Posts tagged with "zoom"

Zoom Where It Happens

KEKE PALMER, WANDA SYKES, LORETTA DEVINE, LATANYA RICHARDSON-JACKSON,JACKEE HARRY AND BLAIR UNDERWOODTO BE FEATURED IN EPISODE 3“ZOOM WHERE IT HAPPENS”TONIGHT, OCTOBER 6 AT 6PM PST / 9PM EST SERIES DESIGNED TO IGNITE VOTER AWARENESS, PROTECTION AND TURNOUT

More Than 100,000 Registered to Watch the Series Since Its September 8th PremiereNew Episodes to Stream on Zoom Up to Election Day 2020 To Mobilize Voters

Tonight at 6:00 p.m. PST/ 9:00 p.m. EST, actors Keke Palmer, Wanda Sykes, Loretta Devine, Latanya Richardson-Jackson and Blair Underwood will appear in episode three of “Zoom Where It Happens,” the live table read series presented by Black women artists to raise awareness, intention and activation around voting rights. In partnership with Zoom, the third table read in the series will re-enact the iconic sitcom “227” and will be directed by Christine Swanson, produced by Emmy nominee Stephanie Allain and hosted by original “227” co-star Jackée Harry.

For the third installment of “Zoom Where It Happens,” Palmer will play Sandra, Sykes will portray Pearl, Richardson will portray Mary, Devine will assume the role of Rose Lee, and Underwood will appear as multiple male characters. The production team of this series also includes Richardson-Jackson, Ryan Bathe, Aisha Hinds, Cynthia Erivo, Tessa Thompson, Kerry Washington, Rashida Jones, Stefanie and Quentin James, Channing Dungey, Karen Richardson, Issa Rae and Ava DuVernay.

“Zoom Where It Happen” launched on September 8 with an episode of “Golden Girls” that attracted more than 100,000 RSVPs. The series returned on September 22 with a re-imagining of “Friends,” which included a livestream to Youtube once Zoom reached its registration capacity. It will continue with a rotating cast of actors up to Election Day 2020.

In addition to offering an evening of culture and live entertainment, “Zoom Where It Happens” aims to catalyze voters and amplify the fight for voting rights and electoral justice. To gain access to the free show, viewers register with their mobile numbers and sign up to receive ongoing election information from various social impact organizations. This week’s performance will connect viewers to PushBlack, the nation’s largest nonprofit media group for Black Americans. All episodes are live one-time only events, produced and performed on a volunteer basis.

Registration is open now here.

Follow the official hashtag #ZoomWhereItHappens for updates on tonight’s show and future “Zoom Where It Happens” episodes.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Independence Day Drink

2020 Labor Day Celebrations

By Cassandra Yany

In the face of COVID-19, Labor Day weekend looked very different his year. Absent were the large family cookouts and pool parties, or the big end-of-summer beach crowds. Many cities even had to omit public fireworks to prevent mass gatherings. Though the long weekend did not bring the celebrations we’re used to, there were still plenty of safe ways to enjoy the holiday.

Virtual events allow you to take part in more activities in different locations than you would have been able to physically. Made in America, a festival started by Jay-Z in 2012, was set to take place in Philadelphia this past weekend. On July 1, festival organizers announced that it would be rescheduled to Labor Day weekend 2021. They said in a statement “Collectively, we are fighting parallel pandemics, COVID-19, systemic racism and police brutality. Now is the time to protect the health of our artists, fans, partners and community as well as focus on our support for organizations and individuals fighting for social justice and equality in our country.”

This year’s lineup went unannounced, but last year’s festival was headlined by Travis Scott and Cardi B. Since the physical festival was canceled, a livestream showcasing the best performances took place on the music streaming service TIDAL throughout the weekend. The virtual festival included sets from Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Lizzo, Coldplay, Rihanna and many other chart-topping artists.

Nationally, a Labor Day virtual race was held by The Best Races for runners to run anywhere on their own time and submit their results. Participants who registered for the full package received a personal coach who was available Monday through Friday to provide help and answer questions during training, and provided encouragement and support on the day of the race.

Runners across the country were able to choose the distance of the race they wanted to participate in. Depending on what package they signed up for, they received a certificate of completion and digital medal, a 3-inch medal sent to their homes, a printable custom bib, a custom digital photo card that contains the race results, a digital running journal, a t-shirt, optional course maps and an optional pen pal program. 

Based in Portland, the Oregon Labor Movement held a statewide virtual Labor Day celebration and call to action on Monday. The organizers brought light to issues taking place in the state saying, “Working Oregonians are facing three crises at once: a deadly global pandemic, an economic free fall, and long-standing institutional racism.”

The event began at noon and featured talks from Oregon’s labor leaders, elected officials, and working Oregon citizens regarding their desire for change and their pursuit toward justice for workers. This event came after Portland’s rise to national prominence for their Black Lives Matter demonstrations and federal agents entering the city in recent months.

A number of virtual events were held in Los Angeles this past weekend, as well. HomeState, the LA-based Texas Kitchen, held its first Margarita Showdown in 2019, but had to move it online this year due to the pandemic and social distancing measures. The virtual event took place Saturday via livestream. Margarita makers in the area competed to see whose drink was the best.

Voters received eight bottled margaritas, along with limes and garnishing salt to try the different submissions from the safety of their homes. The winner chosen was El Compadre, a local Mexcian restaurant. The event was hosted by comedian Cristela Alonzo, and featured musical performances by Chicano Batman, Spoon, Questlove, Fred Armisen, Local Natives and Angela Muñoz. All proceeds from the event benefit the organization No Us Without You! and the Watts Empowerment Center.

The Gourmandise School of Sweets & Savories in Santa Monica hosted a virtual Labor Day Pies class on Sunday. In the class, participants were taught how to make a s’mores pie and key lime pie. Registration for the class included access to the Zoom video meeting, as well as the recipe and shopping list. Recipes can also be found on Gourmandise’s Instagram.

Some cities were able to hold in-person events following social distancing guidelines. Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, located in the Seaport District, upheld its tradition of free admission on Labor Day. The museum is typically closed on Mondays, but was open from 10 am to 5 pm for guests who reserved tickets. 

Monday was the last day for guests to see the exhibits Tschabalala Self: Out of Body and Carolina Caycedo: Cosmotarrayas. Also on display were the Sterling Ruby, Nina Chanel Abney and Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama exhibits. The ICA has increased cleaning and follows Massachusetts COVID guidelines by requiring all staff and visitors to wear face coverings, and allowing a restricted number of guests each hour. Spaces that don’t allow physical distancing are temporarily closed, and exhibition labels and printed materials have been made available online to reduce touch surfaces.


In New York City, a Labor Day Paint in the Park event was held in Central Park. The two-hour socially distant class was led by a master artist who gave step-by-step painting instructions. Participants were required to wear masks and sit six feet apart. Admission included a pre-sketched canvas and painting supplies, and parties were encouraged to bring food and drinks to snack on during the class.

For those who wanted to enjoy the holiday by relaxing at home with their favorite movie or TV show, a number of stores had sales to mark the end of summer. There were countless deals that shoppers could take advantage of to celebrate their work.
Many workers have faced great adversity within the past eight months, some losing their positions and having to move quickly to find a new one, and others doing their job in a way they never thought they would have to. Whether you stayed in or got out of the house for some socially-distant fun, Monday was definitely a day worth celebrating.

Football illustration by Rita Azar

‘Hard Knocks’ – Episodes 1 & 2

HBO’s ‘Hard Knocks’ is back, which, if you’re an NFL fan, is really exciting. It means that football is close. Fall is coming, training camp is starting and 32 teams will clash over the course of the next five months until only one is left holding the most coveted trophy in the game.

This year, things are looking a little bit different. The three other major sports in the United States had their seasons interrupted or delayed by the pandemic. The NFL finished its season about a month before everything began to close and we stopped gathering, so the league had some time to prepare if the virus was still around come August and September. Well, here we are in the middle of August, less than two weeks away from the opening month of the football season, and the pandemic is still changing the sports world.

This year’s version of ‘Hard Knocks’ is taking advantage of a huge opportunity. In 2015, the NFL had zero teams in Los Angeles. Now, the Rams and the Chargers both call it home. The Rams beat the Chargers there, but they’ll be sharing the brand new SoFi Stadium in Inglewood beginning this upcoming season. If they can share a stadium, why not share a documentary series? Double the teams, double the drama.

Just two episodes in, it’s obvious that this season is different from every other season of ‘Hard Knocks,’ and I don’t just say that because of the pandemic. If you’re a fan of the NFL, there’s so much star power to lay your eyes on this season, and the first episode doesn’t miss a chance to capitalize on that. We’re getting the inside scoop on guys like Aaron Donald, Jared Goff, Jalen Ramsey, Derwin James, Keenan Allen and Joey Bosa, who inked his five-year, $135 million deal right in front of us.

I think we tend to take the contract stuff for granted when it comes to these athletes. I know signing a nine-figure deal is life-altering, but it happens so often with these huge stars that we don’t think twice about it. If we do think twice, we’re either eyeballing the amount, criticizing it for being too high, or raising our eyebrows at the amount knowing the team is walking away with a star player for less than he or she is worth.

Before watching ‘Hard Knocks,’ I saw that Bosa signed the extension, but I didn’t think about the way it changed his life. That’s what I love about this show. These guys are freak athletes, built to withstand one of the most extreme sports for our entertainment, but they’re also humans. Bosa signing that deal is the climax in a long life of hard work and sacrifice, and he’s going to be able to provide for his family for generations if he’s wise with it.

I also love things like the juxtaposition between Sean McVay’s home life and Anthony Lynn’s home life. Lynn, the head coach of the Chargers, barbecues in his backyard and uses a napkin attached to a fork by a rubber band to brush sauce onto his chicken legs. McVay, the head coach of the Rams, cracks open a bottle of rosé with his fiancé at his outdoor glass fireplace overlooking the world.

We get to see Jalen Ramsey, who’s going into his first full season as a Ram, go house hunting. So far we’ve learned a lot about Ramsey as a competitor and a person, both on and off the field. He has been front and center for a couple of my favorite moments so far. First, in a Zoom meeting with reporters, he fields a question about a contract extension, which he doesn’t have yet. While we see many players around the league holding out of football activities for financial security, Ramsey insists that he’s in LA to play football, and his agent and the front office will handle the financials.

The reporters continue to pry, which sets Ramsey off, and he walks out of the interview. He does end up returning, but I get why he’s upset. I also get why the reporters are asking the question, so it’s a two-way street. While we’ve seen players say they have no plans to hold out then proceed to hold out, I still admire Ramsey for that position. It can’t be easy to negotiate million dollar deals and play football under normal conditions let alone the conditions we’re looking at right now.

Then, of course, we see how these two teams are handling the pandemic. Immediately upon arriving for preseason meetings, all of these players get their temperatures taken. They’re asked questions that probably aren’t too different from everyone visiting an office or an on-site job every day. Do you have a fever? Do you have a sore throat? Are you coughing? Have you been in contact with anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19?

Right in the back of my mind, I remember last season of ‘Hard Knocks’ when the Raiders had hundreds of guys in their meeting rooms. Jon Gruden, the head coach of the Raiders, would tell his team, “Knock on wood if you’re with me,” and the thunderous knocking of over 100 football players hitting their desks poured through the speakers.

These two teams can’t do that in 2020. We see team’s socially distancing and maintaining that six feet of separation everywhere they go. Team employees even use tape measures to make sure that locker hubs are six feet apart, and the teams don’t allow anyone to sit in the first four rows in meeting rooms. Everyone is masked up, including the coaches, and it seems like they’re truly doing their best to avoid the spread of the virus.

Also, as a huge baseball fan, I love that they use the Marlins as an example of how important the safety precautions are. One guy with the virus could cause an outbreak throughout the entire team and put the season on hold. It doesn’t just affect the person with the virus. It affects everyone they’ve already come in contact with and everyone they might come in contact with. One person can derail the entire season, and it’s fascinating to see such a fragile situation in the hands of men whom we normally think of as the strongest and toughest on the planet.

All of the players are also receiving tests on a regular basis. I don’t know what it was, but something about seeing Keenan Allen and Casey Hayward both act so nervous before their tests made me feel a little bit better about my outlook on the tests. To be completely honest, the fear of having the Q-tip shoved into my brain is making me more strict about my pandemic behavior. It feels good to see professional football players who are just as uneasy about the test as I am.

In the second episode, everyone in camp received a wristband, and while they don’t go too deep into how they work, I imagine they keep track of social distance. If they can figure out whose wristband has been fewer than six feet away from someone who tests positive, they might be able to shut it down quickly by quarantining those players.

They also get the option to wear face shields, which could be a very practical solution to the mask debate. In the first episode, Sean McVay makes a big deal about preferring the plastic face shield over the fabric mask, and it looks like the players will wear something really similar inside their helmets. It sounds like a simple solution to a huge problem. Teams can’t send their players onto the field in hazmat suits, but if they can avoid spitting and breathing on each other, I think that’s a huge step in the right direction.

As per usual, we get to watch all of these positional camp battles that we’d never get to be inside the locker room for without ‘Hard Knocks.’ I love that the second episode touches on Austin Ekeler, who is a star because of the preseason. He’s one of the guys who made the most of his opportunities, and now he’s a starter on a team that’s expected to compete. A lot of guys won’t have those preseason games to make an impression this year. They’ll get fewer reps in practice to show off their skillsets. While it’s not impossible to make an impression, it sure is more difficult.

I enjoyed seeing Justin Herbert work on his game. I remember when Kyler Murray first came into the league and had to learn to take snaps as a professional quarterback. He took a lot of heat for things like clapping to call for the snap, but it looks like he’s going to be just fine. I really hope Herbert can overcome that kind of criticism, which he’ll inevitably get. He has the arm talent, but we’ll get to see if he can overcome the transition.

I also loved seeing Anthony Lynn talk to his players about protests during a Zoom meeting, which launched into an entire conversation between coaches and players. Specifically, Lynn said that his main focus is football, but they can’t focus on football when injustices are taking place off the field, so Chargers players are encouraged to protest however they see fit.

The conversation continued in smaller Zoom groups. In one of those groups, Chargers long snapper Cole Mazza mentioned that he had family in the military who are very much against kneeling during the anthem. Chargers coaches and other players explained that the kneeling had nothing to do with the military and everything to do with racial injustice. I think that’s really important to see in a show like ‘Hard Knocks,’ which draws plenty of football fans on both sides of the issue. Those are the conversations that need to be had, and all players and coaches were extremely respectful of each stance.

To be completely transparent, I caught a Chargers game in Carson last season as a fan of an away team. Fans of the team I went to see probably outnumbered Chargers fans ten-to-one, and I’ve respected the Chargers since then. Their fans had good attitudes about the whole situation, and I felt bad for the players on the Chargers who didn’t play a game in front of a home crowd the entire year.

I’m pulling for them to have a better season and build a bigger fan base in their new market, so I’ll be tuning in every week for more ‘Hard Knocks.’ I’d probably be tuning in no matter which team was on the show, as we’ve been deprived of football for seven months, but I’m extra curious this year.

For anyone just as curious as I am, you can see a new episode of ‘Hard Knocks’ Tuesday on HBO at 10 p.m. EST, or you can stream the show on HBO Max. You can also catch the companion podcast on any podcast streaming platform or on YouTube and HBO Max.

Rita Azar illustrates a video game article for 360 MAGAZINE

Video Games x Standardized Testing

Standardized testing in schools is one of the most hotly contested subjects in academics. Does it actually measure academic skills and learning progress? Is there a better, more definitive way to measure those skills? Is standardized testing punishing hard workers and high achievers who also happen to be anxiety-ridden or bad test-takers?

In an interview with CMRubinWorld, video gaming industry veteran and founder of Breakaway Games Doug Whatley said the next step for these pesky measuring sticks is in the video game world.

“We already have simulation games that are capable of being used as a standardized test, so I think there is real promise for many types of tests to be replaced by games,” Whatley said, adding that games are often better, more secure and more affordable tests.

Whatley also predicted that free-to-play games and large market games would close the gap between the two.

“Mobile apps will get bigger and AAA games will get smaller using multiple season type distribution,” he said.

Whatley used that premise to make five more predictions. First, he said video games will cover a wider variety of content. Next, he said phones will become more powerful, thus driving more gamers to mobile devices as a gaming platform. Third, he expects to see games use new media platforms like Zoom and Google Classroom. Fourth, he expects to see more distribution in rolled out packages, like the already popular DLC model, and finally, he anticipates student-created content to be judged and used by peers.

The pandemic has forced education to adapt on its feet, and it appears technology and video games will be beneficiaries of its modern adjustments and pivots.

Rhea Roberts-Johnson in 360 MAGAZINE talks about Coachella and Goldenvoice.

Goldenvoice Black – Trailblazer

By Neecole Cockerham

Rhea Roberts-Johnson is the first Black woman to be promoted to a VP position at Goldenvoice, an AEG subsidiary. The new executive is also a new mother to an energetic toddler named Story, with her husband industry impresario Marcus Johnson.

As if having a career and being a full-time mom doesn’t take up enough time in the day, Goldenvoice staff and vendors have been forced to postpone Coachella, one of the world’s leading music festivals, due to the COVID-19. The coronavirus disease has created an unprecedented pandemic.

In the midst of the quarantine, the abnormally shut in citizens of the United States, witnessed via a cell phone recording, the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, who pressed his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds. At that moment Black people in the United States were forced into a position that challenged our civil liberties and stripped away our dignity as if we were inhumane. People of all races, from all walks of life took to the streets – men, women and children. The coordinated, mostly peaceful marches were organized by activists and the Black Lives Matter Movement. The protesters began to mobilize and protests began across the U.S and and on every continent around the world. People banded together for an unprecedented globalization of civil unrest and demanded change for the rights of Black people in America against the country’s systemic oppressed law enforcement agencies, and the society that inadvertently supported their actions.

The times are somewhat changing – as universal corporate offices have taken a short but hard look at themselves and the systemic racism that they have promoted through the years. Corporations are challenged with how they hire, retain and promote people of color within their organizations. They are being held to task to begin to fill openings with qualified Blacks and other people of color instead of continually engaging in white employment nepotism, frat boys and a Becky in tow.

The round table at Goldenvoice was a diverse group of people who acknowledged the repugnant feeling of what their eyes had seen and everyone’s heart had felt.

I sat down with Roberts-Johnson, to ask the down to earth, prestigious executive a few questions over a Zoom conference. I’ve known Rhea for a number of years, so it was easy to dive into a conversation that was just as she is – honest and candid.

Can you explain GV Black?

“Goldenvoice Black was birthed from round table discussions of Black employees, who for some time, have exchanged views of working as Blacks in a predominantly white environment – it is the voice of the people. GV Black has become a source of comfort to communicate what being Black means in today’s climate. Our social responsibility is to have acknowledgment from the corporation in which we work, the need to bring equality and more diversity to our workforce and to outline and monitor productive steps to insure that this equality is met.”

Do you have any fear in being a part of a revolutionary entity within the internal confines of a corporate environment?

“As a woman we are already marginalized in this environment. As a Black woman and a mother of a Black male child, I am more interested in social equity not just for now but for the future of those who come after me. I had no mirror to show me insight into how to maneuver in the world of behind the scenes entertainment. The conversations we were having at Goldenvoice were more than just about talking. We were all hurting just like many people and it was important for us to say something and even more important to agree on the actions that we would take to support diversity, elevate youth and develop community under the Goldenvoice umbrella.”

The music festival Coachella released its first statement ever about their position on injustice. The declaration issued by Coachella would be the words of Rhea Roberts-Johnson.

The poetic rhyme scheme is just 5 lines shy of a Sonnet and reads like a mission statement of hope:

We do not stand for injustice.

We do not stand for racism.

We do not stand for bigotry.

We stand for music.

We stand for celebration.

We stand for love.

We stand for unity.

We stand for Black Lives.

They Matter.

~Coachella

Now that the protesting has come to a halt, the pandemic is at an all time high; Goldenvoice employees are working from home or either furloughed… Goldenvoice recently posted on social media and received backlash from a few public critics, because of the word “bodies”..Can you comment on it?

“I’m actually glad that you asked this question. Before I go into what it means, I have to mention that the statement was written by Black employees, and had the public known that, it may have been received differently. Surprise! There are Black people that work at Goldenvoice (I’m sure that’s shocking to some since in its early days the company booked a lot of punk rock bands). We used the word “bodies” as a metaphor to draw attention to the objectification of Black people. Many types of Black and brown people in this country are dehumanized and not allowed the luxury of full humanity as so many others are. We also used it to emphasize the history of physical violence against Black people in our country whether it be through slavery, lynching, police brutality, etc. It’s a common term used by social justice activists, and having come from one of them, there probably wouldn’t have been a peep. Coming from a festival, some people were taken aback.”

Rhea I think to be silent nowadays is to be in agreement. Maybe those taken “aback” will be propelled into recognizing the truth and understanding the ladder is merely semantics.

What is next for GV Black?

“Without giving up too much too soon, we along with our non-Black allies at the company, are working diligently to create an even more inclusive environment for our employees, fans, artists, vendors, etc.”

Rhea Roberts-Johnson is a rare breed. She has a silent strength that exists when you can only imagine the amount of pressure that is being experienced to incite change. As we wait to see what’s next to come you can feel a glimmer of hope. Goldenvoice, GV Black and Coachella are consciously pioneering trailblazers for utilizing their platform to be all inclusive and unite people as one just as music does.

New National Scorecard on Juvenile Record Policies

Juvenile Law Center today launched Failed Policies, Forfeited Futures: Revisiting a National Scorecard on Juvenile Records – a national report evaluating state juvenile records policies. The organization will be holding a national press zoom call on the scorecard today at 12:30 pm EST.

The report updates a project the organization launched in the fall of 2014 – the nation’s first-ever, comprehensive evaluation of state juvenile record confidentiality and expungement laws against best practices for record protection. The 2014 study showed that over 50% of the states failed to adequately protect juvenile records, thereby limiting opportunities for youth exiting the juvenile justice system.

Six years later, Juvenile Law Center’s new report shows some reform but remaining widespread deficiencies in the legal protections necessary to keep juvenile records secure.

The report’s primary author, Staff Attorney Andrew Keats, emphasized the importance of reforming juvenile record laws. “Kids make mistakes,” said Keats. “The role of the juvenile justice system is to rehabilitate them to prevent future mistakes and ensure they can become productive members of society. These goals are frustrated by ongoing access to juvenile record information by law enforcement, schools, businesses and the public, long after a youth’s system involvement has ended.”

While some states acted quickly to reform their laws following release of the 2014 report, too many states continue to provide easy access to juvenile records, which push young people with system involvement—primarily Black and Brown youth—deeper into the criminal justice system and poverty. Juvenile Law Center hopes this new report will return a spotlight to this issue and drive states to do better by their youth. While overall incarceration rates of young people are down substantially since 2014, lax records laws will continue to impede opportunities for future success going forward.

“The collateral consequences of unprotected juvenile records fall most heavily on Black and Brown youth, who are far more likely to face obstacles to securing housing, employment, and a college degree than their white counterparts,” said Riya Saha Shah, Managing Director. “If we want to advance equity, strong juvenile records laws must be part of the solution.”

Mr. Keats and Ms. Shah are available for comment and interview. Please join them both at 12:30 pm EST for a national national press zoom call on the scorecard:

Meeting ID: 764 9954 1320

Passcode: Lm3N15

Juvenile Law Center advocates for rights, dignity, equity and opportunity for youth in the child welfare and justice systems. Founded in 1975, Juvenile Law Center is the first non-profit, public interest law firm for children in the country. We fight for youth through litigation, appellate advocacy and submission of amicus (friend-of-the-court) briefs, policy reform, public education, training, consulting, and strategic communications. Widely published and internationally recognized as leaders in the field, Juvenile Law Center has substantially shaped the development of law and policy on behalf of youth. We strive to ensure that laws, policies, and practices affecting youth advance racial and economic equity and are rooted in research, consistent with children’s unique developmental characteristics, and reflective of international human rights values.

startup, business, online, idea, entrepeneur

Krenicki Center Webinar Series

The John and Donna Krenicki Center for Business Analytics and Machine Learning in Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management will begin hosting a monthly webinar series that brings together speakers from academia and industry to talk about different topics of interest.

The first of the series, scheduled for 3-4 p.m. (EDT) July 14, will focus on two important and current issues.

Tom Aliff, senior vice president of Equifax, will discuss the economic and credit- trending elements and impacts of COVID-19. Krannert professor Karthik Kannan will address the notion of unfairness/bias that can creep into machine learning algorithms as analytics are increasingly used.

Kannan is Purdue’s Thomas Howatt Chaired Professor in Management and director of the John and Donna Krenicki Center for Business Analytics and Machine Learning. The center is used for conducting research, student-led consulting projects, conferences and competitions.

“Our center connects businesses with Purdue researchers to find answers to data-driven business challenges,” Kannan says. “We team faculty and graduate students from science, engineering, agriculture and management to utilize business data analytics to solve deep specialized problems.”

To register and receive updates and instructions on how to join the upcoming webinar on Zoom, click here.

coffee, mug, plate, cocoa, green, white, brown, 360 Magazine, illustration

Virtual Teens Take the MET

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will host the first Virtual Teens Take The Met! which will be held online on Friday May 29, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Teens will have the opportunity to digitally immerse themselves in hands-on experiences created by over 30 New York City cultural and community organizations and institutions, who have partnered with The Met for this day-long online festival. This event is free with registration encouraged, and will be accessible through several platforms including YouTube, Zoom, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and TikTok.

“Teens Take The Met!” has been held at the Museum bi-annually since 2014 and over the years has brought together over 30,000 young people for what has become one of the most dynamic events in New York City for teens. This spring, while the Museum is temporarily closed, the online event will offer a variety of activities, such as art-making, writing and poetry prompts, dance and movement workshops, as well as opportunities for teens to practice self-care and communication about COVID-19 while in isolation.

Led by The Met (@MetTeens) along with partner institutions, there will be new programming and activities every half-hour throughout the day, culminating with a Zoom party with DJ’s from Building Beats. Highlights include an art tour and talk with New York City Writing Project; a step tutorial with the Panthers Step Team from Bard High School Early College; collage and printmaking with El Museo del Barrio; ‘NamaShakespeare’ yoga with Titan Theatre Company; digital zine-making and an exploration of the impact of COVID-19 on incarcerated youth with Art and Resistance Through Education (ARTE); Poetry writing with Urban Word NYC; a fashion party with The Studio Museum in Harlem; and The Met will have a variety of art-making activities including flower crowns and tote bag DIY, ‘Teens Meme The Met’ activity and the Museum’s popular “Balcony Bar at Home,” with the quartet ETHEL, will feature teen musicians. A full schedule is below.

Teens can register

Virtual Teens Take The Met! complements the Museum’s existing selection of online materials, live and interactive programming, performances, and conversations with curators, educators, and artists, as well as #MetAnywhere social media initiatives. The Museum’s Art at Home hub is a resource for MetPublications, Primers, videos, 360-degree gallery tours, and educational materials, and the Virtual Events page is updated regularly. New highlights include a digital exhibition tour of Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara and the launch of an innovative AR audio experience with the zemí cohoba stand.

Teens and Screens During COVID-19

12 TIPS FROM THE EXPERTS FOR PARENTING TEENS ON SCREENS DURING COVID-19

This week, Children and Screens asked our experts to share their best advice for parents raising adolescents in the midst of the global pandemic. Just when parents thought that their teens couldn’t be on their devices for more hours in the day, initial data indicates that screen time among youth has increased dramatically during this time. Like younger kids, teens need guidance in managing their cognitive, emotional and physical health during this challenging and uncertain time, as well as boundaries and schedules for staying connected both on and offline. This age group is particularly susceptible to developing bad habits and addictions, so it’s more important than ever to continue encouraging a healthy relationship with screens and to give them the support they need.

Read on to learn the best ways to talk with your kids about technology and share beneficial screen time with your family; and, be sure to tune in to the next installment of our upcoming interactive popular webinar series this coming Tuesday, May 12th, at noon EDT, when our panel of experts will chat about healthy screen habits for teenagers and answer your questions via Zoom. RSVP here.

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

While it’s important to monitor the amount of time your child spends with screens, it’s even more important to monitor what they’re actually doing with that time. Talking with friends? Encourage it. Writing a journal? Experimenting with music? Wonderful. Support your child’s need for friendship and creativity while also helping them understand that time away from distractions, time for solitude and mind-wandering, is something you value. Screens open our worlds except when they take us away from ourselves. Getting this balance right means you and your children are talking, and in my view, if that’s happening, the rest will follow. And what really helps: no screens at dinner. Consider dinner to be a sacred space, a place for conversation. – Sherry Turkle, Professor, MIT. Author, Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less from Each Other and Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age.

LEAD THE WAY

With everyone cooped up at home, now is a great time for parents to play video games, watch movies and TV shows, and explore the world of social media with their kids. This kind of active media supervision allows parents to guide their children through the world of screens, and it’s been shown to have tremendous benefits in terms of behavior, academic success, and even physical health. This process also allows parents to understand more about the fantasy world of their kids, and it offers the chance for a healthy role reversal, one in which the child becomes the teacher and the parent can model good learning practices. – Paul Weigle, MD, child and adolescent psychiatrist, associate medical director of Natchaug Hospital, Hartford HealthCare

TURN OFF THE NEWS

Daily smartphone use has skyrocketed since mid-March, and students have noted that their largest increases come with apps devoted to communication and the news. One makes kids happy; the other scares them. In order to focus on the positive, older children should reach out to others through Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, etc. for at least an hour a day. Neuroscientists say this calms an overloaded brain. In order to limit the negative, try setting limits on their time reading news apps. At a certain point, they’re more likely to raise their blood pressure and increase their anxiety by mindlessly bingeing the news than they are to actually learn anything. – Dr. Larry Rosen, Professor Emeritus of Psychology

ROUTINES FOR TEENS

The world feels like a chaotic and unpredictable place right now. Trying to maintain a routine can give children and families a sense of normalcy.  This is especially important since, by necessity, schools have shifted a lot of the responsibility for education to students and families. Right now, schoolwork and entertainment are often happening on the same devices.  Structure and routine can help kids prioritize schoolwork, so they take care of those responsibilities before shifting to entertainment or socializing with friends.  It’s also important to maintain routines around bedtime and to encourage kids to turn off their electronics at least an hour before bed.  A good night’s sleep does wonders for mood and anxiety.  –  Dr. Dale Peeples, Associate Professor at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University

EMBRACE THE ANALOG

More time at home means more time for valuable family activities such as cooking, home repair, spring cleaning, yard work, gardening, and landscaping. Adolescents can also unleash their creativity via painting, making music, or crafts. For those with access, the dearth of cars allows for safer and more enjoyable bike rides and long walks. This is also a special opportunity to learn about family history. Teens can interview their extended relatives and create memorabilia such as scrapbooks or cookbooks. – Kristopher Kaliebe, MD, Associate Professor, University of South Florida

TAKE A BREAK

Don’t feel guilty about the increase in your child’s screen time. As the New York Times recently reported: Coronavirus ended the screen time debate, and screens won. It’s not just children’s screen time that’s surged lately, though. Parents rely on screens to follow the news, buy groceries, teach their children, talk with colleagues and friends, and keep up with elderly family members, who they’re no longer allowed to see in person. That means kids and parents alike face increased risk for physical side effects, including nearsightedness, computer vision syndrome, and neck and back problems. Although it’s difficult to limit total screen time at the moment, parents should insist on regular breaks, both for their kids and themselves. – Professor Patti M. Valkenburg, University of Amsterdam

KEEP SCREEN TIME AND BEDTIME SEPARATE

Don’t let your child’s normal bedtime shift too much later during this quarantine period. One way to enforce bedtime is to shut off screens at least one hour before lights out. When kids (and adults) use screens before bedtime, they’re more likely to want to “watch another episode,” further delaying their bedtime. They also may become psychologically stimulated by something they read or see, which may make it harder for them to fall asleep, even if they go to bed on time. In addition, bright light from screens can suppress the natural release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin. In other words, protect bedtime by reducing evening screen time. – Lauren Hale, Ph.D. – Professor, Department of Family, Population and Preventive Medicine Program, Program in Public Health, Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook University

THIS TOO SHALL PASS

Both you and your adolescent may find yourselves feeling anxious right now. Emphasize that regular life is sometimes interrupted in unexpected ways, but that things will eventually go back to normal. Help them avoid bingeing on COVID-19 news by steering them toward more healthy and enriching content, and remind them that now is a time for everyone to come together and help each other out. – Elizabeth K. Englander, PhD Director, Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University

HIT THE RESET BUTTON

Everyone’s a bit stressed these days, and kids can sense it. Many will turn to their favorite passive activities, especially those involving screens, as a way of managing their fears. If your children suddenly can’t tear themselves away from YouTube, more frequent check-ins with a gradual decrease in daily screen time may help to reset their “digital programming.” – Meredith Gansner, MD, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Cambridge Health Alliance

APPRECIATE THE LITTLE THINGS

Recognize that during this time, you will not be as efficient at your job, and your child will likely not learn as much as they would if they were physically attending school. This is all okay. The greatest lesson you can teach your teen, and learn with them, is that you are resilient. You can take a scary and chaotic situation and find beauty, purpose, and connection. – Colleen Kraft, MD

ASK FOR HELP

Now is a time when those teens who already struggle with their screen use are at risk of seriously losing control. Once an adolescent has fallen into addiction, tremendous family conflict is likely to ensue as parents try to take control. With families confined in their homes without a ready way to ease the tension, the situation may become volatile. Following the suggestions found here to create structure, build connections and encourage creative and social uses of tech and non-tech time may salvage the situation. But, if parents do find themselves dealing with an out-of-control teen and can’t seem to lead them onto healthier ground, there are counselors and coaches who specialize in internet addiction. Telehealth is not an ideal way to begin a helping relationship, but it may be what saves your sanity. – Dr. Hilarie Cash, Chief Clinical Officer and Co-Founder of reSTART Life, PLLC

DANGER AND OPPORTUNITY

Compared to adults, children and adolescents are typically less future-oriented, so present-moment experiences are particularly salient for them. As such, children and adolescents may be more inclined during the pandemic to turn to the internet for immediate gratification. There is potential danger in this: kids can get into patterns of gaming or social media consumption that may involve many hours of screen time, generate habits that may be problematic or difficult to break once the pandemic subsides, or engage in boundary-pushing or risky behavior without parental knowledge. However, there is also the opportunity here to involve youth in more adaptive patterns of internet use. For example, in the coming weeks and months, families may be foregoing in-person meetings in favor of remote holiday gatherings over the internet. Encouraging adolescents to help arrange and organize such events may provide opportunities for empowering youth to engage in more healthy forms of internet use. – Marc N Potenza, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine

As kids get older, their needs continue to evolve, but as our experts point out, many of the basic tenets of parenting in the digital age remain the same. With the independence of college and adulthood on the horizon, it’s important to reinforce thoughtful decision-making and responsible online behavior, and we hope these tips can help guide you and your family towards a healthy future together.

About Children and Screens

Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development is a 501C(3) national non-profit organization founded by Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra. Children and Screens advances interdisciplinary research, supports human capital in the field, informs and educates the public, and advocates for sound public policy for child health and wellness.

smartphones, cell, tech, app, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE, sara sandman

IAITAM: Cybersecurity Risks for Companies

IAITAM: TOO MANY COMPANIES, AGENCIES WITH VULNERABILITIES “WIDE OPEN TO ATTACK”  FROM BREACHES DURING COVID-19 STAY-AT-HOME SHUTDOWNS

After Issuing Repeated Warnings, IAITAM Highlights 4 Biggest Problems Happening Now.

Today, the International Association of IT Asset Managers (IAITAM) is warning that breaches of corporate and government data appear to be running at a level even higher than experts had feared going into stay-at-home orders due to COVID-19.

Last month, IAITAM repeatedly warned of “nightmare data risks” for unprepared government agencies & companies, especially as end-of-the month billing procedures were being carried out remotely.

IAITAM President and CEO Dr. Barbara Rembiesa said: “We anticipated that things would get bad. Companies and agencies may be hoping and praying they are safe, but the work-from-home environment has created a multitude of opportunities for leaks. Too many organizations have left themselves wide open for attack. Understanding the pathways for access within a company’s data network is a valuable lens for businesses and agencies to avert leaking their own assets.”

Based on its preliminary analysis of early published reports, IAITAM is breaking down the biggest problems into four categories:  

1. Assets left unsecure  –  An intentional decision to make devices less secure to allow for work from home (WFH) use.  One example would involve removing admin permissions so that employees can complete the task without administrator oversight. Another would be allowing the use of “unpatched” business computers that allow hackers to load malicious files with admin privileges.  In some cases, companies with high-end virtual private networks (VPNs) pre-loaded on business computers are allowing people to work from home on personal devices either with no VPN or with a lower-end virtual private network that may be less hacker resistant.

2. “New” assets created –  More and more reports are emerging of companies purchasing new devices or technology to account for employees working from home.  In one case reported directly to IAITAM a national health care company ordered 9,000 new laptop computers from a major online company and gave its IT department less than a week to prep the new machines and deliver them to users, who had little or no time for training and other security-related instructions. The concern:  The more corporate assets that you have, the higher risk of intrusion. Each asset becomes a doorway or entry point for a breach, particularly when it (or its user) are underprepared. IT Asset Managers help with this by providing the data necessary for corporate security teams to know what exists, where it exists, and what is on the device.

3. Assets now unsecure in at-home environments –  Many company devices were deployed into a WFH situation quickly, leaving little time to ensure that they would be secure via a virtual private network (VPN) or other means. Just last week, school districts in Oakland and Berkeley, California unwittingly became an accomplice in their own data breach by accidentally making Google Classroom documents public, which contained access codes and passwords for Zoom meetings, as well as student’s names and comments.

4. Employees unwittingly inviting in the intrusion –  Human error allows for mistakes and creates a vulnerability (i.e. clicking on phishing emails or downloading malware). Google reported last week that it is stopping 18 million coronavirus scam-related emails every day, many of them targeting cash strapped businesses looking for loans or other capital. An internal memo from NASA on April 6th revealed that increased cybersecurity attacks had been directed at their employees working remotely. These phishing attempts were disguised as appeals for help, disinformation campaigns or new information about COVID-19, to gain login credentials or install malicious software. This is a prime example of how an employee could unwittingly invite in an intrusion. IT Asset Managers are at the forefront of education and communication campaigns within organizations to help teach end users what they should and should not be doing.

Even companies that do not make a mistake themselves could still find themselves the victim of a coronavirus-related breach. Earlier this month, The Small Business Administration experienced a glitch with a coronavirus loan relief fund platform that publicly leaked the personally identifiable information of business owners across the nation.

The good news is that most or all of these issues can be mitigated with proper IT asset management (ITAM). Professionals in the ITAM industry facilitate corporate asset protection. Uncovering the vulnerabilities now, and then putting an action plan into place will save companies money in the end. If companies and businesses act now, they can turn today’s crisis into tomorrow’s opportunity.

IAITAM President and CEO Dr. Barbara Rembiesa recently went on camera
to share more about what companies and government agencies should be doing.

ABOUT IAITAM

The International Association of Information Technology Asset Managers, Inc., is the professional association for individuals and organizations involved in any aspect of IT Asset Management, Software Asset Management (SAM), Hardware Asset Management, Mobile Asset Management, IT Asset Disposition and the lifecycle processes supporting IT Asset Management in organizations and industry across the globe. IAITAM certifications are the only IT Asset Management certifications that are recognized worldwide. For more information, visit www.iaitam.org.