Posts tagged with "Covid Care"

Kaelen Felix illustrates Veterans Day for 360 Magazine

“Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” By Eric Power

Veterans face incredible challenges after leaving the military. From coping with mental health issues like depression and PTSD to finding employment, re-establishing relationships, and more – readjusting to civilian life is not easy. After putting their lives on the line in service of our country, veterans deserve more support than what they are getting.

The pandemic has only made this issue worse over the last year with the surge of loneliness, unemployment, and an increase in mental health cases among all Americans. A survey done by the Wounded Warriors Project found that more than half of veterans said their mental health had worsened during the pandemic.

Fortunately, a new book from recent military veteran, Eric Power can help. “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is a powerful story of self-discovery that shares the keys to overcoming some of life’s greatest challenges and the wisdom and insights in this book are more timely and relevant than ever before.

“This pandemic has set a shocking and much greater feat for veterans (and all Americans for that matter) to rise above thier mental health challenges. Yet, I am very optimistic about the future and hope to provide support, advice, and my personal experience to help save someone’s life…” said Power, whose mission is to provide a valuable resource and life-changing advice to veterans, their families, and all struggling Americans.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Blurring the lines between fiction and nonfiction, “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is a powerful story that shines light on the unique challenges veterans face after leaving the military. As an active combat veteran, Eric Power knows the sacrifices and struggles of civilian veterans. As a mentor and a self-development student, he also knows the keys to overcoming some of the greatest challenges in business and in life.

Power shares his success principles as he takes you through the challenges of David Little, a veteran facing personal and career challenges. Follow along as David meets his mentor, Ralph Power, who helps him discover his self-worth and shows him how to build life-changing relationships.

The statistics on veteran mental health are horrific. According to a 2020 report, roughly 17 veterans die by suicide each day in the US. This means meaning more veterans die by suicide every two days than were killed in action last year! This staggering statistic is why “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” rings true to 24 million veterans around the world who have some type of personal struggle after returning home. As the Coronavirus surges forward, we have seen an increase in mental health conditions among all Americans. The wisdom and insights in this book are more timely and relevant than ever before.

Of course, this personal development is a must-read for military veterans, but it also appeals to non-veterans because it offers timeless and universal business and success principles applicable to all people. This book is a valuable resource for military families or anyone with loved ones in the service. It offers a glimpse into the reality of the veteran experience and readers can learn more about what their loved one is going through and how they can help.

Whether you are a veteran or not, “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is an unforgettable story about life, relationships, and the power we all have to create a lasting imprint on the people we meet and know.

The book was released December 28th, 2020 by Waterside productions and starts at $16.95 for the paperback edition. “Don’t Shoot Your Future Self” is available for purchase on Amazon HERE. 

ABOUT ERIC POWER:

Eric Louis Power is an author, speaker, entrepreneur, and social activist dedicated to helping military veterans and their families achieve a better quality of life. Power served honorably in the US Navy reaching the rank of Petty Officer First Class and serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Southern Watch. Power has a total of seven deployments, with 3.5 years in Active Combat zones. He is the founder of For Veterans By Veterans, a nonprofit that provides assistance to homeless vets, and he is the founder and CEO of Veterans Disability Help, LLC, a firm that manages VA disability claims and helps disabled veterans get the benefits they deserve. Since 2012, Power has been responsible for redirecting over 2.1 Million dollars a month recurring from the VA, back to the veterans in regard to their VA disability claims.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT https://veterandisabilityhelp.com

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Mask Care

Board-Certified Dermatologist Elizabeth Mullans, M.D., from Uptown Dermatology in Houston, TX discusses the best ways to adapt your skincare routine when wearing a mask, ways to avoid ‘mask-ne’ and her top tips to help avoid skin irritation caused by masks.

How can a mask potentially cause irritation on the skin? Masks trap sweat and moisture which along with friction from the fabric can disrupt the skin’s protective barrier. This can result in irritation of the skin. Residue from laundry detergent can also become embedded in the fabric and cause further irritation. It is best to use a hypoallergenic detergent such as Arm and Hammer Free and Clear Sensitive Skin.

What kind of masks is best to wear right now? The best masks will contain several layers of fabric. Cotton is the best fabric on the inner lining touching the skin because it is less irritating than synthetic materials. Masks should be washed every day in hot water with laundry detergent and white vinegar (has antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties) and dried on higher heat settings in the dryer. Detergents with fragrances can leave residue in the fabric, which can also cause a rash in people with sensitive skin.

What skincare routines should one pick up in order to keep their skin healthy? Wearing too many products under the mask, which can cause build up on the skin. Make sure to keep a benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid gel to spot treat pimples and also try to cut down on carbohydrate and sugar intake which can also cause breakouts. Wash face twice a day, before and after wearing the mask. Acne prone individuals may benefit from cleansers that contain salicylic acid. Avoid heavy moisturizers and makeup in the areas covered by the mask. Assuming skin is not too sensitive, if not already using one, this is a good time to start a retinol cream or gel – start several nights a week with a pea sized amount, and gradually increase the frequency.

Covid Mental Health illustration by Mina Tocalini

Covid Long Haul

By Mina Tocalini

A report from the BBC addresses the neurological symptoms of Coronavirus, which are believed to be linked to depleted levels of oxygen (hypoxia) or an over engaged immune system (cytokine storm). However, new evidence indicates that the virus is capable of infecting the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood-brain barrier

This suggests that the virus could permanently find a home in the central nervous system and reappear in the future, as seen with the development of Shingles in individuals who had Chickenpox. If the virus is capable of infecting the brain, how else could it affect our mental health?

Years after the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic, some patients continued to experience a long lasting depression, among other symptoms, due to neurological damage to dopamine neurons in the brain. Similarly, the Coronavirus experience has demonstrated this “long-hauler” behavior. A Body Politic survey reported that individuals endured mental and physical exhaustion, such as: fatigue, chills, trouble sleeping and loss of appetite for up to 5-7 weeks.

As a result, although some may consider the potentially mild experience to be little to no threat, it is important to acknowledge the complexity of this virus and assume all precautions necessary. Afterall, who knows what future infections could arise from Coronavirus? Or how your body will react to the virus for weeks on end.

Coronavirus has reshaped our lives, yet some are reluctant to adjust. Next time you go out, ask yourself, is my health/ the health of others worth it? Each one of us has the power to stop the spread, don’t be part of the problem. Be vigilant with your behavior, wear a mask, commit to social distancing and help keep your community safe.

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Musicares COVID-19 Relief Fund

TOP MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS AND CHARITABLE FOUNDATIONS AND MORE MAKE MAJOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE MUSICARES® COVID-19 RELIEF FUND

STARTED BY THE RECORDING ACADEMY® AND MUSICARES®, THE FUND PROVIDES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR MUSIC CREATORS AND INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC

Music industry associations, including the Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, and the Country Music Association; ticket marketplace StubHub; record label conglomerates Universal Music Group and Warner Music Group; financial institution City National Bank; concert promotion, artist management, touring, and publishing company Bill Silva Entertainment; and charitable foundations and trusts including the Gross Family Foundation, George Harrison’s Material World Foundation, the Michael Jackson Estate, Alicia Keys’ She Is The Music foundation and the Yoshiki Foundation America are the latest organizations that have made major contributions to the COVID-19 Relief Fund established by the Recording Academy® and its affiliated charitable organization MusiCares®.

The MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund was created to help music people affected by the pandemic due to the cancellation of income-generating music events and other industry work opportunities. Since the fund’s establishment two weeks ago with initial seed donations of $1 million each by MusiCares and the Recording Academy, millions more have been raised with the support of numerous partners. However, more is needed to meet the demand.

“We are thrilled that so many in our community are coming forward to support each other and grateful for all the organizations who are standing in the gap for the music community, said Harvey Mason jr. Chair and Interim President/CEO of the Recording Academy. “The music community remains in desperate need and many are living day to day whether they are a gigging musician, sound engineer or event logistics person. The impacts of this virus are very real as many struggle to know where their next rent payment is coming from  or how next week’s groceries are going to be paid for, so our fund is there to help meet needs in a small way.”

Beyond the initial donations, all Recording Academy Chapters have committed to fundraising in their local communities. Additionally, the Recording Academy appealed to Congress to further protect musicians, performers, songwriters, and studio professionals such as self-employed gig workers who are impacted by cancellations due to the ongoing pandemic. The stimulus package has since passed, and includes key provisions and protections that will benefit countless music industry professionals who are struggling in the wake of Coronavirus.

With the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund, music industry professionals, including artists, production crews, technicians, and anyone impacted by the loss of income due to live music event cancelations, can apply for basic living assistance.

If you wish to support our efforts to assist music professionals in need, visit: www.grammy.com/musicares/coronavirusrelieffund

If you are a member of the music industry in need of assistance, visit: musicares.org.  

About the Recording Academy
The Recording Academy represents the voices of performers, songwriters, producers, engineers, and all music professionals. Dedicated to ensuring the recording arts remain a thriving part of our shared cultural heritage, the Academy honors music’s history while investing in its future through the GRAMMY Museum®, advocates on behalf of music creators, supports music people in times of need through MusiCares, and celebrates artistic excellence through the GRAMMY Awards® — music’s only peer-recognized accolade and highest achievement. As the world’s leading society of music professionals, we work year-round to foster a more inspiring world for creators.

For more information about the Academy, please visit www.grammy.com. For breaking news and exclusive content, follow @RecordingAcad on Twitter, “like” Recording Academy on Facebook, and join the Recording Academy’s social communities on InstagramYouTube, and LinkedIn.

About Musicares
A friend and ally of the music community, MusiCares was established by the Recording Academy to safeguard the health and well-being of all music people. A four-star charity and safety net in times of need, MusiCares offers confidential preventive, recovery, and emergency programs to address financial, medical, and personal health issues. Through the generosity of our donors and volunteer professionals, our dedicated team works across the country to ensure the music community has the resources and support it needs.