Posts tagged with "The Atlantic"

H.E.R. Impresses with Live Performances

This past Saturday, H.E.R., the two-time Grammy Award winning singer, songwriter and musician, made her stellar debut on the iconic Saturday Night Live stage with captivating performances of “Damage” and “Hold On.”  The studio versions of both songs are currently available at all digital service providers.

The performances have garnered praise from fans and press alike, including NPR, Entertainment Weekly, Billboard, UPROXX, The Atlantic and Rolling Stone who stated: “For ‘Damage,’ H.E.R. replicated the vibes of the track’s live music video released earlier this week, while the ballad ‘Hold On’ allowed the singer to show off her guitar chops…” H.E.R.’s SNL debut adds to a long impressive list of performances from the dynamic artist, including this year’s Emmy Awards with her beautiful rendition of Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U,” and two consecutive performances on the Grammy Awards in 2019 and 2020.

Tomorrow night, October 27, H.E.R. returns to Jimmy Kimmel Live! to perform “Damage,” followed by the virtual Xfinity Awesome Gig Powered by Pandora on October 29 at 9pm EDT. Fans can RSVP for the free event HERE.

With a brand new full-length album on the horizon, H.E.R. recently became the second artist to score four #1 hits within two years on the Billboard Adult R&B Songs chart with her latest feature on Lonr’s “Make the Most.” Previous #1 chart-toppers were “Focus” and her collaborations with Skip Marley on “Slow Down” and Daniel Caesar on “Best Part.” The first to achieve this feat was Toni Braxton, who H.E.R. recently collaborated with on Toni’s new single “Gotta Move On.”

Click the links below to watch her SNL performances plus more and stay tuned for more news on the musical prodigy.

SNL Performance of “Damage

SNL Performance of “Hold On

“Damage” Music Video

“Damage” Track

“Hold On” Track

About H.E.R.

In a short period of time, H.E.R. has accrued over 7.5 billion combined audio and streams worldwide (5B in the US) – and counting – of the breakthrough projects H.E.R. (RIAA-certified Platinum), I Used To Know Her, and hit singles including “Slide” featuring YG, the powerful track “I Can’t Breathe” and her latest, “Damage.” Accumulating ten Grammy nominations and two wins in just two years, H.E.R. has proven herself as an R&B force to be reckoned with.  In 2019, the singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist won two Grammy Awards for Best R&B Album (H.E.R.) and Best R&B Performance (“Best Part” featuring Daniel Caesar) and a NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Female Artist.

H.E.R. has captivated audiences with stellar live performances on Saturday Night Live, Grammy Awards, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Let’s Go Crazy: The Grammy Salute to Prince, A BET COVID-19 Relief Effort Special, Graduate Together: America Honors the High School Class of 2020 and all the late night television shows – The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, The Late Late Show with James Corden, and Late Night with Seth Meyers. She has also participated in fundraising activities to benefit various charity efforts including COVID relief and Black Lives Matter.

H.E.R. and producer partner Live Nation Urban introduced Lights On Festival, the first female owned and curated R&B festival in decades. While the world was under quarantine due to COVID-19, H.E.R. created “Girls With Guitars,” an Instagram Live performance and conversation series which features guest appearances by Sheryl Crow, Melissa Etheridge, Willow Smith, Tori Kelly, Alessia Cara, Chloe x Halle, Lianna La Havas, Nai Palm (Hiatus Kaiyote) and more. In addition to starring in Pepsi’s new “Zero Sugar. Done Right” Super Bowl LIV commercial alongside Missy Elliott, this year saw the launch of her very own eyewear partnership with Diff with a charitable component, Capsule collaboration with Lewis Hamilton and Tommy Hilfiger, and her own signature guitar line with Fender.

Image Credit: NBC/WILL HEATH

Community illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Renewal Award Winners 

A global pandemic. Racial injustice. Extreme political polarization. In an incredibly challenged moment for the country, extraordinary people in communities across America are working tirelessly to light the way forward. Community-based organizations have become essential lifelines, which is why five nonprofits that represent the brightest lights were chosen as recipients of this year’s Renewal Awards.

The Renewal Awards, presented by The Atlantic and Allstate, is a national competition recognizing organizations that use innovative solutions to create lasting change in their communities. This year’s winners are the 5th class of award recipients and were selected from more than 13,000 nominations. Each winner receives a $40,000 grant to amplify their mission of helping others, along with national recognition that elevates their profile and awareness for their work.

Despite facing significant funding and staffing challenges in this unprecedented year, the winning organizations continue to stay relentlessly focused on the most pervasive and systemic challenges affecting society—homelessness, educational equity, skills and job training, and children and families in need. Each organization serves different needs, but all are united by a core belief that defines our times—no matter who we are, we can lift each other up in times of need.

2020 WINNERS

  • Choose 180 (Burien, WA): Engages youth in critical moments and empowers them to make positive changes in their lives, especially when facing jail time or school expulsion. *Allstate Youth Empowerment Award Winner.
  • College to Congress (Washington, D.C.): Levels the playing field and fosters bipartisanship for congressional interns, providing both financial support and mentorship across the aisle.
  • Facing Homelessness (The BLOCK Project) (Seattle, WA): Integrates 125-square-foot detached accessory dwelling units in residential backyards to reduce homelessness.
  • Hello Neighbor (Pittsburgh, PA): Supports recently resettled refugees with mentorship, educational training, and community events.
  • More Than Words (Waltham, MA): Empowers youth who are in foster care, court-involved, homeless, or out of school by helping to run a bookstore.

The Atlantic’s Ron Brownstein writes about the work of this year’s winners, and the larger story they tell about the country, in a piece published today: “Real Reform Comes From Civic Stamina”. “We are proud to continue this critical partnership with Allstate, especially during the unprecedented events dramatically affecting all communities across the country,” said Hayley Romer, The Atlantic’s Publisher and CRO. “The generous spirit and relentless work modeled by these community leaders is inspiring and driving the progress we need.”

“2020 has changed our way of life, yet these five organizations continue to find ways to serve others despite the enormous challenges they face,” explained Stacy Sharpe, Allstate’s Senior Vice President of Corporate Brand. “These amazing community leaders should remind us all that anything is possible when you know your purpose and have the passion to create a lasting impact.”

Finalists were selected by The Atlantic’s editors and writers. Winners were evaluated by a panel of judges who include former Mayors Rahm Emanuel (Chicago) and Karen Freeman-Wilson (Gary, IN); Anne Marie Burgoyne, managing director of social innovation at Emerson Collective; Kate Nack, director of The Allstate Foundation; former Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Florida); and two past Renewal Award winners, Juedy Mom, director of The Compton Initiative, and Pamela Urquieta, CEO and Executive director of Let’s Innovate Through Education. Allstate selected the Youth Empowerment Award winner.

Started in 2015, The Renewal Awards spotlight grassroots solutions to challenges faced by communities around the country and the people making a positive difference. The awards are the flagship initiative of The Renewal Project, The Atlantic and Allstate’s broader partnership that covers innovation and celebrates change-makers in local communities. With this year’s award, 31 organizations have received more than $800,000 in funding from The Atlantic and Allstate to further their work. To learn more about the awards, and read about past winners, please visit TheRenewalProject.com.

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Family illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

I Miss My Grandfather

By DH Cermeno

Relationships between grandparents and their grandchildren is something that families take great pride in and enjoy to immeasurable degrees. Unfortunately, the current quarantine has put many grandparents into situations where they are unable to see their families, and I went through something similar with my own grandfather years ago.  But the difference is that today’s grandparents are doing what they can to ensure they can see their grandchildren once the quarantine is over, just as referenced in this article by Robin Marantz Henig. But that does not mean that the process is not difficult.

I miss my grandfather. He has been gone for almost 40 years but our relationship is one that I have treasured all of my life.  I remember his warmth, his wisdom, and above all his affection. My grandfather introduced me to wonderful things life had to offer such as jazz and the comic genius of Charlie Chaplin. We had our own private jokes which made us laugh and no one else could understand. I found a tremendous amount of comfort going to his house to just enjoy talking and playing together.  Something simple as sharing a bag of M&M’s or a Snickers bar was a treat. And then once we had enough and were tuckered out, I found great comfort falling asleep with him in his recliner as he crooned “Shortnin’ Bread” in my ear. Then my parents had to ruin it by coming to pick me up. 

I will never forget the last time he was in the hospital.  At eleven years old, I couldn’t understand why I couldn’t see my beloved “Atun”, as I called him. His immune system was low due to the disease he was fighting and the doctors were hesitant about having too many people visit, especially children. All I know is that I was unable to see my grandfather and in my young mind, it didn’t make sense. All I wanted was to see Atun. In an article by Colleen Temple, I understand exactly how the children referenced feel.  

Daily I kept hearing from my family that Atun was getting better, and that I would be able to see him once he came home.  I held that thought in my head, had tremendous hope and I looked forward to seeing him reclining in his favorite chair.  I started drawing pictures of us together and making cards to show him how much I missed him.  I listened to jazz records that he loved, and I even watched Charlie Chaplin films, and imagined him next to me.  I did get to hear his voice on the phone, but he sounded weak and tired, not as peppy as he always was.  But he reassured me that he would be home soon and what wonderful times still lie ahead of us. I told him I couldn’t wait.

But God had other plans and, one morning, I was awoken by my sister and she and I had our first difficult discussion. She shared the news that Atun was not coming home. I bawled my eyes out. I felt cheated and betrayed. Who was to say that the last time that I saw him prior to his going into the hospital was the last time I would ever see him? 

I am grateful for the fact that I was able to speak with him over the phone to hear his voice.  And as modern technology has evolved, grandkids and their grandparents are able to see each other’s faces through Facetime and other inventions.  However, these means are not a substitute for human contact and the warmth we feel when those we love are close to us.  We miss kisses, long warm hugs, and just the solace of cuddling and sitting next to our family members. 

During these times, we need to hold on to the memories and the times shared to get us through this pandemic.  We don’t know how long this will last and that is the other factor that makes this experience so difficult.  If we had a deadline we could work towards, it might make it easier. But we don’t.  All families are trying to do now to remain healthy so that once the quarantine is lifted, they can be reunited.

Since I haven’t seen my grandfather in years, the memories and experiences I shared with him live in my mind and my heart daily.  It was because of everything he taught me and the love he gave me that I felt compelled to write Coffee and Cedar: Finding Strength From Memories. As difficult times arise and we feel helpless and unsure about what the future holds, we need to look to the teachings of our elders, whether they are either alive or have passed, to help us persevere.  Their wisdom and insight help us overcome hurdles and hard times just as they did.  They build us up, make us feel secure and uncover the confidence and resilience that exist in each of us. Whenever I am met with a challenge, I think of Atun and how he would tell me, “El sol no se tapa con un dedo.” He was telling me that the talent and gifts that I had inside of me were impossible to be denied, no matter what criticism or obstacle came my way. And that gave me confidence and the ability to move forward to pursue my dreams.  Our mentors instilled confidence in us and the strength to overcome anything, and that is what we all need to remember.  This situation will come to an end.  And once it does, we will rejoice and truly take advantage of the time together. But until then, we need to be strong.  Because the more we do to control the pandemic, the sooner we can be reunited. So, remember, hold onto those memories of the past and use them as a way to warm your soul to have hope for many more wonderful times to be shared in the coming months. 

Covid Mental Health illustration by Mina Tocalini

Covid Long Haul

By Mina Tocalini

A report from the BBC addresses the neurological symptoms of Coronavirus, which are believed to be linked to depleted levels of oxygen (hypoxia) or an over engaged immune system (cytokine storm). However, new evidence indicates that the virus is capable of infecting the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood-brain barrier

This suggests that the virus could permanently find a home in the central nervous system and reappear in the future, as seen with the development of Shingles in individuals who had Chickenpox. If the virus is capable of infecting the brain, how else could it affect our mental health?

Years after the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic, some patients continued to experience a long lasting depression, among other symptoms, due to neurological damage to dopamine neurons in the brain. Similarly, the Coronavirus experience has demonstrated this “long-hauler” behavior. A Body Politic survey reported that individuals endured mental and physical exhaustion, such as: fatigue, chills, trouble sleeping and loss of appetite for up to 5-7 weeks.

As a result, although some may consider the potentially mild experience to be little to no threat, it is important to acknowledge the complexity of this virus and assume all precautions necessary. Afterall, who knows what future infections could arise from Coronavirus? Or how your body will react to the virus for weeks on end.

Coronavirus has reshaped our lives, yet some are reluctant to adjust. Next time you go out, ask yourself, is my health/ the health of others worth it? Each one of us has the power to stop the spread, don’t be part of the problem. Be vigilant with your behavior, wear a mask, commit to social distancing and help keep your community safe.

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RE-ENGINEERING HUMANITY

Everyday new warnings emerge about artificial intelligence rebelling against us. All the while, a more immediate dilemma flies under the radar. Have forces been unleashed that are thrusting humanity down an ill-advised path, one that’s increasingly making us behave like simple machines?

Have a look at the book’s website.

About the Authors

Brett Frischmann is The Charles Widger Endowed University Professor in Law, Business and Economics at Villanova University. He is also an affiliated scholar of the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, and a trustee for the Nexa Center for Internet & Society, Politecnico di Torino. He has published foundational books on the relationships between infrastructural resources, governance, commons, and spillovers.

Evan Selinger is Professor of Philosophy at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he is also the Head of Research Communications, Community, and Ethics at the Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction, and Creativity. A Senior Fellow at the Future of Privacy Forum, his primary research is on the ethical and privacy dimensions of emerging technology. Selinger is a prolific writer and his next anthology is The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy, co- edited with JulesPolontesky and OmerTene (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2018). A strong advocate of public philosophy, he regularly writes for magazines, newspapers, and blogs, including The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, and Wired.

Advance Praise Re-Engineering Humanity

Frischmann and Selinger provide a thoroughgoing and balanced examination of the tradeoffs inherent in offloading tasks and decisions to computers. By illuminating these often intricate and hidden tradeoffs, and providing a practical framework for assessing and negotiating them, the authors give us the power to make wiser choices.

Nicolas Carr, author of The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, from the Foreword

Re-Engineering Humanity brings a pragmatic if somewhat dystopic perspective to the technological phenomena of our age. Humans are learning machines and we learn from our experiences. This book made me ask myself whether the experiences we are providing to our societies are in fact beneficial in the long run.

Vint Cerf, Co-Inventor of the Internet

Frischmann and Selinger deftly and convincingly show why we should be less scared of robots than of becoming more robotic, ourselves. This book will convince you why it’s so important we embed technologies with human values before they embed us with their own. Douglas Rushkoff, author of Present Shock, Program or Be Programmed, and Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus.

Everybody is suddenly worried about technology. Will social media be the end of democracy? Is automation going to eliminate jobs? Will artificial intelligence make people obsolete? Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger boldly propose that the problem isn’t the rise of ‘smart’ machines but the dumbing down of humanity. This refreshingly philosophical book asks what’s lost when we outsource our decision-making to algorithmic systems we don’t own and barely understand. Better yet, it proposes conceptual and practical ways to reclaim our autonomy and dignity in the face of new forms of computational control.

Astra Taylor, author of The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Control in the Digital Age

A magnificent achievement. Writing in the tradition of Neil Postman, Jacque Ellul and Marshall McLuhan, this book is the decade’s deepest and most powerful portrayal of the challenges to freedom created by our full embrace of comprehensive techno-social engineering. A rewarding and stimulating book that merits repeated readings and may also cause you to reconsider how you live life.

Tim Wu, Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Columbia Law School, and author of The Attention Merchants

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press dates from 1534 and is part of the University of Cambridge. We further the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Playing a leading role in today’s global marketplace, we have over 50 offices around the globe, and we distribute our products to nearly every country in the world. We publish titles written by authors in over 100 different countries.