Posts tagged with "Social Distancing"

Gym Illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Planet Fitness Southeast 100th Club Opening

Sunshine Fitness is Planet Fitness’ first franchise group and it continues to experience steady growth across the Southeast amid pandemic with plans to open nearly 15 more clubs in 2021

Sunshine Fitness Growth Holdings, LLC (“Sunshine Fitness”), a leading owner and operator of Planet Fitness clubs in the Southeast United States backed by TSG Consumer Partners (“TSG”), today announced its 100th Planet Fitness club opening with new locations simultaneously opening in South Carolina and North Carolina.

“Opening our 100th club during this challenging year is not only a testament to our franchise group, but also the desire of the communities to prioritize physical and mental wellness as an essential part of their lives,” said Shane McGuiness, co-owner and CEO of Planet Fitness Southeast. “In 2021 we will continue bringing jobs to local economies, while prioritizing the health and safety of our members and employees.”

Since March, Sunshine Fitness has focused on adapting to the current pandemic while maintaining plans for expansion.  Additionally, Planet Fitness has taken several steps to strengthen existing cleanliness policies, introduced touchless check-ins and “Social Fitnessing,” created its Clean Thumb Club™ policy, and implemented a “crowd meter” available on the Planet Fitness app for customers to see capacity levels in real time. Throughout the year Planet Fitness has taken several steps to strengthen existing cleanliness policies, introduced touchless check-ins and “Social Fitnessing,” created its Clean Thumb Club™ policy, and implemented a “crowd meter” available on the Planet Fitness app for customers to see capacity levels in real time.

Sunshine Fitness has been one of the fastest growing Planet Fitness franchisees in the U.S. and has opened multiple locations since the start of 2020 with strong plans to open 13 additional clubs in communities across the Southeast in 2021. The momentum is driven by the more than 113 million check-ins to Planet Fitness since May 2020, when gyms were cleared to reopen by local officials after the pandemic forced their doors to close. 

For more information, or to join online, please visit www.PlanetFitness.com or follow on Facebook and Twitter. 

About Planet Fitness

Founded in 1992 in Dover, NH, Planet Fitness is one of the largest and fastest-growing franchisors and operators of fitness centers in the United States by number of members and locations. As of September 30, 2020, Planet Fitness had more than 14.1 million members and 2,086 stores in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Panama, Mexico and Australia. The Company’s mission is to enhance people’s lives by providing a high-quality fitness experience in a welcoming, non-intimidating environment, which we call the Judgement Free Zone®. More than 95% of Planet Fitness stores are owned and operated by independent business men and women.

About Planet Fitness Southeast 

Opening its first location in 2003 in Altamonte Springs, Florida, Planet Fitness Southeast is the very first franchisee and one of the largest within the Planet Fitness brand. Started by longtime best friends, Shane McGuiness and Eric Dore, Planet Fitness Southeast now operates 100 locations and still holds true to the original mission of enhancing people’s lives by providing a high-quality experience in a welcoming, non-intimidating environment known as the Judgement Free Zone®.  

About TSG Consumer Partners
TSG Consumer Partners, LLC is a leading private equity firm focused exclusively on the branded consumer sector. Since its founding in 1987, TSG has been an active investor in the food, beverage, restaurant, beauty, personal care, fitness, health & wellness, household, apparel & accessories, and e-commerce sectors. Representative past and present partner companies include Duckhorn Wine Company, Planet Fitness, IT Cosmetics, REVOLVE, HUDA Beauty, BrewDog, Canyon Bicycles, Pabst, Backcountry, vitaminwater, thinkThin, popchips, Stumptown, Smashbox Cosmetics and e.l.f. Cosmetics. For more information, please visit www.tsgconsumer.com.

Immersive Van Gogh

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a brand new venue in Chicago’s Germania Club will open Feb. of 2021.

The recently renovated building will open to the U.S. premiere of Immersive Van Gogh. The building’s Victorian Era, 35-foot-tall walls will show off art exhibitions that completely encapsulate an audience, blurring the lines between entertainment and culture, art and blockbuster creation.

Immersive Van Gogh received rave reviews from critics and a wide array of audiences in Toronto, as it allowed them to step inside the iconic, emotional, imaginative artist Vincent Van Gogh.

The Toronto Sun called Immersive Van Gogh “intense and emotional, cathartic and liberating” while Debra Yeo of the Toronto Star said,  “I wondered: could projections of paintings on walls and floors be thrilling? The answer is yes.”

More than 180,000 guests were able to see the exhibition in July 2020, and it passed worldwide ticket sales for any of Ticketmaster’s live cultural events.

Tickets will be available beginning Nov. 23 at 11 a.m. CST. You can find them by clicking right here, or you can call (844) 307-4644. Admission begins at $39.99, or $24.99 for children 16 years old or younger.

The tickets will be for viewings from Feb. 11 to May 2, and parking is available at the James House parking garage, conveniently located nearby.

Given the world’s current state of affairs, the experience also makes health and safety a priority, as admissions will align with Chicago’s capacity guidelines.

Tickets will also be taken contact-free, temperatures will be taken upon arrival and hand sanitizer stations will be open. Markers throughout the exhibit will also remind guests to socially distant as they get sucked into the world of Van Gogh. Face masks will be required.

The same Italian creative team that pioneered Atelier des Lumières will create a design custom to the exhibition’s home in Chicago.

The exhibition was designed by Massimiliano Siccardi, an Italian film producer, with help from composer Luca Longobardi, who delivers a score that combines electronic music with piano, blending modern and classic tones to evoke the perfect tone for the experience. Vittorio Guidotti is the art director.

Siccardi and Longobardi created the Van Gogh, Starry Night exhibition together, setting them up for Immersive Van Gogh, which features more than 50 projectors that cover more than 14,000 square-feet.

Siccardi said Van Gogh has created a lasting emotional impact despite going relatively unknown while he was alive.

“Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to visit Chicago and once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building,” Siccardi said.

Some of the most notable pieces featured include Self Portrait with Felt Hat, The Bedroom in Arles, Irises and The Starry Night.

Corey Ross, the co-producer of Immersive Art Space, said Immersive Van Gogh is a new way to consume art from all directions.

“Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre,” Ross said. “Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.

For more information, you can click right here.

AREA15 Halloween

AREA15, the brand new immersive entertainment and art complex in Las Vegas, is hosting Halloween events to get visitors of all ages in the spirit.

Oct. 30 beginning at 4 p.m. and lasting until midnight is ScAREA15, an event that encourages guests to represent their favorite horror B-movie. Friendly to social distancing, there will be candy shoots, performances inside AREA15’s The Portal, costume contests, prizes and even more.

Early entry costs $5 while children aged ten and younger can enter for free. Early entry begins at 4 p.m. and ends at 7 p.m. and focuses on family-friendly events.

Late entry, which is geared toward adults, costs $15 for all guests. Late entry begins at 8 p.m. and ends at midnight.

Food is also available to purchase from The Beast Pop-up at an additional charge.

The second event is the Future Carnival Oct. 31 from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.. Again, early entry begins at 4 p.m. and lasts until 7 p.m. with family-friendly events. Late entry begins at 8 p.m. and lasts until 2 a.m. and is aimed at adults but allows visitors of all ages.

Early entry is $5, and late entry is $25 for every guest.

The Future Carnival is described as “part costume bash and part trippy transformation.” Costumed guests are invited to this event that includes acrobats, stilt walkers, fortune tellers, candy shoots, prizes and galaxy games. There will also be live performances inside The Portal along with costume contests.

Once again, The Beast Pop-up will serve food at an additional cost.

Rocket Fizz, the nationwide soda pop and candy shop is also bursting onto the scene in style by handing out complimentary pieces of taffy candy to all costumed visitors at their shop.

Space is limited, and you can purchase tickets by clicking right here. Face masks are required, and you can learn about reservations by clicking right here.

Musicians x Social Distancing

Engineers and musicians from Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music and the Houston Symphony determined social distancing will not be enough to keep musicians safe while performing on-stage.

Using a high-speed camera, researchers studied air released by musicians who were singing or playing wind instruments.

Ashok Veeraraghavan, a Rice imaging expert, said social distancing is important, but other factors must be taken into account.

“Our main message is that there is no single silver bullet. Performance venues are going to need a mix of several different risk mitigation strategies. Each of them will help a little, and the sum total of all of them will minimize risk to both the performers and the audience,” Veeraraghavan said.

Robert Yekovich, dean of the Shepherd School of Music and co-principal investigator of the study, said a goal of the study was to help people return to the stage, which is why the findings are being published.

“Peer review may take a year or more, and we believe it is imperative to make others aware of what we found,” Yekovich said.

Schlieren imaging is a method used to study airflow, so Yekovich, Veeraraghavan and John Mangum, the president and CEO of the Houston Symphony, used it to study singers and flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trombone, trumpet and tuba players.

With cameras, a high-resolution background and computational algorithms, they were able to see and track air flow after it leaves mouths and instruments and travels throughout the room.

While the travel of large droplets is well-documented, they wanted to study microdroplets, which can linger in the air for hours.

The group hypothesized that the microdroplets would be the most important droplets to pay attention to. The experiment showed that exhaled air and droplets tended to rise to the top of the room.

“Because exhaled air was warmer than the room air, we found most of it rose rather quickly, carrying the bulk of exhaled microdroplets into air currents that were primarily driven by ventilation,” Veeraraghavan said.

They now recommend music venues meeting or exceeding federal guidelines of six room air exchanges per hour. They also suggest that venues themselves consider air filtration above the stage.

Veeraraghavan still said social distancing is important because of the large droplets, adding that masks should be worn.

Mangum thought that social distancing would be the most important thing when welcoming performers and audiences back to venues, but it’s going to take a bit more than standing six feet apart.

“The Rice experiments showed it’s more complex than that. Now we want all musical organizations and individual musicians to benefit from that understanding,” Mangum said.

You can see the results of the study by clicking right here. A video is also available by clicking right here.

T.V. Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Watch Together with Sling

By Hannah DiPilato

SLING TV debuted a new co-watching feature today, Sling Watch Party, which enables customers to watch their favorite live programming together. With this feature, viewers can stream live television with up to three other viewers. Watchers can also interact in real-time by the video and chat features. This is an exciting first for the live T.V. industry! 

Recently, as corona has swept the globe, quarantine has led to everyone interacting six feet apart. Loved ones have had to find new ways to come together virtually. One popular activity, during this time, became watching shows and movies together while on video chat. Netflix Party was a popular extension for people to watch Netflix together. This third-party extension had a few flaws, but now SLING is making it easy to watch together, even T.V. that’s live. 

This feature is currently available to all existing SLING TV customers. SLING Watch Party can be accessed on Google Chrome web browsers by a laptop or desktop computer. Through a special beta preview, guests of the SLING subscriber can join a SLING Watch Party by easily creating a free SLING TV account. This free account registration is available through September 30th. 

Those with an account can choose from most live, On Demand and LookBack content to stream with their friends. Channels are available depending on which SLING plan you are subscribed to. Subscription plans include SLING Orange, SLING Blue, SLING Latino and SLING International services. These subscriptions differ and can be chosen based on your television watching desires. Channels available with these subscriptions along with any SLING TV Extra are able to be watched in a party. 

Everyone in the watch party has full control over their own video camera, the volume of the content on their individual device and the volume of video chat that is being received from other participants. The slingers in charge of hosting a Watch Party are able to manage player controls, including play, pause and rewind for all On Demand programming.

To host a SLING Watch Party sign on to sling.com on a Chrome Web Browser and select the program you want to watch. For live episodes, parties can be started up to an hour before the program begins. Select “Start Watch Party” and invite your guests with an email link. Then just start watching with your friends and family, but don’t forget your favorite snacks. 

For more information on the new service, check out SLING’s website. Be sure to follow them on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter for live updates on more exciting new features.

Tropicana Las Vegas Reopens After COVID-19 Shutdown

READY TO MAKE NEW MEMORIES AT A VEGAS CLASSIC, TROPICANA LAS VEGAS® REOPENS WITH ANTICIPATED GUEST EXCITEMENT, GLITZ AND GLAMOUR

Iconic Las Vegas Strip resort and casino officially celebrates its #welcomeback of guests and team members

Tropicana Las Vegas® commemorated a festive #welcomeback celebration this morning with eager hotel and casino guests, loyal team members and locals as they reopened the iconic property following its March closure in accordance with the state of Nevada to slow the spread of COVID-19. Once known as a Rat Pack hangout, Tropicana Las Vegas® has now marked a second grand opening offering renewed energy and excitement among all who attended today’s events which was commemorated in true fashion with the stunning showgirls of Legends in Concert.

Guests were ushered in at 10 a.m. and greeted by hotel executives, stage performers and loyal team members to the reopened hotel, casino and the widely acclaimed Tropicana Pool. The pool that started it all is popular among both hotel guests and Las Vegas locals, with drink specials and free admission to locals seven days a week with valid Nevada ID. Those looking to make new memories at a Vegas classic can book reservations online and take advantage of September rates starting as low as $39 per night by visiting www.troplv.com or by calling 888-381-8767.

“We are very excited to celebrate the reopening of our beloved Tropicana Las Vegas, welcoming back the many loyal customers, hotel guests and remarkably loyal team members we had with us this morning,” said Mike Thoma, Assistant General Manager of Tropicana Las Vegas®. “While the amenities our customers have come to know and love may be somewhat limited for the time being, the ability to safely welcome back our team members and guests always remains our top priority. With this in mind, we worked very closely with the Nevada Gaming Control Board, state and local leaders, and public health officials to finalize what became our comprehensive reopening protocols. We have implemented additional health and safety precautions, trained our returning team members thoroughly, and added reminder signage throughout the property to provide our guests with a welcome sense of comfort as they return to our iconic resort.”

The team at Tropicana Las Vegas® continues to be grateful for the overwhelming support, patience and understanding from its customers through these unprecedented times and are incredibly excited to safely welcome everyone back.

For more information about social distancing and health and safety precautions in place, visit www.troplv.com/covid-19.

ABOUT TROPICANA LAS VEGAS®

Set on the famed Four Corners with commanding views of the Las Vegas Strip, Tropicana Las Vegas – a DoubleTree by Hilton is a Penn National Gaming destination and boasts stylish rooms, suites and luxury villas, complete with acclaimed restaurants, premier entertainment options and a 50,000-square-foot casino. The resort redefines the expectations of today’s global travelers by providing a casually elegant experience on The Strip, all with a South Beach rhythm and vibe. The property is also part of the industry acclaimed mychoice® loyalty program (www.mychoice.com) which provides exclusive offers, events and experiences at more than 35 destinations across the country. For more information, visit www.troplv.com.

ABOUT PENN NATIONAL GAMING

With the nation’s largest and most diversified regional gaming footprint, including 41 properties across 19 states, Penn National continues to evolve into a highly innovative omni-channel provider of retail and online gaming, live racing and sports betting entertainment. The Company’s properties feature approximately 50,000 gaming machines, 1,300 table games and 8,800 hotel rooms, and operate under various well-known brands, including Hollywood, Ameristar, and L’Auberge. Our wholly-owned interactive division, Penn Interactive, operates retail sports betting across the Company’s portfolio, as well online social casino, bingo, and iCasino products. In February 2020, Penn National entered into a strategic partnership with Barstool Sports, whereby Barstool is exclusively promoting the Company’s land-based and online casinos and sports betting products, including the Barstool Sportsbook mobile app, to its national audience. The Company’s omni-channel approach is bolstered by the mychoice® loyalty program, which rewards and recognizes its over 20 million members for their loyalty to both retail and online gaming and sports betting products with the most dynamic set of offers, experiences, and service levels in the industry.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

Storm illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Hurricane During Pandemic

By Mina Tocalini

Evacuations, power outages, flooding and devastation are expected from the c and rain that wreak havoc on coastal communities during hurricane season. Managing the damages and protecting communities is further challenged by the threat of COVID-19 as the Tropical Storm Isaias’ violent path continues up the East Coast.

Designated a tropical storm near Puerto Rico, Isaias began to travel northwest hitting the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, Florida and North Carolina, where it was assessed as a Category 1 hurricane. As it persisted up the East Coast the intensity reverted back to a tropical storm. Regardless, Isaias has been accompanied by strong winds between 60mph – 70mph, over 20 reports of tornadoes, rampant flash flooding and over 3 million homes and business without power. In New Jersey and Delaware the wind gust reached speeds of 109mph and 96mph, respectively.

A report from USA Today, warns that recent 2020 hurricane season forecasting reveals 10 more hurricanes will likely follow, leaving Isaias as a practice run for a hurricane during a pandemic. With that in mind, evacuations needed to be addressed cautiously in consideration of social distancing and other COVID-19 preventative measures. The combination of COVID-19 and Isaias has heightened concerns for emergency services which face overwhelming demands. The COVID-19 consequences of Isaias remain undetermined, but a potential spike in infections could be in our future.

Groceries illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Feed Your City Challenge L.A.

The Feed Your City Challenge – founded by retired NBA star, Ricky Davis, and music industry legend, Tony Draper – will make the fifth stop on its nationwide campaign to combat the COVID-19 pandemic July 25th in the parking lot of the Baldwin Hills Mall at 2 pm PST. LA natives, Grammy award-winning multi-platinum producer Mustard, platinum-selling singer Jhene Aiko and Grammy award-winning artist Roddy Ricch, alongside local city leaders, will help serve the community fresh groceries and PPE items until supplies run out.   

Feed Your City Challenge has provided fresh groceries and essential PPE supplies for up to 10,000 community members via non-contact drive-thru lanes, following all CDC social distancing guidelines. The organization has produced community-driven events in cities across the country and served tens of thousands of people impacted by the coronavirus. Los Angeles will join the growing list of cities receiving support in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.   

With a simple mission statement, ‘to serve underserved communities, ‘Feed Your City Challenge’ will continue feeding those in need and challenge more cities to join. Previous events around the country included Norfolk, VA with recording artist Pusha T; Petersburg VA with recording artist Trey Songz; Brooklyn, NY with music executive Steven Victor in honor of Pop-Smoke; and Oakland, CA with Grammy award-winning (and Oscar-nominated), producer/singer/songwriter Raphael Saadiq. 

Challenge is focused on providing underserved and underprivileged community members with healthy fresh groceries, meat, and essential PPE supplies. The organization plans to produce these challenges throughout the country and spread their message for the betterment of families.  

July 25th at 2 pm PST at Baldwin Hills Mall (3650 W Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90008) 

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Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Coronavirus Awareness Through Art

By Mina Tocalini

Graphic designers, illustrators and all artists alike unite against the Coronavirus pandemic with creative messages of hope and safety. Open calls for creatives were presented by the United Nations, Amplifier, and others back in April for innovative designs and infographics. The Erase Covid community was formed in light of this as well and established a partnership with MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund  to help raise money for artists and musicians. While the Viral Art Project continues to invite artists via social media to submit Coronavirus awareness posters. 

The images created express gratitude for our health workers, safety tips, awareness and more throughout the pandemic, highlighting art’s power to connect and communicate. The Smithsonian Magazine reported how creativity continues on the street, as graffiti artists take their Coronavirus art directly to the public with images centered on increasing privatization, surveillance, increasing marginalization, corporatization, housing issues that have become more prevalent during the crisis. This pandemic has not only brought tragedy to our lives as we watch the death toll increase, but it has also illuminated the ineffective and injustice systems in place in this country that affect the poor, minorities and immigrants. With this in mind, we can turn to art to project our voice towards progress.

Art has always been at the forefront of communication and throughout this pandemic, creativity has triumphed, leaving us with hope for the social limitations in place and the future of this pandemic. If you are an artist, or looking to become one, or even just starting a new hobby, turn to this pandemic with a creative eye. Make art on proper hygiene practice, social distancing, social isolation, virtual communication, the importance of masks, social injustice, economic disparity, current politics or any other topic that coronavirus has impacted in our daily lives. Share your art on social media and stay connected, together we can help save lives and move our country forward.  

Expand your design/art community further on Talent House, Behance, DeviantArt and Dribble.

Additionally, 360 Magazine accepts Illustrated Editorials, if you are interested contact us HERE.

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Follow Viral Art Project: Instagram | Twitter

Follow Erase Covid: Facebook | Instagram