Posts tagged with "Jason Tayer"

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

10:22PM & LVRN’S OMB BLOODBATH BRINGS THE HEAT ON ELECTRIFYING SINGLE “BOLT”

OMB Bloodbath – Bolt

OMB Bloodbath brings the bars and ladies out in her latest single, “Bolt.” Produced by DZL and Johnny Yukon, the Houston MC bodies the beat with a continuous flow that caters to fans who enjoy her quick-witted rhymes. For the studio-based visuals, Bloodbath entertains the ladies during a studio session interrupted by a seafood boil, luxury retail tags, and her animated personality.

Listen HERE

Watch HERE

Fitting on any quarantine turn up playlist, “Bolt” is another hit on Bloodbath’s discography which has been praised by peers in the game like Obe Noir, Stunna Bam and Grammy-nominated producer Murda Beatz. She also found a huge fan in Beyonce when her “2018” track “All I Know” was featured on the singer’s “Classy Bougie Ratchet” playlist for TIDAL.

Representing Houston’s historic Third Ward, OMB Bloodbath is in a class all her own. Making her name for herself on the local tip with the hometown favorite, “Shootston” the rapper secured a deal with 10:22 PM and Love Renaissance (LVRN), in partnership with Interscope Records. Her first single“Dropout” showcases a vicious back and forth flow with fellow Texas native Maxo Kream. HotNewHipHop describes the song as a “slowburner” that confirms the artist “is providing all the reasons in the world right now to make sure all eyes are on her.”

SPIDER-WOMAN SHINES BRIGHT ON PEACH MOMOKO'S SPIDER-WOMAN #100 COVER

Spider-Woman

By Karla Pacheco and Jason Tayer

This October, Marvel is proud to celebrate the 100th issue of SPIDER-WOMAN with a gorgeous variant cover from acclaimed artist Peach Momoko. Known for her striking depictions of female Marvel heroes, Peach Momoko has become one of the most popular cover artists in the industry. Her iconic work continues with this stunning depiction of Jessica Drew charging up her trademark venom blast as she prepares for her next vicious battle with the nefarious HYDRA mastermind, Octavia Vermis!

The story of SPIDER-WOMAN originates as she is stuck in a chamber for years, and decades later, she breaks out in her same form as a teenager. Accompanying her spider-driven powers, SPIDER-WOMAN or Jessica Drew serves as a bounty hunter and a model for female, powerful leaders.

SPIDER-WOMAN #5 will be a special giant-sized issue of the current action-packed run by writer Karla Pacheco and artist Pere Pérez that will propel Jessica Drew into a redefining chapter of her illustrious Super Hero career! Don’t miss your chance to get Peach Momoko’s radiant variant cover for this milestone 100th issue when SPIDER-WOMAN #5 goes on sale in October!

R&B SENSATION, SINGER/ SONGWRITER PALOMA FORD PREMIERES X TAPES

Paloma Ford – X Tapes

The wait has come to an end— today Billboard-charting, acclaimed singer/songwriter Paloma Ford releases her eagerly anticipated EP X Tapes. The 7-track project that compromises the unanimously applauded singles “Rain,” “Chrome In My Feelings” Live, and “Nights I Cry” along with the official lead single for the project “All For Nothing” featuring Rick Ross, and more, is available on all streaming services HERE.

Paloma’s latest body of work marks the culmination of a three-year journey that started in creation shortly after the release of her debut project “Nearly Civilized.” Featured on Apple Music’s ‘New in R&B’ playlist, Spotify’s ‘New Music Friday’ playlist, ‘The Newness’ playlist and more todayX Tapes takes fans on a reflection-filled ride as Paloma speaks to her resilience amid trials, tribulations, and triumphs — ultimately making her stronger than ever as she unveils her second project as an independent artist.

On the release of her new EP X Tapes, Paloma says “In this business where it feels like so much has little to do with art, it’s not an easy task to remain true to yourself and I’m genuinely happy that I was able to create this project that focused on what matters most to me—the art of music. I’m thankful to all the fans that have been riding with me since day one and all the new fans that’ll discover X Tapes and find their story in mine. I’m fulfilled with knowing that at least one person found healing in my music; the same healing I received making this project. Thank you all for listening and keeping X Tapes on repeat“.

Earlier this year Paloma previewed the layers of emotions that would go into the making of X Tapes with “Rain.” Premiering on Complex earlier this year, “Rain” introduces and leads listeners to the heart of X Tapes. “Before you can address the loss of love, you have to start at how you got to that point, the beginning,” Paloma says. “Chrome” ‘In My Feelings Live,’ described as an “intimate, sultry song showcasing  sweet vocals” by ThisisRnB, was also released earlier this year and is accompanied with a special live recording experience Paloma was adamant with sharing to the world—showing a glimpse of her vulnerability that listeners will hear more of on this project. “Nights I Cry” rounds out the already released tracks from X Tapes and serves as an R&B, heartbreak ballad that finds Paloma at a moment of disappointment over a love that can be considered a loss. Praised by LA Weekly and more, the emotive track showcases one of the many moments of realizations, Paloma has personally experienced, that makes up the DNA of X Tapes.

LISTEN TO X TAPES HERE

X Tapes
Tracklist: 
1.  Rain
2. Nights I Cry
3. Space
4. Heartbreak On The Westside
5. All For Nothing (feat. Rick Ross)
6. Only One
7. Chrome ‘In My Feelings’ Live

ABOUT PALOMA FORD
Born in Los Angeles, Paloma Ford—singer, songwriter, designer and mother exemplifies the feminine ideal from multiple angles. On the microphone, her sultry and soulful delivery consistently captivates listeners, while her relatable stories of love, passion and heartbreak keep us coming back for more. It should be no surprise Paloma cites her primary influences as Aaliyah, Sade and Janet Jackson, as she also bends R&B to fit and express her individual style.

Off the mic, Paloma describes herself as simply, “A mother and a girl from Los Angeles who has been through a lot of relatable experiences.” “I’m very optimistic, I try to see the good in others. I love being able to help and heal people. I’m a private person, so I don’t show everything on my social media. In my music, you can recognize moments of sensuality and strength. It’s all part of being a woman. That’s the message. It’s important for me to talk about other situations I’ve been in that other women can relate to.”

In 2006, she serendipitously met Macy Gray before a House of Blues gig. As it turned out, a background singer fell ill, so Macy asked Paloma to step in. Numerous live performances followed as Paloma also contributed vocals to three tracks from the star’s 2007 release Big—joining an esteemed cast of collaborators such as Justin Timberlake and will.i.am. As she built a following on YouTube via independent tracks “Dollars,” “Ménage à Trois,” and “Hit of You,” Meek Mill enlisted her for his 2014 single “I Don’t Know,” which rose fast on the Billboard R&B/Hip-Hop and Rap Charts. During 2017, she unveiled her Nearly Civilized EP powered by a series of standout singles: “W.E.T.” [2.4 million Spotify streams], “Hit Of You” [1.6 million Spotify streams], and “Jada” [1.6 Million Spotify streams]. She appeared alongside Fabolous and Davo on “Connection” from Tory Lanez’s chart-topping Memories Don’t Die in 2018. At the same time, she carefully assembled what would become her 2020 independent EP, X Tapes.

ATLANTA ARTIST 5AM IS BACK WITH HIS LATEST TRACK “AUTOMATIC” TODAY

5AM – Automatic

Today marks the release of artist and producer 5AM’s latest track, “Automatic” on 1865/Interscope Records. On the ethereal yet pop forward track the Atlanta-based rapper/singer shows off his eclectic and ever-growing sound – he showcases his buttery smooth voice that easily flutters between driving verses and a hypnotic hook. Of new music coming this year, 5AM says “I’m really excited about this project and the reception. I can’t wait to hear all the feedback because we really took our time working on these records and they’re very special to me. They represent the space I was in during the recording process.”

LISTEN TO “AUTOMATIC” BY 5AM HERE

Last summer 5AM teamed up with Grammy award-nominated producer TM88 (Lil Uzi Vert, Travis Scott) for their surprise 9-track collaboration, 5:88. The project, which Fader described as “a slick but bouncy and melodic ode to the short-lived thrills and romantic possibilities of summer nights” garnered recognition from HotNewHipHop, The Source, Hypebeast and more. This summer 5AM will continue to share new music with his fans which includes, NBA superstar Kevin Durant who discovered the rising singer on a blog and showed love for his music via Instagram.

ABOUT 5AM: Night turns to day at 5AM. The moment exists between the last gasp of darkness and the first breath of a new morning. Similarly, Atlanta-based artist and producer 5AM signals constant change in his music. Nocturnal production bristles under invitations of seduction, guitar chords reverberate next to a solemn goodbye, or soothing piano resounds through a revelatory affirmation. Via his integration of R&B, alternative, and hip-hop, he communicates real stories culled from a remarkable journey. “My music usually comes out of whatever is going on in my life at the time,” he explains. “Every day, I keep telling myself, ‘S**t will get hard, but if you hang in there, you’re going to be fine. That’s the mentality I take into the studio. You’re going to be alright. Do what you do. Whether I’m dealing with relationships, my personal life, or other struggles, it will work out.” He knows this firsthand from experience. Born in Tifton, GA, his family eventually ended up in Atlanta proper. He always had a drum set and piano within reach, but never took formal lessons. Instead, he played by ear, he even picked up the chimes in the second grade. Simultaneously, he found inspiration in the likes of Eminem, 50 Cent, Three 6 Mafia, and A$AP Rocky. At thirteen-years-old, he received a keyboard from his great grandmother and started to cook up beats. He paid for a session at a recording studio for the first time and never stopped making music from that point on.

MIMI WEBB SHARES NEW SINGLE “I’LL BREAK MY HEART AGAIN”

Mimi Webb – New Single

After gathering 4 million streams in under a few months, garnering success on Tik Tok, and receiving acclaim from Wonderland, Consequence of Sound and more, 19-year-old UK singer/songwriter Mimi Webb unveils a new single and music video entitled “I’ll Break My Heart Again.

Get it HERE via Epic Records.

Watch it HERE.

In the cinematic visual, she awakens in a bed set under a leaf-less tree. Rousing from slumber like a fairytale heroine, the camera follows her through wide open fields and past rolling hills as her vocal delivery also climbs behind stirring strings and soft piano. A stark confession envelopes the chorus, and her voice booms, “Being with somebody helps, but if I’m  honest with myself, I’ll break my heart again and tell him it’s the end.”  Ultimately, “I’ll Break My Heart Again” transmits a heartbreaking, yet glorious goodbye.

Flaunt Magazine exclusively premiered the video earlier today and spoke with Mimi about the song. Watch the video now HERE. About the single and video, Mimi commented, “Writing this song came from a really vulnerable place of admitting the truth of where your heart belongs. You know it’s not right or good for you, but you can no longer convince yourself to stay away from the person you’re still in love with— even though you have something good going with another. It took me a  long time to face it, but this song really helped me through that process.” The song arrives on the heels of her buzzing anthem “Before I Go.” The track caught fire on Tik Tok when platform superstar Charli D’Amelio utilized it in a video on her page followed by over 74.9 million fans. On Tik  Tok alone, it attracted 15 million-plus views, 5.7 million “likes,” 69.8K comments, and 13k shares. Simultaneously, “Before I Go” amassed over 3.3 million Spotify streams and 494K YouTube views on the music video.

Inciting tastemaker applause, Wonderland praised, “Webb’s distinctive  husky vocals and gut-wrenching lyricism.Meanwhile, Consequence of Sound raves that, Mimi Webb has an unassuming sense of style and a voice that hits like a belt of brandy.” Lyrical eloquence, graceful spirit, and a seismic vocal range position Mimi Webb for a major moment in 2020 as she releases her debut EP later this year.

TUNE IN TONIGHT AS 2 CHAINZ AND RICK ROSS GO HEAD-TO-HEAD ON VERZUZ

Rick Ross x 2 Chainz

Tune in tonight as 2 Chainz and Rick Ross go head-to-head on Verzuz.

These two hip-hop icons will display their talent virtually and live. The event is sponsored by Cîroc and everyone is invited.

Watch live tonight August 6th @ 8 PM EST HERE or on @applemusic HD HERE

New approach to airborne disinfection uses food-coloring dyes

Purdue – Airborne Disinfection

By Chris Adam

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed new light on the needs for improved disinfection methods, both for individuals and facilities.

Purdue University innovators have developed an airborne disinfection method – using food-coloring dyes – to be applied to the entire body and rooms for sterilization purposes and lowering the risk of infection.

The Purdue team’s disinfection method uses edible materials. The Purdue team presented the technology in July during a COVID-19 virtual conference sponsored by the National Council of Entrepreneurial Tech Transfer.

“Most of the antiviral and antibacterial sprays used for airborne antiviral and antibacterial disinfectants, such as aerosolized hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and deep ultraviolet illumination, are a biohazard risk to humans,” said Young Kim, an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue. “Additionally, disinfectants containing titanium dioxide and noble metal nanoparticles pose carcinogenic and cytotoxicity risks.”

Kim also said new methods are needed since transmission of pathogens (viruses and bacteria) often occurs in the air and infection with pathogens is transmitted by an airborne route. The Purdue method might also help in medical settings, where healthcare workers typically are exposed to the disease-causing agents when they take off their personal protective equipment.

The Purdue airborne antiviral phototherapy technique uses small aerosols FDA-approved food coloring dyes to mitigate the risks of airborne transmissions of pathogens. This is referred to as Photodynamic Airborne Cleaner (PAC).

“We have demonstrated with our novel solution how visible light activation of several FDA-approved food coloring dyes generate singlet oxygen, which can be used to kill airborne pathogens,” Kim said. “In the medical community, it is well known that singlet oxygen is effective to inactivate viruses. We are developing a scalable aerosol generation system for the dyes, allowing uniform fog-like dispersion lingering in the air to minimize wetting and surface staining. In addition, as health care workers are often infected when removing PPE, this technology can be installed in a confined chamber for health care professionals to change PPE in hospital settings.”

The novel photoreactive arrangement can be used in rooms where many people are present at risk of airborne pathogen exposure.

The innovators are working with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization to license this patented technology.

The researchers are looking for partners to continue developing their technology. For more information on licensing and other opportunities, contact D.H.R. Sarma of OTC at DHRSarma@prf.org and mention track code 2020-KIM-69064.

Kim also is receiving support from Purdue’s Trask Innovation Fund, which helps labs commercialize their innovations.

About Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization

The Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S. Services provided by this office support the economic development initiatives of Purdue University and benefit the university’s academic activities through commercializing, licensing and protecting Purdue intellectual property. The office recently moved into the Convergence Center for Innovation and Collaboration in Discovery Park District, adjacent to the Purdue campus. In fiscal year 2020, the office reported 148 deals finalized with 225 technologies signed, 408 disclosures received and 180 issued U.S. patents. The office is managed by the Purdue Research Foundation, which received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. In 2020, IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation and in the top 20 for patents. The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Contact otcip@prf.org for more information.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 6 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

Food Network’s Andrew Zimmern and Indianapolis’s Jeremy Martindale, The Alexander Hotel, Join Southern California Chefs in 20CHEFS: A Social Distanced Fundraiser for The Beacon House of San Pedro

Beacon House Fundraiser

Beacon House of San Pedro proudly announces two well-known Midwestern chefs to their 20CHEFS fundraising roster which includes Food Network’s Andrew Zimmern (Minneapolis, Minnesota) and Jeremy Martindale, Executive Chef for The Alexander Hotel, the luxury boutique property in the heart of downtown Indianapolis.  The center was recently named by U.S. News and World Report a “Top 200 Treatment Center” in the country.

Food Network host Andrew Zimmern and Jeremy Martindale join Southern California chefs such as event co-chairs Michael Shafer (The Depot) and Christine Brown (Restaurant Christine), Victor Juarez (Fuego at Hotel Maya), and others to raise needed funds for the 115-bed treatment and rehabilitation facility for men in San Pedro. Additional chefs include:

Because of the current pandemic, Beacon House Association of San Pedro had a $225,000.00 shortfall to assist those with alcohol and drug addiction issues. On the website, visitors are encouraged to purchase private dinners with a selected chef starting at $5000.00. The meal will be prepared and served at the buyer’s residence or at the chef’s restaurant with the location and date to be agreed upon by both parties. The number of guests shall be limited to 10 for the culinary team’s well-being. Participating chefs will continue to be announced throughout the summer. More information can be accessed atwww.20CHEFS.org. The buying of the dinners ends on October 11, 2020.  Dining purchases can also be made via email at the 20chefs@beaconhouse.org.

“We feel encouraged by the outpouring of support and love to help these men. Addiction is one of the greatest scourges,” said Beacon House Association of San Pedro’s Executive Director, Brian Smith. “Our center allows these men to rejoin their loving families and become willing participants in their communities.”

ABOUT:  

Founded in 1970 by Father Art Bartlett, a South Bay minister and Michael Dowling, an alcoholic merchant seaman, the Beacon House Association of San Pedro started with a single two-story building with 18 residents. Incorporated into a non-profit in 1974, the association and the accommodations have grown to six residential units with a capacity for 115 residents. The buildings include dining and kitchen areas and spaces for training, counseling, education, and 12-step meetings. The Beacon House Association of San Pedro, for the last 40 years, has assisted thousands of men, from all walks of life, and more than three dozen states, to regain their place as responsible, productive members of society. The non-profit’s mission is to help men recover from the diseases of alcoholism and addiction to other drugs. The association provides food, shelter, treatment, and time to build a foundation in recovery and return to family, home, and community.

 

“MOOD” ALL DAY 24KGOLDN AND IANN DIOR LINK UP FOR NEW VIDEO

24kGoldn – Mood

West Coast rapper/singer 24kGoldn has followed up with the video counterpart featuring himself and Iann Dior for their new song, “Mood.” In the fun new Sebastian Sdaigui directed music video, 24kGoldn and Iann Dior go back to back between vibrant scenes and melodic croons that help set the atmosphere.

“Mood” ft. Iann Dior follows Goldn’s previous singles “Unbelievable” ft. Kaash Paige and “City Of Angels,” which is featured on his Dropped Outta College EP. The eight tracks collectively demonstrate his breadth of talent and tells the story of his life as a budding artist and a college student at USC – exploring the emotions, relationships, and desires he felt at the time. Listen to Dropped Outta College in full HERE.