Posts tagged with "campaign"

Beyonce illustration by Maria Soloman from 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Beyoncé × Jay-Z × Tiffany & Co. – “ABOUT LOVE”

By: Rumnik K Ghuman

On Vogue last week, Tiffany & Co launched its new campaign with Beyoncé and Jay-Z. The main purpose of the “About Love” campaign is still uncertain, but has received many negative reactions. For one reason, the diamond, Beyoncé wore in the promotional pictures. A 128.54 carat yellow diamond is a priceless piece of Tiffany’s collection. It’s amazing how Beyoncé is the fourth woman and the first black woman to wear that diamond. But why did Beyoncé draw adverse attention to this campaign?

The story goes back to 1877 in South Africa when Kimberley was mining diamonds during the British colonial regime. These rocks were more than a hundred years old and are considered blood diamonds. African workers were forced to extract a certain quantity of diamonds, otherwise Revolutionary United Font would cut each other’s hands or legs. This horrible act of blood would happen in war zones and in difficult times for Africans, such as discrimination. That is why they were named Blood Diamonds during this period. 

This bad story brought a huge defamation to Beyoncé’s mark, as an African-American herself and never supported the exploitation of Africans. For example, “Black is King” on Disney, is one of many projects produced by Beyoncé to decolonize black masculinity. According to Beyoncé’s close friends, she did not know the history of this rock and would never have worn it. It was the first time Beyoncé and Jay-Z had participated in a joint campaign. 

Tiffany & Co has completely denied that the diamond is a blood diamond since they have taken “rigorous measures” to ensure that conflict diamonds do not appear in its inventory. As stated in their website, “As global leaders in sustainable luxury, Tiffany & Co. is committed to sourcing natural and precious materials in an ethical and sustainable manner. We have a zero-tolerance policy toward conflict diamonds, and source our diamonds only from known sources and countries that are participants in the Kimberley Process.” As the audience still can’t accept to believe Tiffany, back in 2003, The Kimberley Process was created by the UN to eliminate all blood diamonds to enter the mainstream diamond market. 

360 Magazine finds it difficult to accept that the necklace is a blood diamond, and that it is on Beyoncé, an African woman herself. It is not fair that she is receiving such negative attention for wearing this necklace. Whereas Lady Gaga had worn this same necklace in 2019 in the Oscars awards and didn’t receive any negative feedback. Many fans showed up on Twitter to express their feelings. There are a number of sides to the story of whether or not Beyoncé knew about the diamond. And, she didn’t choose the diamond to wear herself. 

Since we’ve all heard of Jay-Z’s music, his raps include a majority of meanings on buying goods, art and jewelry. It is ironic that this raises the subject of the enormous piece of art that is presented in the campaign. It’s from Jean-Michel Basquiat, who recently passed away. Basquiat was a Puerto Rican/Haitian American painter better known to be a star of anti-settlement graffiti. His work reflected racial and social consciousness.

This campaign did not receive the recognition it wanted with the ultimate message behind “About Love”. Many people have realized the ugly truth about an unfinished history of white supremacy and colonialism of that campaign and the diamond industry. The campaign highlighted more brutal African history than “About Love.”

sports illustration by Allison Christensen for use by 360 Magazine

Xfinity Olympic Games Ad

While the world prepares for what may be the most meaningful Olympic Games in recent history, Xfinity– the Comcast brand providing internet, video distribution, wireless and electronic home security services for Team USA (and for Team USA in 2022, 2024, 2026 and 2028)– will release an ad called “The Song.” This ad will air nationally tomorrow ahead of the opening ceremonies and continue through August 8. The ad – which was released earlier this month in select markets and digitally –takes the timeless tradition of the Olympic Anthem “Bugler’s Dream” and features people from all walks of life humming the iconic seven notes in E-flat major: BUM—BUM—ba-ba-ba-BAH-BAH!

To extend the campaign and spark pride and support for Team USA, Xfinity today launched the #XfinityFanthem Challenge which invites consumers to sing, hum, perform and play their own renditions of “Bugler’s Dream” via TikTok. Olympic Swimmer Brad Snyder, Winter Olympian Brianna Decker, NASCAR Driver Kevin Harvick, E-Sports star Bugha, TikTok Creators Luna the Pittie, Cole Brown, the Philadelphia Eagles Dance Teamthe Philly Phanatic and more have partnered with Xfinity to create content and share their take on the song at #XfinityFanthem starting later today.

Listen to “The Song” HERE.

Watch the #XfinityFanthem compilation HERE.

“The Song” and #XfinityFanthem was created with support from advertising agency 72andSunny.

Image via Seafolly for 360 Magazine

Seafolly Austrailia – Swim at the Beach Collection

LARA WORTHINGTON FRONTS SEA FOLLY’S NEW DIRECTIONAL COLLECTION IN LIVE AT THE BEACH CAMPAIGN.

Seafolly is proud to announce the launch of the latest Live The Beach Campaign featuring

iconic Australian beauty Lara Worthington. Shot by Darren McDonald at Callala Beach, with the essence of stunning Australian beaches at its heart, the campaign celebrates our unique culture and heritage anchored in optimism and natural beauty. Lara Worthington lives the beach, no matter where in the world she finds herself. Her spirit is authentic and unwavering, a true ambassador of the Australian beach lifestyle and the unique culture that surrounds it. She embodies the latest collection and the Seafolly brand; spirited and quintessentially Australian.

This season Seafolly fuses themes from distant global destinations with the Australian beach lifestyle that is synonymous with Seafolly, while introducing more innovations in their sustainability journey. The collection was designed here in Sydney, inspired by retro prints, flora & fauna and sporty minimalism displayed in bold new shapes and cutting-edge materials. Encouraging Australians to adventure in their own backyards and to enjoy our beautiful

home whilst wearing pieces that inspire international confidence. At the core of the range Seafolly have combined new developments in sustainability and wearability with cutting-edge fabrics from Europe, textiles made from recycled fibres and quick dry cups to keep you comfortable and confident on and off the sand.

Seafolly’s sustainable approach starts with innovation. From the production of their first pieces in 1975 to the introduction of dynamic styles, pioneering fabrics, and technologies, they are always striving to push boundaries and create the highest quality products for their customers around the world. This season more so than ever, Seafolly have invested in new innovative fabrics and processes to further them along their journey to sustainability. Cleo packs a punch, combining a 70’s inspired chevron jacquard created in collaboration with a French mill whose

fabrics date back to 1904 and using the only integrated knitting machine in the world. The twinkling Twilight collection is this season’s showstopper, fusing simple, sophisticated styling with a hint of 70’s glam. Swim styles have been crafted from a lurex fabrication, developed with a recycled Nylon base are perfect for long summer days in the sun and romantic starlight rendezvous. Laguna will bathe you in the shadows of summer palms, with a bold floral print

that pops from the darkness with strong brushstrokes of olive and white akin to shady beachside palms beneath the blazing summer sun. Digitally printed on a recycled rope style texture base, this collection is tactile, connecting you to nature through style and fabrication.

Nature is reimagined with the Mandalay collection featuring an abstract animal print that blurs lines and pushes boundaries, using a recycled Nylon base this unique collection screams sophistication with an adventurous attitude. Soft Spot is a play on polkadots, with organic geometric retro shapes scaled and spliced to produce a sophisticated,

minimalist print. Boheme’s bold beauty inspires romance and adventure, the embodiment of a free, feminine spirit. Made for the robust Australian beach lifestyle, the Seafolly Sea Dive and Active ranges are sleek and sporty, designed to wear on the beach, in the water, and everything in between.

The Australian beach is more than a place. It is a unique culture and community. It is the way we live. Our home. Seafolly has been inspiring Summer and the Australian beach lifestyle since 1975. Celebrate the new collection with us though #LiveTheBeach #AlwaysSeafolly

The collection is available to shop on the Seafolly website, Seafolly Concept stores and selected wholesale partners from 9 July 2021.

THE SEAFOLLY STORY

We’re Seafolly. Swim and beachwear founded on fit, quality, and style. Born on the beaches of Sydney, Australia in 1975. Seafolly is made for living. We’re not afraid to do it; explore it, seek it and live it. Seafolly’s mission is to make all women feel confident at the beach through high quality and innovative swimwear that delivers on fashionability and never compromises on fit.

Seafolly is sold in over 1,600 doors in 51 countries, through its retail stores, ecommerce site, leading retailers and major online sites. There are 25 Seafolly stores (21 in Australia and 4 in Singapore).

Make sure to follow Seafolly Austrailia via their website, Instagram and Facebook.

360 Magazine, LA PRIDE 50th Anniversary

H&M × Banana Republic × UN Free Supports Global LGBTI Equality

The United Nations Foundation announced today that top global brands H&M and Banana Republic are once again partnering with UN Free & Equal for Pride Month this June to raise awareness and funds in support of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) equality worldwide. H&M will donate $100,000 to the global campaign this year, while Banana Republic will donate $60,000 this Pride Month.

“Pride connects directly to our core values and encapsulates our social vision to enable everyone at H&M and beyond to live the life they want, express who they are and to be the best of themselves”, says Pascal Brun, Global Sustainability Manager, H&M.

Both H&M and Banana Republic have long supported UN Free & Equal, a global campaign of the United Nations Human Rights Office that strives to advance equal rights and fair treatment for LGBTI people around the world. With this year’s contributions, H&M has now donated a total of $850,000, while Banana Republic has donated $240,000 to date through partnerships with UN Free & Equal.

“Inclusion has always been part of Banana Republic’s DNA and we are proud to partner with UN Free & Equal again this year to support their mission for LGBTI equality and human rights,” said Ana Andjelic, CBO of Banana Republic. “The past year has shown it is more important than ever to fight for equality and celebrate opportunity for all.”

Pride celebrations this year are taking place against the backdrop of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic – a global crisis that has further exposed and exacerbated inequities and underscored the urgency of protecting the rights of LGBTI people.

“Every person – no matter who they are, where they live, or whom they love – deserves to live freely and authentically with full equality,” said Elizabeth Cousens, President & CEO of the UN Foundation. “The UN Foundation is proud to support UN Free & Equal in the fight for global LGBTI equality, and is grateful to both H&M and Banana Republic for their continued partnership.”

Now in its eighth year, the UN Free & Equal campaign aims to win respect, recognition, and acceptance for the human rights of LGBTI people around the world. The campaign reaches parents, students, teachers, journalists, and policymakers, especially in countries where LGBTI communities face hostility and hardship and aims to cultivate new allies in the fight for equality. It has campaigned in more than 30 countries so far, with 12 full-scale national campaigns currently active.

“LGBTI people remain among those who are most often left behind due to exclusion, discrimination and violence, and this has been further exacerbated as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Young LGBTI people in particular face disproportionate levels of family rejection, bullying online and offline, homelessness and restrictions on access to information,” said Michael van Gelderen, LGBTI lead at UN Human Rights.

In support of LGBTI youth, UN Free & Equal recently launched a campaign with the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth calling on allies to support young LGBTI people in creating a fearless future where all young people are safe, loved and empowered to thrive – regardless of who they are or whom they love. The campaign, which is made possible by the generous support of corporate and Government donors, kicked off on May 17, the International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia and will run through International Youth Day on August 12.

To learn more about the UN Free & Equal campaign, visit here.

About H&M
H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is quoted on Nasdaq Stockholm. H&M’s business idea is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. In addition to H&M, the group includes the brands COS, Monki, Weekday, & Other Stories, H&M HOME and ARKET as well as Afound. The H&M group has 53 online markets and approximately 4,950 stores in 74 markets including franchise markets. In 2020, net sales were SEK 187 billion. The number of employees amounts to approximately 153,000. For further information, visit here.

About Banana Republic
Banana Republic is a global apparel and accessories brand committed to building a better tomorrow for people and the planet. Designed with purpose for those who share a passion for life with no boundaries, Banana Republic is redefining luxury by using the finest materials with the latest fabric innovations to create timeless, modern, and versatile clothing, eyewear, jewelry, shoes, handbags, and fragrances. Founded in 1978 in San Francisco, Banana Republic connects with customers online and in company-operated and franchise retail locations globally. For more information, please visit here.

About United Nations Foundation
The UN Foundation is an independent charitable organization created to be a strategic partner for the United Nations to address humanity’s greatest challenges, build initiatives across sectors to solve problems at scale, and drive global progress. Learn more here.

About UN Free & Equal
The UN Free & Equal campaign is an unprecedented global public information campaign aimed at promoting equal rights and fair treatment of LGBTI people. It was launched by the United Nations Human Rights Office in July 2013 and has since reached hundreds of millions of people globally through traditional and social media as well as generated a stream of widely shared materials – including powerful videos, impactful graphics and plain-language fact sheets. For more information please visit here.

Photo of Donovan Mitchell by Bodyarmor for use by 360 Magazine

Bodyarmor SportWater × Donovan Mitchell

“Made For More”, featuring NBA All-Star Donovan Mitchell.

“Made For More” is all about hydrating and celebrating a special kind of person – those who are in the pursuit to be better by making the most of every day, embracing their authenticity and making choices that result in better outcomes. As a world-class athlete, Donovan perfectly exemplifies the essence of this campaign.

7-time Grammy Award-winning superstar and Bodyarmor’s first-ever lifestyle equity partner, Carrie Underwood, is also featured within the “Made For More” campaign, which you can watch here! Watch the Made for More SportWater campaign featuring Donovan Mitchell here!

“It’s been exciting to stay involved with Bodyarmor and build upon the relationship I’ve had with them since 2018,” said basketball superstar Donovan Mitchell. “Today, we’re launching our new ‘Made for More’ campaign, showcasing how Bodyarmor SportWater is the ultimate all-day hydration partner for the most active and multi-faceted people out there. The alkaline pH9+ and proprietary electrolyte formula helps fuel my busy days and allows me to be more productive day-in and day-out.”

Usher illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rémy Martin × Usher

Rémy Martin and Usher team up to celebrate two cultures of excellence:

Music and Cognac

“Team Up For Excellence ‐ The Film” Imagined in collaboration with FRED & FARID New York Brings to Life the History of Harmony Between these Cultural Entities Through a Musical Journey

Rémy Martin announces a collaborative new campaign with multi‐Grammy award winning musical artist, Usher to celebrate the harmonious blending of two cultures of timeless excellence: Music and Cognac. “Team Up For Excellence – The Film” highlights the cultural connection between Cognac and American music since 1917 in France, and how the two have been synonymous ever since.

In the Film imagined in collaboration with FRED &FARID New York, Usher narrates a story spanning the decades from the 1920’s to present day, which pays tribute to the multi‐cultural connections, celebrated styles and rhythms of the past. From Blues to Hip‐Hop, Swing Dancing to Break‐Dancing; Usher and Rémy Martin 1738 Accord Royal travel through decades in France and the US, to honor these cultural figures; both rooted in a shared philosophy of aiming for the stars.

“Music doesn’t need Cognac to exist, and Cognac doesn’t need Music to exist,” states Usher, “but what is beautiful is that they were meant to meet and when they did, they created cultural harmony.”

Teaming up with Usher and Rémy Martin, are globally recognized creatives including Raphael Saadiq, world‐renowned musical composer; Marci Rodgers, Academy‐Award winning costume stylist; Aakomon Jones, award winning dance choreographer; and director of the production; Jake Nava.

“I was really inspired by creating the historical music scenes in a way that felt true to the spirit of that moment, but also relevant and eye‐catching to a young contemporary audience,” states Jake Nava, “This dual priority informed my direction of all the music, dance and Usher’s performance.”

The heart and soul of cultural movements throughout history paved the way for future artists to innovate, while paying homage to their roots and the musical styles that came before them. The same respect for heritage is honored by Rémy Martin and Cellar Master, Baptiste Loiseau, who has inherited the savoir‐faire of the House from previous generations of cellar masters. Through this transmission of knowledge, Rémy Martin®1738 Accord Royal continues to encompass the spirit of celebrating depth of character and the excitement of indulging in moments of collective success.

“Rémy Martin has been at the center of celebration for centuries, and the celebratory nature of Music is synonymous with our history of honoring communities and culture,” said Amaury Vinclet, Global Executive Director of Rémy Martin “Acknowledging this collective success has been at the heart of Rémy Martin since 1724.”

Historically, Rémy Martin and Usher teamed up during his 2010 “OMG” world tour, where the Cognac brand was the official sponsor of after parties across the United States, Canada and Europe. Additionally, Usher co‐hosted the launch dinner for Producer Series with Jermaine Dupri in 2018.

“Team Up For Excellence – The Film is a monumental artistic achievement stemming from our collaboration and long‐standing relationship with our trusted creative global agency, FRED & FARID,” said Philippe Farnier, Chief Executive Officer for The House of Rémy Martin. “We celebrate this performance between our brand, creative agency and artist Usher. At Rémy Martin, we team up with those sharing our same quest for excellence, rooted in our values of people, terroir and time.”

For almost 300 years, the story of Rémy Martin has been one of family, partners and collective success. Teamwork has always been at the heart of the brand, passing the spirit of collaboration on to younger generations. The desire to team up with others in a quest for excellence has been a part of the Rémy Martin ethos since 1724, with the constant dedication to creating premium Cognac. To continually go further and aspire to achieve more is a reflection of the Centaur, Rémy Martin’s brand figurehead for 150 years. Following the launch in the United States, the short film will be screened and showcased globally.

CREDITS:

Brand: Rémy Martin

Title of ad: Team Up For Excellence ‐ The Film

Agency: FRED & FARID New York

Music: Raphael Saadiq

Costume stylist: Marci Rodgers

Dance choreographer: Aakomon Jones

Director: Jake Nava

ABOUT RÉMY MARTIN

Since 1724, Rémy Martin has produced premium spirits that consistently appeal to the world’s most discerning connoisseurs. A profound love of the land, a continuity of family ownership and   a passionate commitment to excellence has sustained Rémy Martin for nearly three centuries. As a result of its masterful production and generations of tradition in Cognac, Rémy Martin today produces Fine Champagne Cognacs, including Rémy Martin® XO, Rémy Martin® Tercet, Rémy Martin 1738 Accord Royal and Rémy Martin® V.S.O.P For additional information, visit the website.

ABOUT USHER

Challenging himself creatively, testing musical boundaries and being on the creative forefront of new and developing trends are characteristics that have defined Usher throughout his 20-year career. Usher has been ranked by the Recording Industry Assn. of America as one of the best‐selling artists in American music history, having sold over 65 million albums worldwide. He has won numerous awards including 8 Grammy Awards and was named the #1 Hot 100 artist of the 2000s decade. Usher has attained nine Hot 100 #1 hits and 18 Hot 100 top‐10 singles. His career in TV and Film includes 2 seasons as a coach on NBC’s The Voice as well as starring roles in films such as “Hands of Stone” and “Burden”. 2021 continues to be a busy year for Usher with an upcoming new album release and the launch of his much-anticipated Las Vegas residency at Caeser’s Palace. In the past year Usher’s two singles “Don’t Waste My Time” and “Bad Habit” both hit #1 on the Billboard R&B Charts. He also released “I Cry”, a powerful and emotional song about the social and racial injustices of our time. Usher is currently in the studio recording his 9th studio album which will be released late 2021.

ABOUT FRED & FARID New York

FRED & FARID is a purpose-driven company producing meaningful ideas, grounding brands into culture. Based in New York, Paris, FRED & FARID New York’s culture is a peculiar mix of the French sense of craft and taste, the Chinese sense of tactic and digital, and the American sense of vision and strategy. The agency focuses on creative consulting, brand strategy, branding, content & social activation, and has produced 1800+ creative campaigns for 250+ brands in 33+ industries, winning 950+ awards and 25+ industry titles – including the AdAge Small Agency 2020 Gold Newcomer of the Year, and Best Integrated Campaign of the Year.

Child illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Child Friendly Faith Project

Child Advocacy Group Highlights Abuse in Religious Institutions for Child Abuse Prevention Month

With National Child Abuse Prevention Month underway, the Child-Friendly Faith Project (CFFP), a national nonprofit that educates the public about religiously enabled child maltreatment, is raising awareness of crimes against children perpetrated in religious institutions.

The CFFP is also drawing attention to a dangerous court decision that could prevent abusive institutions from being held accountable and offering a valuable resource to parents and guardians to help them determine whether they should enroll or continue to enroll their children in certain religious institutions.

The little-known ecclesiastical abstention doctrine (EAD) guides courts in deciding First Amendment, religious matters. While historically the EAD has been raised in cases relating to claims of wrongful termination, in recent years religious schools facing lawsuits involving allegations of child harm have pushed courts to interpret the EAD very broadly to get cases dismissed. In one recent case, the Episcopal School of Dallas was permitted to ignore its own legal contracts with parents and the emotional harm suffered by a child never came to light.

Given this alarming legal precedent, parents and guardians of children who have been harmed by private institutions could lose their right to seek relief in court, while the institutions might never be held accountable.

Parents who have children enrolled in private, faith-based schools (or are considering enrolling them) should be aware of the potential harm posed by the EAD. With this in mind, CFFP’s campaign is offering parents valuable tips on how to determine whether they should enroll (or continue to enroll) their children in private, faith-based schools:

  • Determine whether the institution your child is enrolled in (or might be enrolled in) could claim to be faith-based. Some private schools have stretched the meaning of “faith-based” as a way to be shielded by the EAD in court. Even if an institution seems to operate in a way that appears secular, as long as a facility, school, program, or daycare operation can claim that it has some sort of faith-based or spiritual component, it could convince a court that it should be protected by the EAD and cannot be sued for child abuse or neglect.
  • Read the school’s contract carefully. Many schools specify in their contracts how legal issues must be resolved. For example, some require parents to agree to mediation. It’s important to know what legal recourses you’re agreeing to. However, be aware that if a case goes to court, the EAD does have the potential to make contracts of religious school’s moot.
  • Ask to see a school’s child-abuse prevention policies & procedures. Those that take abuse seriously and proactively develop and enforce comprehensive abuse-prevention policies are usually open to making these policies available and may even post them on their websites.
  • Research whether the school has a history of abuse allegations. Conduct an online search using the name of the institution and words such as “lawsuit,” “sued,” and “abuse” to determine if it has been accused of abuse or of covering up cases in the past. Be extremely wary if you find a pattern of abuse allegations, even if you do not find information about final court decisions.
  • Explore the educational programs of secular private or public schools. Children can receive a high-quality education and experience at many different types of schools. Consider the offerings of private secular schools or public schools, which would be unable to raise the EAD in court.

Recent abuse cases

The CFFP has previously exposed issues of religious institutional child abuse and offered support to survivors and affected families. An example is its efforts to make public the decades-long, egregious abuses perpetrated at Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch. Recently, other cases have also made the news:

  • Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) — Last February, the SBC’s executive committee voted to expel two member churches for employing pastors who were convicted sex offenders. One pastor, who had been with his church since 2014, had pleaded guilty to two counts of statutory rape of a minor in the 1990s. The other pastor led his church since 2018, despite having been on Florida’s sex offender registry since 1993. In 2019, the SBC published a report on preventing and responding to cases of sexual abuse and later launched its “Caring Well Challenge” that calls on all SBC churches to adopt the report’s recommendations. Unfortunately, the program is voluntary.
  • Circle of Hope Girls Ranch — The owners and operators of this faith-based boarding school in Missouri face more than 100 criminal charges of sexual, physical and mental abuse of girls in their care. Their arrests came after their estranged daughter, Amanda Householder, posted social media videos of former residents talking about the abuse they endured. In an interview with a Missouri TV station, Householder said that victims had been speaking out since 2007. “Why did it take ten years for anyone to do anything?” she asked.

A dangerous court decision

While it’s heartening that these cases are receiving public attention, it is possible that they, and many more like them, could be dismissed thanks to a legal precedent set by a Texas appellate court in 2018. The case involved the Episcopal School of Dallas which invoked a common-law doctrine known as the “ecclesiastical abstention doctrine” (EAD). The EAD provides guidance to courts when weighing in on First-Amendment, religious matters. However, in the Dallas case, in which a father alleged that his son had been wrongfully expelled and in violation of school policy, it was applied very broadly and used to shield the school from being sued.

In another case involving Trinity Episcopal School in Galveston, Texas, a district court, in recognizing the EAD, threw out a lawsuit filed by a mother whose son had endured repeated racist bullying by other students. The mother wanted the school to hold the perpetrators accountable after the school had only demanded a written apology and suspended them for one day. Despite emotional trauma suffered by the victim, the judge agreed with the school’s claim that a court should not “intrude upon a religious institution’s management of its internal affairs and governance.”

“The EAD allows courts to prioritize a religious institution’s desire for secrecy and avoidance of accountability over the wellbeing of children,” said CFFP founder Janet Heimlich. “In cases in which organizations invoke the EAD, the public may never learn what abusive or neglectful actions took place, and parents may unwittingly enroll their children in those schools.”

To schedule an interview with a representative of the CFFP, an affected parent or a survivor of religious institutional child abuse, contact Jeff Salzgeber  through email or (512) 743-2659 cell.

The Child-Friendly Faith Project (CFFP) is a national, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that seeks to end religious child maltreatment by raising awareness of this issue through educational programs that benefit the general public, survivors, professionals, and faith communities.

BeBe Shopp illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Miss America Partners with Rowan University

Miss America Partners with Rowan University for 100th Anniversary Archival Project

With an eye on history and ideals of beauty, students digitize Miss America archives

“There she is…”

One hundred years of artifacts from the Miss America Competition—from jeweled crowns and velvet capes to programs, photographs, judges’ books, oil paintings, films, and business records—tell more than the story of the competition.

They also provide a rich look at both American and New Jersey history and help illustrate how ideas surrounding beauty and women’s roles in society have changed over a century. 

Now, through a unique partnership with the Miss America Organization, Rowan University students are sifting through the organization’s expansive archives and digitizing the artifacts. Their work, currently underway in the Digital Scholarship Center at Campbell Library, will be the cornerstone of the new Rowan Digital Collections.

Scholars worldwide eventually will have access to the artifacts through the archive, hosted by Rowan Libraries.

Currently, the massive Miss America collection is tucked away in storage in South Jersey. The storage contains a treasure trove of floor-to-ceiling artifacts from the competition.

The Miss America Organization will continue to retain the physical artifacts. But the digitization, which began with program books and some oil paintings of former winners, will ensure the artifacts are categorized and documented–and available widely to future scholars.

The preservation partnership was orchestrated by University administrators, who were approached by the Miss America Organization.

‘An enduring feature of American culture’

“We’re excited Rowan is doing this, and we’re thrilled the University sees value in this project,” says Shantel Krebs, chair of the board and interim president and CEO of the Miss America Organization.

“This is New Jersey history. The digitization project will help others learn more about the quintessential competition and its evolution from a ‘bather’s revue’ into a nationally recognized non-profit that offers scholarship assistance and helps thousands of young women from America to improve their communities through service.”

The project will be a crucial resource to scholars and students, notes College of Humanities & Social Sciences Dean Nawal Ammar.  

“The Miss America competition has been an enduring feature of American culture, producing idealized images of female beauty and achievement,” says Ammar.

“However, the pageant also has been a space to challenge those images, both inside and outside the competition hall. This collection will be an invaluable source for the study of American history, culture, women’s history, business history, media studies, and many other topics.”

Project manager Katie Turner, a professor of history and American Studies, says Rowan students working on digitization are gaining first-hand experience of the archival process. 

“This is a great opportunity for our students to get their hands on history and to really see what goes into making a collection,” adds Turner. “Everything today is digitized for students. They often don’t get to see and touch historical documents. When you sift through paper and do research in an archive, there’s a real commitment to the work.”

Founded as a bather’s revue by businessmen in 1921 as a gimmick to lengthen the summer tourist season in Atlantic City by capitalizing on popular American ideals of female beauty, the competition in its early years was often a steppingstone for women who wanted to pursue show business careers. More than 100,000 people swarmed onto the Atlantic City Boardwalk the first year to watch 16-year-old Margaret Gorman be crowned.

Candidates in the 1920s were rated by judges on everything from the construction of their heads to their “grace of bearing” to their eyes, hair, torso, and hands. Every measurement—from ankles to biceps to head—was recorded by judges and assessed on a points system.

By the 1950s, the competition, under the leadership of Lenora Slaughter, the program’s director for more than 25 years, had been transformed into a source of scholarships for contestants. In 1958, more than $200,000 in scholarships were awarded.

A crown jewel for Atlantic City.

But the competition, a crown jewel for Atlantic City, has not been devoid of controversy. In 1968, it was the site of the first major women’s liberation protest in the United States, when the New York Radical Women, some 400 strong, protested on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. They maintained that the competition objectified women and upheld female stereotypes.

Protestors through the years also objected to the program’s exclusion of women of color. The first Black Miss America, Vanessa Williams, was crowned in 1983—more than 60 years after the competition’s founding.

That isn’t lost on Rowan senior English and writing arts major Destiny Hall, who is working on digitization. She started with the 1984 Miss America magazine, where Williams is featured prominently. Hall, a women’s and gender studies minor, says work on the project has been eye-opening as she explores her own views of feminism.

“Part of being a feminist is allowing women to be whatever they want to be. I have a complicated history with Miss America. In the beginning, I saw it as sexist. Now, I see it as a celebration of womanhood. Many of these women compete to further their careers,” says Hall, 22, who will attend graduate school at Columbia University in the fall as she pursues a career writing fiction for women.

“Through this project, I feel like I’m preserving history and I really appreciate that. It’s important to have this information and to have access to it.”

Freshman English major Grace Fox, who is pursuing the Thomas N. Bantivoglio Honors Concentration in the Honors College, is digitizing program books.

“I’m hoping I’ll find one nugget…something nobody knows about,” says Fox. “I’m definitely looking at the advertisements, the kinds of products they marketed, the images of fashion. There’s so much value in this work. It’s so applicable to things we talk about in class, including how societal views on women’s bodies are enmeshed in the culture we see.”

Robert Hilliker, interim associate provost and director of research engagement and scholarship at Rowan Libraries, and Michael Benson, digital scholarship specialist, are overseeing the digitization work. Additionally, Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication Director Julie Haynes, whose research focuses on depictions of gender in popular culture, is involved in the project.

About the collection

While programs, photos, and other ephemera are being scanned, other artifacts, such as crowns, trophies, and a Waterford scepter carried by winners, will be photographed. Scores of oil paintings and sketches of winners, including some sketches by renowned portrait artist Everett Kintsler, whose work includes official White House portraits of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, will be digitized under the guidance of Rowan art historians.

Rowan’s Department of Radio/Television/Film may assist in digitizing hundreds of films and slides, some of which were donated by shore-area residents who religiously attended the annual Miss America parade on the Boardwalk.

“Prioritization of the digitization will be quite a project,” Hilliker notes. “The collection is so special from an archivist’s standpoint because it contains varied materials. That will make for some interesting research projects, but it also presents a lot of technical challenges. For our students, this project certainly will be an excellent apprenticeship in digital preservation.”

The collection is an eclectic mix.

The same storage that currently houses the unwieldy Golden Mermaid trophy, presented in the early 1920s to the winner, also includes the crown of 1955 winner Lee Meriwether, who went on to a successful television career. Then Miss California, Meriwether was the first Miss America to be crowned on television, an event that drew 27 million viewers.

Stars flocked to the competition over the years. Grace Kelly was a judge. Marilyn Monroe was the grand marshal of the parade in 1952. Eddie Fischer was a host before Bert Parks, famed singer of the “There She Is” Miss America theme, emceed for 24 years.

The collection also includes Slaughter’s personal scrapbooks. Some of her other papers are housed at the Smithsonian Institution.

Some of the artifacts, such as the film of Meriwether being crowned, were lost during an Atlantic City Nor’easter some years ago. That makes the digitization project particularly valuable, Krebs notes.

BeBe Shopp, Miss America 1948, says she’s delighted Rowan students are preserving Miss America’s legacy.

“This will make it easier for anyone to view our history and learn how Miss America has grown and become even more vital to young women today,” says Shopp, who represented Minnesota in the competition. “This is important. What an experience the students must be having combing through hundreds of thousands of documents and learning about our past. At my age, I’m thrilled that they are going to preserve me for ages to come.”

Supporting the archival work

The Miss America Organization has established a campaign to help fund the digitization project and preserve the thousands of artifacts in the organization’s 100-year history. Visit the organization’s funding site to learn more about supporting the work.