Posts tagged with "HUFFPOST"

A$ap rocky and rihanna in nyc at mercer prince party via 360 Magazine

ASAP ROCKY × MERCER + PRINCE

Friday September 9 btw 11pm-2am in NYC, Mercer + Prince kicked off fashion week in New York with Mercer + Party a night of whiskey and music hosted by A$AP Rocky

Living between the intersection of art and culture, Mercer + Prince embraces the cutting-edge style and sophisticated taste of co-founder A$AP Rocky with a focus on celebrating creativity in all forms. Mercer + Party exists to bring this lifestyle into fruition. 

The evening was full of impromptu performances and unforgettable moments, starting with a surprise performance by Thottwat. The night continued with music by Iceywat and A$Ap Lou. Additional guests: Rihanna, Tremaine Emory, 40oz Van.

ABOUT MERCER + PRINCE

Born at the intersection of art and culture, Mercer + Prince is a Canadian whisky that is defying the traditional rules surrounding the whisky industry through co-founder A$AP Rocky’s cutting-edge style and sophisticated taste. Distilled, aged, and blended in Canada complemented by a minimum of 4 years aging in American White Oak barrels, Mercer + Prince has a complex profile driven by fruit, vanilla and caramel balanced with a combination of light and toasted oak, layered with intense hints of baked apple and cinnamon from the Japanese Mizunara oak. Named after A$AP Rocky’s favorite New York City cross streets, Mercer + Prince is for cultural tastemakers that push boundaries consistently. Mercer + Prince’s artistic yet functional design is created to stand out on any surface, with two cups built in yet hidden to the naked eye. Consumers can immediately open the bottle and pour a drink for themselves and a friend, celebrating creativity in all forms. Mercer + Prince will be available in retail this summer at the suggested retail price of $29.99. 

To learn about Mercer + Prince, follow @mercerandprince on Instagram or visit HERE.

Images courtesy of Mercer + Prince.

Laura Basset is the co-founder of the Save Journalism Project

Laura Bassett QxA

Laura Bassett is co-founder of the Save Journalism Project. She was formerly a senior culture and politics reporter at HuffPost before being laid off in 2019. She currently writes for GQ Magazine, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Marie Claire, the Daily Beast, and other publications. Along with John Stanton, she began the Save Journalism project after losing her job, when she became interested in why so many great news publishers were beginning to go under and having to lay off staff.

  1. How did you first get interested in journalism and politics and have these always been passions of yours?

I’ve always had a passion for writing, but wasn’t sure what direction it would take. I was in a graduate program for English Literature in 2008, thinking I wanted to go on and do a Ph.D. when Obama first ran for president. I became kind of obsessed with the election and started blogging on the side, and then I realized I enjoyed doing my politics blog a lot more than I enjoyed sitting in a library writing research papers that only one or two people would read. So I applied for a reporting internship at HuffPost, and the rest is history!

  1. Which are some of the biggest issues with modern journalism and how have they coincided with your career so far?

I think there are three big ones: Lack of diversity in newsrooms, the question of what objectivity in political journalism means in the age of Trump, and the financial/existential crisis facing the industry as a result of the digital age and big tech’s monopoly on ad revenue. The last one affected me the most directly, as I was laid off in 2019 after ten years at HuffPost. The site just wasn’t generating enough profits, having to compete with tech giants like Google and Facebook for ad money, and I lost my job along with scores of other journalists. I never expected to be freelancing for the first time, involuntarily, in the middle of my career, but it has proven to be a great exercise for my writing.

  1. What have been the most valuable skills/pieces of knowledge that you have learned from working at HuffPost?

I never went to journalism school, so most of what I know about reporting I learned at HuffPost. I learned how to write a compelling lede and nut graf, how to draw interesting things out people in interviews, how to show both sides of an issue without necessarily drawing a moral equivalence between them. I learned how to build source relationships and hustle for scoops. And I developed a deeper knowledge of politics and my particular beat, which for a long time was women’s rights issues. I learned how to own up to mistakes immediately and correct them in a transparent way, how to accept constructive criticism, and how to tune out the internet trolls and harassment. All the basics!

  1. What motivated you to co-found the Save Journalism Project and what made it special as an initial idea?

John Stanton, formerly of BuzzFeed, and I were laid off the same week in January of 2019. It was very unexpected for both of us: He was the Washington Bureau chief at the time, and I was a senior politics reporter. There seemed to be very little rhyme or reason to who was laid off that year; news outlets were forced to cut hundreds of staffers and had to make some really tough decisions. At the same time, local newspapers like the New Orleans Times-Picayune were going under entirely. We could see that our whole industry was facing a potentially fatal financial crisis, and we felt like if we didn’t fight for it ourselves, we didn’t know who would. So this project was born.

  1. How can you and your teamwork with or against big tech companies to improve the integrity of news?

Big tech companies are the financial competitors to news publishers, and it isn’t a fair fight right now. They gobble up about two-thirds of the digital ad market, leaving very little money for the actual content creators and publishers from which they also profit. Right now, we are looking to Congress and federal and state antitrust regulators to conduct antitrust investigations into the big four– Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon–and hoping that when they see the devastating impact those companies are having on newspapers, they will break them up and/or regulate them and create a more even playing field.

  1. In the era of fake news and heavy media bias, how can technology be used for the greater good in terms of addressing populations?

“Fake news” is a term the president has thrown at real news outlets because he doesn’t like their coverage of him. By and large, the news stories he calls “fake” are true and factual. But the internet does have an actual fake news problem, which is the disinformation that fringe activists and bad actors spread online, particularly on Facebook and Twitter. I think social media platforms have a massive responsibility to closely monitor and regulate the false propaganda raging through their sites, especially close to election time.

  1. In your opinion, how do you see the future of journalism and how can the Save Journalism Project be a part of this future?

I don’t know what I see for the future of journalism because, especially since COVID, we are on an extremely troubling trajectory. What I hope to see in the future of journalism is a sustainable business model– one in which people are happy to pay for news, and one in which news publishers and magazines don’t have to compete with Google in a David and Goliath-type situation for ad money to survive. And ideally, newsrooms can stop firing and start re-hiring again, because so much talent has been lost in the past few years.

  1. Why is it so important that our country defends the freedom of the press and how can this freedom lead to a more functional democracy?

We’re at the nexus of several historic national crises at the moment, including a deadly pandemic, so journalism–especially local journalism–has never been more important to get life-saving information across to the people and to hold powerful people and institutions to account. At the same time, we have a president attacking the press and encouraging violence against us, along with these devastating financial issues. Without a robust and thriving free press, no one is there to uncover corruption and expose the lies of politicians and inform the electorate and just, basically, keep people aware of what’s happening in their communities and the world at large. That in itself is a massive threat to democracy.

  1. What kinds of opportunities do you have for people who may want to get more involved with the Save Journalism Project?

Please contact us! We’re looking for help raising money, we’re funding freelance stories on local news deserts, and we can always use the voices of other journalists who would like to fight with us to save this industry.

  1. Do you have any clear goals or visions for expanding this Project’s influence, and if so, what are they?

Our primary focus and objective are on policymakers. We aim to get U.S. lawmakers and regulators to address the exploitation of the online marketplace by Google and Facebook which gives them an unfair advantage in the competition for digital advertising revenue. Antitrust regulators in Australia and the U.K. have begun to take these kinds of steps that are necessary and we are encouraged that their American counterparts appear to be on the verge of similar actions.

It is only after the distortions of the marketplace have been addressed that we can rebuild a sustainable business model for journalism in the digital age, particularly local news. Given our focus on policymakers, we are more supporters rather than drivers of changes in the industry. We do not favor any specific model for what kind of journalism industry emerges from these multiple ongoing crises, only that we believe it must include a viable method for news outlets to monetize their content through advertising.

Reo Cragun

Reo Cragun – Cuss You Out

BMG’s Reo Cragun releases “Cuss You Out” featuring Jumpa & Press Start.

Cragun truly established himself as an artist while on tour with multi-award-winning artists such as Billie Ellish, Flume, and Lil Yachty while building an untouchable empire with his new partnership with BMG. With over 50 million streams across all platforms, a 95k social media following, and his flawless musicianship, he caught the eye of news sites, including Huffington Post saying, “He carries a sultry flavored, powerful vibe.”

Cragun has always made it his mission for his music to make a statement. His first single, “Grown Men Don’t Cry” released April 3rd, has over one million streams. It spewed out of his emotions dealing with heartbreak. “Cuss You Out” is a more up-tempo track that invites fans to join in the celebration as Cragun finally cuts ties with his ex-lover and moves on from the relationship.

WEBSITE / INSTAGRAM / TWITTER

newspaper via 360 Magazine

Tech’s Impact on Journalism

In the epicenter of big tech, Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) joined Audrey Cooper, the Executive Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group Neil Chase, and Save Journalism Project co-founders Laura Bassett, a laid-off HuffPost reporter, and John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed, to shine a light on the plight of local news and a key culprit: big tech.   

n the first quarter of 2019, the media has shed more than 2,400 jobs – including East Bay Express staffers – and, over the past 10 years, newsrooms have declined in size by 45%. The plight of the journalism industry has generated bipartisan congressional action, a rather unique occurrence in this polarized political climate. And while the journalism industry faces many challenges, the focus of Congress’ current action is to halt big tech’s negative impact on the economic sustainability of the free press. Wednesday’s speakers will address this unusual bipartisan action and the widespread consequences of the loss of local news.

According to Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), “Not that long ago, the Bay Area was home to over 1,500 journalists, but now there are less than 300 serving roughly 7 million people. This problem is not unique to our community—it is happening in every corner of the country, and we need to act. During a time when fact and accountability are under constant attack, today’s conversation about ways to preserve and protect local news and high-quality journalism is critical to the health of our democracy.”

According to Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group, “I’m glad we had such a deep, meaningful conversation about the challenges facing journalism today, right here in downtown San Francisco. If we can’t solve it here, we can’t hope to help the places across America that don’t have the technology and financial resources that are available in a place like this.”

According to Laura Bassett, laid-off HuffPost senior politics reporter and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “As our country grapples with natural disasters, political turmoil, violence, and everyday life, Americans rely on journalists and the news industry to explain and break through the chaos. But, for that process to survive, we need well-staffed newsrooms and a blossoming industry. Instead, big tech is decimating journalism. Facebook, Google, and big tech have consumed the digital landscape and continue to threaten local and national journalism. We need our elected officials to weigh in, to reign in big tech, and to save the journalism industry, before this goes any further.”

And, according to John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “The irony of all ironies, we live streamed today’s event on Facebook to ensure it reached the largest audience. The mere fact that we had to rely on the conglomerate proves our point: Facebook and Google have too much power. Together, they control the landscape, the audience, and the content. I saw this first hand at BuzzFeed, when Facebook, without notice, changed its algorithm, resulting in huge viewership and financial losses for the company. As more and more local and national news outlets feel the death grip of big tech, we need Congress to step in and save journalism.”

 

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.

CALUM SCOTT!!

CALUM SCOTT PREMIERES THE VIDEO FOR “WHAT I MISS MOST” TODAY

CALUM TO PERFORM “YOU ARE THE REASON” WITH LEONA LEWIS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA ON JUNE 6TH LIVE ON ABC.

DEBUT ALBUM – ONLY HUMAN – OUT NOW ON CAPITOL RECORDS.

U.K breakout artist Calum Scott releases the new video for “What I Miss Most” today. Directed by Ozzie Pullin and filmed in the U.K., the video and song unfold as a triumphant homage to Calum’s hometown and country. Says Calum, “This song is all about nostalgia and missing home, for me that’s Hull! Watch the video HERE and check out Calum perform the bright and soaring track live from Abbey Road Studios HERE.

Calum’s debut album, Only Human hit #1 on iTunes in over 20 countries. Tracks from the album, out now on Capitol Records, have over 1 billion combined streams and his new single, “You Are The Reason” is already certified Gold. Calum will perform the song live with vocal powerhouse and 3-time Grammy nominee, Leona Lewis on Good Morning America on June 6th on ABC. Calum was nominated for a Brit Award for Best Single, for his poignant version of Robyn’s “Dancing On My Own” which became a global sensation with over 750 million streams worldwide, and is now Platinum in five countries.

“Scott’s stunningly pure voice is affecting enough in itself, but his lyrics on every one of the (album’s) tracks are vulnerable and raw.”

“With Only Human, (Calum Scott) makes an impressive splash, a compelling debut album.”

“What I Miss Most” is propulsive, a soaring mid-tempo track about homesickness.”

“A record filled with lyrical gold, Only Human reveals an intense and honest vulnerability to songwriting.
Wholesome and hopeful, Scott elegantly transforms pain into beauty, soulfully unwinding his personal life throughout the album.”