Posts tagged with "mortgage"

Realestate image by Rita Azar for 360 magazine

Property Liens 101: What Are Your Options When Selling a Home?

Sometimes, getting from under debt can mean selling your home. However, how can you relieve yourself of mortgage debt if your property has a lien attached?

More than likely, a property sale will bring any related legal problems to light. A property lien is a serious issue that you must deal with before you can close the sale. Property liens give a creditor the right to possession of your property until you pay any debts.

To learn more about your options when selling a home with a lien, continue reading.

What Are Liens?

A credit error can prove problematic if you’re trying to buy a home. Likewise, a property lien will cause similar grief if you want to sell your property.

A property lien will most often show up when a bank or potential buyer does a title search. A title search is a legal check on the ownership of your property.

If there’s a problem with your title search, it will more often than not delay the closing. For this reason, you need to deal with the lien before you can sell your property.

A lien on a house is a legally binding claim that another party has on your property. It allows them to access your property if you do not pay your debts.

A creditor must file a property lien with the county clerk’s office or a state agency. Next, the appropriate office will approve or deny the claim.

The office that records the claim will then deliver notice to you with the terms of the lien. In short, the notice will explain that a creditor has taken action against your property.

A creditor can place liens against property for tangible items such as your car or boat. However, they can also file for a property lien against your home.

For instance, a bank would file for a property lien if you fall behind on your mortgage payments. Usually, a property lien is a last resort action to recover a debt.

Who Can File a Lien Claim?

The courts will award a property lien after a creditor has made numerous attempts to collect payment. For example, the creditor may have hired a collection agency to recover the debt.

A property lien is a very effective way for a creditor to recover a debt. However, it’s also particularly stressful for debtors.

With a bank loan, for instance, a lender can file for a first-order property lien. A bank may apply for this kind of lien after you’ve missed several mortgage payments.

A lender has specific rights regarding how they can use a property as collateral against a mortgage. For this reason, it’s quite easy for a bank to obtain a property lien for delinquent mortgage payments.

Can You Sell a House With a Lien?

In short, yes. You can sell your home if a creditor has placed a lien on it.

You could try to close a sale without help. However, the process is long and complex. It’s also stressful and financially draining.

Various types of creditors may place a lien on a house. For instance, you may have an outstanding debt with a bank, homeowner’s association, or the state or federal government. These parties all have the power to prevent you from selling your home if the courts have awarded a lien.

However, creditors don’t want your home. They want their agreed-on payment. To that end, a property lien gives them the right to sell your home to recover the delinquent debt.

Once you pay the debt, the creditor will issue a Letter of Satisfaction. However, creditors take advantage of the fact that most homeowners don’t know their rights when it comes to property liens. The typical homeowner doesn’t understand the options that they can use to resolve a lien.

If you’re trying to sell your home, this fact adds to the problem. If a creditor knows that you want to sell your home, they’ll use that fact as leverage to collect the debt. Often, a homeowner will end up with more problems from debtors that use circumstances to their advantage.

For these reasons, it’s beneficial to seek financial help when you’re trying to sell a property that’s under a lien. An experienced lawyer, for example, can help you to navigate the process.

What Are My Options Regarding Property Liens?

If you decide to resolve the issue independently, you’ll need to start by evaluating the lien. In other words, you’ll need to figure out what kind of liens and judgments creditors have against your property.

The procedure for different liens varies. Some liens on a property are nonnegotiable. However, you can settle other kinds of liens with little or no money.

Next, you’ll need to find someone willing to purchase a house with a lien. Most often, buyers and realtors view a lien is a major problem.

No buyer or agent wants to deal with a stubborn creditor. For this reason, they won’t pursue a property purchase until you’ve paid all debts in full.

Instead of going it on your own, it makes sense to hire an experienced real estate attorney. An expert attorney can make a big difference in your ability to sell your home that’s under a lien.

A knowledgeable real estate attorney can make sure that you say the right things to creditors. For instance, it’s a good idea not to tell a creditor you’re trying to sell your home. As soon as you give them this information, they’ll use it to pressure you.

In other cases, the creditor will lie in wait for your settlement payment. Once you receive it, they’ll claim the funds. If they win, a judge might award them compensation directly out of the closing proceeds.

It can prove difficult knowing what to say when talking to creditors. An experienced attorney can help you navigate this kind of minefield. To learn more about working with a professional real estate attorney, take a look at this article by Fernald Law Group.

Mulling Over a Lien Sale

If you need to sell your home and there’s a lien on it, it’s in your best interest to work with a professional real estate lawyer. There are a lot of nuances when it comes to liens on property.

For example, each state has different rules about the statute of limitations for liens. Even if a lien expires, however, a creditor can refile a lien and extend it in most states.

For this reason, it’s important to have an experienced professional on your side. A professional understands how to overcome the challenges of selling a house with a lien. More importantly, a creditor is more likely to negotiate with an expert who understands lien laws.

Learn More, Know More, Do More

Now that you know more about property liens, you can hopefully make a more informed decision about what you’ll do next.

Life has its challenges. Navigating some of life’s challenges, such as liens against property, can prove downright perplexing. Fortunately, there’s help.

With the right information, you can make it through the toughest obstacles that come your way. Check out our blog for more insightful news and tips for help navigating business, pleasure, and life.



The Millennial’s Financial Guide to Homebuying

Around 4.8 million millennials are turning 30 in 2020. This is the largest age bracket among millennials, according to CNBC. Many of them have families and are looking to buy their first home.

Compared to older generations, saving for a house hasn’t been easy for millennials. In 2017, millennials who bought homes paid around 39 percent more than baby boomers who bought houses in the 80s. With higher costs of living and rising student debt, it takes millennials longer to afford a home. Now, considering the economic impact of COVID-19, it’s tougher for people to make major life purchases.

But don’t fret. Knowing your mortgage options and proper financial planning will make a difference. If you commit to a budget now and work on your savings, it’s possible to purchase a house in the near future. Here are essential financial tips you need to know before buying a home.

When to Consider Buying a House

Before taking a mortgage, improve your credit score. Give yourself time to improve your credit. Make sure to pay your loans and credit card on time. If you have large outstanding debts, be sure to pay them down. Check your credit report and see if there’s any inaccurate information. Disputing errors like unrecorded payments can help improve your credit score.

Most conventional lenders usually approve a credit score of 680 and above, and some may approve 620. Conventional loans are offered by lenders that are not sponsored by the government. You can get them from banks, credit unions, and non-bank mortgage companies.

If you have an excellent credit rating, you’re eligible for lower interest rates. This makes your monthly mortgage more affordable. It will help you save on total interest costs throughout the life of your loan. Make sure to shop around for loans and choose the lowest interest rate.

Know how much house you can afford.

Compare real estate listings to know what price range you can manage. As a rule of thumb, you shouldn’t buy property beyond your means. How do you know if your dream home fits your budget? You must understand your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.

DTI ratio compares your gross income with how much debt you owe. If your DTI ratio is too high, your loan will not be granted. A low DTI ratio makes it more manageable to make monthly mortgage payments. This decreases your risk of defaulting on your loan and losing your house to foreclosure. Once you’re perceived as a low-risk borrower, lenders are more likely to approve your mortgage.

Lenders check these two important DTI ratios before approving a loan:

  • Front-end DTI ratio – The percentage of your income that pays for mortgage-related costs. It includes monthly mortgage payments, property insurance, and association dues. Your front-end DTI must not exceed 28 percent. This is the standard requirement for conventional mortgages which are not federally backed by the government.
  • Back-end DTI ratio – The percentage of your income that pays for your mortgage-related costs along with your other debts. This includes auto loans, credit cards, student loans, etc. Your back-end DTI ratio must not exceed 36 percent. But for federally backed government mortgages such as Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans, the DTI limit is 43 percent.

Know how much you can borrow.

To know this, get pre-approved for a mortgage. Speaking to a lender determines the specific amount you can borrow. It’s one of the best ways to know how much home you can afford. To do this, you must authorize your lender to review your credit report. Getting pre-approval does not require you to borrow from the lender. But once you’re ready to make an offer, you can choose one with the best rates and terms. Lowermybills.com mentions that “Like all things connected to home buying and mortgage rates, do your research.” Furthermore, they state that “If you find a rate you are comfortable with, and it gets you the mortgage payment in your price range, it might be a good idea to decide to lock in the interest rate.”

Know when and where house prices are low.

A year before buying, research local market conditions in your preferred area. Check common house prices and pay attention to big price shifts. There are periods when real estate prices are depressed or generally low. In other times, they can be awfully expensive. It also pays to check houses in low-cost locations such as less crowded suburbs. Homes in busy metropolitan areas and coastal states usually have expensive price tags.

How Much Down Payment Should You Save?

Ideally, homebuyers should make a down payment that’s 20 percent of the home’s value. For instance, if you’re buying a $250,000 house, your down payment should be $50,000. These days, you might notice buyers making a smaller down payment. This has its drawbacks, which come in the form of mortgage insurance costs.

Conventional loans come with an annual private mortgage insurance (PMI) policy, which is 0.25 percent to 2 percent of your loan amount. It’s typically required if your down payment is less than 20 percent. PMI is usually rolled into your monthly payments and is canceled once your mortgage balance reaches 78 percent.

Meanwhile, federally backed mortgages such as FHA loans come with mortgage insurance premiums (MIP). If your down payment is less than 20 percent, MIP is required. It’s paid both as an upfront fee (1.75 percent of the loan amount) and an annual insurance fee (0.85 percent of the loan amount). MIP is usually paid for the entire life of the loan, which makes it a lot costlier in the long run.

How do you save for your down payment?

Start gathering funds as early as you can. Saving your tax refund is a great source. As of 2020, the average tax refund is $3,100, which is a large amount that can bolster your down payment. You can also use work and holiday bonuses you get from your employer. Save cash gifts during birthdays, as well as windfall inheritance funds from relatives. To earn extra income, work overtime hours or get a freelance job on the side. This will take time. So the earlier you save, the better.

Low Down Payment Options for First-Time Homebuyers

More often, people do not usually have enough time to save for a higher down payment. They need to relocate because of a new job or a growing family. When this happens, you can opt for low-cost mortgages options. If you need a loan with low down payment and relaxed credit requirements, consider government-sponsored mortgages. These are loans meant for low to moderate income families who need assistance in buying a home.

FHA Loans
You can qualify for an FHA loan if your credit score is between 500 to 580. Your down payment can be as low as 3.5 percent if your credit score is 580 and above. If your credit score is below 580, your down payment must be at least 10 percent. All FHA loans require MIP regardless of your down payment amount.

USDA Loan
The U.S. Department of Agricultural approves home loans if your credit score is 640. Down payment is not required but is definitely an option. To get a USDA loan, you must purchase a house in a USDA-approved rural area. This includes many suburbs and around 97 percent of land mass in the U.S. Moreover, your household income must not be over 115 percent of the median income of your area. USDA loans come with a guarantee fee, which is paid as an upfront fee and an annual fee rolled into your monthly payments.

VA Loans
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers special loans to active military members, veterans, and qualified military spouses. VA loans are flexible with credit scores, but it’s better if your credit score is at least 620. Down payment is also not required but is an option. However, instead of a mortgage insurance premium or guarantee fee, VA loans require a VA funding fee. Paying at least 5 percent down payment helps reduced this added cost.

Worried about poor credit? There are local housing agencies per state that can help you. Your state agency can assist you in looking for housing options that can accommodate your low credit score. They can also provide down payment assistance for mortgages. Just get in touch with your state housing agency soon.

The Importance of Saving a 20 Percent Down Payment

Making a 20 percent down payments eliminates private mortgage insurance costs. This reduces the amount you need to borrow, which effectively lowers your monthly mortgage payment. The higher payment also decreases your loan-to-value ratio, which is the amount of your loan compared to your home’s value. It also allows you to secure a much lower mortgage rate.

To give you a better idea how it affects your mortgage payments, let’s see the table below. It compares the same mortgage. One made an 8 percent down payment, while the other made a 20 percent down payment.

30-year Fixed-Rate Mortgage
Home price: $350,000
Interest rate: 3% APR
Mortgage5% Down Payment20% Down PaymentDown payment$17,500$70,000Borrowed amount$332,500$280,000Monthly payment$1,401.83$1,180.49Total interest paid$172,160.03$144,976.87Loan-to-value ratio95%80%Total PMI cost$18,038.130

In the example above, making a 20 percent down payment reduces your borrowed amount to $280,000, while 5 percent only reduces it to $332,500. Your monthly mortgage payment will be $221.34 lower with a 20 percent down payment. As for interest cost, you save $27,183.16 more in total interest with a 20 percent down payment. Meanwhile, with a 5 percent down payment, you still need to pay $18,038.13 on top of interest charges. Basically, you’ll gain more saving in the long term if you make a higher down payment.

Need help with your mortgage budget? Use this mortgage payment calculator to estimate your monthly mortgage payment, total interest, and PMI costs.

Here’s a tip: If you take an FHA loan for the low down payment, there is a way to remove MIP. If your credit score is at least 620, you have the option to refinance into a conventional mortgage after a few years. Refinancing is basically taking out a new loan to replace your existing one. You can refinance to a conventional loan with a lower rate. You may consider this option to get rid of costly MIP charges.

The Bottom Line

Now that you know your housing options and requirements, you can better prepare your finances. As early as now, start improving your credit score to qualify for a loan. Borrowers are offered lower interest rates when their credit score is high. It’s also ideal to save up for a 20 percent down payment.

Next, keep track of your debt-to-income ratio. As long as you don’t accumulate large debts, you should be eligible for a mortgage. Moreover, start checking home prices at low-cost areas. If you time your purchase when house prices are generally low, you can score a better deal.

If you can’t make the 20 percent down payment, there are low-cost mortgage options to choose from. Check out FHA loans and USDA loans. If you’re a veteran or military member, you’re qualified for VA loans. Just take note that government-backed loans come with extra costs, such as mortgage insurance premium for FHA loans. If you take advantage of these options and plan your finances, soon you can purchase your own house.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

BRAVO x SERHANT

BRAVO MEDIA CLOSES THE DEAL IN NEW SERIES “SELL IT LIKE SERHANT” PREMIERING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 AT 10PM ET/PT

‘MILLION DOLLAR LISTING’ STAR RYAN SERHANT PUTS HIS SALES SKILLS TO THE ULTIMATE TEST

Bravo Media is stepping up its sales game with top New York City realtor Ryan Serhant in the new docu-series “Sell It Like Serhant,” premiering Wednesday, April 11 at 10pm ET/PT. It doesn’t matter what you’re selling – if you know your client and your product, a good salesperson can sell anything to anyone, and no one exemplifies this better than Ryan Serhant, the leader of one of the top real estate teams in the United States. In this new series, Ryan answers the call of struggling salespeople across multiple industries who are on the brink of losing their jobs and are desperate for his expertise. With some tough love and humor, Ryan will give underperforming employees a head-to-toe business overhaul and turn them into sales machines.

In each episode, Ryan takes a deep dive into each protégé’s world, using every trick in the book to become their bootcamp instructor, friend, teacher and even customer, to help them reach their full potential. Ryan goes all in, often hilariously so, as he learns the ropes of different industries that are somewhat foreign to a “Million Dollar” broker – from learning to sell services in a waxing salon, to learning the world of high stakes hot tub sales, he will push his students, and himself, to the limit. As he tries their products and tests their sales skills, he gets to the root of what’s troubling each salesperson, breaking them down and building them back up with expert knowledge and newfound confidence. Ultimately, employees will be put to the test each week when he or she will showcase their new skills in full view of their bosses and hopefully prove they can “Sell it Like Serhant.”

Meet Ryan Serhant

Ryan Serhant’s first day in the real estate business was on September 15, 2008, the day Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy in the wake of the subprime mortgage collapse. While the real estate sector has slowly recovered, Serhant has become one of the most successful brokers in the world, with agents under his leadership in New York City, Los Angeles, Miami and the Hamptons. Ryan is known to audiences all over the world as one of the stars of Bravo’s Million Dollar Listing: New York. Serhant is recognized as a real estate powerhouse. His team at Nest Seekers International sold just under $1B in real estate in 2017 and consistently ranks in the top five real estate teams nationwide in the Wall Street Journal Real Trends annual review, with Serhant consistently the youngest team leader in the top ten. As a real estate expert he is a frequent contributor to CNN, CNBC, The Today Show and Bloomberg TV, and is often quoted in The New York Times, Forbes, and the Wall Street Journal. He is the real estate correspondent for Daily Mail TV, a nationally syndicated television show and he recently launched his own vlog. Serhant is an active supporter of nonprofit organizations including DKMS, Operation Smile, Save the Children, Make a Wish, the Human Rights Campaign, Ronald McDonald House, Habitat for Humanity, Pink Agenda and UNICEF, among others. After graduating Hamilton College in 2006 with twin degrees in English literature and theatre, Serhant headed to New York City to pursue an acting career before becoming a successful real estate broker. He currently lives in New York City with his wife Emilia.

“Sell It Like Serhant” is produced by World of Wonder with Fenton Bailey, Randy Barbato, Tom Campbell and Danielle King serving as Executive Producers along with Ryan Serhant and Rob Bola as Co-Executive Producers.

DION K. HICKLES

Dion K. Hickles has over 10 years of experience providing leadership in project management, real estate, construction, and engineering operations for federal and local government agencies, fortune 500 companies, small businesses, and educational institutions. Dion is a Real Estate Broker with Re/Max Premier based in the Chicagoland area with all-around expertise in multiple aspects of real estate, site development and construction. He’s experienced in negotiation, conflict-resolution and consensus building skills. Mr. Hickles has repeatedly provided expertise on major portfolio management and commercial and residential development and transactional activities for various clients. Additionally, Dion has experience collaborating with design consultants in developing schematic designs for new and existing real property.

Dion has an impressive history in defining and clarifying customers’ real property outlook by evaluating client entrance and exit strategies, performing market analysis and ensuring his client’s needs are appropriately addressed. He’s recognized as an advanced real estate leader with a creative approach to critical thinking and proven program development and sales’ strategies. Dion is a strong communicator able to produce and manage real property buyer and seller relationships, lasting networks and has the natural ability to interface with diverse populations.

Dion has managed real estate solutions for over 6 organizations, and he delivers strategic consulting to companies nationally. During his career, he has been promoted five times, contributed to asset growth for corporations, developers, investors and individuals. During his tenure, he has provided his expertise on development programs totaling $8.8B.

Dion received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2005 and his M.S. in Real Estate from Roosevelt University in 2015.

Dion is on Instagram and Facebook at: @dionthebroker

His blog: http://www.chicagonow.com/building-chicago/

His website: dhickles.illinoisproperty.com

Dion Hickles’ Realtor Testimonials:

“I HIGHLY recommend Dion Hickles for any real estate or rental needs. He met every request and exceeded my expectations with respect to helping me find the perfect apartment. He set up my appointments and attended every viewing with me, making sure I was happy and did not stop until I found what I wanted. To say that Dion is an asset is an understatement. I’m very grateful and pleased with the service he provided.”

Jessica, Chicago, IL

“Working with a first-time homebuyer takes a special level of knowledge, patience, and endurance. You need to be part realtor, teacher, and coach. I found all of these qualities in Dion as he helped me navigate the home buying process. There were times when I felt discouraged and Dion reminded me that what I was experiencing was normal. There were other times I walked into a property with stars in my eyes and he brought me back to reality and was honest in sharing that he didn’t feel it was the best investment. Dion would also email me helpful links and share City of Chicago home buyer resources which were extremely beneficial when it came time to close. A quality that really impressed me was Dion’s responsiveness. There were a number of days and nights when I called or text at odd hours and would be pleasantly surprised that Dion would answer or text back in minutes! Throughout the process I had a wonderful teacher, coach and realtor and I would highly recommend Dion to any homebuyer, but definitely one who is new to the experience.”

Ayanna, Chicago, IL

“I began searching for a home in 2015, but had no idea who I should trust in my area to help me. I turned to Dion Hickles because I knew he was a knowledgeable Realtor and could help guide me in the process. Although I was interested in homes outside of Dion’s state, he took time to help me find a realtor that could meet my needs locally. My experience was seamless in working with Dion, and then, a new realtor in my home state who supported me through closing on a home. Dion was sure to check in throughout the process to confirm the referral was a good fit.

I would recommend Dion to anyone looking for a top professional in the business, and his commitment to high standards met my needs from beginning to end. You can tell he enjoys his work, which helped make my home buying process stress-free…even with an out-of-state home.”

Robyn, Washington, D.C.

“Dion worked with me under very rushed conditions. He is knowledgeable and asked all the right questions to help me make informed decisions. I am pleased with Dion and would recommend him first to everyone in need of a Realtor.”

Veronica, Chicago, IL

“Dion was very proactive which made this process super easy and simple. For a busy person who’s always on the go, Dion did a great job of keeping me on task. His response time was impeccable and he’s very knowledgeable about the industry. He came prepared to negotiate in my best interest. Can’t wait to work with him again!”

Shani, Chicago, IL