Posts tagged with "campaign"

JLO × COACH

By Cassandra Yany

Coach unveiled its holiday campaign Tuesday with the central message “Holiday Is Where You Find It.” It emphasizes the message that holiday is a state of mind regardless of how you’re celebrating this year.

There is no doubt that 2020 has been a unique year for everyone. Coach acknowledges this through the campaign and underscores that during these unprecedented times, the meaning of the holidays remains the same no matter how different festivities may look this year. They encourage fans of the brand to “cherish the big things, celebrate the small things.”

“Holiday Is Where You Find It” highlights Coach’s belief in optimism, finding joy in the little things and seeking comfort in togetherness and family traditions. The campaign will be presented in a series of short vignettes and images showcasing the cast celebrating new and old traditions. 

The cast consists of Jennifer Lopez and Michael B. Jordan and their families, as well as ambassadors such as Kiko Mizuhara, Jeremy Lin and Yang Zi.  Other members of the Coach Family featured in additional content include Camila Morrone, Megan Thee Stallion, Quincy, Yuna and Ramla Ali. 

Jordan is depicted celebrating Kwanzaa with his parents Michael B. Jordan Sr. and Donna Jordan, brother Khalid Jordan and sister Jamila Jordan-Theus. A video shows the family setting up the lights outside to spread holiday cheer. “Hanging out and giving back, honestly that’s at the top of my list,” said Jordan. 

Lopez is seen on Coach’s Instagram with her mother Guadelupe Lopez, and her children Emme and Max Muñiz. “I find holiday in the smiles on my kids’ faces,” said Lopez. “Number one on my to-do list is to count my blessings.” She is photographed wearing the Beat Shoulder Bag and the Holiday Cityscape Intarsia Sweater.

Lopez’s involvement in the holiday campaign follows her first collaboration with the fashion brand for the Coach X Jennifer Lopez Hutton Bag which launched earlier this month. The bag was designed with Creative Director Stuart Vevers and inspired by Coach and Lopez’s shared values of authenticity and inclusivity. It combines Coach as a modern-day icon with Lopez’s unique approach to style.

The holiday campaign spotlights the Beat Shoulder Bag, inspired by the downtown attitude of New York. The purse has three compartments for organization and a secure snap closure. The crossbody strap allows for hands-free wear, while the interchangeable chain strap lets you carry the bag. Crafted with soft leather, the Beat Shoulder Bag is available in a variety of colors and patterns, with distinct embellishments accenting some of the versions.

Also presented is the new Hitch backpack and belt bag for men. Each comes in three different color variations. The backpack is available in solid black and patterned black/ gray, brown/ black and brown/ tan displaying Coach logos, while the belt bag is sold in solid amber and patterned brown and brown/ tan with logos. Made of leather and canvas, the backpack is spacious and has multiple pockets for accessories. The bag is durable and lightweight, making it multifunctional and perfect for anything from work to travel. The leather belt bag was created with a hands-free design, and the zip closures and exterior pocket make essential items easily accessible. The bag can effortlessly be dressed up or down.

A social series will feature the archive-inspired Swinger Bag, which was first introduced in the ‘80s and has been reimagined for today. The short-strap shoulder bag is available in both nylon and leather. The bag is sold in a number of solid colors and a patterned version containing Coach’s signature jacquard. It is secured with a zipper, along with the iconic turn-lock closure. The Swinger Bag also has a detachable strap for those who want to style it as a crossbody.

Coach worked with a global family of creatives to bring this campaign to life. This team included photographers and directors Ryan McGinley, Renell Medrano, Hao Zeng, Brad Ogbonna, Takako Noel, Gen Yoshida, Fan Xin, DJ Furth, Zhangmeng, Jian LV and Christelle de Castro.

ABOUT COACH

Coach is a leading design house of modern luxury accessories and lifestyle collections, with a long-standing reputation built on quality craftsmanship. The brand approaches design with a modern vision, reimagining luxury for today with an authenticity and innovation that is uniquely Coach. All over the world, the Coach name is synonymous with effortless New York style.

360  Magazine, Vaughn Lowery,  Coach, holidays, Jennifer Lopez, JLO, Cassandra yany
360 magazine, vaughn lowery, michael b jordan, coach, fashion, kwanzaa, holidays, cassandra

Jaime Harrison criticizes Sen. Lindsey Graham on SiriusXM

Today, Jaime Harrison, candidate for U.S. Senate from South Carolina was a guest on SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show,” where he discussed his feelings regarding the recently postponed debate with Sen. Lindsey Graham.

During the interview, Harrison told host, Laura Coates: “This is probably the most historic Senate Race in the history of this state, and to have Senator Graham ducking and dodge [the debate], is really sad, but it’s a testament to who he is.”

Audiogram below with transcript. If used, please credit SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show.”

The interview with Harrison is on SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show.”

Transcript from SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show”—

“Well, you know, he’s saying scheduling, and then he even said something about September debate. This is October, you know, I can send the Senator a calendar if he doesn’t have one. I know he doesn’t have a smartphone, he still uses a flip phone, but this is October. We are two weeks away from the election and the people in South Carolina want to hear from their Senator and the candidates about this particular race. This is probably the most historic Senate race in the history of this state, and to have Senator Graham ducking and dodge [the debate], is really sad, but it’s a testament to who he is. He believes that he represents the interest in Washington, D.C. Instead of representing the interests of the people in South Carolina. And that’s why he’s on the verge of getting that one way ticket back home. We are building something because we are focusing like a laser on the people in the state. As I said, so many times on this campaign trail, we’re about to close the chapter on ‘the old south’ and write a brand new book called ‘the new south,’ one that is bold, that is inclusive and diverse. And it’s a movement that we have spawned here in South Carolina, and it’s one that I hope people continue to invest in. Volunteers, sign up, go to Jamieharrison.com if you want to be a part of this movement and to give Lindsey Graham his one way ticket home back to Seneca, South Carolina.”

Presidential candidate illustration

Presidental Campaign Money

By Hannah DiPilato

Both President Donald Trump and presidential candidate Joe Biden have splurged a fair amount on their 2020 presidential campaigns. Biden’s campaign along with his allies have spent an estimated $600 million while Trump’s campaign and his supporters have spent a little over $400 million. 

Over $1 Billion has been spent between the campaigns on TV advertisements in only 13 states alone according to an NPR analysis from the tracking firm Advertising Analytics. This money is being used to target six states: Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Arizona. TV ads may be playing a larger role in the presidential campaign this year because of the pandemic keeping so many Americans at home watching TV. 

Tracked by Ad Age Datacenter, for the presidential, congressional and gubernatorial races, campaign spending has now surged past $3 billion. This hefty amount includes TV, radio and digital ad spending. The digital ad spending includes Facebook and Google properties only for presidential candidates. 

This is “the most expensive election in history,” according to CNBC. The expected total spending for the 2020 election is predicted to be a whopping $10.8 billion according to the Center for Responsive Politics. This prediction takes into account both presidential and congressional races. CRP has recorded the election has already cost $7.2 billion, so the $10 billion milestone isn’t far out of reach. 

“The 2018 election smashed fundraising records for midterms, and 2020 is going to absolutely crush anything we’ve ever seen — or imagined — before,” Sheila Krumholz, executive director of CRP, said in a statement. “This is already the most expensive presidential election in history and there are still months of election spending to account for. The unanswered question is whether this will be the new normal for future elections.” 

So far Biden has topped the charts for his advertising spendings. Between September 28 and October 11, Biden estimated spendings have been $55,928,770 and his ads have aired about 80,452 times. Trump trails Biden with estimated total spending of $31,796,960 and 32,011 airings in the same time period. 

The Biden campaign has been able to air ads in 17 states, even though there are many fewer states considered a close race. The campaign cost continues to grow over the expected TV budget of $280 million. “If we didn’t have the resources we had now, we’d be having to make [some] hard choices right now,” said one Biden campaign official.

Bill Stepien, Trump’s campaign manager, said the campaign has “more than sufficient air coverage.” He also stated that the campaign has spent more than the Biden campaign in different areas such as Facebook ads. 

The Biden is not shying away from spending and they plan to keep spending as much cash as possible until the campaign concludes. However, in the event the result of the race is contested, the Biden campaign is reserving money for legal fights.

St. Helena Celebrates Napoleonic Heritage

ST. HELENA LAUNCHES ‘NAPOLEON 200’ CAMPAIGN TO COMMEMORATE NAPOLEONIC HERITAGE

Starting this fall, the remote South Atlantic island of St. Helena is hosting a series of events and special projects surrounding its Napoleonic heritage. The campaign, under the auspices of The British Napoleonic Bicentenary Trust, marks 200 years since Napoleon died on the island to which he was exiled after the French defeat at the 1815 Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon allegedlydied of stomach cancer on May 5, 1821 at Longwood House, one of the most visited historic sites on St. Helena. In 1840, his coffin was disinterred and transported to Paris where it was reburied beneath the dome of the des Invalides.

Located 1,200 miles from Africa and 1,800 miles from South America, St. Helena (pronounced St. Hel-EE-na) is one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands. As Napoleon’s place of exile, the island is home to numerous heritage sites; and valleys dotted with forts and flag stations built to ensure Napoleon could not escape.

The Trust has two main objectives: to preserve the island’s at-risk heritage sites, and to promote new perspectives on the story of Napoleon on St. Helena.

To preserve the island’s heritage, two projects have been announced. The first is the restoration of Toby’s Cottage, a building that housed the aristocratic Balcombe family’s slaves – including a man named Toby. The cottage is one of a few surviving dwellings of enslaved Africans on the island. There are also plans for a new Heritage Trail, encompassing several historical sites.

The campaign will feature a series of online events. These aim to commemorate the death of Napoleon in a respectful manner, acknowledging the complicated legacy of his rule, defeat and death.

In May 2021, there will be several intimate memorialization events at the graveside of several notable individuals of the Napoleonic period. Virtual experiences will include 3D ‘visits’ to the island’s main Napoleonic sites. More information on the British Napoleonic Bicentenary Trust and Napoleon 200 can be found at:www.napoleon200.org

ABOUT ST. HELENA: St. Helena is one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands, located in the middle of the South Atlantic, 1,200 miles from Africa. St. Helena Tourism is dedicated to the conservation of its diverse and unique animal, plant, and marine life, and eager to welcome visitors to come to the island. Starting in 2020, St. Helena became accessible by regular flights from Johannesburg, as well as season services from Cape Town.

Rita Azar illustrates artwork for Beirut in 360 MAGAZINE

Mika – I Love Beirut

  • Beirut born, British-Lebanese singer Mika will live-stream a concert across four time zones on 19 September in aid of the people of the city
  • Mika will perform an intimate show from a special location, with a number of surprises from friends, all money from ticket sales and donations going directly to aid charities helping those affected in Beirut
  • ‘I Love Beirut’ partners with GoFundMe to launch a campaign where additional donations can be made
  • Tickets will be available to purchase via Ticketmaster worldwide at 9am BST / 10am CET on Monday, 24 August

Today, Mika announces the ‘I love Beirut’ benefit concert, which will be performed on Saturday 19 September and will be live-streamed across four time zones via YouTube. Tickets cost £10 / $10 / €10 and will be available from TicketMaster alongside the GoFundMe campaign, where people can make additional donations to the cause with 100% of all proceeds being split across Red Cross Lebanon and Save the Children Lebanon. Tickets go on sale at 9am BST / 10am CET on Monday 24 August.

This intimate performance has been initiated by Lebanese born singer Mika after he was profoundly affected by the scale of devastation from the explosion in Beirut docks and its impact on the people of the city. Following on from his ‘Love Letter to Beirut’ (see note to editors below) which he wrote directly in the aftermath of the explosion. In an effort to do more he has created ‘I Love Beirut’ an event to raise funds to help those who have been affected by the devastating explosion.

Mika comments: -“After all the years of civil war, financial crisis and political upheaval, the news of the tragic explosion was unbelievable. Although far away, my heart broke for the families losing their homes, their livelihoods and their loved ones in this catastrophe. I wanted to do something to help in any small way I can. That is why I am staging a live stream concert in aid of the people of the city. Beirut has been through so much and the resilience and strength the Lebanese people is undeniable. I have no doubt that the city will recover and the unique life of this magical city will resume once again. Beirut is the place of my birth, is part of me and will always be in my heart. ‘I ❤️ Beirut’.

The Lebanese United Nations team has reported the explosion was like 15 years of war in 15 seconds, comparing its impact to the devastation from the country’s civil war that lasted from 1975 to 1990. Miles from the blast site apartments are wrecked and families left homeless. It’s estimated 300,000 people do not have homes fit to live in, as Lebanon now has to undertake a single recovery effort of unprecedented scale.

Hospitals in Beirut are now overrun with wounded people, with some being referred to Tripoli, 50 miles to the north of Beirut, for treatment. The destruction of Beirut’s port will devastate the country further as it relies heavily on imports for its essential supplies. Red Cross Lebanon, Lebanese Food Bank, Islamic Relief and Save the Children Lebanon. are working around the clock to help those on the ground affected by the blast. Donations will fund immediate emergency response and wider long-term rehabilitation.

Donations to be made at: http://gfme.co/ilovebeirut

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

Pitbull × Wyland × National League of Cities

Wyland kicks off his 9th nationwide campaign for conservation August 1 in support of Water Quality Month. The program, which was postponed in April due to coronavirus, encourages residents across America to make small changes in their lives to better manage our water resources and improve the health of our ocean, lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands. Conservation partners this year include Pitbull, mayors across the country and the National League of Cities among others.

“It’s more important than ever to maintain smart habits that support the health of the world around us — especially when it comes to our water and air, “ said marine-life artist and conservationist Wyland. “If Covid has taught us anything, it’s that we can change behaviors for the benefit of everybody.”

Participants can win thousands in eco-friendly prizes at www.mywaterpledge.com starting August 1.

Wyland is available for interviews as is Wyland Foundation President, Steve Creech.

Everyone is invited to share how they are doing their part with hashtag #mywaterpledge. Examples include:

* I use cloth shopping bags instead of plastic. #mywaterpledge
* Instead of plastic water bottles, I switched to reusable containers. #mywaterpledge
* I helped clean up my local beach this weekend! #mywaterpledge
* I biked to the store instead of using my car. #mywaterpledge #airquality

About the National Mayors’ Challenge for Water Conservation

The annual Wyland National Mayors’ Challenge for Water Conservation will relaunch in August as part of national water quality month, Aug. 1-30. The program, which was postponed in April due to coronavirus, encourages residents across America to make small changes in their lives to better manage our water resources and improve the health of our ocean, lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands.

Presented nationally by the Wyland Foundation, the campaign rewards residents who take part with a chance to win $3,000 toward their home utility bills, home irrigation makeovers, environmentally friendly cleaning products, and hundreds more eco-friendly prizes. Residents can also nominate a deserving charity in their city to receive a 2020 new-generation Toyota Highlander Hybrid XLE. Cities with the most residents that make pledges qualify for over $50,000 in prize drawings. Residents make their pledges online at www.mywaterpledge.com throughout the month of August.

Encouraging Green Living

In the wake of the current pandemic, the campaign will provide residents with more opportunities to get involved safely from home, including making water-friendly lifestyle changes on behalf of their city, undertaking home-based environmental projects that add up to cleaner, safer communities, and sharing tips and strategies with friends and neighbors. Last year, mayors from 39 states encouraged residents to make more than 740,000 pledges to promote drought resiliency, protect watersheds, and reduce stress on aging water infrastructure.

“It’s more important than ever to maintain smart habits that support the health of the world around us — especially when it comes to our water and air, “ said marine life artist and conservationist Wyland. “If Covid has taught us anything, it’s that we can change behaviors for the benefit of everybody.”

Green Homeschooling

Despite school closures, teachers working remotely are also encouraged to engage their students to take part by accessing a special section of the website to make a series of water-saving commitments with their classes and win classroom supplies and gift cards for their school.

Partners

The non-profit campaign, which has included numerous live events, educational tours, and hundreds of city-led activities over the past decade, is presented in association with The Toro Company, EPA WaterSense, National League of Cities, Conserva Irrigation, and Earth Friendly Products (makers of ECOS) and PETAL (withpetal.com sustainable personal care products which reduce waste and take the dirt out of clean.) The Challenge encourages residents to follow their city’s progress throughout the month and to use that information to encourage friends, neighbors, businesses, and civic groups to get involved.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine, BLM, black lives matter, protests, marches, change

Motown Records Campaign

Today, Motown Records put up a virtual “help wanted” sign, seeking Black creatives to apply their talents to developing materials to promote upcoming releases from the label’s artists. To be considered for a role with the Motown collective, applicants are encouraged to submit a resume and portfolio to CMGHR@umusic.com. For details, check out this promotional spot, which features “Jobs,” the new track from Quality Control/Motown’s City Girls.

The announcement coincides with today’s J for Jobs focus on The ABC Initiative – a multi-faceted campaign focused on helping communities navigate the fundamentals of life in these unusual times. Over the course of 13 weeks, the label is unveiling compelling social media content to entertain, inform, and inspire Motown’s followers. Tied to the alphabet, topics include everything from Action, Fake News, and Jobs to Nurses, Side Hustles, and Xenophobia.

The ABC Initiative is also bringing immediate aid to the hungry, small business owners and others who are particularly vulnerable at this point in history. Inside Projects, a Los Angeles-based creative agency led by two Black women created the campaign and is responsible for its execution.

politics, podium, flag, speech

Trump Rally Fails

By Eamonn Burke

Despite the continually grim forecasts of COVID-19, which is spiking in almost half of the states in the country right now, and the many warnings of experts, President Trump carried through with his rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma yesterday.

The rally, originally scheduled for Juneteenth but pushed ahead so as to not disrespect the holiday, was one of the first large gatherings planned since the coronavirus outbreak began. The participants were not required to wear a mask or social distance, but they were required to sign a liability form agreeing not to sue the President’s campaign if they did contract the virus.

The rally turned out to be a failure, and Trump was not happy. It was claimed that almost one million people had bought tickets, and yet just under 6,200 people actually showed. This ruined Trump’s image of sold out arenas and hoards of crowds, and Trump responded by allegedly lashing out at aides, giving a poor speech, and of course, taking to Twitter trying to change the subject. Trump also attempted to blame protestors outside of the rally who wouldn’t let audience members in.

Reason for a mild turnout is largely believed to be the very real fears of the coronavirus, which Trump has been downplaying and even, in the case of this rally, acting against. However, there is also a more exciting story behind the empty seats: the viral social media platform Tik-Tok became the base for an organized effort to upend the rally, by spreading the message to purchase tickets without going to the event. Fans of Korean Pop, or K-Pop, also joined together under this effort. Trump’s campaign manager Brad Parscale dismissed the teens as “Leftists and online trolls doing a victory lap’” but it cannot be denied that this had an effect on the outcome of the rally.

Trump plans to hold another rally soon, but it is yet to be known whether or not he will comply with the safety measures necessary or just ignore them again.

BODYARMOR × MICHAEL B. JORDAN

Award-winning actor Michael B. Jordan is lending his voice to premium sports drink and water brand, BODYARMOR’s newest campaign: “Only You Can Make You Better”.
 
The largest advertising campaign to-date for the brand, voiced-over by Jordan, stars seven of BODYARMOR’s athlete partners: NBA MVP and All-Star James Harden, MLB MVP and All-Star Mike Trout, USWNT star Megan Rapinoe, women’s tennis sensation Naomi Osaka, WNBA All-Star Skylar Diggins-Smith, PGA Tour standout Dustin Johnson, and MLS MVP and All-Star Carlos Vela.
 
The campaign is rooted in the belief that no matter who you are, only you can make you better – and that includes the work you put in, your mental toughness, and what you put in your body.Athletes today are more health-conscious than ever and won’t settle for inferior products, which is why so many are choosing BODYARMOR for their hydration needs. BODYARMOR is made with potassium packed electrolytes, antioxidants, coconut water, and no artificial flavors or sweeteners, providing athletes with better hydration options.
 
The campaign will make its national TV debut during The Match this Sunday, May 24 and will continue to air throughout the summer. Furthermore, BODYARMOR will be surprising some young fans throughout June who post on social media how they are committed to making themselves better with #OnlyYouCan.