Posts tagged with "Ethics"

Heather Skovlund computer illustration for use by 360 Magazine

CSR In The Digital Age: With 360 Magazine

By: Kai Yeo

“We’re all connected through culture. Basically, we all must learn to adapt. We learn more through traveling and seeing more. When you’re in a different environment, everybody must love and laugh and dance. I don’t need to know your language. But companies need to focus on connecting everyone through love, not war.” – Vaughn Lowery

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for years, with its’ roots being found as early as the 18th Century. In my CSR research assignment before, I wrote that “the key idea of CSR is for companies to pursue pro-social objectives and promote volunteerism among employees (such as through donating to charity and participating in volunteer work), as well as by minimizing environmental externalities.” As an international student trying to find my career path in the United States, I find that company CSR is one of the first few things I look for when finding a suitable company to work with: how genuine they are and how much they care for their employees. The process of researching and writing my essay on CSR in the modern day and CSR within my internship site provided me with the valuable opportunity not only to learn about an important business topic, but also allowed me to develop a better understanding of what it is.

For my CSR Interview, I got the opportunity to speak on the phone with my supervisor Vaughn Lowery. His career started from “humble beginnings in Detroit to a full scholarship in Cornell University under the ILR program. From there, he became active in modeling, acting, and producing screenplays.” Now, Vaughn is the publisher and founder of leading fashion and lifestyle magazine, 360 Magazine, which is also my internship site. His job involves fostering relationships within the community and being an editorial director that curates and oversees content for all columns of the magazine. The position also entails making sure that Apple News, LinkedIn, Twitter, and all other news sites are updated. As a pop culture and design magazine, it is important to constantly be up to date with relevant content and breaking news. Being a quarterly publication, 360 is also working on their summer magazine issue. Vaughn mentions that with COVID making everything digital, the team has been working on expanding the business: creating a self-publishing division, developing e-commerce, getting sponsors, and most importantly, waiting for things to start opening back up.

With a background in studying business and company culture, Vaughn says that his education helped him design a company culture that made sense, “Transparency, cool kids, intelligence. I wanted a space for comfort regardless of race, age, and religion. Education was not the answer to my business but a part of the process to help with preparing for my magazine. The most important thing is life experiences, there are no books on it.” Vaughn emphasizes sending people in his company for events and communicating with clientele because “you can’t speak about things you don’t know.” COVID has made jobs in the media a little more mundane, but he’s excited about things opening back up and is hopeful for the future. Without in-person experiences, it is hard to understand the inner workings of media companies with everything being digitally produced.

Vaughn defines Corporate Social Responsibility at 360 Magazine as “having an environment that is inviting and inclusive, especially showcasing inclusivity.” As a magazine that promotes culture and lifestyle, it is important that everyone he works with is aware of what is going on in the world that we live in and what is happening with minority populations. He speaks about being the only African American in a lot of his school and work experiences, and he created 360 with the ideal of having more minorities and women working in his company: “We all live in the same world… and some people don’t know that. But we need representation and for people to see us. It’s not on us to educate them, but it’s on us to speak up.” 360 avidly speaks up for diversity (#metoo) and openly supports nonprofit organizations.

When asked about how veritable he thinks big companies are with CSR movements, he says that they’re doing it for a myriad of reasons. Companies get away with more stuff as a corporation, “But the responsibility is about being genuine. The board of directors and Zoom calls and the whole spiel. If they’re trying to just make money, revenue principals are not true to themselves. 360 was founded on real culture. The diversity is important. It is what it is.”

“Your company diversity is a reflection of the world, we’ve been doing this since the start of 360, we’ve been ahead of the trend.” The magazine has always featured drag queens, people who are transgender, and minorities, “This is very important when doing events and stuff, it’s a big family. We have less than 50 people. And it’s important for our clients to know that we have each other and rely on each other. That we know how to respect one another and appreciate each other, despite all odds.” Vaughn believes that diversity and inclusion of people of color has always been important, and he emphasizes that 360 will keep pushing these agendas and morals as long as he’s the head of the company. I see this in his effort to get everyone together (even if it is just on Zoom for now) to celebrate big articles, book releases, sponsorships, and so on.

As I type this interview essay, I find two key points to really reflect on: 1) assumptions about company morale and 2) why diversity is so important to me.

1) I think back on everyone else I’ve spoken to during my time as an intern here with 360, and I find that these core values that Vaughn spoke about with me are reflected in all the conversations I’ve had with him and other employees. Coming from a very structured, patriarchal Asian background, I came into this internship thinking that it would be like all my previous experiences (they talk of diversity, but it’s never really executed once you’re a part of it – school projects, internships, part-time jobs, and so on). However, no one in the company has been curt or condescending when speaking with me, and they truly mean it when they point out mistakes and gently correct me. Maybe it is because of the way I was brought up, or the environment I was most familiar in, but these good intentions had me on my toes for the first couple weeks I was here, and I’m honestly still getting used to it.

2) With the rise of Asian hate crimes in the past year, I find myself turning very reclusive and immediately trying to find fault with people when something brushes me the wrong way (though sometimes it really is a racist comment or remark). It’s been difficult having to correct people when they say my name wrong or trying to explain my culture when these simple things can so easily be looked up online. I’ve been very lucky growing up well-traveled and seeing different parts of the world, and I understand that not everyone has that privilege, but how far does “I don’t know” get you in the digital age? I need to work in a company where people are willing to learn and grow new perspectives, and I see this quality in Vaughn too as he speaks about his loneliness as the only African American in his industry when he was first starting out.

After 45 minutes of talking about diversity and the whole CSR conversation winding down, Vaughn tells me to keep doing what I love, “Understanding the industry through work experiences is how you’ll get in. It’s constantly changing.” He talks about learning to forecast and foreshadow and having connections at arms’ reach. By the end of our conversation, I felt that I learnt a lot and could have a clearer vision of what I wanted out of this internship. I’ve had the opportunities to go for company events (for brands including Lillet, Chinese Laundry, Rockstar Original, etc.), though I would really like to be able to go to a CSR event in the near future to promote these same values that I share with 360 Magazine.

To read more about Vaughn Lowery, please visit his Wikipedia and IMBD.

LGBTQIA via Gabreille Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

Ten Reasons Brands Should Celebrate Pride Month

By: Skyler Johnson 

As Pride Month approaches, it’s expected that we’ll see a number of pride-related products pop up. There are people that think brands celebrating Pride Month is “tacky” or “preachy.” However, it’s still important for brands to show their support for the LGBTQIA+ community, even if it’s just in the month of June. Here are a few reasons why:

10. Celebration of Pride Month Wasn’t As Good In 2020

Because of the Black Lives Matter Protests and Covid-19, brands didn’t celebrate Pride Month in 2020 the way they had in previous years. While they could have done both, a lot of companies didn’t. So, it’s extra important this year for brands to show that they still care about LGBTQIA+ individuals through celebrating Pride Month extra hard.

9. Generates Profit for Brands

Statistically, being in support of the LGBTQIA+ community has been shown to increase company sales. People will have more respect for those companies, and will be more likely to purchase their products. 

8. Supports LGBTQIA+ People for No Cost

While brands may have to change the packaging, that’s all they need to do to support Pride Month. There’s no real loss that can be had towards brands celebrating Pride Month, except for a few people thinking that it’s “preachy.”

7. Shows the Power of Brands

Brands are more powerful than you might think. After all, we’re constantly seeing them, and they are always affecting our lives, even if we don’t realize it. Everything we do– from brushing our teeth to putting on clothes–has us interacting with brands. And the actions of brands do affect us. Think about the uproar that Discord received over changing their logo. People got legitimately upset over the actions of a corporation. So people will be affected by brands that are supporting the LGBTQIA+ community, and may change a negative stance if their favorite brand supports it.

6. Recognizes the History of Hate Towards LGBTQIA+ People in the U.S.

It’s sickening how much hatred has been directed towards people just trying to live their lives. For a long time, there were laws that prohibited homosexuality and being trans was virtually impossible. 2015 was the year when gay marriage was declared legal, and that was only six years ago. Because of the long struggle with homophobia and transphobia, it’s important to recognize these people, and show them we care through the brands we as Americans deem as important.

5. Decreases Homophobia and Transphobia in the World

Although Americans are more accepting of LGBTQIA+ individuals compared to other countries (and even we’re not perfect), there are other countries that are much worse. A lot of countries still have laws that prohibit gay and trans individuals from being themselves. Given the international nature of these brands, they can help change the mindsets of people in countries that are much less accepting than the U.S.

4. Encourages Workplace Diversity

If members of the LGBTQIA+ community see that companies support them, they’ll be more likely to apply for jobs within the company. Diversity in the workplace has been shown to increase profit margins. 

3. Raises Awareness

I wouldn’t know about Marsha P. Johnson if they weren’t honored by Google during Pride Month. Brands can give people information on important people in the LGBT community, and makes people aware of history that would otherwise be forgotten. I was never taught about the Stonewall Riots in school, but Google allowed me to find information on this important piece of LGBTQIA+ history.

2. Supports LGBTQIA+ Individuals

LGBTQIA+ artists and creators have been historically marginalized due to their identity. There was a time, not long ago, when your career would end as a result of coming out. Now that there are more and more creatives able to have careers despite, or even because of, their identity. Brands should support those individuals via including them in their ad campaigns or creating a product inspired by them. Smirnoff’s partnership with drag queen Alyssa Edwards is a great example.

1. Gives Brands a Reason to Donate to Show they Care

A lot of brands have donated part of their proceeds to charity. LGBTQIA+ people are thus given the resources they need to survive and thrive.

scholastics illustration by sara davidson for 360 Magazine

Robert George Joins Pepperdine Faculty

Philosopher and Legal Scholar Robert P. George Joins Faculty at Pepperdine Caruso School of Law and School of Public Policy.

Princeton University professor Robert George has been named the inaugural Nootbaar Honorary Distinguished Professor of Law at the Caruso School of Law and the Ronald Reagan Honorary Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at the School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University. George will commence his new roles at Pepperdine in fall 2021 and serve a five-year term. He will continue to serve as McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University where he is a full-time faculty member. As an honorary distinguished professor at both schools, he will be invited to give academic lectures, lead student colloquia, and participate in other speaking engagements with members of the Pepperdine community.

“I am delighted that Dr. George has accepted our invitation to affiliate with our schools of public policy and law as an honorary distinguished professor. His national platform and influential voice will elevate the conversation of respectful discourse and intellectual freedom at Pepperdine,” said Jim Gash (JD ’93), president of Pepperdine University. “Dr. George brings to Pepperdine his passion to invest in the leadership development of students, which is one of our most cherished core values.”

George was introduced to the University community at the inaugural President’s Speaker Series event in January 2021, where he joined fellow professor and political scholar Cornel West for a discussion about honesty, civility and courage through the lens of faith. During the event George expressed that universities have a sacred mission to open students’ minds to the truth and to encourage the pursuit of information from opposing sides in order to better understand and defend the truth.

“Pepperdine is one of the world’s truly great Christian universities—an institution that embodies the conviction that faith and reason are the ‘two wings on which the human spirit ascends to contemplation of truth,’” said George. “Some years ago I was delighted to speak at Pepperdine’s Commencement and become an honorary alumnus. I’m thrilled now to deepen my relationship with the University’s exceptional faculty and student body by becoming an honorary distinguished professor of law and public policy.”

The Ronald Reagan Honorary Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, which is the most distinguished of the School of Public Policy’s visiting professorships, was launched in the program’s first years and approved by Nancy Reagan. As the school’s first-ever visiting professorship, and the only professorship in the president’s name at any policy program in the United States, the position was initially endowed and facilitated by University supporter Flora L. Thornton.

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Swarthmore College, George holds degrees from Harvard University and Oxford University, in addition to 22 honorary degrees. He is a recipient of the US Presidential Citizens Medal, the Honorific Medal for the Defense of Human Rights of the Republic of Poland, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The University of Dallas and the American Enterprise Institute host the Robert P. George Initiative in Faith, Ethics, and Public Policy in Washington, D.C. His most recent book is Conscience and Its Enemies.

To learn more about Dr. Robert George visit the Pepperdine Newsroom.

Laura Harrier X Danielle Macdonald

Suzy Amis Cameron’s Red Carpet Green Dress (RCGD) celebrates its 10th anniversary showcasing sustainable fashion. In honor of 10 years rocking sustainable dresses on the red carpet, RCGD is pleased to announce that Laura Harrier, from this year’s six-time Oscar nominated film BlacKkKlansman, and Danielle Macdonald, from the Oscar nominated short film Skin and Netflix’s acclaimed DUMPLIN’, will be representing RCGD at the 91st Academy Awards. They will be wearing ethical gowns designed by global fashion houses.

Each year the RCGD campaign has worked with internationally acclaimed designers to dress stars in sustainable formal wear for the Academy Awards®.

To qualify as a RCGD eco-conscious garment, each piece must either be made from sustainable materials, including organic, recycled or repurposed fibers. Other features include using hand-made detailing or incorporating natural dye processing, with a dedicated focus on minimal negative impact on the environment, and environmentally and socially responsible design.

In honor of the 10th anniversary, this year’s sustainable criteria will be overseen by Good On You, a new partner of RCGD. Good On You is the world’s leading rating system on ethical and sustainable fashion to assist people in making positive shopping choices–all delivered through an accessible app.

“I can’t believe it has been 10 years since RCGD was born,” shares founder Amis Cameron. “It has been an incredible journey and inspiring to see how the campaign has grown every year. I am so proud of helping people become more aware of what sustainable fashion can look like and its impact on the planet. What we wear and the fashion industry has a tremendous impact on the environment—and people’s choices can move the marketplace and the climate change needle. From changing one of your meals a day to a plant-based meal, to wearing vintage or ethically made clothes, we can all make a difference. Thank you to everyone for your continued support and joining the green revolution!”

Suzy Amis Cameron is an actress, environmental advocate, and author of OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline and Save the Planet. She was inspired to create RCGD back in 2009 on her husband, James Cameron’s press tour for “AVATAR”. She wanted to challenge designers to think about fashion in an eco-conscious context.  Since RCGD’s inception, a variety of celebrities have represented the initiative at the Oscars, including Emma Roberts (Scream Queens), Sophie Turner (X-Men, Game of Thrones), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Gina Rodriguez (Annihilation, Jane the Virgin), Priyanka Bose (Lion), Kellan Lutz (Twilight), Lakeith Stanfield (Get Out), Zoey Deutch (The Set Up), Camila Alves, Jake McDorman (American Sniper), Missi Pyle (Gone Girl), and many others. To date, the brands who have partnered and supported RCGD range from TESLA, Vivienne Westwood and Armani, to ESMOD, Reformation, Swarovski, among others.

Proceeds from RCGD go to MUSE School CA, a nonprofit environmental school Amis Cameron founded in Calabasas, Calif. with her sister, Rebecca Amis. This assistance enables students to access a transformative educational experience. MUSE School CA ensures smaller class sizes with personalized instruction and learning practices; all set within an inspiring and beautiful campus. Through these key elements, MUSE School CA paves the way in creating leaders of the future. For more information, go towww.museschool.org.

RE-ENGINEERING HUMANITY

Everyday new warnings emerge about artificial intelligence rebelling against us. All the while, a more immediate dilemma flies under the radar. Have forces been unleashed that are thrusting humanity down an ill-advised path, one that’s increasingly making us behave like simple machines?

Have a look at the book’s website.

About the Authors

Brett Frischmann is The Charles Widger Endowed University Professor in Law, Business and Economics at Villanova University. He is also an affiliated scholar of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, and a trustee for the Nexa Center for Internet & Society, Politecnico di Torino. He has published foundational books on the relationships between infrastructural resources, governance, commons, and spillovers.

Evan Selinger is Professor of Philosophy at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he is also the Head of Research Communications, Community, and Ethics at the Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction, and Creativity. A Senior Fellow at the Future of Privacy Forum, his primary research is on the ethical and privacy dimensions of emerging technology. Selinger is a prolific writer and his next anthology is The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, co- edited with JulesPolontesky and OmerTene (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2018). A strong advocate of public philosophy, he regularly writes for magazines, newspapers, and blogs, including The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, and Wired.

Advance Praise Re-Engineering Humanity

Frischmann and Selinger provide a thoroughgoing and balanced examination of the tradeoffs inherent in offloading tasks and decisions to computers. By illuminating these often intricate and hidden tradeoffs, and providing a practical framework for assessing and negotiating them, the authors give us the power to make wiser choices.

Nicolas Carr, author of The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, from the Foreword

Re-Engineering Humanity brings a pragmatic if somewhat dystopic perspective to the technological phenomena of our age. Humans are learning machines and we learn from our experiences. This book made me ask myself whether the experiences we are providing to our societies are in fact beneficial in the long run.

Vint Cerf, Co-Inventor of the Internet

Frischmann and Selinger deftly and convincingly show why we should be less scared of robots than of becoming more robotic, ourselves. This book will convince you why it’s so important we embed technologies with human values before they embed us with their own. Douglas Rushkoff, author of Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, and Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.

Everybody is suddenly worried about technology. Will social media be the end of democracy? Is automation going to eliminate jobs? Will artificial intelligence make people obsolete? Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger boldly propose that the problem isn’t the rise of ‘smart’ machines but the dumbing down of humanity. This refreshingly philosophical book asks what’s lost when we outsource our decision-making to algorithmic systems we don’t own and barely understand. Better yet, it proposes conceptual and practical ways to reclaim our autonomy and dignity in the face of new forms of computational control.

Astra Taylor, author of The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Control in the Digital Age

A magnificent achievement. Writing in the tradition of Neil Postman, Jacque Ellul and Marshall McLuhan, this book is the decade’s deepest and most powerful portrayal of the challenges to freedom created by our full embrace of comprehensive techno-social engineering. A rewarding and stimulating book that merits repeated readings and may also cause you to reconsider how you live life.

Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School, and author of The Attention Merchants

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press dates from 1534 and is part of the University of Cambridge. We further the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Playing a leading role in today’s global marketplace, we have over 50 offices around the globe, and we distribute our products to nearly every country in the world. We publish titles written by authors in over 100 different countries.

hhuhuh via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Internet Policy

1. Purpose.

The purpose of this policy is to ensure the proper use of 360 MAGAZINE, INC’s (hereinafter referred to as Company) internet system and make its employees and users aware of what the Company deems as acceptable and unacceptable use of its internet system. This policy also provides for sanctions in the event of a breach or violation of the policy terms hereunder.

2. Applicability.

This Policy applies to all users of company technology, including employees, contractors, vendors, partners, associates, and any other parties accessing or using the Company’s System through on-site or remote terminals.

3. Disclaimer of liability for use of Internet.

The Company is not responsible for material viewed or downloaded by users from the Internet. The Internet is a worldwide network of computers that contains millions of pages of information. Users are cautioned that many of these pages include offensive, sexually explicit, and inappropriate material. In general, it is difficult to avoid at least some contact with this material while using the Internet. Even innocuous search requests may lead to sites with highly offensive content. In addition, having an e-mail address on the Internet may lead to receipt of unsolicited e-mail containing offensive content. Users accessing the Internet do so at their own risk.

4. Duty not to waste computer resources.

Employees must not deliberately perform acts that waste computer resources or unfairly monopolize resources to the exclusion of others. These acts include, but are not limited to, sending mass mailings or chain letters, spending excessive amounts of time on the Internet, playing games, engaging in online chat groups, printing multiple copies of documents, or otherwise creating unnecessary network traffic. Because audio, video and picture files require significant storage space, files of this or any other sort may not be downloaded unless they are business-related.

5. No expectation of privacy.

The computers and computer accounts given to employees are the exclusive property of the Company. No individual should have any expectation of privacy in any communication over this System. The System is to be used solely for company-related business, and is not to be used for personal business or pleasure.

6. Monitoring computer usage.

The Company reserves the right to monitor, intercept and/or review all data transmitted, received or downloaded over the System. Any individual who is given access to the System is hereby given notice that the Company will exercise this right periodically, without prior notice and without the prior consent of the employee. The Company’s interests in monitoring and intercepting data include, but are not limited to: protection of company proprietary and classified data; managing the use of the Company’s computer System; preventing the transmission or receipt of inappropriate materials by employees; and/or assisting the employee in the management of electronic data during periods of absence. No individual should interpret the use of password protection as creating a right or expectation of privacy. In order to protect everyone involved, no one can have a right or expectation of privacy with regards to the receipt, transmission or storage of data on the Company’s Internet System.

7. Blocking of inappropriate content.

Company may use software to identify inappropriate or sexually explicit Internet sites. Such sites may be blocked from access by Company networks. In the event you nonetheless encounter inappropriate or sexually explicit material while browsing on the Internet, immediately disconnect from the site, regardless of whether the site was subject to company blocking software.

8. Prohibited activities.

Material that is fraudulent, harassing, embarrassing, sexually explicit, profane, obscene, intimidating, defamatory, or otherwise unlawful, inappropriate, offensive (including offensive material concerning sex, race, color, national origin, religion, age, disability, or other characteristic protected by law), or in violation of Company’s equal employment opportunity policy and its policies against sexual or other harassment may not be downloaded from the Internet or displayed or stored in Company’s computers. Employees encountering, witnessing or receiving this kind of material should immediately report the incident to their immediate supervisor and Vaughn Lowery, by phone at 213-841-1841 or email at vaughn@the360mag.com. Company’s equal employment opportunity policy and its policies against sexual or other harassment apply fully to the use of the Internet and any violation of those policies is grounds for discipline up to and including discharge.

9. Games and entertainment software.

Employees may not use the company’s Internet connection to download games or other entertainment software, including wallpaper and screen savers, or to play games over the Internet.

10. Illegal copying.

Employees may not illegally copy material protected under copyright law or make that material available to others for copying. You are responsible for complying with copyright law and applicable licenses that may apply to software, files, graphics, documents, messages, and other material you wish to download or copy. You may not agree to a license or download any material for which a registration fee is charged without first obtaining the express written permission of your immediate supervisor and Human Resources.

11. Accessing the Internet.

To ensure security and to avoid the spread of viruses, employees accessing the Internet through a computer attached to Company’s network must do so through an approved Internet firewall. Accessing the Internet directly by modem is strictly prohibited unless the computer you are using is not connected to the company’s network.

12. Virus detection.

Files obtained from sources outside the company, including disks brought from home; files downloaded from the Internet, newsgroups, bulletin boards, or other online services; files attached to e-mail; and files provided by customers or vendors may contain dangerous computer viruses that may damage the company’s computer network. Employees should never download files from the Internet, accept e-mail attachments from outsiders, or use disks from non-company sources, without first scanning the material with company-approved virus checking software. If you suspect that a virus has been introduced into the company’s network, notify the Help Desk immediately.

13. Sending unsolicited e-mail (spamming).

Without the express permission of their supervisors, employees may not send unsolicited e-mail to persons with whom they do not have a prior relationship.

14. Amendments and revisions.

This policy may be amended or revised from time to time as the need arises. Users will be provided with copies of all amendments and revisions.

15. Violations of this policy.

Any employee who abuses the privilege of access to the Company’s Voicemail, E-mail or the Internet System will be subject to corrective action, up to and including termination. If necessary, the Company also will advise law enforcement officials of any illegal conduct.

16. Use of Internet.

Use of the Internet via Company’s computer system constitutes consent by the user to all of the terms and conditions of this policy.

17. Points of Contact.

Questions concerning the use of the Internet System should be directed to Vaughn Lowery, by phone at 213-841-1841 or email at vaughn@the360mag.com. Questions concerning the improper use of the System should be directed to the employee’s immediate supervisor and Vaughn Lowery, by phone at 213-841-1841 or email at vaughn@the360mag.com.

Community Service via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine