homelands; their stories and embracement are portrayed on each piece of artwork that was specifically made to present their vision, their commitments, and their actual life.

-Featured Artwork is “Summertime”, 2021, digital painting on canvas 36 x 48 inches by Mamus esiebo*

 "Untitled", 2021, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm. (Moustapha) via BlueStrokes exhibit at GR Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

“Untitled”, 2021, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm. By: Moustapha Baidi Oumarou

"survival's gaze", 2021, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 72 x 61 in. By: Atanda Quadri Adebayo  via the -Bluestrokes- exhibit at GR Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

“survival’s gaze”, 2021, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 72 x 61 in. By: Atanda Quadri Adebayo

Immersive Van Gogh

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a brand new venue in Chicago’s Germania Club will open Feb. of 2021.

The recently renovated building will open to the U.S. premiere of Immersive Van Gogh. The building’s Victorian Era, 35-foot-tall walls will show off art exhibitions that completely encapsulate an audience, blurring the lines between entertainment and culture, art and blockbuster creation.

Immersive Van Gogh received rave reviews from critics and a wide array of audiences in Toronto, as it allowed them to step inside the iconic, emotional, imaginative artist Vincent Van Gogh.

The Toronto Sun called Immersive Van Gogh “intense and emotional, cathartic and liberating” while Debra Yeo of the Toronto Star said,  “I wondered: could projections of paintings on walls and floors be thrilling? The answer is yes.”

More than 180,000 guests were able to see the exhibition in July 2020, and it passed worldwide ticket sales for any of Ticketmaster’s live cultural events.

Tickets will be available beginning Nov. 23 at 11 a.m. CST. You can find them by clicking right here, or you can call (844) 307-4644. Admission begins at $39.99, or $24.99 for children 16 years old or younger.

The tickets will be for viewings from Feb. 11 to May 2, and parking is available at the James House parking garage, conveniently located nearby.

Given the world’s current state of affairs, the experience also makes health and safety a priority, as admissions will align with Chicago’s capacity guidelines.

Tickets will also be taken contact-free, temperatures will be taken upon arrival and hand sanitizer stations will be open. Markers throughout the exhibit will also remind guests to socially distant as they get sucked into the world of Van Gogh. Face masks will be required.

The same Italian creative team that pioneered Atelier des Lumières will create a design custom to the exhibition’s home in Chicago.

The exhibition was designed by Massimiliano Siccardi, an Italian film producer, with help from composer Luca Longobardi, who delivers a score that combines electronic music with piano, blending modern and classic tones to evoke the perfect tone for the experience. Vittorio Guidotti is the art director.

Siccardi and Longobardi created the Van Gogh, Starry Night exhibition together, setting them up for Immersive Van Gogh, which features more than 50 projectors that cover more than 14,000 square-feet.

Siccardi said Van Gogh has created a lasting emotional impact despite going relatively unknown while he was alive.

“Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to visit Chicago and once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building,” Siccardi said.

Some of the most notable pieces featured include Self Portrait with Felt Hat, The Bedroom in Arles, Irises and The Starry Night.

Corey Ross, the co-producer of Immersive Art Space, said Immersive Van Gogh is a new way to consume art from all directions.

“Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre,” Ross said. “Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.

For more information, you can click right here.